Loading...

Follow Utah Technology Council Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The Utah Technology Council is proud to announce the 2018 Hall of Fame Inductees

Candidates for the Utah Technology Council’s Hall of Fame are heavily vetted by a committee of leading industry professionals. Nominees are judged based on their contributions to the innovation community through disruption, innovation and philanthropy.

The 2018 Hall of Fame Inductees are Ryan Smith, Founder and CEO of Qualtrics, Gail Miller, Philanthropist and Chairman of Larry H. Miller Group of Companies, and Jeremy Andrus, CEO of Traeger Grills.  Supported by over 1400 technology CEOs, Vice Presidents, Directors and many more, the inductees will accept their awards on October 12, 2018 at the 20th Annual Hall of Fame Gala, Utah’s premier tech event of the year.

Our featured guest for this influential event is none other than Netflix CEO Reed Hastings. Join UTC today by visiting 2018HoF.eventbrite.com or emailing info@utahtech.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Yesterday, UTC hosted Congresswoman Mia Love and FCC Chairman Ajit Pai for a round table discussion with Utah tech leaders on important issues facing our industry. There was no agenda, no pre-submission of topics, and the Chairman answered rapid fire questions on net neutrality, throttling, antitrust, privacy laws, and many more.

Congresswoman Love and Chairman Pai were clear for the reason for their visit: to build good policy, Congress needs good input from real people working in the fields they are attempting to regulate.

More than net neutrality – Utah needs an ever strengthening infrastructure to ensure that our state and our country can provide jobs and education to anyone who needs them. That issue is one at the heart of UTC’s mission to build the strongest, most inclusive, and most connected innovation community in the country.

Where would you like to see the Congresswoman and the Chairman focus? Comment below.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

You’ve built a fantastic product. But what about the workplace that goes with it?

Big players like Uber, GitHub and SheThinx somehow missed that second part (although they did muddle through their nightmares of workplace harassment). Other startups, however, haven’t always been so lucky, even if they didn’t take it to the extreme of these companies. No entrepreneur wants to have the company where employees say, “Ugh, do I have to go to work again today?”

Whenever a business owner asks me a question about hiring, I ask them this: “if the tables were turned, would you want to work here?”

Here are some things to think about:

We say one thing, do the other. The company SheThinx went through some major growing pains by having a corporate philosophy built on women empowerment — while having a CEO who verbally abused the staff and forgot to ensure essentials like sufficient maternity leave. Want to be sure your company isn’t doing the same? Take a hard look at how you and your managers interact with everyone and invest in manager training.

The work you do? It may not really be a fit. There’s not a startup founder who hasn’t had to answer phones, restock the breakroom and oversee hiring at some point. But if you’re growing and still asking people to step in and take on tasks that they’re uncomfortable with, the staff isn’t going to stick around long. We all want to do our jobs and do them well, but there are only so many hats a person can wear!

We’ll get to that … eventually. Say this happens: John, the junior developer, is finally ready to move out of mom and dad’s house, but he needs copies of his paystubs going back three months. How quickly can you respond to his request? If you’re doing everything yourself or overloading the person on the team who should respond to these requests, John may be living in his parents’ basement even longer.

Is it really a problem? Remember Uber’s highly publicized sexual harassment problems? It all started when a female employee raised a complaint with an inexperienced HR manager, and the situation progressively got worse when that employee was informed that her harasser was a valuable contributor so, um, never mind. Whether you’re fielding employee complaints and concerns or you have a team member doing it, ensure you are (or they are)  empowered to make the right decisions and that they know the law, too. If you’re small, just bring in an expert: you can outsource this pretty easily.

We have a foosball table AND lunch on Friday. Just don’t get sick. Perks like free food and a PlayStation are great, but I’m talking about basic needs. Insurance is a must, so is PTO and a retirement plan. And be sure they’re documented and competitive. I know of one workplace that kept changing its PTO policy — it went from “unlimited” to “how about two weeks?” and would change with the owner’s mood. The better route is to create written policies, ensure employees know where and how to find answers anytime, and if benefits sound expensive, shop around to find options that make them competitive and affordable. Yes, they do exist.

