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CCTV Camera Pros has helped hundreds of customers setup IP camera streaming to a website. In this article, I will document how-to use a free service that can use the RTSP stream from an IP camera to embed live video on a web page.

This will not be a short article and it will be fairly technical. If you prefer to get assistance from one of our system designers, please request a free consultation here or you can call us at 888-849-2288. We can design simple systems for end users with little to no technical experience as well as large scale applications.

Who should read this?

This article is intended for anyone looking to live stream an IP cameras to a website using RTSP video. In the past, we have setup similar applications for tennis courts and other sports arenas, weather channels, barber shops and so on; the applications are endless. This article will allow the average end user to setup a camera live video stream to their website with an easy to use embed code, using basic html. Using the method documented in this article you will be able to stream the live video to an unlimited amount of users without the need for high end servers and other equipment.

Why Should I Use RTSP vs MJPEG?

One of the benefits of the method we are documenting in this article is it uses the RTSP stream instead of a MJPEG. MJPEGs are typically more popular because it is so much easier to create a basic html code to with a basic internet connection. The issue with a MJPEG, it is not as fluid of a video stream, the video will be much choppier compared to RTSP which is more real time. Another benefit of RTSP is it can carry audio as well as video. In short RTSP is going to give you a much nicer video with much less latency.

What will I Need to Accomplish Embedding a RTSP Stream to my Website?

You will need the following:

  1. A device that outputs an RTSP stream or a Device that supports ONVIF protocol. In this article we will be using a GeoVision GV-EFER3700 IP camera that is both RTSP and ONVIF compliant. GeoVision is a leading IP camera manufacture with great, easy to use cameras. I also highly recommend Zavio IP cameras for website embedding.
  2. Internet at the camera location. We recommend at least 2Mbps upload speed.
  3. A subscription with IPcamLive (You will need the “Standard” package or higher).
  4. Depending on the camera / device you choose you may need a CAT-5E cable with RJ45 Connectors and POE Injectors / switches for power if you choose to go with POE (Power Over Ethernet).
Getting Started

First, you need to ensure that your IP camera / devices RTSP stream is active and working. Some cameras will require you to enable the RTSP stream prior to it being available. You will typically find this in the cameras Web GUI. To test the RTSP stream you can simply use VLC player. Again, in this article we will be using a GeoVision IP camera. All GeoVision IP network cameras use the following URL for their RTSP stream.

rtsp://username:password@<IP address of the camera:8554/<CH Channel number>.sdp

ex. rtsp://admin:admin@192.168.0.10:8554/CH001.sdp

NOTE: The RTSP URL will most likely be different from manufacture to manufacture, you will need to refer to your devices user manual to ensure you are using the proper RTSP URL.

Once you have the correct RTSP call out you can test and view the video feed via VLC player. To view the RTSP stream in VLC player go to MEDIA > OPEN NETWORK STREAM

Now, type in the URL of the RTSP stream of the camera / device and press the play button. If working correctly you should see video.

Once you have the RTSP stream working properly, go to https://www.ipcamlive.com/register and register your account. IP Cam Live does give a free trail so you do not need to commit to payment until you know everything is working.

Once you are registered and logged in click the “New Camera” button.

Now, if your camera / device supports ONVIF protocol you can select the “Add new camera via ONVIF”  option. If your device does not support ONVIF select the RTSP/HTTP Stream option.NOTE: Each camera you wish to use with IP Cam Live will require you to forward the respect ports for each camera’s RTSP stream. For GeoVison we are required to forward ports are 80 (HTTP), 10000 (VSS) and 8554 (RTSP). Since you cannot forward the same port for multiple devices you will need to change the ports so they are unique on each one of your cameras.

Once the ports are forwarded, Type in your host address / ip address into the “Address” field followed by a colon, http port. The User name and password are admin by default for GeoVision cameras.

NOTE: It is recommended to use a static ip address. If you do not have a static IP address it is recommended to use a DNS services like dyn.com , noip.com etc. Some IP cameras come with a built-in DDNS service, GeoVision does offer a free DNS host-name with the purchase of their cameras.

Click the “Discover” button

You should now see (2) profiles , you will want to grab profile one as this is the main stream and higher resolution. Click the + button next to Profile 1 to select it.


10. Click the “Test” button to gain access.

Once available, click the “Add camera” button.

Select the plan you wish to use.

NOTE: to get the embed code you will need to select at least the “STANDARD” package. 

Now select the “Sharing” tab and you should see the embed code. This is the embed code that will allow you to stream the ip camera to your website.

Now you will take the above embed code and drop this into your webpage you would like the video stream to display on.

More Ways to Stream an IP Camera

If you are looking for a way to stream an IP camera to website for free you can reference our ZAVIO IP cameras and the article below. The following method uses MJPEG and will not look as nice however it is free and a great option for websites that do not require audio or Real time video.

https://www.cctvcamerapros.com/Embed-IP-Camera-in-Web-Page-s/657.htm

If you would like help designing a system or have any questions, you us an email here here.

Here are some additional streaming options

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This article will assist in designing the best outdoor wireless security camera system with DVR. You may have come across this article when searching online for “best wireless outdoor security cameras”. Or you may have contacted myself or one of the other surveillance system engineers at CCTV Camera Pros . We refer many of our customers to this article to get educated on outdoor WIFI cameras. My goal for writing this article is to explain the key concepts and challenges when designing a wireless camera system that fits your specific needs.

I want to be upfront and mention that this will not be a short article and it will be somewhat technical. If you prefer to get assistance from one of our system designers, please request a free consultation here. We can design simple systems for homeowners, as well as very large, complex wireless camera systems for commercial and government applications.

I will discuss the following system applications in this article.

  1. Point-to-Multi-Point WIFI Systems – these systems consist of surveillance cameras at more than one remote building that need to communicate to a DVR located in another building.
  2. Point-to-Point WIFI Systems – these systems typically consist of a main building where the cameras are hard wired to a DVR / NVR and there is one separate building with one or more cameras that must record to the DVR / NVR at the main building.
  3. Non-Direct Line of Sight Wireless Systems – a direct line of sight between the WIFI transmitter and receiver is always the most ideal situation, however, non-direct line of sight wireless bridges are available as a last resort option if this is not possible. These systems can transmit the video signal from a security camera through trees and sometimes through buildings.
Who should read this?

The information in this article is written for home owners, business owners, security installers, government contractors and anyone else who wants to learn how to design and/or install an video surveillance system with wireless cameras. Me and the other system designers at CCTV Camera Pros have assisted DIY and professional security installers with these types of wireless IP camera / NVR systems for many years.

These systems work great for the following applications and many others.

  • Home camera system with cameras installed on a detected garage or barn
  • Farmhouse or farm business with security cameras installed on one or more barns that have power but no network connection
  • Storage facility / storage yard with security cameras spread out all over the property (multiple buildings)
  • Apartment complex with cameras on multiple buildings communicating back to a central DVR
  • Any type of government or commercial property where you need to connect security cameras from multiple buildings back to a central recording DVR

I want to be upfront by saying that installing a long range wireless systems that connects remote cameras to a centralized DVR in another building is much more complicated than installing a simple plug and play CCTV camera system with pre-made BNC cables. However, I will do my best to break down the information in as simple of terms as possible.

One last thing. In this article, I am referring to high quality, commercial grade equipment. These systems are designed to perform at a very high level and be extremely reliable. These systems are not cheap and can not be compared to an $600 residential system from Costco or Walmart. These are commercial grade IP cameras, custom built video recorders with professional recording and analytics software, and high end wireless networking equipment. Most important, all of the products include world class technical support from the team at CCTV Camera Pros.

IP Cameras and NVRs

The wireless camera systems discussed in this article will use network IP cameras. Why? Because the video signal from IP cameras can natively be sent over a wireless network bridge with no need to convert the video signal. It is already in an IP format.

Wireless systems are available for analog and HD CCTV cameras that use BNC connectors and coax cable. However, installers must understand that the video signal from analog CCTV cameras and HD coax cameras (AHD, HD-TVI, HD-CVI) must be converted to an IP signal before being sent over a wireless network. This often requires two conversions: first CCTV to HDMI, then HDMI to IP. Last, the IP signal must be decoded back to the original analog, AHD, HD-TVI, or HD-CVI video signal before being connected to the DVR. This adds additional hardware converters to the application and complicates the system design.

IP cameras are available in all of the same styles as CCTV cameras, such as dome and bullet cameras. And just like CCTV cameras, some IP cameras have built-in IR LEDs for infrared night vision.

The DVRs that are used with network IP cameras are usually referred to as an NVR (network video recorder). This is because the video is sent over an IP network instead of a closed circuit cable system. NVRs record and store video on a hard drive, just like a DVR.

Point to Multi-Point Outdoor Wireless Camera System

The first type system I will talk about will be a point to multi-point system. This type of system typically uses an omni-directional antenna to receive the video signal from multiple buildings on a property. Here is a site diagram of an actual point to multi-point system that I recently designed for a customer.

This system was designed for a storage facility that consisted of many separate storage buildings and an outdoor storage yard for boats and vehicles. The concepts used to to design this system are applicable to any other project that consists of security cameras that need to be installed in separate buildings from where the recording DVR is stored. This is known as a point to multi-point wireless network.

Here are the details of this project.

  • The facility’s main office where the manager works and where the DVR / NVR resides is noted by the red circle on the above site survey. The red circle also notes the location where the omni-directional antenna and wireless receiver will be mounted. The office building is two stories tall which works out great because it is the highest building in the yard. This helps to make a direct line of sight connection between the omni antenna and the four transmitting antennas.
  • The DVR / NVR will be located in in the office building (where the omni-directional antenna is mounted).
  • The orange rectangles note the installation location for two cameras that will monitor the storage yard entrance and parking lot. Being that these two cameras will be installed on the exterior of the building where the NVR will be installed, these two cameras will be hard wired to the network switch in the main office. This is the same switch that the receiving antenna and NVR will be connected to.
  • There are 4 locations on the property that require two surveillance cameras each. These IP cameras (noted by the blue rectangles) will be connected to a wireless transmitter antenna, which will connect to the omni-directional antenna on the office building.
Outdoor Wireless IP Cameras

This is the detailed view of each of the outdoor wireless IP camera transmitter locations documented on the site survey. Each of the buildings with wireless cameras will be configured as follows.

  • 2 bullet outdoor IP cameras will be mounted to the exterior wall using a PVC junction box. These are full HD 1080p resolution cameras. They are also weatherproof rated and have built-in infrared night vision. The lens of these cameras provides a 90 degree field of view and can be configured to record to the DVR based on motion detection or continuous recording.
  • weatherproof NEMA enclosure with power will be mounted to the exterior wall.
  • The power supply in the NEMA box is hard wired to a 110V power source. All of the buildings for this project have power in place located near the camera installation locations. An electrician will be running conduit and the new power lines to the NEMA enclosures. The red line in the above wiring diagram illustrates the power being connected to an existing 110VAC source such as an existing power outlet or switch.
  • The NEMA box will contain a POE-SW54 4 port power over Ethernet switch and a PoE injector for the wireless transmitter. The wireless transmitter includes the required PoE injector.
  • The orange wires in the above diagram illustrate the use of CAT-5 or CAT-6 network cable. The IP cameras are wired to the PoE switch in the NEMA box.
  • 1 WIFI-NAN5 wireless transmitter will also be mounted to the wall near the IP cameras with a wall mount J-pipe. The wireless transmitter will be mounted high enough so that there is a direct line of sight to the receiving antenna at the office building. This wireless system uses 5.8Ghz frequency which avoids a lot of potential network congestion and conflict with other networks in the area.
  • The wireless transmitter is connected to the PoE injector with CAT-5 or CAT-6 network cable. The network port on the PoE injector is connected to the uplink port on the PoE switch.

This creates the transmitting side of the wireless bridge and enables the video signal from both cameras to be transmitted over one antenna. The transmitter connects to the wireless receiver at the office building where the DVR is located, which creates a “wireless bridge”.

Something important to note: these are not wireless IP cameras by themselves. By connecting the cameras to a long range wireless transmitter, a “wireless IP camera” is essentially created. One wireless transmitter can send the video signal from more than one IP cameras over the WIFI bridge when you use a network switch.

Point-to-Multi-Point Omni-Directional Wireless Camera Network

Here is a close-up and network diagram of the wireless receiving station and DVR located at the storage facility’s main office. It is configured as follows.

  • A WIFI-OMNI5 directional antenna is connected to a WIFI-MR5 outdoor wireless receiver. By connecting the WIFI-OMNI5 to the WIFI-MR5, a point-to-multi-point wireless receiver is created.
  • The WIFI-MR5 wireless receiver is mounted to the exterior of the office building using the same J-Pipe wall mount that is used for the transmitters.
  • The wireless receiver includes a POE injector. CAT-5 is used to connect the receiver to the injector. The injector is connected to the network router or switch located in the office.
  • A mini PC based NVR is used as the recorder for this system. These recorders as small, but very powerful. CCTV Camera Pros custom builds these or a per project basis. For systems that need more than a few weeks or months of recorded video storage, we can also use standard towers and rack mount cases. We build these NVRs with the software that is included with Geovision IP cameras or Zavio IP cameras.
  • The PC is built with a dual graphics card so that two monitor can be used. One monitor is used by the office manager to manage the surveillance system. The second monitor is setup as a live security camera display for the office lobby area.
  • Both Geovision and Zavio NVR software that is included with their IP cameras includes remote viewing software for desktop PCs and mobile devices (Android and iPhone). Office managers and business owners can login remotely to view their security cameras and play back recorded video.
Direct Line of Sight Long Range Outdoor WIFI

It is important to understand that for a 5.8Ghz long range outdoor WIFI to work, there must be a direct line of sight between all of the transmitting antennas and the omni-directional receiving antenna. Each transmitting antenna can be configured to only connect to the receiver. If there is a power loss and the equipment reboots, the antennas will automatically reconnect and the wireless network restored.

Point-to-Point Wireless Network

Some security camera systems may only have one separate building with security cameras, instead of many (like system for the storage yard described above). For example, some homes and farm houses may need to install a few cameras on a barn or garage.  Those barn or garage cameras need to record to the DVR at the main house. There are also many commercial applications where only two buildings needs to be connected over WIFI. A point to point wireless network is used to connect two buildings.

This point-to-point setup is very similar to the multiple building setup, except that for a point to point wireless camera system setup, there is no need for an omni-directional antenna. The system that is used in the above diagram is the WIFI-EH9500 wireless bridge for IP cameras. It includes one WIFI transmitter and one WIFI receiver. Each has a built-in directional antenna. It is designed to connect two buildings (point-to-point).

As you can see in the above example, the wireless bridge can transmit more than on IP camera to the NVR by using a network switch. This is how it works.

  • The building on the left has power but no network or Internet connection. This may be the barn or garage.
  • The IP cameras can be indoor or outdoor. All of the cameras are wired to a 4 port POE network switch using CAT-5. The uplink port of the switch is connected to the transmitting antenna using CAT-5.
  • The receiving antenna is mounted on the building where the NVR / DVR is located. The receiving antenna is wired to the network switch or router. The NVR is connected to the same switch or router.
  • Please note that although none are picture on the building with the NVR, additional security cameras could be installed on that building and hard wired to the same network switch.
  • The cameras from both buildings would record video surveillance footage on the one NVR.

Note: other smart home IP devices can also be sent over a wireless bridge. You are not limited to IP cameras.

Non-Direct Line of Sight Outdoor Wireless

So far, I have stressed the importance having an unobstructed direct line of sight between WIFI antennas. The 2 wireless systems described above use 5.8Ghz frequency antennas. 5.8Ghz is great for long distances and high bandwidth throughput. Unfortunately, 5.8Ghz WIFI is not good at traveling through objects such as trees. So, what if a direct line of sight is not possible?

900 MHz WIFI is able to penetrate some objects. However, there is a trade-off when using a 900 MHz system.

  1. The bandwidth throughput is much lower.
  2. The max WIFI distance is much lower, and decreases based on the number and density of the objects it must pass through.

For example, this 5 GHz wireless camera system can achieve up to 150 Mbps at a distance of 3 miles with a direct line of sight. But it can not transmit through obstructions. This 900 MHz non-direct line of sight wireless camera system is rated at about 1500 feet when the signal must pass through trees, and the data transfer rate drops to about 1.5 Mbps.

Custom Wireless Camera System Design Services

The team at CCTV Camera Pros designs wireless camera systems everyday for DIY and professional installers who do not have the time to learn all of the technical details. We have many customers and installation partners that are extremely proficient in running cable and mounting cameras perfectly, but they do not want to learn the IT and configuration part of wireless and IP network setups.

This works out fine because CCTV Camera Pros can pre-configure these systems for customers before we ship them. We also are dedicated to supporting these systems after they are installed. We provide technical support for our customers and our installations partner’s customers for the life of the products that we supply.

We typically design these systems using Zavio IP cameras or Geovision IP cameras because we supply them at very competitive prices and can provide a very high level of support with them. However, we can design outdoor wireless systems for all major brands of IP cameras including Axis, Vivotek, Hikvision, Dahua, Bosch, Honeywell, Samsung, and all others.

Choosing the best outdoor security camera system really depends on the requirements of that particular system. The team at CCTV Camera Pros is here to help if you need it.

If you would like help designing a system or have any questions, you send me an email here.

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This video will guide you through how to install a CCTV power supply box using pre-made Siamese security camera cables. Power supply boxes for CCTV are typically used in multi-camera installations instead of using single power adapters for each camera. The process is almost exactly the same if you prefer to use RG59 Siamese cable spools. This guide is applicable to analog CCTV cameras and HD BNC security cameras (AHD, HD-TVI HD-CVI, HD-SDI).

The cable installation is the same for 12V power supply boxes and 24V power supply boxes.

Power Distribution Box with PTC Fuses

The latest power distribution boxes use PTC auto reset fuses.

The above image shows the inside of a security camera power supply box with traditional fuses and one with PTC auto reset fuses. These are two different methods for surge protection. The advantage of PTC is that they do not burn out. The a circuit is overloaded,  the PTC turns the circuit off. When the load is fixed, the PTC fuses automatically resets. There is no burnt out fuse to replace.

Video Transcript

In this video I’ll show you how to connect a CCTV camera to a power supply box using pre-made Siamese CCTV cables. On my bench, I have a 540L4 bullet security camera. It’s a standard DC powered security camera that has a BNC connector for the video output, and a 2.1mm power plug for the power input. Here is the pre-made Siamese cable.

Something to note: when you’re running this cable just be careful and make sure you run the right ends. You can see that they are different. The camera end is going to be the one that has the female power supply connector. Just be careful when you run cables that you do them correctly. I can’t tell you how many times we’ve done it wrong and then had to pull the cable out.

The BNC video connector pushes and twists on. The 2.1mm 12V DC power plug just pushes on real easy like that. Then, your power cable would be run back to where your power supply and your DVR are located. Then obviously the video would go to your CCTV DVR. I don’t have a DVR on the bench you can just pretend that’s connected to a DVR.

On the power end, you’ll notice the power supply box doesn’t have these 2.1mm plugs. It’s expecting a positive and a negative raw wire connection that screw onto these terminals. What we do is we use a PT3 power lead, plug that into the cable, and then run this through the access holes on the top of the power supply box. Now this is a 12 Volt DC power supply box, DC-powered camera.

With DC power, polarity is important, so you need to be sure to connect the positive connection, which is the solid red to the top terminal block, and then the ground or common to the bottom, which will be the red and black wire.

These are just standard screw terminals. You just insert the wire and then tighten it down. There’s the positive and then here’s the ground. Now those are secure there.

Typically this power supply box would be mounted on a wall right near your DVR. The box powered by a standard 110-120 volt AC power wall outlet with a 3-prong power cord.

There is a power switch for the whole power supply box. It turns on all the ports. This is an 18 port / 18 channel box, so it can power up to 18 cameras.

For more information on the equipment that was used in this video, please visit this webpage. Thank you for watching.

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At CCTV Camera Pros, we regularly hear from people that need help saying “my CCTV camera is not working”. Here is a guide for CCTV troubleshooting no picture issues.

The guide is used for hard wired security cameras that use BNC connectors and coax cable. It applies to analog CCTV cameras and HD coax security cameras.

Initial Troubleshooting Questions

Here are some initial questions that you should answer when troubleshooting a security camera that has no video image.

Test Your Power Supply

Before you go through the trouble and expense of buying a test monitor or a spare CCTV cable, I recommend that you check to make sure that you do not have a power supply problem. Many CCTV systems include individual DC power transformers for each camera (like the one in the above image). If you do not have a spare, you can find security camera power supplies here.

Be sure to look at your existing power supply to confirm whether it is 12V DC or 24VAC. Most are 12V DC.

Disconnect your existing power supply from the cable and attach your spare. Plug it in and test to see if you camera now displays video.

Check Power Supply Box Fuses

If your security camera system uses a CCTV power supply box, I recommend that you check the fuses inside the box. The above image shows the inside of two CCTV power supply boxes. The one on the left uses traditional one time use fuses. The one on the right uses PTC “auto reset fuses”. Both types have an on / off switch the control power to the entire unit.

Follow these steps to troubleshoot your power supply box.

  1. Make sure that the the power switch is turned on and the LED status lights are on.
  2. If your power supply box uses traditional fuses, confirm that none of the fuses are burnt out. If one is burnt out, the LED light under that particular fuse will be off. You should replace the fuse.
  3. If your power supply box uses PTCs, instead of fuses, confirm that the LED light are on for all channels. If they are not, you may have a short circuit somewhere. Disconnect each camera one at a time to see which one is causing the problem.
  4. Confirm that the wire power connections are securely in place and have not become loose or disconnected.
Test Camera on a Different DVR Port

This is uncommon, but it is possible that one of the BNC video input ports on your DVR went bad. It is a simple thing to test, so you may as well give it a try before you spend time on the other troubleshooting steps.

Simply disconnect the BNC video connector of the troubled surveillance camera from the back of your digital video recorder and plug it into one of the ports where a working camera is plugged in. Plug the BNC connector of the camera that is working into the port of the camera that is not working. Does the working camera show video on the other BNC port? Does the troubled camera display video on the other port?

If the troubled camera works on the other port and the working camera does not work on the other port, you have a bad input port on your DVR.

Use a Test Monitor

If you have confirmed that your power supply is working properly and that the ports on your DVR are also working properly, the next step would be to determine if you have a bad cable. Using a test monitor is one way to do this.

A CCTV test monitor is extremely helpful when troubleshooting camera video issues. One of the most common problems when a camera is not displaying video is a bad cable or BNC connection. Using a test monitor, you can temporarily eliminate the power and video cable that your camera is using. Many CCTV testers, like the one above, have a 12V DC power output that can be used to supply power to your camera.

Here are the steps that I recommend if you are going to use a test monitor to troubleshoot.

  1. Disconnect the video cable from your camera and use a short RG59 BNC jumper cable to connect the video output of the camera to the BNC input of the test monitor. If your camera is already mounted and connected to a power supply, I recommend that you first only connect the camera’s video to the input of the test monitor.
  2. If you do not get a video signal, disconnect the power cable from your camera. If you have a test monitor that can supply power to your camera, connect the power output of the monitor to your camera. The MON-7HD test monitor in the above image includes a short power jumper cable used to connect your camera’s power input. You can see the cable being used above.
  3. If you are using a test monitor that does not have power output, I suggest that you use a spare individual CCTV camera power supply to temporarily power the camera.
  4. If you do not get any video signal after switching the video cable, power cable, and power supply, you most likely have a bad camera. If you have a spare camera, connect it to the test monitor to make sure that it is working properly, then connect it to the existing cable and power supply of the camera you are replacing.

*Important Note: if you are replacing your camera, make sure the replacement camera uses the same type of power supply before connecting it. If your previous camera used 24VAC and you connect a 12V DC camera to that power source, it will ruin the camera.

Use a Test Cable and Spare Power Supply

If you do not have a test monitor, I recommend that you use a spare cable for testing.  These pre-made Siamese CCTV camera cables are a great choice. They allow you to run both the video and power. Using a test cable will be feasible only if your existing cable run is not longer than 165 feet – the max length that pre-made CCTV cables are made.

Here are the troubleshooting steps that I recommend if you are going to use a spare cable.

  1. Before you go through the trouble of unwinding and running a spare cable from your camera to your DVR, I recommend that you check your existing power supply
  2. Confirm that your spare cable is long enough to reach from your camera to the DVR or monitor that it is connected to.
  3. Disconnect only the BNC video cable from your camera and attach the spare cable.
  4. Disconnect the other end of the cable from your DVR or monitor and attach the other end of the spare cable. Test to see if there is video.
  5. If there is still no video, use the power portion of the spare cable to run the power.
  6. If there is still no video, you most likely have a bad camera.
Security Camera DVR Compatibility

If you recently purchased a new DVR or a new security camera, you should confirm that the video format(s) that they support are compatible. Many of the latest DVRs and cameras are “hybrid” which means they support multiple surveillance video formats. The above image shows a hybrid analog CCTV / HD dome camera. Notice the small joystick that is attached to the video cable. The video output of the camera can be switched by holding the joystick up / down / left right for 5 seconds. This particular camera supports AHD, HD-TVI, HD-CVI, and analog CCTV (CVBS) video formats.

If you are using a 960H type DVR that only supports analog video (CVBS), you must put your camera in analog CVBS mode for it to work with your DVR.

You will most likely need to consult the owners manual of your DVR to know what video format(s) it supports. If you need help researching security camera and DVR compatibility, you can contact me at mike@cctvcamerapros.net. Please let me know the make and model of your DVR and camera.

Replacement CCTV Camera Recommendation

If you need to buy a replacement CCTV camera, I highly recommend these hybrid BNC security cameras – especially if you are using an analog 960H or D1 format CCTV DVR. These hybrid cameras support analog CCTV format and multiple HD surveillance formats. They can be used in analog mode with your existing DVR and later switched to one of the HD video modes if you upgrade to an HD surveillance DVR.

Here is a video surveillance demo of one of our best selling turret dome security cameras. The video was captured with the camera in 1080p / 2 megapixel AHD video mode.

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iDVR-PRO “H” hybrid CCTV DVRs support an advanced dual monitor and spot monitor setup. This is only available on iDVR-PRO8H and iDVR-PRO16H.

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Watch this video to see how to backup recorded video surveillance footage from iDVR-PRO hybrid CCTV DVRs to a USB drive.

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Watch this video to learn how to backup and playback recorded video surveillance footage from your DVR using Mac Software.

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Watch this video to learn how to backup and playback recorded video surveillance footage from your DVR using Windows CMS Software.

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Watch this video to see a demo of an HD PTZ camera controlled by an iDVR-PRO surveillance DVR.

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Watch this video to see what 1080p video surveillance recording looks like using AHD and HD-TVI cameras.

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