Loading...

Follow Uncle Jack's Very Vintage Vegas - Mid.. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Home prices in the U.S. have risen steadily over the last few years. In many cities, some home values are now at their highest point in history — even higher than the last housing boom.

But what determines the “market value” of a home? How do sellers determine their list prices, and how can buyers evaluate a listing based on current market conditions. Here’s a crash course in determining market value, for sellers and buyers alike.

The Definition of “Market Value”

Let’s start off with a quick definition. In a real estate context, the “market value” is the most likely price a home will sell for within a reasonable amount of time. It is based on local housing market conditions and recent sales activity.

You’ll notice this definition does not mention the original price paid by the homeowner. Unless they bought the home a month ago, the original purchase price is likely irrelevant to the current market. Likewise, the market value of a home has nothing to do with the homeowner’s current mortgage balance. Some sellers list their homes for the amount needed to pay off their mortgage loans. But that doesn’t always line up with the current market value of the property.

How to Determine Market Value

With that introduction out of the way, let’s get to the heart of the matter. How do you know the market value of a home you’re thinking about buying? Or the value of your own property, when listing it for sale?

The first thing you’d want to do is track home sales in the area. The longer you do this, the better. It gives you a good base of knowledge with regard to asking prices versus selling prices (hint: it’s the latter of these two that determines market value).

Next, you’ll want to review sales data on homes that are similar to the one you’re considering. This is what real estate agents refer to as comparable sales, or comps. The more alike the two properties are, the more accurate the pricing comparison.

Try to find as many comparable home sales as possible. This will help you support your offer amount, by showing the seller you’re using actual market data from recent sales in the area. Remember, home prices can change over time. So recent comps will give you a better idea of what’s happening now, in the current real estate market.

When you determine the market value of a home, you also need to take any unique features into account. For example, let’s say I’ve found sales data for two Mid-Century Modern homes that are 2,000 square feet. The home I’m considering is also a Mid-Century Modern with 2,000 square feet. But it has a completely renovated kitchen, a pool, and sits on a more spacious corner lot with a great view. The other houses lack these qualities. So the house I’m considering will likely sell for more than the two comps, despite the fact that the homes are similar in size and style.

Negative aspects of the house need to be taken into account as well. Ugly carpet? Busy/noisy street? No landscape? An abandoned house next door? These types of things should be corrected when possible or deducted from the market value.

Here’s a good “formula” to keep in mind when considering the market value of a home in a particular area:

Comparable sale prices + unique features – negative features = a good fair market asking price

An Easier Way: Work With a Real Estate Agent

 Online estimates, especially estimates with a “Z” are merely computer algorithms. There’s no human input. They’re ok if you merely need a “ballpark idea” of what your house is worth or want to obsessively check it every day the way you glance at the stock market daily or now and then. But those estimates aren’t enough if you’re actually going to sell or buy a house.

This is just a basic overview of market value within the context of real estate sales. There’s more work involved to properly evaluate the value of a particular property, especially when the market is changing constantly. And that’s where real estate agents come into the picture.

You can have a house with the exact same features as one across the street but they can sell for difference of 10% or more.  An agent that specializes in your neighborhood and type of home will know why. On line pricing services can’t give you that information.

Real estate agents undergo extensive training in this area. Much of their education has to do with real estate market cycles, home prices and values, and related topics. So whether you’re buying or selling a home, you could save yourself a lot of time and energy by having an agent on your side!

I offer two FREE services to help you determine the value of your home.

I can give you a free evaluation of your home with no obligation. CLICK HERE and requested information.

I can also keep you up to date on the listings, sales and closings in the Vintage Neighborhoods that I have been representing since 1990 with a daily report. CLICK HERE to receive this free report.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Throw Back Thursday. September 2007

Old downtown neighborhoods are the new places to be

By BEVERLY BRYAN

  Photo by Jim Miller (View)

Jack LeVine sells houses downtown, he said, because he’s always been a downtown kind of person. He believes in downtowns as great places to live, and he is especially bullish on downtown Las Vegas and the older homes he calls “vintage.”

LeVine himself lives and works in a 1954 custom home at the end of a cul-de-sac near Oakey Boulevard, in a neighborhood he calls the epitome of the mid-century modern style.

“A lot of people in Las Vegas don’t even know the term, let alone that they live in it,” LeVine said.

