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March 13, 2019 Rush, Colorado (USA): There are certain weather events that defy preparation. You are simply left to deal with it the best you are able. Wednesday’s Bomb Cyclone paralyzed parts of the central US with hurricane strength winds and drifting snow. A bomb cyclone is a meteorological term for a storm that intensifies quickly a process called “bombogenesis” in which the barometric pressure falls by at least 24 millibars over 24 hours. On Tuesday, Coloradans were enjoying a sunny day with temps near 60. By Wednesday the temperature dropped more than 40 degrees as storm winds reached nearly 100 mph creating massive snow drifts and causing extensive structural damage.

Carrie Terroux-Barrett runs C Lazy T Performance Horses near Rush, Colorado and hosts horses for The Colorado Horse Rescue Network. Carrie and her husband, Pete, prepared as best they could for the storm, securing their horses inside with blankets. However during the height of the storm, the winds blew open a barn door and one of the horses wandered outside.

Horse buried by blizzard in eastern El Paso County - YouTube

Bernadette days after the Bomb Cyclone.
Photo Credit: Carrie Terroux-Barrett

Bernadette, a 20 something arab mare had only recently arrived at the ranch, a sheriff’s surrender. Once outside, Bernadette was soon stuck in deep snow. Unable to move, encased inside her frozen blanket, it took Carrie and Pete three hours to dig her out during the height of the storm. Thankfully, Bernadette was freed, returned to the barn and days later seems unaffected by her ordeal.

Photography Courtesy Carrie Terroux-Barrett Facebook

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Microtechnology and robotics have become common tools in human medicine. They are used as internal payload devices to deliver medicine, to affect molecular changes that help patients recover from physical trauma, to perform less intrusive surgery and to help diagnose internal issues. Recently some of these technologies have become available to small animal veterinarians which offers hope for future application in large animals like horses particularly in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal issues.

In 2016, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada, researcher Khan Wahid and student Shahed Khan Mohammed used a human Pill Cam to successfully video tape the stomach and small intestine of a mare named “Mama”.

In 2018, Renaud Leguillette, DVM, Msc, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, ACVSMR, professor of equine internal medicine in the University of Calgary’s Department of Veterinary Clinical and Diagnostic Science, in Alberta Canada performed 20 capsule endoscopy examinations on horses. The hope was to video the horse’s entire 100 foot long gastrointestinal system. Traditional veterinary exams are limited to only the first 10 feet through a horse’s stomach and the first section of the small intestine. Leguillette’s examinations allowed identification of ulcers, submucosal hemorrhages, polyps, sand accumulation and parasites through the small intestine, a distance of approximately 60 feet. Video of the entire system proved to be a bigger challenge. Beyond the cecum into the large intestine video quality was poor and camera battery died before the capsule passed through the horses’ systems, a journey that can take anywhere from 2 to 14 days.

Researchers are working to make a full gastrointestinal examination a reality developing capsule endoscopy devices with 360 cameras, improved lighting and longer battery lives. In the near future, horses suffering from gastrointestinal issues like colic, ulcers, tumors will certainly benefit from more specific diagnosis and focused treatments.

Feature Photography Courtesy the University of Saskatchewan, “Mama”.

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March 12, 2019, WASHINGTON, D.C.: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced that they will pay anyone who adopts a wild horse or burro $1000.

According to the BLM, an estimated 82,000 wild horses and burros live on public land, more than triple the number allotted. The animals are routinely rounded up and placed in holding facilities that cost taxpayers nearly $50 million a year. BLM officials concluded that its cheaper to pay people to take the horses.

“We understand that adopting a wild horse or burro represents a commitment. The incentive is designed to help with the adopter’s initial training and humane care,” said BLM Deputy Director of Programs and Policy Brian Steed. “I encourage anyone who has considered adopting a wild horse or burro to join the thousands of owners who have provided good homes to more than 245,000 wild horses or burros since 1971.”

Potential adopters must pay a $25 adoption fee and complete an application proving they have the means to feed and care for the animals, and that they will adhered to the “prohibited acts and titling requirements.” Once approved, adopters are eligible to receive a $500 payment within 60 days of the adoption date and another $500 within 60 days of titling for each animal, which normally occurs one year from the adoption date.  For more information visit the BLM site.

BLM holding facility.
Photo Credit: BLM

This new program follows another recent incentive announcement tailored for land owners. The BLM will pay private land owners to keep large numbers of animals on their property. Contractors must accommodate herds of 200-5000 animals, provide a free range area and agree to a 4 or 9 year renewal option. Bids will be accepted through May 3 from the following states: Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas “Panhandle (only north of Hwy 82 and 84), Utah, Washington and Wyoming. Some parts of Oregon and Washington are excluded. For more information visit the BLM site.

In an effort to alleviate the agency’s stock, other programs were considered including sterilization (removing ovaries from mares) and selling animals for slaughter. Both were abandoned after various court rulings and overwhelming public outcry.

How to Notify the BLM about Wild Horse & Burro Abuse

Mustang freeze mark.
Photo Credit: BLM

The BLM provides information to equine sale and auction facilities regarding the illegal sale of untitled wild horses and burros. If you observe or have factual information that a federally protected (untitled) wild horse or wild burro has been treated inhumanely or illegally sold to slaughter, please contact the BLM at wildhorse@blm.gov or at 866-468-7826 with your name, contact information, and specific information about what you saw or know. If possible, please include the freeze mark and/or photos. 
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March 11, 2019, Corrigan, TX (USA): Drivers on US-59 were horrified to see a horse struggling to stand in the back of a pick up truck going 70 miles per hour down the expressway Monday morning. The driver photographed holding the saddled horse’s reins through the open back window of the cab.

Video: Horse stands in bed of moving truck https://t.co/6R5FncOCCp @FOX26Houston pic.twitter.com/Y9Nu3ad382

— FOX26Houston (@FOX26Houston) March 11, 2019

A Texas trooper pulled over the driver at a Whataburger restaurant. The driver explained this his truck, the one that pulls the horse trailer would not start that morning so he had no choice but to haul the horse to work at the stockyards in the bed of this truck. The driver further explained that his horse is extremely well-trained and worth $15,000.

Troopers reported that the horse safely arrived at the Stockyards. No mention how the horse got home. Police did not issue a citation – no law was broken.

Feature Photo Courtesy: Kerry Green Costello

Then there was this one who thought scaring carriage horses dressed in a T-Rex costume was a good idea. Read More
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February 28, 2019, Berlin, MD (USA): The National Park Service (NPS) says it has completed its February 2019 population census of wild horses on Assateague Island, which noted that three aged mares are missing and presumed dead.

The total population of the Maryland herd is currently at 76 horses, including 21 stallions and 55 mares. The three aged mares missing and presumed dead were identified as N6BK “Bessy Twister”, N6H and X24M “Patty.”

A full census of the Maryland horse population is completed six times per year during February, March, May, July, September and November. During each census, horses are identified by their distinguishing characteristics, mapped and counted. Individual horses that are not seen during multiple census periods are presumed dead, NPS said.

The goal is to track the overall population dynamics of the herd in support of the long term fertility control program that was initiated in 1994.

The NPS also noted that back in November 2018, it collected fecal samples to test for pregnancy hormones in selected mares. There were four positives among the pregnancy test samples collected in November 2018 including: N2BHS-A “Gokey GoGo Bones”, N2BHS-AL “Ms. Macky”, N2BHS-I “Annie Laurie”, and N2BHS-M “Susi Sole” (foaled in January).

Feature Photo Courtesy The National Park Service. L2R: N9BFT-KP (Alexandria’s Angel), N6BMT-FQ (Theodore), and N6BMT-F (Jojo) in February, 2019.

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February 27, New York, NY (USA): Detective John Reilly and his partner Trooper are the only mounted officers assigned to patrol Central Park in New York City. Last week both officers retired. Detective Reilly “aged out” when he turned 63, the mandatory retirement age for members of the New York City Police Department. Trooper, 15, has worked for 10 years, the typical limit for a city police horse.

Detective Reilly and Trooper in Central Park

Detective Reilly and Trooper have patrolled Central Park year round Sunday through Thursday regardless of the weather for ten years. Their presence services as both a crime deterrent and makes park visitors feel safer. Over the years many locals have formed friendships with the patrolling pair. While tourists seek their assistance with directions or simply wish to snap their photo.

“Trooper’s well loved around the neighborhood,” Reilly said proudly. “People wait for him to come up West End Avenue, hearing his ‘clip clops’ in the morning.” Reilly described Trooper as smart, perceptive and a goofball who loves jelly beans.

The city does not plan to assign another dedicated team to Central Park, instead patrolling will be shared among several mounted officers. Formed in 1858, the unit has 55 horses and 100 members comprised of both officers and civilians.

Feature photo Courtesy Lauren Cook

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Theodor Seuss Geisel aka Dr. Seuss

Who hasn’t read “The Cat in the Hat” or “Horton Hears a Who” or watched “The Grinch Who Stole Christmas” during the holidays? Theodor Seuss Geisel aka Dr. Seuss is one of the most beloved authors of children’s books in our lifetime. Born March 2, 1904 in Springfield, Massachusetts, he was already a successful illustrator creating WW2 propaganda when he published his first children’s book, “And to Think I Saw It on Mulberry Street” in 1937. It had been rejected 27 times before Vanguard Press picked it up.

Dr. Seuss’s simplified vocabulary, lyrical rhymes and illustrations charmed the imaginations of children worldwide. In 1939, Geisel left Vanguard Press for Random House. The move came with one condition – Geisel wanted to publish a book for adults.

The Seven Lady Godivas by Dr. Seuss

“The Seven Lady Godivas: The True Facts Concerning History’s Barest Family” was published later that year. The story is inspired by the tale of Lady Godiva who rode naked through the streets to protest her husband’s oppressive taxation upon his subjects. Geisel’s tale is about seven naked sisters who upon the death of their father (caused by his horse) pledge to remain unmarried until each discovers a ‘new and worthy Horse Truth, of benefit to man’.

The book was a publishing flop. Of 10,000 original editions only 2,500 sold. The hefty $2 price tag during the Depression was a factor. A book about 7 naked sisters also turned away many readers. Geisel often claimed the books failure was based on his inability to draw naked women.

I can’t draw convincing naked women. I put their knees in the wrong places,” explained Geisel.

Unsold copies were later distributed through a chain of cigar stores for 25 cents each. Geisel never published another book for the adult audience. However as his popularity increased Random House republished “The Seven Lady Godivas” in 1987. Securely entrenched as a children’s author, the book was only slightly better received.

Horse Museum by Dr. Seuss

Another Seuss Book about Horses?

This week a Random House Children’s Books press release announced the posthumous publishing of a never before seen book, “Dr. Seuss’ Horse Museum”. The book will be released September 3 with a first printing of 250,000 copies. Illustrator Andrew Joyner completed the book based on Geisel’s original sketches. It is about a friendly horse who takes a group of students on a tour of an art museum to view horse themed works by Pablo Picasso, Alexander Calder, Jackson Pollock and others.

“Artists and non-artists alike will appreciate the timeless theme in Dr. Seuss’ Horse Museum that there is no one right way to interpret the beauty we encounter every day,” the press release says.

Buy The Book

Lulu Godiva

Get Your Own Copy of “The Seven Lady Godivas” by Dr. Seuss For Sale in WARHorses’ SHOP! Hurry – We only have one copy!
Don’t Miss WARHorses Post About Lady Godiva
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UK based horse trainer and award winning film maker, Emma Massingale is embarking on a “miniature” adventure this summer. Emma will be trekking with two miniature horses across Europe in a custom built carriage but here’s the twist. Emma will be providing all the horse power.

Emma will peddle her two miniature horses, Percy and Stanley, in a custom tricycle designed by her father and built by Metrax Engineering. Along for the ride is Emma’s dog and navigator, Inca. Their route will cross 1000 miles and 6 countries in 6 weeks.

“Horses have pulled us for centuries so I rather like the fact that I’m pulling them,” states Emma on her Facebook page.

Emma is renown for her equestrian adventures including The Island Project. In 2015 Emma moved to an uninhabited island off the cost of Ireland where she spent one month living at liberty with six Connemara horses, four from her Liberty team and two untrained horses. Her motivation for this summer’s “Trike Trek” is simply to make people smile.

“My horses make me smile everyday, this is not only incredible therapy but has helped me become the horsewomen I am today,” explains Emma.

Should you be out on a stroll this summer and Emma, Percy, Stanley and Inca peddle by, be certain to wave and give them a big smile!

Europe One Smile at a Time! - YouTube
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It may surprise you to learn that today’s modern armed forces still utilize horses, mules and donkeys part of a long standing military tradition – caisson horses, Sergeant Reckless. Every animal is considered an active member of the unit. When they reach retirement age, the military employs a strict vetting process to transition them into loving private homes.

Tina the mule retires from Army service.
Photo: CD Horse Cavalry Detachment

Tina the mule is retiring from the Army. Since 2006, she has served at Fort Hood’s 1st Cavalry Division Horse Detachment, Texas. Born in 1999 Tina participated in cavalry charge exhibits, mounted demonstrations, civic parades and color guards. Tina was partnered with her sister, Dolly, who died in 2018 from bone cancer.

Tina herself is healthy and still capable of doing light riding and driving work. Anyone interested in adopting Tina should send an email to the detachment unit requesting an application packet: 201CDHorseCavalryDetachment@gmail.com.

The application deadline is Friday, March 1.

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Dear Appy,
Why does my dog eat horse poop?
Signed, Concerned Dog Mom

Dear Concerned Dog Mom,
Ew. Why do dogs do anything? Some of them eat their OWN poop (known as coprophagia for the uninitiated.) The human at my farm has a dog that eats walls. Figure that one out. But seriously, most humans with horses agree the smell of horse manure is pleasing and given the amount of time they spend moving it around, it’s obvious that manure is a high value item. Dogs love to please humans by loving the things their humans love. Ergo, dogs eat manure. And roll in it. 
Sincerely, Appy

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