Payroll? Is it that time again already? Just outsource this task so you and everyone involved can stop worrying about payroll. You need to get this one right every time. There are two things you never EVER mess with: time and money. Mistakes happen, but if they’re happening on a consistent basis, that’s not cool.

You wanted something else? Every workplace is different, so what it takes to motivate your staff can wildly vary from another business down the street. Want to know what’s right for your business? Ask your employees (i.e. survey them) and then actually do something with the responses.

Your workplace doesn’t require a culture of harassment and bullying to be un-appealing to great workers. The small things matter just as much. You are asking employees to give you 40+ hours each week, so be sure you’re building an environment where they truly want to be.

About the author: Stephanie Lyon is a business development professional at Stratus.hr, an HR-outsourcing solution that solves problems just like the ones in this article (and keeps everything affordable, too), so real business owners — and their employees — can get back to work.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Original article published by Forbes can be seen here.

The information technology (IT) industry is expected to grow a whopping 6.2% this year alone, according to Statista. This will make the technology industry a $3.74 trillion business by 2018, which is part of the driving force behind how your company communicates today.

Using technology to keep your team connected just makes sense. With more remote employees taking over the workforce and the need to engage with staff located all over the world, having instant accessibility not only makes it easy to work together and collaborate, but is also an effective way to operate today.

Below, 10 members of Forbes Business Development Council share how modern technology changed the way their teams work together and communicate. Here’s what they had to say:

1. Faster Communication

Although I get to see a lot of sales technology and platforms, by far my favorite is the simple chat program. I get enough emails on a daily basis, so when a colleague has a quick question it’s much easier to receive an instant message. This has drastically reduced my inbox count, and is one step further towards “business in real time.” Not only can we communicate quicker, but we can serve our customers faster than ever. – Christopher KingmanTransUnion

2. Comfortable Collaboration

Use technology platforms that your team is comfortable with to encourage collaboration among team members. For example, we use Slack as a way to quickly communicate with multiple departments within the company. But a smaller group of millennials has a Snapchat group to congratulate team members on their personal successes. It’s a way for them to interact using technology they’re comfortable with. – Christian ValiulisAutomatic Payroll System

3. Increasing Team Morale

I worked at APCO Worldwide for almost 12 years, in five cities and on three continents, and have seen firsthand the evolution of internal communications platforms from a simple company intranet to a dynamic Workplace and single portal you can access from anywhere. It enables colleagues from Tokyo to Brussels and Dubai to Seattle to share market observations, work milestones and client successes. – Anna TunkelAPCO Worldwide

4. Remote Control

Evolving technology allows for better leadership and collaboration with remote teammembers. While individually cool, video conferencing, files sharing and editing and messaging apps continue to layer on features that make those working from afar feel more organically connected. As a leader, these advancements provide for more personalized minute-to-minute communication, equaling a more cohesive team. – Brandon FicaraToco Warranty

5. Getting Off Of Email

To further enhance our service levels and communications with both internal and external clients, we have instituted Slack and Monday.com to better manage our processes. This has helped our teams move from countless emails to more streamlined communications platforms with a lot more functionality than email for project management and communication. – Wayne ElseyElsey Enterprises

6. Decentralization And Flattening

Social media norms like news feeds, mentions, cross-level participants and informalism are built into corporate communication tools and have transformed how we get work done. Decisions have moved away from meetings, conference calls and long-threaded emails, and now get made informally on these platforms, often with ad-hoc teams. A vast proportion of our decisions now get made lower down in the organization. – Vijay SundaramZoho Corporation

7. Sales Coaching Using Real Conversations

Modern technology allows sales teams to collaborate and learn from each other far more than ever before. Companies are building call libraries using recorded sales conversations to share best practices and train/onboard new reps. Sharing successes and failures using actual calls also facilitates continuous learning through peer-to-peer coaching, which is a step up from simply role-playing. – Howard BrownRingDNA

8. More Instant Access

Modern technology has changed the way our team — and virtually every other across every other business — works together and communicates. Each person is more accessible, as he or she can be reached by phone, email or applications from Facebook to Google Hangouts to Skype. Hence, even when someone is not in the office, that person can remain connected and productive. –Adam MendlerThe Veloz Group

9. Removing Geographical Barriers

Technology allows for teams to collaborate regardless of location. This means the ability to build stronger, more diverse teams that can execute more effectively and efficiently. Utilizing technology to collaborate also breaks down the old-fashioned silos that exist within organizations and facilitates a more holistic approach to fostering and growing client relationships. – Jen TadinGallagher

10. Harvesting Best Practices

We use our own video coaching and assessment tool to capture the best thinking/practices of our sales reps. We send out regular requests (e.g. “How do you respond to this common objection?”), and reps submit a video of themselves in our system. We then determine the “best of the best,” share examples with the sales team at large and convert them into searchable and measurable learning content. – Jim NinivaggiBrainshark

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Original article by Utah Business Magazine can be found here.

Salt Lake City–Salt Lake City ranked #22 on CBRE’s sixth-annual “Scoring Tech Talent” report, a comprehensive analysis which ranks 50 U.S. and Canadian markets according to their ability to attract and grow tech talent. Salt Lake City stands out as having the seventh largest concentration of millennials among the 50 markets in the report – 21 percent compared to the U.S. average of 13.9 percent. This is one of the area’s greatest strengths; as the largest demographic cohort, millennials’ robust entry into—and maturity within—the labor pool contributes greatly to the growth of tech talent.

The report, which can be viewed in detail by market in the interactive Tech Talent Analyzer, found that the cost of tech talent is ever-increasing and has significant effects on commercial real estate.

“The highly competitive and supply-constrained market for tech talent, along with advanced communications infrastructure, has accelerated the expansion of tech talent pools into smaller markets like Salt Lake City and Provo. These previously under-supplied regions are gaining demand for tech talent from both start-ups and established companies,” said Colin Yasukochi, director of research and analysis for CBRE in the San Francisco Bay Area, and the report author. “Accordingly, demand for commercial real estate to accommodate this growing workforce is on the rise.”

Salt Lake City ranked as the eighth least expensive market in which to start a tech business, when taking into account rents and wages. When considering only U.S. markets, Salt Lake City has the fourth lowest estimated operating cost. This cost savings represents a significant advantage over markets which frequently compete against Utah for the formation and expansion of tech companies.

“The Salt Lake City region has consistently performed well on the Scoring Tech Talent report, but each year’s report highlights key areas in which the market can continue building its momentum, or make slight adjustments in weaker areas to improve its performance,” commented Lloyd Allen, managing director of CBRE’s Salt Lake City office. “A highly educated—and particularly young—labor pool, combined with one of the lowest-cost areas to perform business, has always been a strength of the market and has benefited our local economy for many years.”

Salt Lake also stood out in the report in other key areas:

  • Brigham Young University—identified as the top regional University in the report—ranks #8 overall in the amount of venture capital raised per company formed by alumnus.
  • The number of tech graduates each year far outnumbers the number of tech jobs created each year, leaving a difference—or brain drain—of 12,290; this is an area of opportunity for the region.

“This mismatch in the high number of local tech graduates to fewer tech job openings really represents more of an opportunity than anything else. It tells tech employers looking to grow that even though Salt Lake has a low unemployment rate, there’s substantial local recruiting potential for new, quality talent—something they’d have to fight for (or bring in) in high target markets like San Francisco or Seattle,” stated Joseph Farrell, a research analyst and team lead in CBRE’s Salt Lake City office.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Original article published by Bloomberg Opinion can be seen here.

Written by Tim Culpan, Bloomberg columnist covering technology

Donald Trump may well be the best thing that’s happened to Southeast Asia’s humble electronics industry in quite a while.

Relatively small, and frankly not as sexy as their North Asia cousins, makers of components and devices with factories dotted around the region may get some time in the spotlight thanks to the U.S. administration’s decision last month to levy an additional 25 percent import tax on 818 separate items from China.

Assembly of name-brand gadgets like Apple Inc.’s iPhones tends to grab an outsized share of attention from media, analysts and investors. Yet crucial parts of the electronics supply chain that also rely on low-cost manufacturing exist in Southeast Asia, such as capacitors, printed circuit boards, hard drives and bluetooth headsets.

Simon Shen, president of Taiwanese electronics conglomerate New Kinpo Group, oversees facilities in the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and the U.S., and he’s becoming quite a fan of the U.S. president. Well, his tariffs anyway.

The more the U.S. taxes Chinese electronics products, the better it is for Asian companies like his that have operations outside of China, Shen told Bloomberg News’s Cecilia Yap last week. Of course he’s talking his own book when he says that clients are very keen to hear about non-China manufacturing, especially with a Philippine IPO on the cards.

Some investors have already taken notice of the fact that Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam stand as likely beneficiaries of the U.S.-China trade war.

Thailand’s electronics components sub-index is up 14.5 percent in the past month against a 4.8 percent rise for the broader market. Eight of its 29 members have climbed by double digits over that period, led by a 20 percent advance for Delta Electronics Thailand Pcl. Stars Microelectronics Thailand Pcl has climbed 12 percent.

Perhaps investors are willing to bet that 12 straight quarters of revenue declines at Stars might be brought to an end if customers lean more on Southeast Asia. They’re also betting on Shen’s Thai unit Cal-Comp Electronics Thailand Pcl as well as Hana Microelectronics Pcl.

Viettronics Binh Hoa JSC, a Ho Chi Minh City-based assembler of electronics and components, more than doubled in the past month compared to a 4.5 percent decline in the benchmark Hanoi UPCoM index. The 28 members of Malaysia’s information technology sector averaged an 8.4 percent return compared with 4.6 percent for the market.

The Philippines is an exception, with its information technology index falling 0.5 percent versus a 5.4 percent advance in the Philippine Stock Exchange All Share Index. Perhaps a listing for the local unit of Shen’s Cal-Comp Technology will help turn that around, aided by a protracted U.S.-China tariff dispute. With Trump repeatedly upping the ante, the U.S. president is likely to remain an accidental ally.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Original Op-Ed published by the Deseret News can be read here.

Climate solutions are not only economically viable in Utah, they are already being implemented across the state in different communities, paving the way to reduced carbon emissions that will lead to better health and safety and a more livable future for Utahns.

This year’s passage of HCR007, the first climate resolution ever to pass in a red state, demonstrates an increased willingness by elected officials to represent the belief of a strong majority of Utahns that climate change is real. Indeed, a 2017 Hinckley Institute poll shows that 71 percent of Utahns believe in climate change.

The resolution, which had 31 House co-sponsors and the support of community big-wigs like Rocky Mountain Power, Rio Tinto, Garbett Homes, Ski Utah, Silicon Slopes, Utah Technology Council, Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce, Mark Miller Toyota and several ski resorts, encourages the responsible stewardship of natural resources and reduction of emissions through incentives and support of technologies and services that will enlarge the economy.

With HCR007, Utah’s state Legislature and governor have shown national leadership on climate that other red states can and should follow. But HCR007 is not the first effort in Utah to prioritize the use of free market resources to deal with climate impacts, which include our longer, hotter summers and recurrently lower snowpack and reservoir levels.

Municipalities, counties, institutions and businesses have taken the lead to address climate variability using solutions that work for their communities.

Cities like Salt Lake, Park City and Moab have passed strong resolutions committing to carbon emissions reduction targets and a transition to 100 percent renewable energy. Salt Lake County and Summit County too have passed strong regional measures.

Notably, less usual suspects have also taken important steps to increase environmental stewardship and mitigate the impacts of a changing climate using viable and forward-thinking solutions that impact air quality, water availability and energy consumption using careful planning and local sustainability offices.

Provo’s Sustainability and Natural Resources Committee, for example, promotes the health and quality of life of Provo residents by encouraging planning for a sustainable future and prudent use of natural resources. Provo’s “Vision 2030” includes a “commitment to responsible stewardship of the environment.”

South Jordan’s sustainability office prioritizes, among other things, solutions to improve the city’s energy efficiency, and the city has launched environmental stewardship projects like the South Jordan Riverway Wildlife Enhancement project to preserve South Jordan’s natural beauty. The Daybreak community is exemplary of the city’s stated mission, which includes “an unwillingness to compromise in securing a sustainable environment for future generations.”

In southern Utah, the small bedroom community of Ivins currently generates 40 percent of its electricity through solar arrays on public works and has one of the strongest water conservation plans in Washington County. Beaver County is considered Utah’s renewable energy breadbasket with abundant use of renewable energy resources to electrify Beaver City and a booming renewable energy market that recently won a $140 million federal grant to develop enhanced geothermal systems.

In northern Utah, the city of Logan passed an air quality and climate change resolution in 2016 and committed the following year to reaching 50 percent renewable energy by 2030.

Given the polling numbers on climate variability and acknowledgement of state officials with the passage of HCR007 that environmental and economic stewardship can go hand in hand, it is time for Utah to engage in more conversations about climate solutions at the local, county, state and federal levels. Elected officials need to hear from constituents that creating a livable future is a priority that can be achieved in a viable way with innovation, planning and a solutions-oriented approach.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Original article from Associations Now can be found here.

Written by Samantha Whitehorne for Associations Now

A recently launched initiative from Time’s Up hopes to boost women in the workplace by intentionally bringing more of them to events and providing more networking opportunities. The idea offers some possibilities for associations too.

I’m sure almost all of you are familiar with Time’s Up, an initiative that was launched in January by more than 300 female actresses, agents, writers, directors, producers, and entertainment executives to fight systemic sexual harassment in Hollywood and in blue-collar workplaces nationwide.

While the group’s biggest component—the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund—has been a key piece since its inception, the organization has developed a number of related groups to aid women in other industries and also is launching smaller-scale grassroots initiatives.

One of them—Time’s Up Plus One—provides food for thought about how associations connect people at their events.

The initiative, which launched at the Tribeca Film Festival in April, “aims to increase women’s power in the workplace by intentionally bringing more women to events and providing them with more opportunities to network,” according to a BizBash article published last week.

The ask behind the plan, known in Time’s Up lingo as “+1/x3,” is straightforward: Bring one woman with you to a professional event and introduce her to three other women she should know.

Desiree Gruber, founder and CEO of PR and producing agency Full Picture, said said the idea was inspired by the desire to “get more women in the room where it happens.”

“It’s making an everyday practice of bringing women into the opportunities you’re earning and giving them the exposure they need to build their skills and network,” she said. “See a woman who needs a boost that you can provide? Offer it. Have questions of your own? Ask a woman for her best advice.”

According to Gruber, the initiative is gaining traction because it’s “extremely low lift while being high impact.”

Personally, I love this idea. It’s a great (and relatively simple) way to connect women to one another and get them talking. Beyond that, I can see the same idea working well to connect people at association meetings and events.

Say, for instance, your association is looking to get more early- or mid-career professionals to attend your events. You could consider running a promotion where one exec-level attendee can invite an early-career professional to attend for free. Or you can ask your mid-career members who are already registered to bring one of their peers to an upcoming event.

Another idea: Host a networking reception around a specific audience type or industry specialty where every attendee is required to bring someone who they know would benefit from being in the room and being introduced to others in attendance.

No matter what route your association chooses, it does need to take one cue from Time’s Up Plus One: Make it easy. To encourage participation, it can’t take a lot of time or effort for those extending the invitation, and participants need to see, relatively quickly, that it has an impact.

What does your association do to encourage attendees to bring women, early-career professionals, or other groups who are typically underrepresented in your industry to your events? Please share in the comments.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview