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This Wednesday, May 23rd at 7:00 pm central time—we are pleased to offer an encore performance of our popular SWEbinar entitled Sizing up Soil—presented by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE.

Here’s how Jane describes the session: When we talk about wine, we talk about soil. But do we really know what soil is—what it is composed of, how we define a soil type, and how the soil affects the vine? Join us for a 90-minute session on soil—we’ll discuss parent materials, particle sizes, how we define and classify soils, and how the soil impacts the vines and the grapes.

Login Instructions: At the appointed time, just click on this link: Wednesday—May 23rd at 7:00 pm—Sizing up Soil. The link will go “live” a few days before the scheduled date. There is no need to register in advance.

When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.” Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity. We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but it is still a good idea to log on early!

  • There is no need for a dial-in number; audio will be available via the speakers on your computer or mobile device.
  • If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time (just click on the link).
  • If you are having any trouble with your Adobe Connect connection, please see our SWEbinar Trouble-shooting page.

SWE’s SWEbinar series is unique in that it is offered free-of-charge, and open to the public! We also try to accommodate all schedules by offering sessions on weekdays and weekends, as well as daytime and evening hours. Sessions last for about one hour, and are live, interactive events.  If you have a topic you would like to see addressed, or a time-of-day that would work for you, please let our Director of Education, Jane A. Nickles know via email at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

Click here for the–2018 SWEbinar Calendar

 

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SB and Auckland, NZ

Today we have a preview of a session to be presented during SWE’s 42nd Annual Conference, to be held on August 15–17, 2018 in the Finger Lakes Region of New York State. Our guest author is Christine Dalton, CSW, who tells us about her upcoming session entitled Cat Pee By Any Other Name Would Smell As Sweet: Understanding Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc.

Pick a wine-world underdog, wine that has found success under seemingly insurmountable odds. Perhaps you think of Ribiera Sacra’s delicate Mencías, made from vineyards that were left for dead during the country’s political turmoil and resurrected, only to be re-planted on vertigo-inducing slopes. Maybe your mind goes to the Canary Islands, where vines huddle for shelter amongst powerful winds and Sharpie-colored volcanic earth. Or perhaps you give a nod to the vineyards of Salta, sitting closer to the heavens than us oenophiles on Earth. Though all feats of viticultural wizardry, my choice is perhaps less obvious, purely because it is so obvious. This wine takes up large plots of real estate on grocery store shelves and has earned a reserved parking space on most by the glass lists. Yet even with this success, I consider Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc, in all its turquoise- and green-labeled glory, as a most fascinating, yet unlikely champion of the hearts and taste buds of wine lovers the world over.

New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula

Consider its origin story. New Zealand is very much a New World wine country. Vines were first planted in the early 1800s, even before it was founded as a British colony in 1853, but New Zealand didn’t find its wine footing for over a century. If we zero in on Marlborough specifically, the first Sauvignon Blanc vines that brought the region oenological fame were not planted until 1975. (To put that in context, California, another infant in the long history of winemaking, was already winning international recognition at the Judgment of Paris around the same time.) Before Montana (now Brancott Estate) planted these original vines, the consensus was that grapes could not ripen on the chilly South Island. How wrong that wisdom was, as we’ve all seen in the expeditious rise of this little experiment.

We must also consider the terroir. New Zealand sits alone in an isolated corner of the Pacific Ocean. Its closest neighbor is Australia, which lies approximately 2,000 miles away, and it is consistently pummeled by the maritime breezes bounding off the icy Tasman sea. The islands receive intense bouts of sun laced with some of the highest ultraviolet rays in the world. To intensify the extreme natural circumstances further, the country rests squarely on the boundary between the Australian and Pacific tectonic plates, which creates both geologically diverse soils and up to fifteen thousand earthquakes per year.

Vineyards in Marlborough

Then we arrive at the wine itself. Let us jump in our time machines, travel back a few hundred years and pour a goblet of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc to the most esteemed winemakers of the Loire Valley. Would they recognize it as the grape born of their region? Or would they cast it off as a bastardized version of their time-tested style? The wine’s unique aroma and flavor profile is another enigma of its success. The novice wine drinker may not clamor for flavors of grass and bell pepper, though I doubt she would be horrified by reading these notes on the back of a label. But sweaty, stalky and punctuated by cat pee? It is difficult to imagine the success of a wine marked by these traits, yet here we are, transfixed by this wine from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc is an oxymoron. It transfixes me in its unconventional conventionality. It is born of a grape known across continents, climates and time, yet is entirely idiosyncratic. It is a 20th century “invention” nudged on by a risk-taking winery, but primarily by Mother Nature herself. There were no crossings, no hybrids, no labs; there was just a revelatory eruption of pure New Zealand flavor.

What gives our lovable underdog its edge? What allows the Sauvignon Blanc grape to thrive at the end of the earth? What creates the complexity and concentration of its unique feline flavors? Scientists have a few ideas.

Queenstown, New Zealand

Winemakers and researchers have been working to unwrap its riddles since the early 2000s. The aptly titled New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc Programme is a collaboration between The Universities of Auckland and Lincoln, NZ Winegrowers and local winery partners. They have delved into the science of Sauvignon Blanc and have gained a better understanding of the chemical compounds that make up the sensory attributes of this wine. They have looked at how the unique Marlborough terroir—the cool breezes, the intense sunlight, the native yeasts and soils—creates a Sauvignon Blanc expression different than anywhere else in the world.

Their research has also revealed how much more Marlborough has to offer. To those who peg the region and its wines as one-trick-ponies, taste the differences within. Marlborough’s diversity lies in the baseball-sized river rocks of the northern Wairau Valley. These rocks absorb the sun’s powerful rays and ripen grapes that are rife with ruby red grapefruit and exotic passionfruit. Or try an intensely herbaceous expression from the windblown Awatere, which yields wines with crunchy capsicum and tomato leaves. For a revelatory treat, try an age-worthy example, like Brancott Estate’s Chosen Rows. It would be hard to imagine the Sauvignon Blanc experts of the Old World turning up their noses at a wine vibrating with so much energy and finesse.

Punakaiki,New Zealand

Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc is an underdog that has already proven its success in its few decades of existence, though the region is just beginning to reveal all it has to offer. At this years’ Society of Wine Educators Conference, my mission is to inject a renewed fascination in Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc into the palates and imaginations of all who attend my seminar, Cat Pee By Any Other Name Would Smell As Sweet: Understanding Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc. We will explore the findings of the research program to better understand the wine’s unique aromas and flavors, delve into the differences between its varying subregions and taste the fine examples that have resulted from this heightened understanding of Marlborough and its beloved Sauvignon Blanc.

Christine Dalton, CSW

Christine Dalton is a member of Pernod Ricard Winemakers’ International Graduate Wine Ambassador Program, based in Southern California. As representative of the Pernod Ricard wine portfolio, she has spent time learning and working vintage in Rioja, Spain, Sonoma, California, the Barossa Valley, Australia and Marlborough, New Zealand. Originally from the Washington D.C. metro area, she previously wrote for Wine Spectator magazine as an Assistant Editor, and volunteered at the Astor Center at Astor Wines & Spirits in New York City.

She began formal wine training with an introductory wine course at Cornell University while working toward a dual degree in Government and American Studies. She is a Certified Specialist of Wine with the SWE and also holds a WSET Advanced with Distinction certification.

Christine’s session, Cat Pee By Any Other Name Would Smell As Sweet: Understanding Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc, will be offered on Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 10:30 am as part of the 42nd Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators to be held in the Finger Lakes Region of New York State.

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Today we have a preview of a session to be presented during SWE’s 42nd Annual Conference, to be held on August 15–17, 2018 in the Finger Lakes Region of New York State. This preview is authored by Don Kinnan, CSS, CWE. 

There is perhaps no vinous rivalry more intense and long-standing in Burgundy than that between Nuits-Saint-Georges and Beaune.  Both villages serve as namesakes for their prominent wine districts, Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune.  Both are major wine producing villages with highly rated vineyards in the respected Burgundy wine classification hierarchy.  Within Burgundy’s hallowed Côte d’Or, no other villages can match the number of premier cru vineyard climats of Nuits (41) and Beaune (42).

During the SWE Conference in August, 2018, a courtroom format will be used to present the two villages’ cases for supremacy.  Some of that evidence is included below just to stimulate your unquenchable thirst for knowledge.  However, during the live presentation in August, be prepared for some surprises as certain facts may be challenged, objections will be made and ruled upon, and the jury (the audience) will give its verdict.

Map of the Côte de Nuits via www.bourgogne-wines.com

Nuits-Saint-Georges

Nuits-Saint-Georges sits at the southern end of the famous Côte de Nuits, Burgundy’s most acclaimed red wine producing district.  The reputation of the Côte de Nuits’ wine quality is firmly based upon its superlative “terroirs”.  Complex Middle Jurassic limestone-infused marls have been shuffled like cards in a deck of cards to create indelible stamps of individuality and potential greatness in Côte de Nuits red wines. The hand of the winemaker is sparingly and gently applied, so as not to disturb the subtle “terroir” signature of the wine’s growing site.

Nuits-Saint-Georges is blessed with tremendous diversity and wealth within its Middle Jurassic soil packages as attested to by its award of 41 premiers crus under Burgundy’s classification system.  With a vineyard area that stretches nearly 4 miles, longer than any other Côte d’Or village, Nuits has 3 major “terroir” packages within its boundaries.

The vineyard area north of the village proper, sometimes referred to as Côte Vosne (because of its proximity to Vosne-Romanée), tends to produce wines of greater elegance and finesse than Nuits’ other sectors.

The middle section of vineyards, just south of the town, is considered the best part of the commune.  Here one finds the very esteemed premiers crus, Les Saint-Georges, Les Cailles, and Les Vaucrains, all candidates for Grand Cru status.

Finally, further south, in the village of Premeaux, lies Nuits’ third vineyard sector.  Here, the soil is shallower, the slope steeper, and the Jurassic layers beginning to transition to those most commonly found in the Côte de Beaune.  As a result, the normally richer, sturdier style of Nuits wine becomes more austere, a little rough around the edges, and maybe with a touch of the maverick.

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The wines of Nuits have a long history of fame and royal patronage.  Most notable is King Louis XIV’s conversion to Nuits wine at the recommendation of his personal physician, Monsieur Guy-Crescent Fagon in 1698 AD.  After taking his doctor’s advice, the king, who had been ill, returned to good health.  More recently, in 1971, the wine of Nuits-Saint-Georges became enshrined on Earth’s moon when the Apollo 15 astronauts named the crater at their landing site, “St-George” in honor of Nuits-Saint-Georges wine.  Later that year, the Apollo 15 astronauts visited the town of Nuits and were made honorary citizens.

Like Beaune, Nuits is a commercial center, as well as, a wine village.  Population-wise, Nuits, with approximately 5,500 residents, is about one fourth the size of Beaune.  It does sit astride the major autoroute from Paris and serves as a center for wine shippers, brokers, negociants, cooperages, crémant producers, liqueur makers, and other service industries.  Just as Beaune has its Hospices de Beaune, Nuits has its Hospices de Nuits, a charitable organization founded in 1692 AD and devoted to the support of local hospitals.

The ultimate test of wine supremacy, especially in Burgundy, rests with the demonstrated excellence of the growing sites or “terroirs”.  In the hands of respectful “caretakers”, wine produced from these sites will translate into original and universally admired wine, vintage after vintage.  Nuits-Saint-Georges has clearly demonstrated this trait ever since the monks began to produce wine from their Clos St-Georges vineyard in 1093 AD.

However, you be the judge.  Come to the SWE Conference in 2018, attend this session, and taste the wines for yourself.  Then decide who is supreme—Nuits-Saint-Georges or Beaune.

Map of the Côte de Beaune via www.bourgogne-wines.com

Beaune

Beaune is the historic center of Burgundy’s wine trade.  Many of the major wine merchant houses are headquartered there, such as, Louis Jadot, Louis Latour, Bouchard Pere et Fils, Champy, and Joseph Drouhin.  Most of these firms have cellars under the streets of this ancient walled town.   Beaune’s origin goes back to 40 A. D. when it was a Roman settlement lying astride the main access roads into the heart of Gaul.  Today, with a population of 23,000, it is Burgundy’s largest commercial center and annually hosts the famous wine auction of the Hospices de Beaune.

The vineyards of Beaune appear as majestic as the town itself.  Most of the vineyards are arrayed on a looming slope just to the west of the town.  This is where the 42 premier cru sites are found.  Beaune has more premiers crus than any other village appellation in the Côte d’Or, a true testimony to its superb “terroir”.  The slope is fairly contiguous and is generally southeast facing as it extends in a north-south direction.  The relative uniformity of the slope, along with its exposure and geology, result in a similarity of wine style among the various premiers crus.  However, though sometimes more discreet, distinctions and differences are there.

The premier cru slope is normally discussed by dividing it into 3 sections, the north, the center, and the south.  Soils are thinner in the north, possessing more gravel in the center, and with more limestone mixed with sand in the south.  Mid-slope sites in the south become very stony, but lower down there is more clay and less gravel.  There are also pockets of whitish marls which accommodate white grapes , especially in the Clos Des Mouches and Les Grèves premiers crus.

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Beaune is the Côte d’Or’s second largest producing red wine village, just behind Gevrey-Chambertin.  The wines of Beaune are internationally recognized for their approachability and value.  They consistently display lovely perfumes and lively red fruits, with a finely-knitted gentle structure.  Of course, there are many examples of more intense wine with substantial complexity and depth. We invite you to attend the SWE session at this year’s conference to discover the beauty and diversity of this wonderful appellation.

The session—Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Nuits vs Beaune—will be held on Thursday, August 17, 2018 at 1:15 pm as part of the 42nd Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators to be held in the Finger Lakes Region of New York State. The presenters will be Don Kinnan CSS, CWE; Nicholas Poletto CSS, CSW, DipWSET; and Missi Holle CSS, CWE, WSET III

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This Saturday—May 12th at 10:00 am central time—we are pleased to offer one of our most popular webinars: A Spirited Discussion: The Insider’s Guide to the CSS Exam.  This is one for the spirits crowd!! If you are interested in pursuing the CSS Certification—or just a spirits lover-bartender-mixologist-beverage aficionado interested in learning more about spirits and the CSS, this one-hour session is for you! Join our Director of Education, Jane A. Nickles, and learn what to expect from the CSS!

Login Instructions: At the appointed time, just click on this link: Saturday—May 12th at 10:00 am central time: A Spirited Discussion: The Insider’s Guide to the CSS Exam. Link will go “live” a few days before the scheduled date. There is no need to register in advance.

When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.” Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity. We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but it is still a good idea to log on early!

  • There is no need for a dial-in number; audio will be available via the speakers on your computer or mobile device.
  • If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time (just click on the link).
  • If you are having any trouble with your Adobe Connect connection, please see our SWEbinar Trouble-shooting page.

SWE’s SWEbinar series is unique in that it is offered free-of-charge, and open to the public! We also try to accommodate all schedules by offering sessions on weekdays and weekends, as well as daytime and evening hours. Sessions last for about one hour, and are live, interactive events.  If you have a topic you would like to see addressed, or a time-of-day that would work for you, please let our Director of Education, Jane A. Nickles know via email at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

Click here for the 2018 SWEbinar Calendar

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Today we have a preview of a session to be presented during SWE’s 42nd Annual Conference, to be held on August 15–17, 2018 in the Finger Lakes Region of New York State. 

Unexpected Napa Valley 

What do you think you know about Napa Valley wines?

What are your perceptions about one of America’s most recognized grape growing regions?

Well, you should leave poplar notions at the door and begin an exploration of the unexpected Napa Valley. You might discover it is not about just one grape, one style or one price tag! Napa Valley may be America’s most well-known wine region, famous for big Cabernet Sauvignon and full-

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bodied Chardonnay—but there is more than that to Napa Valley, including wines made from old vines, from almost unheard-of varieties, and classics made in a range of enjoyable styles.

This seminar will cover wines and styles that might challenge conventional wisdom with some classic grapes seeking a renaissance and other wines expressing the diversity of the Napa Valley soils. Come taste with an open mind and expand your horizons!

The speaker for this session is John Skupny. John began in the wine trade in 1975 working as a buyer and Wine Steward [sommelier] for restaurants in Kansas City. In 1980, a move to California launched a 38-year career working for some of California’s finest wine producers. Since 1984 he has lived in the Napa Valley; working in sales & marketing for Caymus Vineyards, Clos Du Val Wine Company and then as General Manager of the Niebaum-Coppola Estate (Inglenook). Inspired by the charms of the Cabernet Franc grape, John Skupny and his wife, Tracey, launched Lang & Reed Wine Company in 1996.

John operates a consulting practice, Vineyard Avenue Marketing, providing strategic planning for wineries. John is a past Chairman of the Napa Valley Vintners Board of Directors (‘96), Chair of Premiere Napa Valley Barrel Auction (‘06). President of the Stags Leap District Winegrowers (’90) and founding Vice-President of the Rutherford Dust Society [‘93/94].

The Unexpected Napa Valley seminar will be presented on Friday, August 18, 2018 at 1:15 pm as part of the 42nd Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators to be held in the Finger Lakes Region of New York State.

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Jason Wyatt, CS, CWE

Jason Wyatt, CWE, of Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits, is the company’s newly minted Director of Wine Education for the state of Kentucky.  Jason is a proud member of the Society of Wine Educators, and a newly-minted Certified Wine Educator (CWE).

In his new position as Director of Wine Education for Kentucky, Jason has retail and restaurant sales responsibilities throughout the state, and works with a number of sales teams on training, courses, and examinations.  He also runs the SGWS Wine Club, which is an informal monthly meeting between SGWS employees and their customers that provides the opportunity to focus on a particular region, wine style, or producer.

Jason was born in Kentucky, and graduated from (go Hilltoppers!) Western Kentucky University.  At the time, a career in wine and spirits was not on his radar. However, he soon moved to Louisville and made the acquaintance of someone who was in the trade.  He got his first job in the industry at the famous Brown Hotel in Louisville and received his first significant introduction into the world of fine dining and wine. From there, though he took some time away, his interests blossomed.

Jason joined Southern Glazer’s in 2009, first responsible for selling to restaurants and later as the Fine Wine Portfolio Manager.  Intentional about his studies, he received his Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW) credential in 2011, and continued his studies non-stop. Jason passed the Certified Sommelier (CS) exam in 2015, earned his Italian Wine Professional (IWP) and WSET (level 3) in 2016, and he completed the WSET Nominated Educator Program in 2017. In 2017, he also received his CWE.

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The CWE was a significant milestone for Jason, the culmination of much study and preparation.  Has it changed him in any way?  In a word:  confidence.  It is an imprimatur, an acknowledgement of his skills, knowledge, and talents, the recognition of achievement, and he is able to carry that confidence daily into the work that he now does.  And, armed with that confidence, he continues to direct his attention to improvement and growth in his chosen profession.

What counsel might he give someone seeking a certification through the SWE?   Take time with preparation, but do set a date for the exam to give yourself a goal and be able to work toward it; know the ins and outs of each region and have a great understanding of viniculture and viticulture; nourish the fire and passion you have for wine and spirits.  Jason:  “With SWE, its more than just memorization of facts.  Its cause and effect, its historical and cultural, its ‘what’s new’ with innovation.  The SWE exams are no joke.  They are very difficult, and you need to be versed in all things wine.  Ask for help, there are numerous tools available to you.”

The suite of his talents and accomplishments points toward Jason making significant contributions in the world of wine.  He enjoys first of all options and varieties: there are so many wines from so many places, and the landscape of the wine industry is so continually changing and evolving, that there is always something new and wonderful to discover and enjoy.  He also likes the fact that wine is so helpful in bringing people together from all walks of life; as Jason puts it:  ‘When in a social situation and the ‘what do you do for a living’ conversation starts, I always enjoy telling people what I do.  People love sharing their wine experiences and everyone seems to want to know more about wine.  When you open a bottle, everyone gathers around.”  He gets a particular thrill out of working with others who are learning about wine, and he relishes seeing people challenge themselves and pass their exams.

Jason Wyatt–one of a new generation of talented wine professionals whose work is helping shape the future of the wine trade.

Guest post written by Reverend Paul Bailey

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Are you struggling with your wine studies? Are you motivated to begin to study for the CWE but aren’t quite sure where to begin? If that’s the case, you first step should be acquiring the CWE Candidate Manual—it is packed with study tips and step-by-step guidelines to preparing for the skill-based portions of the exam.

After that, you’ll want to plan out your study program to prepare for the theory portion (multiple choice and essay) portion of the exam. And just in case you are looking for some guidance for this step, we have some news for you!

SWE is pleased to announce the launch of our CWE (Certified Wine Educator) Study Site—a new resource for CWE candidates.

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This site provides a detailed study program for the theory portion of the CWE Exam—all based on the texts and other resources included in the Recommended Reading List for the exam. Suggested study schedules, critical thinking questions, and suggested essay drills are included—along with a plethora of quizzes based on the suggested study modules.

The CWE Study Site is available on SWE’s learning website. 

Use of the site is available for $19, which entitles the user to unlimited use for six months (after which the enrollment may be renewed).

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles, SWE’s Director of Education and Certification at: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

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This Wednesday—May 2nd at 7:00 pm central time—we are pleased to offer one of our most popular webinars: The Insider’s Guide to the CSW Exam – presented by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE: If you are currently pursuing the CSW Certification, or considering the CSW as your next stage of professional development, this session is for you! This one-hour, online workshop will cover all aspects of the CSW, including what the test covers, how difficult the test is, what type of questions to expect, the resources available to students, and how long SWE recommends for study before sitting the exam.

Login Instructions: At the appointed time, just click on this link: Wednesday, May 2 at 7:00 pm: The Insider’s Guide to the CSW Exam – presented by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE: Link will go “live” a few hours before the scheduled date. There is no need to register in advance.

When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.” Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity. We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but it is still a good idea to log on early!

  • There is no need for a dial-in number; audio will be available via the speakers on your computer or mobile device.
  • If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time (just click on the link).
  • If you are having any trouble with your Adobe Connect connection, please see our SWEbinar Trouble-shooting page.

.

SWE’s SWEbinar series is unique in that it is offered free-of-charge, and open to the public! We also try to accommodate all schedules by offering sessions on weekdays and weekends, as well as daytime and evening hours.

Sessions last for about one hour, and are live, interactive events.  If you have a topic you would like to see addressed, or a time-of-day that would work for you, please let our Director of Education, Jane A. Nickles know via email at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

Click here for the 2018 SWEbinar Calendar

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Photo via: www.austrianwine.com

The Austrian Wine Marketing Board has announced the approval and registration of a new wine region to be known as the Rosalia Districtus Austriae Controllatus (DAC). The area of Rosalia was previously classified as a Grosslage (large collective vineyard site) and is located in the south of the Leithaberg (Burgenland) appellation.

Rosalia is named for the Rosaliengebirge—the Rosalia Mountain Range—that comprises a portion of the Alpine Foothills located on the border between Burgenland and Lower Austria. The Rosalia area is situated on the eastern slopes of the Rosalia mountains and includes the valley of the Wulka River, the political district of Mattersburg, and the famous Forchtenstein Castle. Vineyards are situated in the rolling hills at elevations up to 2,640 feet (750 m).

Three styles of wine are approved under the Rosalia DAC:

  • Rosalia DAC:  Approved for dry, red, wines produced using either the Blaufränkisch or Zweigelt grape varieties. These wines are required to contain a minimum of 12% abv and a maximum of 0.04% residual sugar. The wines may be oak-aged, but oak contact is not required. The flavor profile should be “complex, aromatic, and show finesse, fruit, and spiciness.” Wines may be mono-varietal or “harmonious blends;” single-variety wines may include the name of the grape variety on the label.
  • Rosalia Reserve DAC: This designation is also approved for dry, red, wines produced using either Blaufränkisch or Zweigelt; however, Reserve DAC wines require a minimum alcohol content of 13% abv. Rosalia Reserva DAC wines are allowed to list a single-vineyard (Ried) designation on the label. Wines may be mono-varietal or “harmonious blends;” single-variety wines may include the name of the grape variety on the label.
  • Rosalia DAC Rosé: This designation is approved for dry, rosé wines using one or more “quality” grape varieties (as approved for Qualitätswein in Austria).  Rosalia DAC Rosé must contain less than 0.04% residual sugar and may list a specific vineyard (Ried) on the label; however, a specific grape variety (or varieties) is NOT allowed to be stated on the label. The wine is intended to be aromatic with the scent of red berries and show “fresh, fruity, and spicy” flavors.

Map via: www.austrianwine.com

Rosalia is the 11th area in Austria to be recognized as a DAC wine production region. We can expect to see the Rosalia DAC designation on bottles and labels with the release of wines from the 2017 vintage. Welcome to the world, Rosalia DAC!

References/for more information:

Are you interested in being a guest blogger or a guest SWEbinar presenter for SWE?  Click here for more information!

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This Wednesday—April 18, 2018 at 7:00 pm central time—we are pleased to offer a SWEbinar entitled “The Wines of Australia’s Limestone Coast,” to be presented by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE.

Here’s how Jane describes the session: World-famous for its terra rosa soils, Australia’s Limestone Coast Zone is one of the most significant wine areas of Australia, producing some of which are the most highly acclaimed wines in the country. Join us for this one hour session as we travel to Coonawarra, Mount Benson, Mount Gambier, and the other wine regions of Australia’s Limestone Coast! This session will last about an hour and 20 minutes.

Login Instructions: At the appointed time, just click on this link: Wednesday—April 18, 2018 at 7:00 pm central time—The Wines of Australia’s Limestone Coast. The link will go “live” a few days before the scheduled date. There is no need to register in advance.

When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.” Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity. We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but it is still a good idea to log on early!

  • There is no need for a dial-in number; audio will be available via the speakers on your computer or mobile device.
  • If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time (just click on the link).
  • If you are having any trouble with your Adobe Connect connection, please see our SWEbinar Trouble-shooting page.

SWE’s SWEbinar series is unique in that it is offered free-of-charge, and open to the public! We also try to accommodate all schedules by offering sessions on weekdays and weekends, as well as daytime and evening hours. Sessions last for about one hour, and are live, interactive events.  If you have a topic you would like to see addressed, or a time-of-day that would work for you, please let our Director of Education, Jane A. Nickles know via email at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

Click here for the–2018 SWEbinar Calendar

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