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200 I Street, SE, Washington, DC 20003

SYNERGY features visual arts applicants for the FY20 Arts and Humanities Fellowship Program (AHFP) general support grant. On display are pieces submitted by the artists that represent their individual style and body of work. This exhibition allows grant review panelists an opportunity to evaluate the applicants’ works in a gallery setting, while at the same time showcasing the broad scope of the District’s dynamic art scene to the public.

Free and open to the public. Reservations are not required.

GALLERY HOURS
Monday – Friday
9 am – 6 pm

CLOSING RECEPTION
Friday, July 19, 2019, 6 – 8 pm
I Street Galleries
200 I Street, SE, Washington, DC 20003

The Arts and Humanities Fellowship Program (AHFP) provides general funding support of up to $10,000 to individuals who demonstrate exceptional creativity. These grant funds are intended to encourage the creative contributions of the District’s established and emerging individual artists and humanities practitioners and further cultivate the District’s dynamic cultural sector. The works in this exhibit will be evaluated by a DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) review panel.

About CAH
Established in 1968, CAH supports programs that promote progress in the arts and humanities through grants, professional opportunities, and other services to individuals and nonprofit organizations in all communities within the District of Columbia. CAH is the designated state arts agency for the District of Columbia, and is supported primarily by District government funds and in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

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12th Annual JRA Day – Saturday, December 7, 2019

The James Renwick Alliance invites media based artists to submit an application to participate in the 12th Annual JRA Day, a one-day showcase for artists in the craft media. The JRA Day Artist Contract — Space Reservation Application can be found online at www.jraday.org/apply.html.

JRA Day is sponsored by the James Renwick Alliance, an independent national nonprofit organization that celebrates the achievements of America’s craft artists and fosters scholarship, education and public appreciation of craft art. The JRA was founded in 1982 and fulfills its mission through public programs, publications, recognition of craft artists, and financial support, including contributions to the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. For more information on the JRA, go to www.jra.org.

Last year’s JRA Day was a great success. The JRA plans to offer free admission and expand our efforts to promote the show. In 2018 most artists sold individual works at prices ranging from below $25 to as much as $600, and they expect a similar group of buyers this year.

This year’s event will be held on Saturday, December 7, 2019, at the Woman’s Club of Chevy Chase, in Chevy Chase, Maryland. The web site for the event is www.jraday.org.

JRA Day is open to all craft artists who are members of the James Renwick Alliance. Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. If you are not a JRA member, you may apply for the show, but participants must hold a paid membership in the organization within a month of acceptance in the event and on JRA Day.

Memberships for professional craft artists start at the ART level (Alliance for Renwick Tomorrow) at $80 per year. For additional information on JRA membership go to www.jra.org/levels-benefits, call 301.907.3888, or email admin@jra.org.

A few changes in timing!

– Artist set up will take place from 8:00 to 10:00 a.m.

– The show will begin an hour earlier and will run from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

– Take down will be from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Panels are no longer available!

– Booth space that accommodates panels is limited.

– Artists may apply for a booth space and provide their own panel(s)

(for further details, see the application).

– Panels can be found online in searches for freestanding display panels

Additional notes (see the application for further details):

– The initial application deadline is June 30, 2019, and during this period preference will be given to artists who participated in last year’s show

– At least three reproducible 300 dpi JPEG images are required by July 15, 2019; photographs must reflect current work and be different from those previously used by JRA Day.

– The JRA will receive 40 percent of all proceeds from the artist’s sales.

– Advance promotion of JRA Day is done through postcards, the web site, social media, listserv notices, and press releases.

Please contact the JRA Co-Chairs if you have any questions.

Looking forward to a wonderful event on December 7!

Jere Gibber & J.G. Harrington

JRA Day Co-chairs

jgibber@aol.com

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CALL FOR ARTISTS
THE JAMES RENWICK ALLIANCE CHRYSALIS AWARD FOR EMERGING CRAFT ARTISTS
2019 Focus: Mixed Media

The Chrysalis Award was created by the ​James Renwick Alliance ​to encourage and assist emerging American visual artists. The awardee will receive all of the following: a $5,000 unrestricted award, an opportunity to meet with other artists, collectors, and JRA members in the Washington, DC area, and to give a formal presentation about their work at an important JRA event in November 2019.

Emerging is defined as someone early in their artistic career, without regard to age, who demonstrates excellence in their work and a commitment to developing in unique and dynamic ways, but without major gallery representation or significant exhibition history.

Our 2019 award will focus on emerging artists working in the ​MIXED MEDIA craft field. In future years we will solicit nominees in other media. The awardee will be selected by an independent panel of jurors.

2019 Award
Application fee: $20
Application deadline: August 28, 2019
Notification of Award: September 13, 2019
Awardee Presentation in Washington, DC: November 17, 2019

Eligibility

The applicant must be working in the mixed media craft field and show merit, skill, and innovation in their work. Craft is the creation of original objects through the skillful manipulation of materials. These materials were traditionally considered to be clay, fiber, metal, wood, or glass. Today’s artists working in a craft discipline may also employ concrete, plastic, synthetic fibers, recycled materials and other non-traditional materials.

The artist must have completed a four-year academic program or self-directed equivalent training within the past 5 years. Residencies, workshops, and/or a dedicated practice qualify as equivalent training. Applicants may not have had a solo commercial exhibition or be exclusively represented by a gallery or commercial entity. The applicant must have residency in America. Applicants are asked to supply five images of work completed in the past three years and answer all application questions.

Merit, skill, and innovation are the judging criteria for submitted work. Qualities that contribute to the success of a craft object include the skill of the maker, the use of the material, the refinement of the design, the originality of expression, and/or its cultural significance.

How to Apply
Please go to the JRA website at ​www.JRA.org/chrysalis-award​ for the artist application and instructions. Applications and all supporting material must be received by August 28, 2019 to be considered.

About the James Renwick Alliance

The​ James Renwick Alliance​ is an independent national non-profit organization that celebrates the achievements of America’s craft artists and fosters scholarship, education, connoisseurship and public appreciation of craft art. Founded in 1982, the Alliance fulfills its mission through public programs, educational trips, publications, recognition of craft artists, and financial support of museums and other non-profit organizations, including the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

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Photo of Teri Bailey’s work in Making (or, The Iceberg Paradox) opening June 17th and running until July 2nd.

New WGS Creative Coordinator – Teri Bailey – will have two shows openings soon! Both are collaborations being shown at The Urban Arts Space- Hopkins Hall Gallery as part of their summer series. The first is titled Making (or The Iceberg Paradox) running from June 17th – July 2nd with the reception on June 27th from 4-5pm. The second is titled Here/There running from July 29th – August 2nd, with the reception on August 1st from 4-5pm. OSU Hopkins Hall Gallery is located at 128 N Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210.

Detail of Teri Bailey’s installation at OSU.

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Dad – you Rule! (the galaxy)


Thanks for teaching me the way of the Force! I’d join the Dark side for you Dad!

Yoda Best!!

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Montpelier Arts Center 38th Annual Invitational features works by Washington Glass School artists & alum.

The 38th annual Montpelier Invitational Sculpture Exhibition will take place in the Main Gallery at Montpelier Arts Center. Artists from the region including Erwin Timmers, Tim Tate, Eric Dyer, Paul Daniel and WGS’ former Studio Coordinator – Laura Beth Konopinski.We all miss LBK as she has moved to Philadelphia to become the studio tech for the glass program @ Philadelphia’s University of the Arts – but it will be great to see her artwork!

38th Annual Invitational Sculpture Exhibition
June 7 – July 28
Opening Reception: Friday, June 7 from 7pm to 9pm

Montpelier Arts Center
9652 Muirkirk Road
Laurel, MD 20708

Artist Talk/Luncheon: Friday, June 14, 12 pm
To register for the Artist Talk/Luncheon, please call 301-377-7800 by Friday, June 7, 2019.

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In honor of Pride month, WGS is sharing Tim Tate’s essay on the early days of Queer Glass. In this post, we will share Tim’s writing and include many images of Tim’s work starting in the 90’s. 

Tim Tate: Queer Glass

I’ve heard the term “Queer Glass” being used lately, which completely excites me! Meegan Coll’s “Transparency.” LGBTQ exhibit at the Liberty Museum last year, Jan Smith’s Bergstrom-Mahler Museum of Glass, Reflecting Perspectives: Artists Confront Social Issues of Diversity and Inclusion and Susie Silbert’s (Curator of Modern and Contemporary Glass at The Corning Museum of Glass) upcoming seminar discussion in October ( thank you Meegan and Susie!). This makes me want to cheer from the roof tops. Thank you to Meegan for curating that first show, and thank you to Susie for being the first institution to use the term Queer Glass.

One of Tim Tate’s earliest glass pieces from the mid 90’s. Said Tim of the work: “I lost 9 friends to AIDS in one year. This bowl with 9 angels covered by positive symbols was my tribute.”

One of the reasons I’m happy about this is that it gave me a reason to compile a history of my own Queer Glass, an excessive I had never undertaken. There are a few more reasons as well.
In 1990 I began taking glass classes at Penland School of Crafts. I went there to heal by creating. A few years earlier I received a terminal diagnosis: I was told that I had one year to live; I was a gay man who had AIDS. I embraced glass at that time so that I would at least die as the artist that I had wanted to be, rather than my former job…the job that everyone else thought that I should have.
In this 2-week class I met another gay man who was a very nice guy. I didn’t come out to him right away, as I was going to do it later that week. Before I could, however, this young man went to another well-known glass artists studio, covered the ground with newspapers, and fatally shot himself in the head.
I was not to meet another gay man in glass for the next 15 years.

Tim Tate, “The Fulcrum of Heaven” , 24”h, forged steel and glass; 2002. Said Tim: “As an HIV+ gay man I was frequently told I was going to hell. I wasn’t as sure. You spun this piece to show which hereafter you were destined for. Angels in the blue, devils in the red. It sold to a preacher, which I somehow liked.”

I had no idea at that time just how scarce gay people were in the world of fine art glass. It was a hetero-normative art form. They are still scarce, though things are getting better. Frequently when I mention this fact to people, they start telling me the names of gay people they knew of (almost always the same 5 or 6 names). Comparing this list to the number of heterosexual glass artists is ridiculous. If anyone else was making direct queer work back then I would love to hear from you. 
I had heard of several gay women artists, and eventually heard of a few gay men. Thank God for them! It always gave me hope. But being a gay person making glass sculpture does not mean that you make Queer Art. I believe Queer Art should address the concerns of gay people. They should be fighting issues that stand in our way towards equality. At least to me, they should also be identified as Queer Art… no “passing” allowed! I’m just happy that we live in a time when we can publicly embrace the word queer to re-empower ourselves.

Tim Tate; “Positive Fractals” 36″ x 36″ x 6″;Blown Glass, Mirror, Silvering, Paint, Steel, 2002. Said Tim of this work: “I used these fractals to try to make sense of the HIV in my bloodstream and what it was doing to me.”

The queer issues then centered around HIV, marriage equality, violence towards gay men and women, all vast civil rights. Today’s issues seem to be centered around getting acceptance of family, civil rights (still), political advancement and keeping the extreme right at bay in order to keep the rights that we now have. So – as I waited to meet other queer men in glass, I made my art. 
To be clear, there were other queer people making art…but not glass art. So, I began on my own. I never saw another piece of queer glass until the Liberty Museum’s “Transparency” show last year. What a delight to meet others embracing their self-identities for all to see!

Tim Tate; “Two Paths Taken” ;Blown Glass, Found Objects, Original Text; 18″x10″x10″; 2004. Said Tim: “On the inner dome is the etched story of how my life changed after becoming HIV+. On the outer dome is my fantasy of what my life would have been like if things had been different. Both lives have their pros and cons. What I lost in one narrative I gained even more back in the second. The magic 8 ball in the center references the role that chance played in my life.”

The vast majority of my queer work goes back to 1992 to 1999, when I was the founder and director of the Triangle Artists Group (TAG) in Washington, DC…. which at one time boasted over 200 members who curated over 40 shows. Most notable was a show curated by Ruth Trevarrow entitled, “Too Queer”, which examined society’s homophobia and our own internalized homophobia. We worked with art and what was then called the “Prison Project” (concerning how gay people at that time were 3 times more likely to be incarcerated and 10 times more likely to be sexually abused in prison). AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) played an important role among many TAG members. We were fighting to stay alive. 
As such, this was the soup in which I swam. I was an HIV+ gay man surrounded by the politics and artistic expression of our times. I just never saw or experienced any queer glass art, other than my own. I saw the creation of this type of issue driven art as healing to me. Not only healing in the act of creating, but also healing for the viewers who shared these issues. Loss and healing became the main theme of many of my works. In one year alone, I went to 9 funerals. My friends, my partners… my world – was dying before my eyes. It was impossible for us to stay silent. HIV and Matthew Shepard’s death defined the late 90’s. Either a faceless disease or homophobic murderers were going to kill us. This seemed to be the worst time in the last century to be gay. The world’s queer artists united together – but not queer glass artists.

Tim Tate; “A Century Of Longing”; Blown & Cast Glass / electronics, original video; 16″ x 7″ x 7″; 2005. photo by Pete Duvall. The top finial is of a cast glass hand holding a Victorian bouquet. Inside there is a film projector and a stack of film. The video is an 1896 sound test by Edison. In it, two men dance for the first time in film history. A century has passed, and not only has the definitions of “New Media” changed (it begins with Edison’s films), but the way we perceive the 2 men dancing has changed as well. Edison was testing whether or not he could sync sound and motion at the time. These men have been dead for 50 years….but they dance on, oblivious that this 3 minutes would be remembered as iconic to a population they couldn’t have imagined. It was probably thought of as amusing back then, or convenient……but the way we perceive these 2 men has evolved so much over time that now it seems touching and sweet to think of them dancing for eternity together.

There was also a few gay glass collectors that existed. Unlike the fine art world, they rarely supported struggling queer glass artists (they still rarely do). Perhaps it was the old internalized homophobia rearing its ugly head again. One glass art gallery that I showed my work in said that I could make glass with a gay narrative, but they would not exhibit those works in the gallery. They said they had no clients for it. The economics were on the side of hetero-normity.
I was lucky in that I discovered that some many non-gay collectors would acquire my work, even queer work. The artwork just needed to be very good work as well. The glass and art collectors of the time were, for the most part, enlightened liberals. Museum curators were much more open to showing queer artwork. In the earliest days it was never about the economics anyway. It still isn’t. It’s about refusing to stay invisible. SILENCE = DEATH was the mantra for queer artists.

I assume that there were regional pockets of queer glass artists that I was just not aware of. I hope I was just not seeing a collective queer effort in glass. I saw work by queer glass artists, but nothing was in any way obvious. My point with my artwork was to escape the invisibility of being a gay glass artist at that time. Invisibility had to be left behind. I was eventually lucky enough to be asked to speak at Yale University by Glenn Adamson on the topic of Art and Conflict in a panel sponsored by the Chipstone Foundation.

Tim Tate; “In The Dark Hours”; 16″ x 7″ x 7″; Blown and Cast Glass, Electronics, Video; 2006. Said Tim of this work: “In the early days of AIDS, there was a great deal of shame associated with contracting the disease. It felt like all control had been taken from your life, so many people took back the that control by committing suicide before the onset of symptoms. Suicide was the first thought I had when I discovered I was positive.” Photo by Pete Duvall.

So much has changed for gay people: HIV can now be controlled, we can now marry, and we have achieved some human rights. We have 10 openly gay men and women serving in Congress. We have a gay man running for president. Attitudes in the American public have improved drastically towards gay marriage. My fear is that we are becoming complacent with the gains that we have made. Anti-gay violence is on an alarming increase. The civil rights we have achieved are being eroded by the far right. This seems like the perfect time to focus again on queer art and defending what we have struggled for. I just thought I would gather that history here. Younger people than I will take it from here.

The [attached] images represent just a small portion of the works that I created during these last 30 years on this topic. 

Said Tim Tate of this image of New Orlean’s AIDS Memorial – “The cornerstone of my Queer Glass Series is of course The New Orleans AIDS Memorial. I designed it in 1996 and my friend Mitchell Gaudet cast the glass when it finally got installed. This was one of the very first AIDS memorial sculptures in this country. It represents one of my proudest achievements as an artist. Thank you all who helped make it come to fruition. Its in Washington Park in the French Quarter.”

Tim Tate
June 3, 2019

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Ohio’s Kent State University’s School or Art has announced a call for glass artists to submit artwork for “Emerging Glass” – a new exhibit in honor of the 50th Anniversary of the Glass program at the at The Kent State University School of Art.

Submissions accepted April 30 – July 30, 2019.The entry fee is $20, to be paid online. Deadline for submissions: July 30, 2019, at midnight. 

On view in The Payto Gallery, at the Center for the Visual Arts, Kent State University, September 4 – October 4, 2019.

JURORS: Jurors are Assistant Professor and Head of Glass at Kent State University, Davin Ebanks and Lecturer and Co-chair of Glass at Cleveland Institute of Art, Benjamin Johnson. Artworks will be selected based on originality and innovation, design, technique and craftsmanship.

Acceptance will be granted based on digitally submitted images by a “blind” jury process, meaning the jury will not be informed of the artist’s name, background or location.

Selected works will be on display The Payto Gallery in the Center for the Visual Arts at Kent State University, September 4 – October 4, 2019.   

Deadline for submissions: July 30, 2019, at midnight.

Click Here for info link.

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Memorial Day is an American holiday honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, often holding family gatherings and picnics. It will also be celebrated by the display of flags, the sound of bugles and drums, by parades and speeches and unthinking applause. 

Memorial Day should be a day for putting flowers on graves and planting trees. Also, for destroying the weapons of death that endanger us more than they protect us, that waste our resources and threaten our children and grandchildren.

Trish Kent, “Divided States of America”, fused glass, 18″ x 16″, 2019. photo by Pete Duvall.

One of the Resident Artists of the Washington Glass School – Trish Kent – has a stunning new series of art works that have a strong political charge. Trish’s works had earlier focused on aspects of femininity, often making cast glass dresses that emphasized the feel and flow of fabric as it drapes the female form.

Trish Kent, Dress Series, kilnformed glass.

She started incorporating the disturbing cultural aspects that she felt should be addressed into her work – making her dresses feature guns and bullets as part of her work. 

Patricia Kent, “Crying Bullets”; fused glass. Photo by Pete Duvall.

Her newest series unabashedly deals with gun politics in the United States. The U.S. has the highest estimated number of guns per capita, at 120.5 guns for every 100 people. Her new work also touches on the divisive nature of the current political scene, with the American flag shown in a violently deconstructed manner. The work is thoughtful, powerful and moving. The use of the craft medium of glass to express a charged emotional concept is where the art form needs to go. Taking her skills and techniques and telling a story from her heart is exciting.

Bravo Ms Kent, on the new series, looking forward to seeing the full set!

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Arizona’s Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art features contemporary glass art in an exhibit that blends historical methods with current interests, resulting in stunning and divergent artworks. Curated by Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art Lauren R. O’Connell, the show highlights contemporary glass artists-both masters and emerging-whose innovative approaches to using glass have advanced the medium’s discourse within contemporary art. The exhibition, titled “Divergent Materiality” was developed from a collaboration with four local glass art collector couples: Judy and Stuart Heller, Linda and Sherman Saperstein, Sharon and Fred Schomer, and Gail and Dan Tenn.

Tim Tate, “Bitcoin.. Wealth in the 21st Century”

Divergent Materiality: Contemporary Glass Art
May 25 – October 13, 2019
Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art
7374 East Second Street
Scottsdale, AZ 85251

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