Loading...

Follow Utah Family Magazine on Feedspot


Valid
or
Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook

In honor of Black History Month, the County Library is offering a free film screening on February 1 and a special HistoryMakers event on February 3.

The public is invited to attend a free screening of “Street Fighting Men,” with director Andrew James in attendance for a post-film Q&A, on February 1. Shot over two years in the neighborhoods of Detroit, this film is a modern American narrative: a story of hard work, faith, and manhood in a community left to fend for itself.

On February 3, in partnership with The HistoryMakers organization, the County Library will honor Salt Lake County HistoryMakers Emma E. Houston, the Honorable Shauna Graves-Robertson and Dr. Joyce M. Gray, with the new addition of Representative Sandra Hollins, in a special program.

The program will spotlight the contributions of the four honorees and feature a Q&A session. Following the presentation, attendees may enjoy light refreshments and mingle with the local HistoryMakers.

WHAT: Free screening of “Street Fighting Men”
WHEN: Thursday, February 1 at 7 pm
WHERE: Library’s Viridian Event Center (8030 S 1825 W)
WHAT: HistoryMakers Program
WHEN: Saturday, February 3 at 2 pm
WHERE: Library’s Viridian Event Center (8030 S 1825 W)
RSVP: Space is limited; RSVP is preferred.

For more information, visit slcolibrary.org/specialevents.

The post The County Library Celebrates Black History Month with Film and HistoryMakers appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When the weather is cold and the nights are long, new parents can be tempted to put extra blankets in a crib or bring their infant into bed with them.

Both practices can lead to death for children under a year old, who do not have the ability to protect their airway and prevent their own suffocation.

“We see several co-sleeping deaths or near deaths,” said Amy Bollinger, manager of the Pediatric Trauma and Injury Prevention Program at Penn State Children’s Hospital.

The Back to Sleep campaign in the 1990s, which taught parents to always place infants on their back to sleep, led to a decrease in the number of cases of death related to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Since then – and despite knowing what the recommendations are – parents still engage in unsafe practices. According to a report issued this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 3,500 infants die each year in the United States of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID), which includes deaths classified as SIDS, suffocation and unknown causes.

Since 2011, the recommendations have focused on not just back sleeping, but also on making sure the baby is sleeping alone and with nothing else in the crib.

However, the recent CDC report found more than 60 percent of parents have shared the bed with their baby; about 39 percent of mothers have used soft bedding in the baby’s sleep area; and about 22 percent have placed their babies on their side or stomach to sleep.

Dr. Erich Batra, a pediatrician at Penn State Children’s Hospital, said it’s a struggle to get the message across.

“We’re tired of reviewing these deaths and having coroners have to tell parents that they possibly contributed to their baby’s death,” he said.

Bollinger said mothers who give birth at Penn State Health are given safe sleep education before being discharged. Parents also get that information again anytime their infant is admitted to the hospital.

The challenge is the fatigue that many new parents fight. “Every parent becomes sleep deprived and desperate at one time or another,” she said. “Parents need to ask for help.”

That could mean asking a partner, family member or another trusted person to care for the baby so they can catch up on sleep.

Bollinger said there are additional local resources available to help if a mother doesn’t have someone in her network to help. She encourages mothers of infants to talk with their pediatrician or women’s health provider if they need a break.

She also encourages adults who are responsible for infants to be vigilant about their use of alcohol or prescription drugs, which can cause drowsiness and impair judgment.

Batra reminds parents that safe sleeping practices need to be followed not just by parents at bedtime, but at naptime, in the middle of the night and by grandparents or other caregivers. Putting an infant to sleep in a bed with another child or falling asleep with an infant on a recliner or sofa can also be dangerous.

“People don’t think about it, but enough babies are dying that everyone should be vigilant about every sleep,” he said. “It’s one of those things that nobody thinks is going to happen to them.”

SOURCE: Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

The post Despite Warnings, Unsafe Infant Sleep Practices Persist appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Utah Family Magazine by Utah Family Magazine - 4M ago

University of Utah professor provides 10 tips for discussing race and culture with small children.

Although children don’t come with instruction manuals there are, thankfully, an unlimited number of books and online resources to help parents navigate the ins-and-outs of raising children. Many popular resources are focused on topics such as sleep training, nap lengths, feeding, discipline and how to distinguish a blazing 2-year-old’s tantrum. But what about instructions for raising socially conscious children? How do you talk to a 5-year old about skin color, diversity or equity? Karen Tao, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Utah, can help.

Tao studies how children talk about and understand race and their other social identities. She has collaborated with elementary school teachers, students and parents in the Salt Lake School District to implement a classroom-based program focused on topics such as race and gender. She also conducts research on how parents and kids discuss these issues. Tao stresses the importance of starting conversations about diversity early, as children as young as 2-years old are beginning to articulate their ideas about difference and developing judgments on what these differences might mean.

Below are 10 of Tao’s tips for discussing race and culture with children:

  1. Examine your own understanding of race. If race wasn’t discussed in your household growing up, do some research on your own and reflect on what it brings up for you. The more you understand what race means and how it operates in our society, the better equipped you are to teach your children about it.
  1. Become comfortable with terminology and familiar with how certain concepts are used. For example, race and culture are not synonymous. It’s important to be explicit and provide children with accurate terms so they can learn how to apply them.
  1. When your child brings up a topic related to race, don’t be afraid to keep the conversation going. This lets children know it is OK to talk about what they notice. Instead of telling kids to keep quiet, refrain from using particular words or make specific observations out loud, talk to them. Ask them what they noticed and discuss it.
  1. Find opportunities to ask questions. For example, when reading a book to or with your child, ask them why someone is being treated a certain way? Is it because of their gender or skin color? Let this lead into a rich conversation.
  1. Let children take the lead. They will probably be the ones to initiate the conversation, so spend some time on what they bring up. Validate their questions or observations (“that’s such a great observation…”) and then move into a discussion. Statements and questions such as, “I’d love to hear more about that,” “that’s really interesting, what made you think of this?” or “how did that make you feel when you saw that happen?” are helpful ways to deepen your conversations.
  1. Involve your children in activities to help them learn about their own cultural, racial and ethnic backgrounds. This will help them develop a greater sense of who they are, which will then enable them to create more positive interactions across various racial-ethnic groups.
  1. Help your children to think critically. It is common for children to focus on concrete and visible features to describe others, such as skin color or assumed gender. Challenge them to think about other important personal dimensions. For example, if your child refers to a friend as “my brown-skinned friend,” ask her to tell you more about her friend (e.g., “What does your friend like to do?” and “What kinds of things do you play together?”).
  1. Recognize your child’s limits and know when to stop. Depending on age and attention spans, conversations with children about these topics may only last a minute or two.
  1. Initiate a book club or conversation group with other parents who are interested in learning how to talk with their children about race. Sharing challenges you encounter will normalize the difficulty in talking about socially charged topics.
  1. It’s OK to make mistakes. Many of us did not grow up discussing racial issues, so there is quite a steep learning curve. You will stumble over your words and may share wrong information. Let your child know you are still figuring out how to talk about these important topics too and are so happy you get to have these conversations together.

Below are links to more resources on how to talk to your children about race.

26 Children’s Books to Support Conversations on Race, Racism and Resistance

20 Empowering Children’s Books that Celebrate Diversity and Social Justice

Children’s Book That Tackle Race and Ethnicity

Guide for Selecting Anti-Bias Children’s Books

White Children’s Bias Towards other White Children is Not Due to Prejudice Against Black Children

We Stories

How White Parents are Addressing Racism – by Reading to their Children

SOURCE: University of Utah

The post How to Talk to Children About Race appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Want to help your teenagers become successful adults? Get them involved in civic activities – voting, volunteering and activism.

Although parents providing this bit of advice to teens will likely be met with groans and eye rolling, research does back it up.

In a study published in the current issue of the journal Child Development, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center found that teens who were engaged in civic activities were more likely than non-engaged peers to attain higher income and education levels as adults.

“We know from past research that taking part in civic activities can help people feel more connected to others and help build stronger communities, but we wanted to know if civic engagement in adolescence could enhance people’s health, education level and income as they become adults,” said Parissa J. Ballard, Ph.D., assistant professor of family and community medicine at Wake Forest Baptist and principal investigator of the study.

The research team found that volunteering and voting also were favorably associated with subsequent mental health and health behaviors, such as a fewer symptoms of depression and lower risk for negative health behaviors including substance use.

Ballard and her team used a nationally representative sample of 9,471 adolescents and young adults from an ongoing study called the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Participants were between the ages of 18 to 27 when civic engagement was measured, and then six years later outcomes – health, education and income – were measured.

The research team used propensity score matching, a statistically rigorous methodology to examine how civic engagement related to later outcomes regardless of participants’ background characteristics, including levels of health and parental education. For example, adolescents who volunteered were matched to adolescents from similar backgrounds who did not volunteer to compare their health, education and income as adults.

“Relative to other common approaches used in this kind of research, this method lets us have greater confidence that civic engagement really is affecting later life health and education,” Ballard said.

The research team found that volunteering and voting also were favorably associated with subsequent mental health and health behaviors, such as a fewer symptoms of depression and lower risk for negative health behaviors including substance use.

For teens who were involved in activism the findings were more complex. Although they too had a much greater chance of obtaining a higher level of education and personal income, they also were involved in more risky behaviors six years later, Ballard said.

“In this study, we couldn’t determine why that was the case, but I think activism can be frustrating for teens and young adults because they are at a stage in life where they are more idealistic and impatient with the slow pace of social change,” Ballard said. “I would encourage parents to help their children remain passionate about their cause but also learn to manage expectations as to short- and long-term goals.”

This research was supported in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under a cooperative agreement (UA6MC27378) for the Adolescent and Young Adult Health Research Network.

SOURCE: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

The post Getting Teens Involved Now Gives Them An Edge Later In Life appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Offered in partnership with The HistoryMakers organization, the County Library will honor Salt Lake County HistoryMakers Emma E. Houston, the Honorable Shauna Graves-Robertson and Dr. Joyce M. Gray in a special program on February 3.

The program will spotlight the contributions of the three honorees and feature a Q&A session. Following the presentation, attendees may enjoy light refreshments and mingle with the local HistoryMakers. Space is limited. RSVP is preferred.

About HistoryMakers

Since 1999, The HistoryMakers organization has been recording African American oral histories to refashion a more inclusive record of American history and to educate and enlighten millions worldwide.

WHAT: HistoryMakers Program
WHEN: Saturday, February 3, 2018, 2-3:30 pm
WHERE: Library’s Viridian Event Center (8030 S. 1825 West)

For more information, visit slcolibrary.org/specialevents.

The post The County Library Honors Salt Lake County ‘HistoryMakers’ in Special Program appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Repertory Dance Theatre is bringing the talented artists from Gina Bachauer International Piano Foundation to Ring Around the Rose for the first time as part of the series’ 20th anniversary season. Gina Bachauer will perform on Saturday, February 10 at 11 am in the stunning Jeanne Wagner Theatre to celebrate the history of great American piano music.

Soprano, Laurel Elizabeth Hofer will join pianist, Janae Williams to introduce the audience to brilliant, virtuoso piano music. The artists will focus on music inspired by American songs and written by American composers including Aaron Copland, Louis Gottschalk and George Gershwin. The audience will be invited to sing along throughout the show to favorites like “Camptown Races” and more.

Pianist Janae Codner Williams began taking piano lessons at the age of four and made her symphony debut at the age of seven, performing with the Utah Valley Symphony under the direction of Ralph Laycock. She has performed with many other orchestras in Russia, Illinois, Florida, California and Utah. Janae also performed as a soloist with the Utah Symphony’s annual Salute to Youth concert at the ages of eight, ten and thirteen. Janae graduated with a Master’s of Music in April 2017 from Brigham Young University and is now pursuing a doctorate at the University of Utah studying under the direction of Dr. Ning Lu.

Like all Ring Around the Rose performances, the audience will have a chance to participate in the action with an invitation to sing-along to well-known tunes. This wiggle-friendly show will delight young audiences as well as educate them on the history of American piano music.

Laurel Elizabeth Hofer is a graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Music. She has performed in many Opera and Musical Theatre productions in Utah and Ohio.  She is presently head of the Vocal Department at The Gifted Music School in Salt Lake City.

The mission of the Gina Bachauer International Piano Foundation is to further the pianistic art, foster excellence in performance and teaching, develop opportunities for pianists beyond the scope of the organization and offer leadership in developing a musically-educated citizenry. While they are well-known for their international piano competitions, they perform around Utah in the schools as part of their “Music-In-Our-Schools” program.

The Music-In-Our-Schools program is designed to introduce students to the finest classical piano literature, develop young piano audiences, and instill a life-long desire to seek beautiful music, as well as teach concert manners and more.

Like all Ring Around the Rose performances, the audience will have a chance to participate in the action with an invitation to sing-along to well-known tunes. This wiggle-friendly show will delight young audiences as well as educate them on the history of American piano music.

Who: GINA BACHAUER INTERNATIONAL PIANO FOUNDATION
What: RDT’s Ring Around the Rose
When: Saturday, February 10 at 11 am
Where: Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center (138 West 300 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84101)
How: $5 tickets available through ArtTix (www.arttix.org, 801-534-1000, or at the box office)

The post Gina Bachauer Hits the Ring Around the Rose Stage with a Tribute to American Music appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Repertory Dance Theatre celebrates 52 years of revolutionary modern dance with their annual fundraiser and performance, ‘Regalia,’ on February 24, 2018 at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center.

Returning for the third year, ‘Regalia’ features choreographers creating new work in just a matter of hours. This year, RDT is thrilled to have choreographers from across the country who submitted work to be considered for the honor. Marty Buhler, Bryn Cohn, Laja Field & Martin Durov (‘Lajamartin’), and Molly Heller will compete for votes from audience members to be awarded a chance to create a new commission for RDT’s 2018-2019 season.

There are two pricing options for ‘Regalia.’ VIP ticket holders ($75) will be invited to enjoy an exclusive pre-show cocktail party with heavy hors d’oeuvres and cocktails from Utah Food Services. Performance ticket holders ($50) will arrive at 7 pm to peruse auction items, enjoy a drink at the bar, and wander the studios to watch the final touches put on the choreography.

All audience members will enter the theatre at 8 pm to see each piece performed. Afterward, audience members will vote using “bidding paddles” in the theatre to raise money for a commission to be completed next season as well as for RDT’s celebrated free school outreach that reaches over 25,000 students and teachers in Utah every year.

Afterward, all are invited on to the Jeanne Wagner stage to enjoy delectable desserts from Utah Food Services and dance the night away to the sounds of the Joe Muscolino Band.

WHO: Repertory Dance Theatre
WHAT: REGALIA
WHEN: February 24, 2018 
WHERE: Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center (138 West 300 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84101)
HOW: Tickets are $50-$75 available through ArtTix

The post RDT’s ‘Regalia’ Returns To Raise Funds for Arts-in-Education appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Celebrate the value of the library and learning by bringing your children to the County Library on Saturday, February 3.

Children who visit any County Library branch during normal business hours that day will receive a high five, sticker and storytime — plus an added appreciation for reading and learning.

Many children who are read to and read with as young children have an easier time learning in school and throughout life. Early Learning Librarian Anna Zanarini said the County Library can play a key role in that development.

“Bringing children to the library early in life helps develop lifelong learning routines,” Zanarini said. “They establish the library as a community place where they can go to find books, to learn and to have fun.”

More-specific information on the many branch-specific activities can be found online in Utah Family’s No-Bored-Kids Calendar. These events are free and open to the public.

When: Saturday, Feb. 3 from 10 am-6 pm
Where: All County Library Locations

The post Take Your Child to the Library Day at the County Library Promotes Lifelong Learning appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By royal decree, King Marcus III invites you to Salt Lake’s Mardi Gras Gala 2018 at the County Library — an event that sold out last year.

Wear a mask and come dressed to the nines for this Cajun-flavored brouhaha, complete with traditional Nawlins’ eats, beats, beads and contests.

“The whole experience is just really a feast for the senses,” Library Event Coordinator David Woodruff said. “The food is awesome, we’re going to have a live band, and we’ll crown the kind and queen of Mardi Gras. You really can’t describe it.”

Salt Lake’s Mardi Gras Gala 2018 is free and open to all adults (aged 18 or older). Tickets to this free event are required, and are available atslcolibrary.org/mardigras.

For more information on this and other free County Library activities, visitslcolibrary.org/specialevents.

When: Friday, Feb. 2 from 7-10 pm
Where: Library’s Viridian Event Center, 8030 South 1825 West

The post County Library to Host Cajun-Flavored Brouhaha at Mardi Gras appeared first on Utah Family Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Utah Family Magazine by Utah Family Magazine - 4M ago
Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview