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The ReSchool competition consisted of rethinking and re-imagining the idea of schools and challenging the conventional education system and learning spaces reaching out millions to whom Education is inaccessible.

Come take a look at what the winner of “ReSchool 2018 Architecture Competition″ has to say about his design process!

We’d like to take the opportunity to introduce you to the winner of ReSchool 2018 Architecture Competition – Zhen Lei (ZL) from Nanjing, China.

 

VZ: How would you introduce Yourself / Team /Firm?

ZL: I come from China. I am a graduate student studying in Southeast University. My main research direction is architecture and landscape in art design. I like to stand on the boundaries, seeking a balance between technology and art, politics and democracy,
even between the west and the east. In my opinion, the future of architecture lies in how humans view their own history and the design should be based on the new humanism and sustainable development.

VZ: Give us brief information of your previous projects/ works/ research/achievements?

ZL:

Awards:

1. The 15th Asian Design Award: Conservation and Restoration in 2017_Silver Award
2. The 3th China Habitat Design Academic Year Award in 2017_Honorable Mention
3. The Best Architectural Drawing of 2017 by Archdaily_Nomination Award

Research:

1. Journal Article Published in 2016_On the Application and Development of“New Chinese Style”in Residential Landscape Design
2. The 6th Chongqing University Scientific Research Plan in 2015_Research on Characteristic Landscape Design in Jiangjin Zhongshan Town

 

VZ: What advice would you give to individuals who struggle to decide whether it would be beneficial for
them to participate in architecture vision competitions?

ZL:   Trying to understand life and solve problems through an architecture competition is like a very challenging
brainstorming between your own ideas. I think presenting and expressing your design ideas on a good platform can promote design communication and improve self-competitiveness. In particular,“Volume Zero”is providing an innovative design platform for students
majoring in design. There is no denying that the process of the design competition is often the hardest, but also the most rewarding and
meaningful. So I really enjoy participating in architecture vision competitions with some competitors from all over
the world.

 VZ: What where the challenges you faced while designing for such educational space?

ZL: 


The isolated population: The first problem is the people who want to have access to educational resources. In my opinion, although the education in some remote villages is backward, their living environment determines the education level, so it will be improved as a whole with the development of science and technology. However, there is a group of people called the migrant workers, who bring their children and work in the city. Their children are lack of parental companionship and social care. Meanwhile, they suffer regional discrimination
because they are denied urban education benefits.

Interaction of education: The second is the behavior of education. It should be different from the usual exam oriented education.
As far as China is concerned, today’s education is a tragic model, with students following rote learning and a set of norms that inhibit the
nature of children and obscure the true meaning of education. This is also common in the populous developing world, where
education urgently needs to find a way to reshape children’s values. Education needs an interactive behavior, such as meeting,
communicating and collaborating. I think interaction is the potential for revolution.

Versatile space: The third point is how to share resources. These Spaces can be used for community activities even if they are places of education. A multi-functional architecture contains more possibilities. The school needs different people to participate in order to bring vitality and imagination to the site. I want the school to be flexible, fluid, even built in an informal way, so that people in the community can participate. Experience and landscape become part of the educational space and this space becomes an indispensable part of the
community and society. Therefore, it requires me to find the best way and material for construction.

VZ: What was your thought process while designing for Re School 2018 Architecture Competition?

ZL:

1) Population:

The site is located in the block fragments left by the demolition in the urban construction, which has not been reconstructed and rectified by the government. A large number of temporary houses are rented at a low price to the migrant workers who bring their children and work in the city, and it gradually becomes the forgotten and abandoned ruins of a city. According to the field research, the site of the population can be divided into 4 types. Among them, the occupancy rate of migrant workers and their children has increased significantly in a decade,
mostly due to the demolition plan of old houses in the city. At the same time, there is a nursing center in the site, and the population rate of the elderly is stable. The shanty area is out of use during the day and migrant workers and their children back here at night to rest.

2) The Original Building: 

3) Informal Construction:

The local history of informal construction means that temporary buildings cannot be recognized by modern cities. This is just like the migrant workers and their children in the city, can not enjoy social services and care. Beyond a high wall to the north of the site is an urban elite elementary school. As children of migrant workers do not have urban household registration and sufficient funds, they cannot enjoy superior educational resources equally with urban children. They gradually become isolated population and often suffer from
regional discrimination.

4) Architecture Vision:

The art of scaffolding was depicted in the scrolls of the Northern Song Dynasty. The design will use this lost traditional culture as a breakthrough to evoke community construction.

5) Design Concept:

Ruins are not the end of architecture, but its origin. The school floats above the shanty area, assembled with sandwich panels and scaffolding into a form that fuses structure, experience and the scenery. The school is like a lattice structure growing in the earth, but it is not permanent.

6) Plane layout:

7) Module and Structure:

8) Section & Function:

Schools, communities and social organizations share the same space, forming the abundant and continuous system of culture and education. Here, different ages, classes, professions and values are integrated, and the school is more like a spontaneous theater. It can be said that architecture is woven by metal and boards and education is woven by different people and events.

9) Design Expression:

VZ: What attracted you to this competition?

ZL: Undoubtedly, I am very interested in the theme of this competition. In China, 63 percent of children in remote areas do not attend high school, and those lacking education can only choose to be workers. This competition takes educational space as a strategy for community interaction and poverty care. In view of many social evils at present, such as poverty discrimination, resource shortage and environmental pollution, it is a great challenge of the design sustainability and innovation.

VZ: Where does your interest in design come from?

ZL: My interests often focus on the social development problems in the process of globalization and urbanization, especially the vulnerable groups who are neglected and passively survive. There are some thought-provoking historical processes behind some things that people turn a blind eye to and think are usual. When these events are discovered and firmly grasped by me, they will become a critical attitude and motivation for my design.

VZ: What design fundamentals do you believe in?

ZL: 

I think architectural design is more like a novel, it must perfectly coordinate all the factors. Design is both a continuous whole and a fragmented mixture. From a macro perspective, I think the basis of architectural design is to build on a certain place, a certain structure, and make it available to people. With these three conditions, architecture is no longer equivalent to art installation, sculpture or landscape. From a micro perspective, architecture is a product of space. Among the design elements, the wall is the entity with guidance, the window is the interaction between the inside and the outside, glass is the interaction between virtual objects, the door is the interaction between the entities, the staircase is the essence of the space, and the light is the product of feeling the space.
These elements exist for people.

VZ: What were your references/ inspiration?

ZL: 

When I thought about what an educational space should look like, I remembered a book about Louis I. Kahn called Between Silence and Light. In the chapter of“Institutions”, Kahn mentioned what a school should be. The origin of school is one person tells several people about his understanding and experience under a tree. Teachers and students have an equal relationship which is a kind of natural organization or a beautiful initial dream. I think the characteristic of an educational space should have the willingness to integrate into the environment, no matter how bad the environment is. If this space tries to improve the environment by itself and encourage people to meet, stay and explore, then it is what kahn said: a good institution and a place with many possibilities. Another example that touches me is Fuji Kindergarten designed by Japanese architect Takaharu Tezuka with his wife. Designers regard danger and nature as the first lesson of children’s education. This architecture design encourages children to explore the real world and natural environment in the continuous open spaces. I think this project has a revolutionary education concept.

VZ: Which aspects of a design do you focus more during designing?

ZL: I’m more focused on vernacular community construction and sustainable design, which are also my research themes at this stage. The problems studied in these two directions are also increasingly prominent in the process of the metropolis of the 21st century.

VZ: What according to you is the key to making your design a success?

ZL: I am lucky to be the winner of this competition, because every entries from all over the world has a unique idea. This site is located in my hometown Nanjing, where some of my childhood friends still live. So I was very impressed with the environmental issues and the history of the site. If I have to say what is the shining point of my design, I think it is a series of thinking on the flexibility of construction, the participation of society and the criticism of urbanization. It is very exciting to resolve these social conflicts with the educational space of informal architecture.

VZ: Which tools do you use during design? What is inside your toolbox? Such as software, application,
hardware, books, sources of inspiration etc.?

ZL:

I am fascinated by traditional design tools and books of architectural theories. Sketch, watercolor and colour pencil are convenient tools at the initial stage of design, which enable many inspirations to be displayed on paper immediately. In addition, collage is also a good design tool and can be operated by software. About books, Wang Shu’s 造房子and Cecil Balmond’s Informal I often read last year. The former gives me a lot of spatial inspiration about literature and abstraction. The latter makes me pay more attention to the balance between structure technology and art form. The best inspiration for design is travel. Le Corbusier’s journey to the east was the architectural enlightenment for his youth. When I see the great works of architects like I. M. Pei, B. Doshi, Tadao Ando and Zaha, I spontaneously resonate with the architectural space.

The post An Interview with the winner of ReSchool 2018 – Architecture Competition – Zhen Lei appeared first on Volume Zero.

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The ReSchool competition consisted of rethinking and re-imagining the idea of schools and challenging the conventional education system and learning spaces reaching out millions to whom Education is inaccessible.

Come take a look at what the Third Place of “ReSchool 2018 Architecture Competition″ had to say about their design process!

We’d like to take the opportunity to introduce you to Nikita D’Silva (ND), Siddhant Tikkoo and Debolina Ray  (STaND) from Mumbai, India; who have successfully secured Third Position in  ReSchool 2018 Architecture Competition

VZ: How would you introduce your team?

ND:  STaND is an architecture and design studio based in Mumbai, co-founded by architects Siddhant Tikkoo and Nikita D’Silva in 2016. With a vision to evoke emotion through simplicity and design, STaND works towards delivering innovative and inspiring design solutions that are continually evolving. Everyone deserves to experience design to more fully perceive the uniqueness of their environment. It is STaND’s passion to create that experience. The studio is an effort to bring together the founders’ shared vision to keep this passion and curiosity alive through experimentation. With an organic design process, STaND works on almost all things design: Architecture, Interiors, Furniture and Product.

VZ: Give us brief information of your previous projects/ works/ research/achievements?

ND: In the past 3 years STaND has worked on a gamut of projects of varying scales, from commercial interiors and furniture to architecture and social research projects. In the commercial realm, STaND has worked on offices for Citrus Pay, PayU and Grace Chemicals to name a few; and restaurants for Hauslandish Hospitality (Goyaa, Mumbai). The studio has designed and consulted on architecture projects- an Equestrian Resort in Karjat, a Wellness Resort and Spa in Kamshet, a family home in Ashok Vihar, Delhi (G-91), an E-waste recyclying plant for Ecocentric in Khopoli and a Residential Community for JK Developers – IRIS at Mira Road.

The studio takes a keen interest in research projects, having designed and presented a low cost, sustainable solution for toilets in rural India at the United Nations conference at the India Habitat Centre, Delhi. STaND was also part of the SDG-6 (clean water and sanitation) panel discussion for the same.

The studio’s projects have been featured in Architecture Digest, Interiors and Architect India, The Hindu, The Bombay Times and nominated for the Trends Excellence Awards in the category of Bar & Restaurant of the Year 2018.

VZ: What advice would you give to individuals who struggle to decide whether it would be beneficial for them to participate in architecture vision competitions?

ND: Being a Mumbai based studio, the pace of the city and the ease with which one gets sucked into the rut of projects and their commercial feasibility, can be highly toxic. We found that working on architecture competitions helps keep in touch with your core values and creative side. We also saw a recognisable spike in the energy at the studio. It facilitated healthy debates, brainstorming sessions and team spirit.

VZ: What were the challenges you faced while designing for such educational space?

ND: Designing for children is always a sensitive matter, more so when we were designing for a population that was deprived of education for so long. It was important here to understand the user – the child. Our research varied from case studies of native, regional schools and anthropometrics of a child to studying the Gond way of life and their relationship with spaces. It was important to use the tools of material and scale wisely.

VZ: What was your thought process while designing for Re School 2018 Architecture Competition?

ND: The thought of the structure being more than just a school building. One core concept that shaped the school’s design was the thought that the structure had to be more than merely just a school building, but had to activate an entire community through its function and design. Research showed that the newer generations of the Gond tribe diversified into different trades often far from their roots. The school was envisioned to bind the youth and elders through the tribes’ unique traditions and native values and yet impart knowledge that would keep students at par with the current educational system.

VZ: What attracted you to this competition?

ND: The nature and theme of the competition, that addressed a very real and raw concern was a large attraction in itself; it has also always been the studio’s passion to work on projects that give back to rural India, more specifically the youth of the country. We find it rewarding to use architecture as a tool for holistic development and welfare of society. The Gond tribe is one such community on the verge of losing their identity, age old traditions and culture, integral to them leading a sustainable independent life. To be able to use design as a tool to even remotely solve the education crisis in interior India, and more importantly revive a tribe proved reason enough to be drawn to Re-School.

VZ: Where does your interest in design come from?

ND: A strong love for experimentation fuels the studio’s passion for design. Design has always been an ardent passion for both the founders, whether it be furniture, product, architecture, art, installation or fashion. We believe that design at all scales however large or small has some effect on people. The vision of the studio is to create physical manifestations in order to see that effect.

VZ: What design fundamentals do you believe in?

ND: With a vision to evoke emotion through simplicity and design, we believe in working towards delivering innovative and inspiring design solutions that are continually evolving. Our process and design seeks sustainability through minimalism.

VZ: What were your references/ inspiration?

ND: For this competition we dwelled a lot into the works of Anna Heringer (DESI Training Center and Modern Education and Training Institute, Laurie Baker (Pallikoodam School) and Charles Correa (planning and strategies in the Indian Context). Ideas of open schooling, courtyards, bringing the outdoors inside were other key inspirational concepts.

VZ: Which aspects of a design do you focus more during designing?

ND: Our concept and research phases are often the most important in our design process as they set the foundations of any further design decisions and create a strong sense of ethics that bind the project together beautifully.

VZ: Which tools do you use during design? What is inside your toolbox? Such as software, application, hardware, books, sources of inspiration etc.?

ND: Research is a major step in our design process. It sets parameters to guide our first strokes, which is usually a hands on process of sketches, and physical models. We develop those ideologies further through our study of architecture theories, both traditional and contemporary. As designers, presentation plays a pivotal part in conveying our vision- softwares like Rhino, the Adobe Suite (InDesign, Photoshop & Illustrator) and AutoCAD aid us.

The post An Interview with the Third Place for ReSchool 2018 – Architecture Competition – Nikita D’Silva appeared first on Volume Zero.

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We are excited to announce the winners of our recent architectural design competition, House of Santa. The challenge looked at participants design a new place of residence for the harbinger of Christmas, Santa Claus, at his home turf on the Arctic Circle.

JURY


The jury for the competition consisted of esteemed architects Ar. Benjamin G. Saxe (Studio Saxe), Ar. Peter Pichler (Peter Pichler Architecture), Mark Foster Gage (Mark Foster Gage Architects) and Mikkel Frost (Cebra Architecture).
The top three winners were awarded a total prize money of $3200 while ten entries received honorable mentions.

The full results for the House of Santa competition can be found here. 

Here are the winning entries.

Winners: FIRST PLACE:
         Participants: Hubert Rozewicz, Bartosz Kolodziejczuk and Damian Konieczny (Poland)

“The ‘Heart of the Arctic’ imagines rebuilding the living and working area of Mr. Santa Claus and his family on a floating iceberg in the Arctic Circle. The design looks at adapting architecture to face the monumental issues of climate change, rather than ignoring the problem.”

SECOND PLACE:
Participants: Pei Chi Tsai and Chao Chun Kung (Taiwan)

“The ‘Defence of the Glacier’ imagines Santa’s ne house to be built at Danmark Fjord, a place with the thickest ice sheet in Arctic that may soon crack owing to global warming. This house is designed on a high wall that intends to slow down the melting of the glacier and help it recover from recession. The site chosen is near a weather station so as to co-operate with scientists to monitor the glacier and study the effects of climate change on the same.”

THIRD PLACE:
    Participants: Dong Si Wah and Lau Doris Yen Kiu (Hong Kong)

“‘Santa’s Cocoon’ emphasizes on architecture as means for the children visiting Santa Claus to get in touch with nature. The house is designed with a terrace system to reduce its reliance on an artificial heating technique. The spaces inside the Cocoon are connected with each other through various functional areas, making the house a cozy living and working area for the residents and the visitors.”

Honorable Mentions:   Participants: John Sawouk (Lebanon)  Participants: Wooseong Lee and Junsu Jeon (South Korea) Participants: Timothee Mercier (United States of America) Participants: Shan Jin, Qingyang Xie and Yicong Shan (United States of America) Participants: Stephanie Ruya Stout (Turkey) Participants: Mai Viet Anh and Behna Clea (France) Participants: Seongho Bae and Gayan Munasinghe (Australia) Participants: Nandan Bushry (India) Participants: Muhammad Arif Bin Mahamad Apandi and Haziq Bin Yunos (Malaysia) Participants: Nurlan Kamitov, Kuralay Yesmukhanova and Dilara Myrzagalieva (Kazakhstan) -TANVI NAIK, VOLUME ZERO

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We are very happy to announce the results of our RE School Architecture Competition 2018 – the contest challenged the participants to design an innovative school that brings education to children living in the most inaccessible areas of the world, while also being a hub for interaction between the local communities.

The jury for the competition consisted of esteemed designers Hellmut Raff (Ackermann+Raff GmBH & Co. KG), Taku Hibino (HIBINOSEKKIE), Jun Sekino (JUN SEKINO Architect and Design), Paulo Afonso (Paulo Vale Afonso Architecture Studio), Raul Pantaleo (TAM ASSOCIATI) and Hoang Thuc Hao (1+1>2).

The top three winners were awarded a total prize money of $4000, while ten entries received honorable mentions.

Here are the winning entries. The full results for the RE School 2018 Architecture Competition can be found on https://competition.volzero.com/

Winners: FIRST PLACE

Participants: Zhen Lei (China)

“Ruins are not the end of architecture, but its origin. The ‘Woven Clouds’ school floats above the shanty area, assembled with sandwich panels and scaffolding into a form that fuses structure, experience and the scenery. The school is like a lattice structure growing in the earth, it is not permanent, this informal building will inspire community participation and education revolution”.

SECOND PLACE Participants: Ling Lee and Hsieh I Jon (Taiwan)

“Earthquakes, typhoons and volcanoes constantly ravage coastal regions around the globe. Countless schools take the brunt of this destructive force, but simultaneously act as emergency operation centres after the disaster. ‘The Nest – Shelter School’ uses a new system that can be easily constructed with hands-on materials and which can be readily transported to damaged environments”.

THIRD PLACE Participants: Nikita D’Silva, Siddhant Tikkoo and Debolina Ray (India)

“Our vision of a school is one with no boundaries between education and culture, a space that unites native dying skill sets with integrated learning”. Inspired by the indigenous Gond tribe, their lifestyle and households, the school is a sublime balance between enclosed and shared spaces made using locally sourced materials.

Honourable Mentions:  Participants: Renzo Lopez (United States)

Participants: Ayman Omeirat (Germany)  Participants: Chloe Macary Carney and Urska Malic (France)   Participants: Mamingyuan, Jinlianzi and Zhaixuanyi (China)

Participants: Parallax Design Studio (India)

Special Mentions:

Participants: Avinsa Haykal, Abraham Risyad Adicunkoro and Insan Mutaqin (Indonesia) Participants: Tian Yukan and Fan Yunlong (China)
Participants: Aayushi Sejpal and Siddharth Shewade (India)
Participants: Aida Zare Mohazzabieh, Sobhan Zare Mohazzabieh and Alireza Jamali (Iran)

Participants: Ziyang Xu and Zhiyu Li (United States)

Participants: Nishant Mittal, Dhara Patel and Rajesh Suthar (India)

Participants: Abhinav Prasoon, Siddarth Mahadevan and Dhvani Shah (India) Participants: Roshan R Prabhu and Rajiv Babu (India)

Participant:Jakub Dygdon (United Kingdom)

Participant: Julia Dias Da Mota and Sofia Araujo Lima Bessa (Brazil) -TANVI NAIK, VOLUME ZERO

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We are very happy to announce the winners of our recent architectural design competition, Aquatecture 2018. The contest encouraged the participants to imagine a utopian world on water and design the same considering the aspects of innovation, originality and sustainability.

The jury for the competition consisted of revered designers Anouk Legende (Xtu Architects), Marco Lavit (Atelier LAVIT), Abraham Cota Paredes (Cotaparedes Architects), Richard Coutts (BACA Architects), Anuj Gudekar (Professor), Mridula Pillai (Professor), Chris Precht (Penda), Andrew Patterson (Patterson Associates) and Moon Hoon.

The top three Winners and five Special Mentions were awarded a total prize money of $4500 while ten entries received Honorable Mentions.Here are the winning entries. The full results for the Aquatecture 2018 competition can be found here 

Winners: First Place: The ‘Float Hub’
Participants: Daniela Lamartine (Sweden)

The ‘Float Hub’ goes beyond design, and merges the vital aspects of infrastructure and economic development. “Float Hub aims to achieve a long-term economic and residential security through a catalogue of typologies that benefits the floating community. The existence of resources in the communities enables an economy where any surplus generated is recycled back”. The important activities of the proposed floating community are production, recycling and vending.

Second Place: The ‘Nuevo Mundo’ Participants: Wandi Jin and Jin Yi (China)

The ‘Nuevo Mundo’ looks at traditional Chinese architecture for inspiration. The designers wanted to create “a water building that can flexibly cope with its living environment and can freely control its own dimension, move freely and can easily dock, with the control room diving into the water. The energy of the new water building is supplied by solar and its surrounding environment can produce food and purified water”.

Third Place: The ‘Water Miner’ Participants: Sidharth P T and Balaji B (India)

The design of the ‘Water Miner’ is a “torus pod with all amenities and food production technology. Multiple pods would come together to form a floating settlement with shared food production and programs. The design also has the capability to mine for fresh water while in the sea through osmosis, with the help of synthetic membranes”.

Special Mentions:
Participants: Miguel Angel Vargas Sanchez and Andres Torres Rodriguez (Colombia) Participants: Neha Agarwal, Kaustubh Kulkarni and Raghu Vamshi (India)
Participants: Nguyen Phuc Minh, Hoang Thanh Hai and Nguyen Xuan Ngoc (Vietnam)
Participants: Kash Moghaddam, Perry Katropoulos and Kanishk Meghani (Australia)
Participants: Silvia Angeli, Sophie Angrilli and Xhesika Pfriti (Italy) Honorable Mentions: Participants: Nur Arsad Eko Pramono, Ardyana Fahmiadi and Arief Singgih Wibowo (Indonesia)
Participants: Lorena Rossi, Dimitra Eleni and Hubert Bokobza (France)
Participants: Kaushal Suresh Tatiya (India)
Participants: Jiaming Zhang and Yanzhen Qiu (United States)
Participants: Xiaorui Ge and Yan Zhang (China)
Participants: Saqib Mansoor, Lily Ni and Shidong Wang (Canada)
Participants: Patrick Danahy and Caleb Ehly (United States)
Participants: Alvaro Herrera and Esteban Ramirez (Chile)
Participants: Antony Thomas, Sarath Kapplangat Sarasan and Juno Jose (India)
Participants: Ananya Nayak, Devayani M and Shashwath Ravisundar (India)

-Tanvi Naik, Volume Zero

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We are honoured to announce the winners of our recent competition, Marsception, one that challenged the participants to envision a habitat for the first five colonizers on the Red Planet where they would research on the viability of life for the future human generations would live there; a habitat that would define a trend for the architecture of the upcoming human civilization on Mars.
The top three winners were awarded a total prize money of $4000 while ten entries received honourable mentions.

Winners: FIRST PLACE
Participants: Thomas Goessler (Austria)

The human base is proposed to be situated in the area of Arcadia Planitia and entails different survival aspects for its inhabitants. The vision of the design is “a self-sustaining system which not only provides humans with what is necessary to survive but also fulfils their social and psychological needs”.

SECOND PLACE
Participants: Agata Mintus, Leszek Orzechowski, Wojciech Fikus (Poland)

The design aims at protecting the future humans on Mars from low pressure, radiation, toxic regolith contamination and low temperatures. The participants believe that “Architecture must not only shield from outside environment – it must provide – it must process – it must be all what a natural habitat is”. Based on the circulation concepts from the ESA MELISSA project, the design aims at providing a habitable environment for the future civilizations on Mars.

THIRD PLACE
Participants: Renzo Lopez (USA)

The BOUNCE LAB is a futuristic research centre that is conceptualized like a living organism. “The structure is a recreational and kinesthetic exploration environment which shields humans from the dangers of living on Mars, while eliminating the claustrophobic feeling currently associated with space exploration”.

THE HONOURABLE MENTIONS Participants: LUIZ PAULO COSTA PEGORAR, BRAZIL. Participants: PATRICE GRUNER, RAOUL SKREIN, Switzerland Participants: SADULLAH ENGIN, MUHAMMED MURAT EROL, Turkey Participants: ANG WEI LI, GOI YONG CHERN, ONG CHAN HAO, Singapore.  Participants: HOYIN LUI, United Kingdom. Participants: NADIA CHAN, KANGMIN LEE, Canada. Participants: DUARTE ALVES, ANA LIMBADO, Portugal. Participants: TARANG SURESH CHHEDA, PIYUSH MAHENDRA CHAUDHARI, HETVI VIPUL BHEDA, India. Participants: INDRAJEET HALDAR, India. Participants: FELIX MASHKOV, SILIN JOHN, POTAPENKO ANASTASIA, Russia. -Tanvi Naik, Volume Zero.

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Project description Team Architects: MESURA Partners in Architecture. (Barcelona)
Collaborator: Dr. Joan Albert Adell
Construction Company: Burgos Gasull
Marble: Kendra
Lights: Adymus
Photography: Salva López

Peratallada, which literally means “carved stone”, is a heritage village in the region of Baix Empordà of Catalonia in Spain. In the village that preserves a clear vestige of its medieval past in every street, lies the Peratallada Castle.

The Peratallada Castle, an ensemble of heritage buildings with a common courtyard is now a luxury resort, and a national heritage building for its historic value. Ensconced within these stunning edifices lies a beautiful patio that dates back to 10th Century A.D. In this context, Studio Mesura was commissioned to build a garden with terrace for a timid and camouflaged holiday resort, a quiet sanctuary for the body and soul.

The Design

The resulting intervention respects the history of the place, making use of local materials, yet the minimalism adds a touch of modernity to it. The landscape consists of terraces at different levels, combined with vertical concrete wooden-textured walls and a pool at the centre of it.
The terraces are made in Turkish white travertine marble, which were salvaged from a project in Girona, Catalonia. The stone pavement is composed of pieces with varying widths owing to its reuse. These pieces were then arranged in different compositions, hence breaking a recurring pattern. The idea of terraces with three different platforms was introduced in response to a 2m drop from the plinth to the street. The terrace is dotted with stone benches made with the same material. A massive 100-year-old acacia tree at the centre is a natural shade which dominates space with its vertical presence, and becomes the centre of the landscape.

The existing water tank that was turnedinto a pool is more of a sensorial intervention than a visual one. The sound of constantly moving water, brought on by water overflowing over a concrete wall adds to the calm aesthetic. The pool is finished in colourless micro cement that preserves the traces of the medieval past and the surrounding nature in its reflection. A garden aiming to be sustainable, the entire project is conceived to collect rainwater into medieval well dug out in the natural stone soil, more than 9 meters above ground level. This water is used for gardening.

Technical Information Location: Plaza Del Castillo, Peratallada.
Municipality: Forallac
Region: Baix Empordà
Destination of use: Private pool
Description: Garden and pool
Owner: Robert Ferrer-Cajigal
Year of construction: November 2015
Dimensions: 10.8 m x 4.9 m
Depth: 1.7 m

-Anshika Srivastav, Volume Zero.

The post Infusing modernity within heritage at Peratallada Castle, by Studio Mesura. appeared first on Volume Zero.

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Volume Zero by Truptesh Sawant - 1y ago

We are extremely proud to announce the winners of our recent competition, Pocket Seat 2018; one that challenged the participants to create an innovative and portable personal seat that can be used by individuals anywhere, in the public arena or in the comforts of their private spaces.

The jury for the competition consisted of esteemed designers Sigal Baranowitz and Irene Goldberg (Baranowitz and Goldberg), Tom Fereday (Tom Fereday), Paul Sandip (Paul Studio) and Ben Uyeda (Homemade Modern).
The top three winners were awarded a total prize money of $3000 while ten entries received honourable mentions.

Here are the winning entries. The full results for the Pocket Seat 2018 competition can be found on https://competition.volzero.com/  

Winners: Participants: Harini Muthamma Aiana, Nidhi Nirmal Kulkarni and Keith Pereira (India)

“The Pocket Seat is designed to fit into the dimensions of a water bottle – something that can be carried everywhere and that is used by everyone. It is simple and intuitive to open and use, with two adjustable heights so that it can be lowered for kids and raised for adults.” The design is minimalistic and can be used practically anywhere, while waiting for a train, in parks or while camping.

Participants: Shaurya Volvotkar and Gopalkrishna Pai Kane (India)

MATE, a companion in the form of a wooden stool, encourages the user to move around while making it possible to sit and rest too. “It is not meant to be sat on for longer periods. When the stool is not being used, the legs can be folded and held like a carry bag. The seat also has storage space and is upholstered for more comfort. The MATE can be used easily by all the age groups.

Participants: Omar Alsaleh and Omar Khaireddin (Canada)

“SITPACK is designed to incorporate the ‘action of sitting’ into something that exists in our every moment. It is a tool, a plug-in into one’s life. It allows the user to carry the idea of sitting on his/her back, by simply wrapping the straps of his/her backpack and carrying their bags normally”. This seat is a portable object that can be carried easily and that adapts itself as per the need of the user.

Honourable Mentions: Participants: Scott Kervin (United States of America) Participants: Paras Bharti and Ankur Singh (India) Participants: Devanshi Saksena and Quashif Qureshi (India) Participants: G R Dilip Kumar (India) Participants: Dhevat Sobti (India) Participants: Ningthoujam Kingson Singh (India) Participants: Kiran Babu and Anant Mittal (India) Participants: Gavin Munoz (United States of America) Participants: Ashwin Vasudevan, Indrajith K and Shreegesh T K (India) Participants: Yuvaraj P, Divyanand S V and Sridhar M A (India)

– Tanvi Naik, Volume Zero.

The post Pocket Seat 2018 appeared first on Volume Zero.

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Image Courtesy: Neha Nath/ India Today Group/ Getty Images (Source: www.livemint.com)

With a global practice and international recognition, Charles Correa and his remarkable projects, whether the Kanchanjunga Apartments at Mumbai, the Jawaharlal Kala Kendra at Jaipur or the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown in Lisbon have been an intrinsic part of nearly every Indian architectural student’s academic trajectory. Projects involving imitation of drawing style, emulating spatiality and theorising design principles which oriented around Charles Correa’s work have been part and parcel of the curriculum. And while we have been engrossed in ensuring intake of the tangible aspects of his practice, we cannot claim to have invoked the intangible values which formed the very essence of his words and work. In fond memory of Charles Correa, three years after his demise, we pay our tribute and attempt, through examples of some of his best known work, to explore his ideology.

Hailing from Secunderabad, education led him to St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai and University of Michigan as well as Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, and he initiated an architectural practice in 1958. His extensive practice, now spanning over five decades defines a range of projects across fields – residences and apartments, institutes, exhibition spaces and master planning for housing as well as urban centres. Among the most prominent aspects his architecture reflects include contextual planning, a confluence of traditional principles with contemporary designs and people centric spatiality.

Residences & Apartments: Kanchanjunga Apartments, Mumbai (1970-83) Image Courtesy: Charles Correa (Source: www.archdaily.com)

The iconic Kanchanjunga Apartments have not only been a significant expression of Charles Correa’s architectural language, but in the midst of the dynamic skyline of Mumbai, the building is also a representative of his core ideology – An urban, Indian work of architecture, which draws from tradition, and yet serves contemporary requirements. The picture depicted above highlights the disparity between the heritage architecture of Mumbai, and the haphazardly situated skyscrapers encouraged today, rooted more out of the need to explore floor areas, than spatiality within and between structures, and compares them to Kanchanjunga, a sole symbol of what contemporary architecture in urban Indian spheres could be.

Image Courtesy: Charles Correa (Source: www.archdaily.com)

The section depicted is synonymous with an architectural student’s ideal perception of an architectural representation drawing, and indicates the people and nature centric ideology adopted and propagated by Charles Correa and his work.

Offices and Commercial: British Council, New Delhi (1987-92)  Image Source: www.prestigeonline.com Image Courtesy: Aga Khan Trust for Culture (Source: www.archnet.org)

Excerpts about the architecture of British Council, New Delhi, from www.charlescorrea.net

At the farthest end is the axis mundi of Hinduism, a spiral symbolising Bindu – the energy centre of the Cosmos. The next nodal point, located in the main courtyard, is centered around another mythic image: the traditional Islamic Char Bagh, i.e. Garden of Paradise. The third nodal point along this axis is a European icon, inlaid in marble and granite, used to represent the Age of Reason, including the mythic values of Science and Progress.

Presiding over all this is India herself, symbolised by the shadows of a giant tree, executed in an exquisite inlay of white makrana marble and black kuddappa stone. – the work of the British Painter Howard Hodgkin.

With this conceptual basis, the design of the British Council is an expression in secular unity, and indicative of how varying elements can be harmoniously fused. Elements of art, such as the depiction of the shadows of the tree herein, have been a constant within the designs of Charles Correa. His work never separated the art from architecture, either visually or spatially. Towards his later years, from 2005 to 2008, Charles Correa was the Chairman of the Delhi Urban Arts Commission. Contrarily, as architectural identities within the nation are yet to be strongly defined, the accompanying art dwindles further, with numerous examples opting for imitation and art for the sake of art, a mere aesthetic addition.

Educational: Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune (1988-93) Image Source: www.ebuild.in

The conceptual design for IUCAA represents the model of the Cosmos. The site comprised three contiguous pieces of land, with two campus roads passing in between, and the design incorporated elements such as structures, courtyards and a kund, embellished with sculptures, plantation and tiles. The ensemble represents the dynamics of Outer Space and an Expanding Universe.

The insight and thought process involved with such design adds to an inherent intangible value to the design and the project. Such examples are portrayal of true architecture, where the resultant is not a production achieved through mass replication or imitation, for the sake of building. Here, architecture is derived from the soul of the site and the function itself.

Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon, Portugal (2007-2010) Image Source: e-architect

The aspect of reflecting metaphoric expressions through architecture does not remain singular to particular works, and appears even in the design for Champalimaud Institute for the Unknown, a research and diagnostic centre. The significance of the site is evident as it is at this point where the river meets the Atlantic Ocean, and it was from this point that Henry the Navigator, Vasco da Gama, and such other pioneers embarked on their journeys.

Excerpts about the architecture of Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, from www.charlescorrea.net

The pathway is ramped up (at a gentle slope of 1:20) – so as you ascend, you see the only sky ahead of you. At the end of the ramp are two stone monoliths, straight from the quarry, as primordial as Stonehenge. When you reach the highest point, you begin to see a large body of water – which seemingly connects (i.e. without any visual break) to the ocean beyond. In the centre of this water body, just below the surface of the water, is an oval shaped object – made of stainless steel and slightly convex, so that it reflects the blue sky and passing clouds above. It could be anything – the back of a turtle, a tropical island, a treasure chest. It is the mythic adventure they went in search of, 500 years ago – and a perfect metaphor for contemporary Science’s own journey.

Representing architecture in a way that people can connect to it was an intrinsic factor, observed in all projects. Not only did his practice attempt this means to reach out to the people through individual works, but his masterplans for towns and urban centres are among the biggest reasons why he is acknowledged as one of the greatest architects hailing from India.

Urbanization: Planning for Bombay, 1964

Charles Correa conceptualized a plan for developing the region across the harbour, then to be called New Bombay, to act as a satellite town for the city of Mumbai so that all functions of Mumbai could be split accordingly. The plan gained momentum, the State Government acquired the vast 22000-hectare site for execution, and set up CIDCO, the City and Industrial Development Corporation. Charles Correa’s vision for the city was one wherein people could live, work, recreate and, by extension, commute easily in. However, with the State Government not complying with the requirement of relocating their base from South Bombay to New Bombay, a significant aspect of the proposal never gained fruition, and the plan, to decongest Bombay and transform it into an urban utopia never materialised. However, Charles Correa he did not cease to raise efforts in achieving thoughtful architecture, as evident from his legacy – his practice, his buildings, and his contributions towards inducing the same ideology among others – through organisations such as Urban Design and Research Institute, Mumbai, which is dedicated towards protection of the built environment and interests of urban communities.

The work of Charles Correa, be it an individual home, or a masterplan for a city, exemplifies intricate thought and detail in planning. While the various elements throughout his designs, such as courtyards, linear planning, incorporation of nature shows us what an architect should think about, it is in knowing him, and his ideology which teaches us how an architect thinks. As students, and practising architects, it is essential to keep the latter in sight, for our focus lies neither on expressing through aesthetic forms, nor on building mere shelters, but on enhancing lives through visuals, experiences and spaces, and Charles Correa exemplified this principle in Indian practice.

-Devashree Vyas, Volume Zero.

The post Charles Correa – Deriving Architectural Lessons through His Ideology. appeared first on Volume Zero.

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Can Llimona, at Alella, Barcelona, Thoughtful Intervention for Elegant and Effective Design, by Mesura Architects

Project Details:
Name: Can Limona
Location: Alella, Barcelona
Architects: Mesura


Can Limona, the beautiful home of the Iborra-Wicksteed family has a rich history, corresponding with its quaint appearance and ornate charm. Situated in Alella, Barcelona, the original cottage of this structure is dated as far back as 1778. It was in the late eighties that Lluís Clotet and José Antonio Martínez La Peña were on a bid to find distinctive characteristics that would make their home, which included a strong architectural character and segregation of spaces with a large, common garden. Then, the majestic ‘mansion’ in Alella was discovered, as the old cottage, remodelled and enlarged in the Modernist architectural style in 1909. Duly, the discovery led to division of the floors of the structure, a residence for each tenant.


In 1992, the home was reformed again, wherein the architects ensured the original architecture of the cottage was respected, and new spaces generated were more open and versatile, through the design intervention introduced, which links the spaces with a base at a height of 2.2m.
Now, the Iborra-Wicksteed family sought residence in this structure, after twenty-five years of the previous reform. While nearly all their requirements, such as a single-storey house, a large garden and a rich architectural space, were met with at the ground floor farmhouse, the previous reform undertaken had led to the house resembling a familial space, and the clients were a couple. This gave rise to greater and varied design opportunities for transformation of spaces and usage, inclusive of the clients’ wish to incorporate a ‘huge master bedroom’.


“The project observes and studies the existing house from deep respect, understanding its three great formal singularities: the cottage house (with its large swastika walls); the modernist house (with its high ceilings and its large transverse spaces); and the intervention carried out in 1992 (which opens more common spaces, and links them with a base of 2.20m).”


While taking up the design project, it was observed that the previous reform project comprised treating the farmhouse and the modernist house differently, with regard to form as well as material. With the new design, it was intended that the whole house depict uniformity, and therefore, the disparate worlds were devised to be linked. A large and continuous longitudinal piece of furniture, therefore, interlaces the two separate structures. The furniture extends along two structural axes, and in three existing heights, separates the spaces for day and night. This is exemplary addition of a design element, wherein separation between two aspects is bridged, while separation between two other aspects is also stated. It is the transversal connector that will generate new spaces unprecedented through its permeability with large doors inspired by the stately Noucentist doors.


The materials employed in the interior design and décor majorly include stone, wood and stucco, the original materials of the modernist house. This idea is taken to the limit in the materials and planted forms: large white spaces with vertical curtains and stone floor; rooms of stucco finish (original of the modernist house and lost in the reform of 92) dark with wooden floor; A stone monolith as a kitchen island; Stone walls seen in the indoor pool, etc.

“The modern intervention (back to the modernist and rural origins of the imposing estate) accommodates the new needs of the tenant through a permeable longitudinal furniture that opens for the first time the transversality of the spaces.”

Can Llimona is a confluence of its rustic and rural charm, modernist vibes and rational designing. Shrouded in its green cover, the home offers recreation in the large garden, and spaces within which reflect elegance and generate tranquillity. 

About the Architects:
Mesura Architects, in their own words, ’strive to create an unbelievable experience, handcrafted and tailored exclusively to the misura of each distinct client that exceeds his expectations.’
It is evident, through the design of Can Llimona, that the architectural team paid immense attention, not solely to the structure and the materials involved, but even the historic fabric and the story of this structure. Through such emphasis on details, their creations have reflected harmony and grace in architecture.
The very appearance of Can Llimona is a visual treat, a credit to its designers, and the interiors have been worked accordingly to encompass all required spaces, while keeping a general sense of minimalism.

– Devashree Vyas, Volume Zero.

The post Can Llimona, Thoughtful Intervention for Elegant Design, by Mesura Architects appeared first on Volume Zero.

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