He said it’s part of his mission to change that.

On a short tour he points out the sharp lines of flat roofs with overlapping eaves and exposed beams he said typify the modernist architectural style popular between the late 1940s and early 1960s.

“They were really designed for the desert,” said LeVine.

Designed for the desert and “destined to come back as fabulous housing stock,” he added.

In the John S. Park historic neighborhood where he lives, there are pre-war ranch houses, tract houses built for the first men stationed at Nellis Air Force Base. There are “Cinderella ranches” with their delicate molding and tiki houses with swooping roofs and outcroppings that look like the prows of Polynesian ships.

The area is full of the exposed natural stone work, wide awnings and triangular windows near the ceilings that have returned to vogue.

The idea in mid-century modern’s day was to make houses light and airy with giant windows — “bringing the outdoors in and letting the indoors out,” as LeVine put it.

While showing one house, LeVine points out the hardwood floors. It’s built on a crawl space, making such a feature possible, and also has a swamp cooler and a space heater set into it. He tries to advise sellers to preserve such original elements whenever they can.

Next door, there is a Dumpster bespeaking in-progress renovations.

Whenever LeVine spots a new Dumpster, he takes a picture and puts it up on his blog. He blogs everything he finds at www.veryvintagevegas.com and brands the business VeryVintageVegas.com.

“The whole thing is done off the blog,” he said.

He started the blog about six months ago as a way to market himself, blogging about chimneys and decorative concrete blocks. He said he’s identified 37 kinds of the lacy masonry.

For the last few decades these were just old houses with outdated, tacky designs.

When LeVine’s mom moved to Las Vegas in 1975, her Realtor apologized for all the flat roofs in the neighborhoods he was showing her and she eventually settled in a new house on the edge of town.

But that perspective is starting to change — due in no small part to nostalgia.

“Some of it’s baby boomers going back to what they grew up in,” LeVine said.

The neighborhoods themselves are a subject of renewed interest. Marycrest — which contains the home Liberace built for his mother — was very run down 10 years ago, LeVine said, except for 15th Street. Restoration has been spreading block-by-block from 15th Street. He called it the anchor street.

“Without the anchor streets, I’d have never been able to get people to move back down here,” he said.

He said the people who come to him to buy houses range from “middle-class people interested in an urban lifestyle,” to people who just don’t want to drive for an hour to get to work.

That’s one of LeVine’s big selling points. He described an urban professional community and lifestyle burgeoning in the area. The blog doesn’t just promote real estate, it also features pictures from First Friday and other events downtown.

“Everyone works, hangs out and parties within three miles of here,” he said.

“This is re-gentrification at its best,” he said and asserted that Las Vegas was the last city in the country not to have the oldest part of town remade into an exciting, but pricey, place to live.

As always, first artists and bohemian types moved in and started fixing up the inexpensive properties. Now, LeVine said, the college professors and young doctors and lawyers are starting to move in.

“They’re coming here because of what these houses are, not because they’re cheap houses anymore,” he said.

At the moment, houses in the historic district start at $275,000 and go up to $600,000. In Huntridge and Charleston Park, some houses go for $200,000, but they can go up to $600,000 or more.

And they’re going to get more expensive.

“They will be too expensive for a lot of people,” he said, predicting that soon, buyers will gladly pay more for two bedrooms and one bath in an old cottage downtown than they would for four bedrooms and two baths in a new place in the suburbs.

They’ll pay, he said, for the location or the charm or to be a part of the neighborhood.

It’s not for everyone. There’s no compulsory homeowner’s association, just a voluntary neighborhood association. And the neighborhoods are a mixed-bag of old and new houses, big and little ones — which is not to every prospective buyer’s taste.

As for the sellers LeVine works with, many of them are on the same page as he is.

For instance, LeVine and his right-hand man and mortgage specialist, Steve Christmas, often work with a couple who restore vintage homes with modern fixtures.

LeVine himself settled here in 1985. He’s been in real estate for 17 years and downtown Las Vegas real estate for 10. He said he believes people come to him to sell their houses because “they know I’m dedicated to preserving the neighborhood.”

He said there are a few neighborhoods that remain undiscovered, such as the “mini-mods” — some of the first Pardee homes — along St. Louis Avenue in the shadow of the Stratosphere. He’d like to see people move in to them, too — and fix them up and then get their neighbors to fix theirs up.

Sure, the area could go out of fashion, but LeVine predicts that for the next 10 years at least it’s the old neighborhood’s turn.

Jennifer Chambless, a teacher who has lived in Las Vegas for nine years, has no interest in the new neighborhoods. The houses are small, they all look the same and she would have to drive an hour to work.

“To me, it’s just not interesting enough. I mean, I live in Las Vegas,” she said.

She just moved into a house in LeVine’s cul-de-sac and seems intent on staying.

“I like that there’s not a PetSmart on the corner,” she said.

Neither Chambless nor LeVine is concerned about the encroachment of high-rises. The big towers are coming, but no one is going to take their houses away. “Won’t happen,” said LeVine — “There would be such a fight.”

For more information on VeryVintageVegas.com, call 378-7055 or go to www.veryvintagevegas.com.

The Downtown View is a newly published version of the Review Journal’s neighborhood local weekly.

We’re very excited & happy about finally having our own View, and not just because Beverly wrote an amazing article on us.  (we think she’s a great reporter all around)  Big thanks go out to Beverly Bryan and her photographer Jim Miller for a wonderful story on us & for everything they’re doing to make Downtown a better place to live, work & play!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

From August 2007

‘Curbie Award’ – 10th & Oakey

The ‘Curbie Award’ is something Jack thought up months ago… and since we’ve had barely a minute to breathe with everything going on, we’re just getting to it now. It’s basically our version of a formal recognition of VVV neighbors who’ve done a great job of restoring, updating, cleaning and polishing their curb appeal. Even with Jack’s super key, we can’t get in to ooh & aaah over the interior of every home down here, but it’s the curb appeal that is changing the dynamic of the neighborhood’s appearance.

We love to see owners who care enough to do their little part in beautifying the area. Our first ‘winner’ are Lawrence & Joan Tourville who own the home on the South West corner of 10th & Oakey. I’ve admired their lattice work above the screened in porch & great paint job since coming to the area. Their landscaping is always manicured & the property has a ‘well loved’ feel to it. What pushed them over the winner’s line was the addition of the multi-colored wrought iron fencing around the perimeter. Here’s a picture of the great Huntridge tract home made beautiful:

We hope to see more and more people following the example of the Tourvilles, and you never know.. we might pick you next! If you’re in the process of beautifying your curb appeal, let us know & snap a few ‘before’ pictures so we can show off the work when its done.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

From November 2009

Many of the oldest existing buildings in Las Vegas are in what we refer to as “Lawyer’s Row”. The area was the prewar WWII suburbs of Las Vegas. Amusingly, it’s the area is between Fremont Street and Charleston on the East side of Las Vegas Boulevard. 6th, 7th and 8th Streets to be exact. In their day, the homes were not in Downtown Las Vegas. They were they suburbs. Las Vegas’s population at the time was less than 50,000.

Technically, the area is the “Las Vegas High School Historic District”. Most of the homes there have been converted to Professional use. Far too many of them have been torn down or have had their charm and character stripped away.  I use the area all the time to point out the distinctive difference between PRE WAR housing, and the post war housing that we now refer to as Mid Century Modern.

I bring this up because 4 side by side properties in the district – at the corner of 7th and Bonneville are going to be auctioned this Saturday morning.

These are the moments that stop the heart of serious preservationists.

I’m hoping that they don’t all sell to one buyer. They’re being offered first as a group, and if they don’t sell all at once, they’ll be offered individually.

If they sell as a group, the chances that the buyer will want to tear them down to build a McOffice or two.

Here’s pictures of the 4 houses. Three of them are pre-war, built between 1937 and 1939. The fourth one was built in 1947, but still with the pre-war aesthetic.

The weather is beautiful. Take a walk or a drive thru the tree lined streets of Downtown’s Las Vegas High School Historic District.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Throw Back Thursday –  SEPTEMBER 14, 2007
Marycrest Is One Of Las Vegas’ Most Desirable Downtown Neighborhoods

Marycrest Estates has been home to some of the most recognizable family names in Las Vegas. Liberace, Marnell, Foley, Tiburti, Greenspun and many others have made Marycrest their homes. Some still live there.


Marycrest is one of the nicest pocket neighborhoods, featuring all custom built one of a kind homes on lots ranging from 7000 to 16000 sf. 

Marycrest encompasses a square bounded by Oakey on the North, 15th Street on the east, Maryland Parkway on the west and St. Louis on the South. The “Liberace” condos on St Louis are technically called Marycrest Manor, but are generally considered part of the neighborhood. The old Gorman High Campus (now Eldorado Preparatory Academy) is also part of the neighborhood.
The homes themselves, being custom, range from a very small house on Oakey at less than 1000 sf all the way to the biggest which is almost 4600.
A quick driving tour of 15th street, 14th Street (and the cul-de-sacs which run off of 14th) as well as Bonita is a true trip back in time.

If you’d like to see what I aspire to have all of Very Vintage Vegas eventually look like, take a walk or drive thru Marycrest.

Jack LeVine has been trusted by well over a thousand clients in the last 27 years. He gets the job done – gets it done right. No other agent in Las Vegas has the depth of knowledge and experience that Jack has of the vintage neighborhoods, the mindset of buyers for 50 or 60-year-old homes, and the special things that dramatically affect the value of a vintage home.

If you want to sell (or buy) a Vintage Las Vegas era home – Call or email Jack LeVine of Very Vintage Vegas Realty – 702-378-7055 jack@unclejack.com

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It a hand drawn rendering of Paradise Palms from 1963. It was also handed out at the sales office, which I now know had a Desert Inn Address, though it was the last lot at the end of Dakota Circle. Was it in the house that’s there now? A trailer? A different building that was replaced with house?

Having stared at this map for hours over the last few weeks, it’s also created all kinds of new questions. Im trying to put together all the pieces of the puzzle. I’ve had to go back into the county records to discover that the unlabeled segment containing Aztec and Cayuga are really unit. The west half of Sombrero, Raindance and Scout Street (which doesn’t exist, and is called Raindance now) are really unit 15. Sombrero Avenue goes straight thru from east to west from La Canada to Eastern. Where’s La Canada?

Obviously, this wasn’t the final version of the map. The Unit 15 homes were built in 64 and 65. They’re mostly ranch styled mid mod’s. Someday I’ll figure out the whole puzzle. If anyone has any clues..please send them my way.

The map does help us see where the park once was. And you can see in the bottom left hand corner, that there was another whole group of homes that never materialized. That area is now apartments.

Unfortunately, the map was printed on 11×17 paper which didn’t fit in my scanner, so I did it in 2 parts. In retrospect, I should have taken it somewhere with a bigger scanner. Maybe someone with some photo shop skills will do us a favor and put it back together as one full map.

I hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the 1963 brochures and newsletters as much as I have. Now it’s time for some coverage of some other neighborhoods..and some Mystery Pict

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This Throw Back Thursday is from May, 2011 but seems fitting today with all the things going on with Circle Park lately.

BIG NEWS!

I’m 2/7th happy that the Huntridge Circle Park will be opening again – at least on weekends.

Bob Coffin, who I am supporting for the Las Vegas City Council will bringing donuts at 10am on SUNDAY MORNING May 29. Please come out to support him and the park.

Others are calling for picnic at 11 on Saturday. This isn’t officially organized yet, but as the word spreads, I’m sure it will turn into something big.

There’s plenty of comments flying on the Huntridge Circle Park facebook page. Be sure to “like” it.

Bring the dog, bring the kids, bring some food, bring a frisbee.  Let’s show them how 2/7th happy we are.

One important note is that NO ONE including and especially Gary Reese, the current City Councilman for ward 3 should get credit for this. We’re very curious that not even the President of the Huntridge Neighborhood Association was notified, none the less any of the other neighborhood presidents or activists who have begged, pleaded, scolded and demanded – for 5 long years – that the Huntridge Circle Park be re-opened. Where did we hear about it? Some one heard it at an Adrianna event.

At least we get it open on weekends, even if it’s nothing but a political ploy.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Blast from the past. May 4th, 2009

Atomic Passage

I attended the unveiling of some some of the street art that’s been incorporated into the design elements of the new Casino Center Streetscape in the Downtown Las Vegas Arts District.

The 4 artists, Aaron Sheppard, Erin Stellmon, Danielle Kelly, Adam Morey all mentioned in their comments the timeless Mid Century Modern Heritage of Las Vegas, and it’s influence on their designs for the Streetscape.

Atomic Passage is the first public art project in the history of the city of Las Vegas where artists’ concepts have been integrated into the engineering infrastructure of a Public Works Streetscape enhancement. Please join us for the dedication of this unique and original work of art that embraces and references the city of Las Vegas signage and nuclear history.

ACE Transit Shelters

Another major improvement to the downtown will be the ACE Transit System. Maps and details are here, but this month you can see the artists concepts in the Stop and Glo exhibit at the Contemporary Arts Center which is located in the Arts Factory at Main and Charleston. All the shelters and the wind screens will me Mid Century Modern in their basic design.

The Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada, in conjunction with the City of Las Vegas and Clark County, worked with local artists to add artistic enhancements to the new ACE transit shelters at seven locations in the City of Las Vegas, and one in Clark County (a total of eight locations) for the Las Vegas Resort Corridor Downtown Connector project.

Each stop consists of two shelters, one on each side of the street, so that together they serve buses traveling in both directions. Eight artists created work: Catherine Borg, Evan Dent, Stephen Hendee, Danielle Kelly, Sean Russell, Eric Pawloski, Brian Porray, and Todd Von Bastiaans. Their imagery evokes ideas about Las Vegas history and iconography and is being implemented into the wind screens of each transit shelter and will be lit.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Travelers who use short-term residential rentals as an alternative to traditional hotels enjoy cost savings and “living like a local.” Property owners, or “hosts,” enjoy extra income generated by renting out a spare bedroom they’re not using anyway. In fact, countless hosts have come to count on this added income to help pay for repairs, their mortgage, and other costs of daily living — exactly the initial purpose of short-term rentals.

When the city of Las Vegas decided to hold public hearings many agreed that a homeowner should have the right to rent a room or two, make a few dollars on the side.  It’s their property after all.  With all other income generating businesses you had to be in areas zoned for business and have licenses.  The city agreed to allow short-term rentals at the urging of many that showed up at the hearings, believing that with the homeowner living on the premises, this type of “home business” would be self-policed.  In principle, it sounds like a viable plan but like many things, it has gone off the rails.  The program is now mostly benefiting corporate property owners who are short-term renting whole houses. Many are from out of state. They sometimes have multiple properties and have found a way to now own motels located in residential areas – and do so with the blessing of the City of Las Vegas.  With Las Vegas being one of the best tourist towns in the world this is the perfect business model for those that did not want the major expense of owning a commercial motel/hotel.

NEIGHBORHOOD IMPACT

Twenty to forty times a year short-term renters move in and out of houses in a neighborhood. They have no social, emotional or financial investment in the neighborhood or the community. They either don’t know or care about the rules/laws when renting the house next-door to you for the weekend.  The short-term rentals that are only renting one or two rooms with the homeowner present don’t seem to be the problem.  It is the corporate owned houses that are renting the whole house out to people that they don’t know.  They are a business, they have to be about the profits of their business. They also have no social or emotional investment in the community since many of them are out of state companies.  Many of them don’t care or enforce the rules/laws or what effect it has on the neighbors.  We belong to many of the neighborhood Facebook groups in the Vintage Vegas areas.  There is not a weekend that goes by that someone is not posting about parking, trash, noise and party problems at a short-term rental in their area.

THE NUMBERS ARE HUGE!

Airbnb estimates the short-term rental market business global market was worth $138 billion in 2016 and expected to grow to a value of $194 billion by 2021.  In the Las Vegas valley, they reported renting 265,000 room nights in 2016 and that grew to over 500,000 room nights in 2017 Airbnb’s market share is estimated to be  55% of the short-term rental market. Using these numbers it suggests there are over 900,000 total room nights being rented by all of the short-term companies operating in Las Vegas.  It has also been reported that 10% of the Airbnb owners make 45% of the income. The bottom 50% bring in 30%.

LONG TERM RENTAL IMPACT

Homes, that could be available for rent to local residents, are instead being bought by investors and listed on short-term rental company websites (think, for example, Airbnb, VRBO, FlipKey, or HomeAway). We have seen rental rates in the Vintage Vegas areas go up 15% to 20% in the last two years. There are people that are trying to move up out of the poorer areas. Vintage Vegas used to be the step up for many of them but now they are being priced above their ability to move up.  This is not 100% caused by short-term rentals but the fact that property values are also increasing. Some of these increases are being caused by investors buying up homes for short-term rentals though.

HOME OWNERSHIP IMPACT

During the down market, many investors were buying bank-owned homes that had been boarded up and left sitting. They could not be sold to a retail buyer due to the poor condition of the homes.  The investors would repair them and flip them back on the market so that retail buyers could enter the market.  The flippers did serve a purpose.  I noticed at the beginning of 2017 multiple cash offers were coming in on the finished homes from the flippers. That caused prices to rise and shut out the owner-occupied buyers for those homes.  They were willing to pay more money for a house ready to rent than spend the time improving damaged homes.  They found they can bring in 50% more money managing short-term rentals than becoming a landlord of long-term rentals.  It became the business model with the most return for them.    With a shortage of houses for sale in the Vintage Vegas area, this made for a major impact for buyers. The driving up of prices in this fashion made it so that local first time and move up buyers could no longer afford to move into the area.  Yes, it’s good for current owners, the value of your home went up.  It did not make for bringing in good neighbors or building up our community.  Again, short-term corporate owners are not the only reason for prices increasing in the historic neighborhoods of Vintage Vegas. There is a huge lack of inventory for sale at this time but corporate buyers are taking houses off the market that could have local families living in them.

HOTEL INDUSTRY IMPACT

When 500,000 to 900,000 room nights leave the hotel industry it not only costs the industry money, it costs residents job. Think about how many housekeepers, valets and other staff are not needed when 2400+ rooms are left empty each night.  It does not just affect the hotels. There are restaurants, gift shops, theaters and hundreds of other businesses that don’t see the business from all of the people not staying in the hotels.  Those hotels are also the ones with the casinos. The casinos that are responsible for the majority of the tax money that is paid to the state. That industry helps keep our property taxes low. It’s why we have no personal income tax. The hospitality and gaming industry provides a major portion of the jobs in this state, and they support most all other industries in the State of Nevada. THERE IS NO TAX REVENUE being generated to our community from both the legal and illegal short-term rentals.

GOVERNMENT SERVICES IMPACT

Clark County made short-term rentals illegal in 1998. Long before the new craze started.  In 2017 they had over 500 complaints about short-term rentals. It is costing them millions of dollars of taxpayer money to police the illegal short-term houses.  They have had over 200 reports in 2018 by the end of March. Illegal short-term rentals remain a problem in the Las Vegas Valley.

The City of Las Vegas decided to bend to the will of the people and make laws/rules for short-term rentals. While they are collecting fee’s for licenses, but the cost to monitor these businesses and enforce the rules may be costing them more than the fee’s they are collecting. Government does not come cheap.  At this point, I can not find any local reports about how well the license holders are complying with the laws/rules.  We do know for a fact there are many illegal short-term rentals within the boundaries of Vintage Vegas.  There are currently some listed for sale that have no licenses.  We have personally seen some.  Many that we have researched are allowing street parking for their guests since many of the older homes have very little parking on property. By law, all parking must be on the property, no street parking. All short-term rentals are required to have a sign posted on the property with a 24-hour phone number of the responsible party so neighbors can contact them.  We have not been able to find a single short-term rental with this sign posted. Neighbors complain about the loud parties and the lack of support and quick response by Metro.  Metro has a lot to do and calls are prioritized. Noise complaints are low on the list of emergencies.  I know that has hard to buy into when you’re trying to sleep and there is a party of 25 people happening next door but that is the facts of using government services to police businesses in private neighborhoods.  All of this is costing the government (taxpayers) money. You can find the Las Vegas City Rules/Las here to review.   The city of Las Vegas has set up a 24 hour hotline if you are having a problem with one in your area.

SHORT TERM RENTAL HOTLINE – 702-229-3500

In order to improve communication with neighborhoods on Short Term Rental issues, the city has established a 24 hour, 7 days a week hotline.

If you need to register a complaint about a Short Term Rental, Vacation Rental or event house in your neighborhood, please call the hotline.

Las Vegas is not the only city that has problems with compliance when it applies to short-term rentals. Many studies have been done. Here is a small sampling of the compliance rates.  We have no reason to believe Las Vegas is any better or worse than those listed below. Fact is Clark County has a 100% compliance failure rate at this point. Airbnb does provide the rules/laws to all users of their system   As with everything in life it is up to the users to read and follow them.  Airbnb is not in the enforcement business.

HOW MANY SHORT-TERM RENTALS ARE IN VINTAGE VEGAS?

We did the research on two Vintage areas. This is where we know the areas best, live, and do most of our business.

When we did a business license search we found that many of the corporations own 10, 15, 20 or more homes in the city of Las Vegas that they are using for short-term rentals.  Many of them are out of state companies.  We’ve also found that 85% of short-term rental licenses are held by corporations.

On the East side of Vintage Vegas, the boundaries are West – Las Vegas Blvd, East – Eastern Ave, North – Charleston Blvd, South – Sahara Ave.  This is a map of all the licensed short-term rentals in that area.  There are 31 Licenses in this area. 26 Corporate and 5 personal. There’s OVER 300 units just on ABNB in the 89104 zip code. Half of them are in the county – so they’re inherently illegal, but that means there about 120 illegal units in the city portion of 89104.

Believe it or not – one of them – is a travel trailer in the driveway that sleeps four.

On the West side of Vintage Vegas, the boundaries are West – Valley View, East – I-15, North – US 95, South – Sahara Ave.  This is a map of all the licensed short-term rentals in that area.  There are 26 Licenses in this area. 23 Corporate and 3 personal. Because this area spans multiple zip codes, it’s hard to isolate the exact number – but it looks like there’s around 200 illegal ones.

To review the map of all short-term rentals in the City of Las Vegas CLICK HERE.

A video was recently released talking about many of the same problems and more in New Orleans.  Hopefully, the short-term rental business does not ever effect Las Vegas in the way it has affected them.

How Airbnb Is Pushing Locals Out Of New Orleans’ Neighborhoods - YouTube

WHATS THE SOLUTION?

In a perfect world, tourists would stay in the hotels that provide most of the jobs and a major portion of the taxes that keep our great state running.  Second to that would be to eliminate corporate owners and whole house short-term rentals. Let it be what was presented at the start.  The homeowner must live in the home, rent one or two rooms. And in all cases – let’s find a way for sales and room taxes to be collected. Homeowners would be able to raise the prices some since they would not have as many whole houses to compete with. One thing’s for sure, the future of short-term rentals will impact many of us in one way or another.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Throw back Thursday   From April 2008

Last week, at the official groundbreaking for Union Park, Mayor Goodman was waving a New York Times article about the project.

I’ve had the link to it since then, but didn’t realize that it was written by my friend and client Steve Friess, who’s one of the most published freelance writers working out of Las Vegas. Steve’s Blog is always full of scandal, dirt, and behind the scenes news about Las Vegas and The Strip

Steve wrote:

LAS VEGAS — As other cities look to replace their blighted downtowns with new development, Las Vegas, known for its extravagant facsimiles of European and American landmarks, has come up with an unusual approach: Build another downtown, right next to the decaying one.

On Thursday, the city will formally inaugurate a new urban core on a 61-acre, undeveloped parcel of land — a project that some experts say is unprecedented in city planning. Called Union Park, its supporters hope it will revive the historic downtown just to the east, where the region’s courthouses, government offices and oldest casinos are clustered.

More than $6 billion in mostly private money has been announced for five ambitious projects: an Alzheimer’s research center, designed by Frank Gehry; a 60-story international center for jewelry trading; a hotel by the celebrity chef Charlie Palmer; a casino-resort; thousands of residential units and square feet of office space, and, as its centerpiece, a $360 million performing arts center.

Construction on the rippled Gehry building and utility lines is under way on this former brownfield, once a chemical dumping ground for the Union Pacific Railroad.

Here’s the whole article: Up With The New: A Second Center City for Las Vegas, by Steve Friess, in the April 23 New York Times.

Mayor Oscar Goodman Deserves High Applause For His Efforts To Revitalize The Urban Core Of Las Vegas

All of us at Very Vintage Vegas believe that Union Park, as well as most of the other development in downtown will be good for all the neighborhoods surrounding downtown.

We want to congratulate Mayor Goodman pushing things along, and wish him and all the city the best for a revitalized and exciting urban core of Las Vegas

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview