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The Kratky Method of Hydroponics has been hailed by many as revolutionary, and yet it is a marvel in its simplicity.  This method of hydroponics was developed by B.A. Kratky while at the University of Hawaii.  His method is contradictory to traditional hydroponics theory on several levels.  First, there is no active water movement, the water remains stagnant. Second, it does not utilize aeration pumps and stones. Third, it does not require the exchange of nutrient solution over time.  It is perhaps the simplest of hydroponics systems.

What is it good for?

The Kratky method is best suited for leafy greens such as lettuce.  To our knowledge It has yet to be proven to work with larger fruiting plants.

It is hard to imagine, but it actually works!

How does it work?

The process starts with the plant’s roots submerged in the nutrient solution within a bucket or other container. Here we start with seedling plants.

The miracle of this system is that as the plant begins to grow, it absorbs more and more of the water, and the roots above the lowering water line become aerial roots capable of absorbing oxygen from the airspace between the lid of the bucket and the water line.

Not only is there no need for pumps or airstone, there is also no need for pH adjustments, no need to top off the nutrient mixture.

By the time the water has been almost completely absorbed the plant is grown to full size and is ready to be harvested.

Conclusion

This method contradicts most of what we’ve learned over the years, but it works and we’ll be implementing it here soon! Stay tuned for updates.

Continue your pursuit of hydroponics knowledge

Check out our hydroponics systems and hydroponics system video reviews articles to take your hydroponics pursuit to the next level.

Thanks always for visiting and follow us on social media for more great hydroponics updates!

The post The Kratky Method of Hydroponics appeared first on uPONICs, Hydroponics and Aquaponics Information.

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Quotes from Hydroponic and Aquaponic Experts

To be the best hydroponic or aquaponic growers possible, it is important to listen to the people who have been there and done that.  We all have missteps along the way, but with the proper tools and advice, anyone can be a successful soilless gardener.

Here we offer you a page of quotes from a few of the hydroponic and aquaponic experts. Some are pioneers, educators, and visionaries, and while others utilize their growing knowledge by “getting their hands dirty” daily.

“Achieve the greatest volume and highest quality of produce possible, while reducing operating costs, and maximizing your profitability by growing smart.”

Tom Blount, Expert at US Hydroponic Association

“It’s a MacGyver’ hobby. You can buy prepacked packages, or you can get pieces and parts and tinker with them.”

Dan Lubkeman, President of the Hydroponics Society of America 

“Temperature in your home generally is favorable to most growing. However, if you have a larger hydroponic unit in a spare room or basement where you can control the temperature apart from the rest of the home, you can achieve more optimum ranges for your plants. Night temperatures should be about 5° to 10° F. less than day temperatures. For tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers a good temperature range is 65° F at night and 75° F during the day. For cool-season crops like lettuce the night temperature should be about 55° F and the day 60° to 65° F. Herbs will tolerate a wider range of temperatures than the above crops. During the summer with hot outside daytime temperatures your crops will benefit from air conditioning to keep temperatures within these ranges. However, during the summer you could also move your hydroponic system onto the patio or balcony or even in the backyard and take advantage of the natural sunlight and temperatures.”

Howard Resh, Author of Hobby Hydroponics   howardresh.com/

“Also, the plants can be grown close together, which means it’s easy to grow salad makings in your kitchen.”

Neil Watson, Spokesperson for General Hydroponics

“I think it could allow us to travel farther and be more comfortable, whether that’s underwater or above the atmosphere.”

Erik Biksa, Editor and co-founder of Grozine

“It used to be hydroponics was just a nod, nod, wink, wink, word for pot growing. Now it is accepted by consumers as a preferred method of growing high-quality food.”

Michael R. Christian, Founder of American Hydroponics

“You don’t need a tractor or a plow or other big implements, and you don’t need to inherit a farm. You can get in very quickly, and can maintain another job.”

Bob Hochmuth, Director of the Suwannee Valley Agricultural Extension Center at U. of Florida

“Maintain your humidity level between 40 and 60 percent. High humidity will encourage molds while low humidity can attract pests. Cover your reservoir to prevent algae growth. Any wet surface exposed to light will encourage molds so maintain a light-tight environment anywhere your nutrient solution flows. Air temperature should never go above 90 degrees. Keep it below 80 to promote and encourage growth.”

Danny Danko, Senior Cultivation Editor of High Times magazine

“Recirculating aquaponic and hydroponic farms are sustainable options that can have controlled inputs and known outputs, like other existing organic farms. In fact, many recirculating farms not only meet, but can exceed current organic standards. They can be eco-efficient and have versatile designs, and reduced use of water, fossil fuels, fertilizers and electricity.”

Marianne Cufone, Executive Director of the Recirculating Farms Coalition

“Most nutrient problems are actually pH problems. For soilless mixtures, use a pH between 6.0 – 6.5. For hydroponic mediums, such as Rockwool or clay pellets, keep it between 5.8 – 6. Warmer roots respire faster, which releases more energy and grows larger root mass and plant size. Keep root temps between 66-70°F.”

Nico Escondido, Cultivation Editor at High Times magazine

“I also value the positive influence of hydroponics, urban farming, and controlled-environment agriculture in solving some of the big problems we face. This story should be shared and celebrated with the same romance as the biodynamic farm with pristine soil and coastal climate conditions.”

Erik Oberholtzer, Co-founder of local- and sustainable-centric restaurant group Tender Greens

“Hydroponics is the most efficient method of feeding plants through the introduction of pure nutrient salts into the water. When you cut soil out of the equation, you bypass soil-born diseases and the plant’s roots no longer have to search through the soil for nutrients. I like to say you can grow twice as much in half the space. There’s also zero run-off, which means fertilizers don’t wind up leaching through the soil and harming natural water sheds. And everyday garden pests are less likely to take up residence and require the application of costly and sometimes toxic pesticides. Typically, you see a two-to-one ratio of growth over conventional soil.”

Keith Roberto, Author of How-to Hydroponics

“In hydroponics, the plant roots we constantly provided with water, oxygen and nutrients–no searching for available nutrients or waiting for the next rain. The challenge for the grower is to keep up with the plants’ needs and to avoid damaging plants with excesses or deficiencies of minerals, extremes in pH and temperature, or a lack of oxygen. A few simple tools and techniques can make the difference between success and failure.”

Lawrence Brooke, Founder of General Hydroponics

“There are a tremendous number of growing systems you can buy that would be scalable — anywhere from a household- or restaurant-sized operation, to something that could feed a community of people (just two floors on top of an apartment house would be enough to supply around 40 percent of the green vegetables the residents would consumer over a year).”

Dickson Despommier, Author of The Vertical Farm and host of the Urban Agriculture podcast 

“We can grow produce right where is going to be purchased and right where it’s going to be eaten”

Josh Hottenstein, Arizona Director for the Cleantech Open 

“In the next 40 years, there’s going to be a 70 percent increase in demand for food worldwide. There’s not a lot of models for how sustainability can capture that increased demand and those increased pressures.”

Jason Reed, Founder of Seedstock

“I think the future of aquaponics is small, decentralized growing systems that will be set up in cities and towns throughout the world. I see that there will be large aquaponics facilities, like there is for say hydroponic tomatoes, but the major use will be small systems in urban areas.”

Dr. Wilson Lennard, Australian scientist and ‎Director at Aquaponic Solutions

“Just one square metre gives you more yield than in one acre of land. That’s an ideal system for a developing country. [It] will produce up to 300 cucumbers a year.… A system like that can supply a family with fresh vegetables and with vitamins and also with protein”

Dr. Nick Savidov, Aquaponics researcher and leader at the Aquaculture Centre of Excellence at Lethbridge College 

“[Plants] grow extremely rapidly because they have all the nutrients and water they need. It’s much better than field production because in the soil, you have insects and not enough water or nutrients,”

Dr. James Rakocy, “Father of Aquaponics,” and former professor at the University of the Virgin Islands

“[Plants] grow extremely rapidly because they have all the nutrients and water they need. It’s much better than field production because in the soil, you have insects and not enough water or nutrients,”

Dr. James Rakocy, “Father of Aquaponics,” and former professor at the University of the Virgin Islands

“Recirculating aquaponic and hydroponic farms are sustainable options that can have controlled inputs and known outputs, like other existing organic farms. In fact, many recirculating farms not only meet, but can exceed current organic standards. They can be eco-efficient and have versatile designs, and reduced use of water, fossil fuels, fertilizers and electricity.”

Marianne Cufone, Executive Director of the Recirculating Farms Coalition

“You can convert 1.2kg of fish food into one kilo of fish. The lost 0.2kg is dissolved into nitrogenous waste. For every kilo of fish you rear, you grow about 10kg of plants and vegetables. All of a sudden, you’re producing a lot from very little.”  “We are potentially taking a natural system that’s evolved over millions of years and we are just copying it, rather than exploiting it. While it can be seen as complex, it is incredibly simple.”

Charlie Price, from the social enterprise Aquaponics UK

“The technology that is accelerating this (soil-less) trend is the proliferation of extremely effective and increasingly energy-efficient grow lights,” said Sylvia Bernstein, owner of The Aquaponic Source in Longmont, Colorado. With today’s grow lights, any space can become a year-round garden. I’ve worked with people who are growing in basements, garages, laundry rooms, warehouses and classrooms,”

Sylvia Bernstein, Author of Aquaponic Gardening 

“Well there’s various levels that you can start at aquaponics. There are people – the do-it-yourselfers and they want to be able to use some kind of recycled material if possible and then there are those who would rather buy something that is nice and new to work with and build a quite secure food production system. So they’re the two ends of the scale. Then there’s all kinds of alternatives in between.”

Murray Hallam, Founder/Director of Practical Aquaponics Australia 

“Only by adopting a mentality that focuses on maximizing conservation and ethical food production techniques, can we establish a future of production that works. We have to intensify production. But it needs intensifying the right way, not just relying on finite resources, because in the long run it won’t work. It’s a false economy, we’ll run out.”

Antonio Paladino, Founder of Bioaqua, biggest integrated aquaponic trout farm in Europe

“The flavor’s more intense for the amount of vegetable you’re getting, so it’s like a little, compact, high-nutrient flavor burst. Microgreens by definition are a high-turnover crop, and they don’t take up a lot of space, which is perfect for urban ag.”

Bowen DornBrook, Founder of Central Greens, a 15,000-square-foot urban aquaponic farm in WI

“This is why we think aquaponics and vertical farming is the right combination. You are making the most effective use of space, while looking at food production holistically.”

Kate Hofman, CEO of GrowUp, London’s first aquaponics farm

“When human designs are rooted in nature and diversity, education and regeneration, abundance and stability emerge.”

Max Meyers, Permaculture and aquaponics educator and founder of the Mendocino Ecological Learning Center 

The post Quotes From The Experts appeared first on uPONICs, Hydroponics and Aquaponics Information.

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IKEA’s Space10 Releases Open Source Design Plans for “The Growroom” Vertical Garden

Swedish furniture maker IKEA has launched open-source design plans for an innovation vertical gardening structure. The goal of the project was to create a large, simple, spherical structure for locally-grown food. At the same time, they hoped this project would spur dialog on matters involving green living, green construction, local agriculture, and sustainability in general.

IKEA’s external innovation hub and design partner, Space10, launched “The Growroom” vertical garden in October 2016. Soon after, interested people from around the globe contacted the company to find out how they could get their hands on a model of their own.

Alas, IKEA decided that shipping the components to build this massive grow space did not align with the organization’s intent to promote sustainable and local agriculture. However, IKEA – and their Danish partners at Space10 – have been gracious enough to release The Growroom design plans as open source documents for all to access freely.

“From Taipei to Helsinki and from Rio de Janeiro to San Francisco, the original version of The Growroom sparked interest and people requested to either buy or exhibit The Growroom,” commented Space10. “That is why we now release The Growroom as open-source design and encourage people to build their own locally as a way to bring new opportunities to life.”

They further described The Growroom as “a future-living lab on a mission to design a better and more sustainable way of living” and “a spherical garden [that] empowers people to grow their own food much more locally in a beautiful and sustainable way.”

Designers focused on creating a model that was could be assembled as easily and intuitively as possible. The Growroom is constructed using just 17 sheets of plywood, a CNC milling machine, and a hammer. Wood is the only material used to build the structure.

Space10 designed IKEA’s The Growroom to be used as a neighborhood garden. The 2.8 x 2.5-meter enclosure requires little ground space, and allows gardeners to grow their crops vertically. Overlapping tiers ensure water and light reaches each level of the garden space.

“It is designed to support our everyday sense of well-being in the cities by creating a small oasis or ‘pause’-architecture in our high-paced societal scenery, and enables people to connect with nature as we smell and taste the abundance of herbs and plants. The pavilion, built as a sphere, can stand freely in any context and points in a direction of expanding contemporary and shared architecture.”

You can download the open source design plans here: https://github.com/space10-community/the-growroom.

We praise Space10 and IKEA for making these plans free to use, and for making the world a little bit greener!

image by: Niklas Vindelev

The post Ikea Growroom for Aquaponics? appeared first on uPONICs, Hydroponics and Aquaponics Information.

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Aquaponics in the Classroom: Will Schools Make Aquaponics Mandatory Curriculum?

There has been a trend across the country in recent years. A simple Google News search for “aquaponics” highlights school system after school system implementing aquaponics programs in the classroom.

At Keystone Oaks High School in Pittsburg, environmental science teacher Maddie Key has transformed a neglected storage room into an aquaponics learning space. In it, the students are raising small mosquitofish in tanks. Herbs – such as basil, oregano, and chives – are fertilized with the waste matter of these fish.  Exciting stuff? YES, says principle Keith Hartbauer.

“We’re ecstatic about what Maddie has done. She’s made learning relevant for a lot of kids who would have shut down otherwise. This group of kids seems to do really well with these types of activities.”

In Georgia, River Eves Elementary School has recently opened an aquaponics lab. This initiative broadens its experiential STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) lessons for all grades at the school.

“After a lengthy search for the right addition to our STEM curriculum, we’re excited to dedicate a classroom for aquaponics with turtles, bluegill, bass, and plants for experiments and study,” says Neil Pinnock, River Eves Elementary School Principal. “It’s equally exciting to kindergarteners through fifth graders and teachers to develop eco-awareness and additional problem-solving skills through aquaponics.”

So with teachers across the country finding value in this type of hand-on learning, how do we implement this educational teaching method across the country? If aquaponics in the classroom keeps students – with otherwise short attention spans – engaged and interested, why not replicated this on a larger scale?

Is aquaponics a solution to our nation’s educational shortcomings? Should it be mandatory in ALL school systems? Or will there simply be a select few school systems choosing to implementing aquaponics in the classroom?  We hope more educators look to aquaponics for hands-on lessons which teach conservation and symbiotic ecosystem relationships.

The post Aquaponics In The Classroom? appeared first on uPONICs, Hydroponics and Aquaponics Information.

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Panasonic’s New Venture into Vertical Farming Raises Eyebrows

When we think of Panasonic, products like televisions and microwaves come to mind. However, this forward-think Japanese company has recently ventured into the agricultural space. In 2014, Panasonic set up a farm in Singapore with the intend to grow leafy green vegetables.  Instead of growing crops in fields, they decided to use vertical farming techniques within a warehouse space. Their plan was to eventually sell the freshly-grown crops to local restaurants and grocery stores. Quite a departure from their normal electronics business!

Singapore imports more than 90% of food. Panasonic set out looking for innovative ways to increase the amount of produce grown on the island nation. Since Singapore suffers from a lack of arable land, indoor farming seemed to be a viable solution.

So were they successful? During the early days, the 2,670 sq. ft. warehouse farm was able to produce 3.6 tons of crops. Since then, Panasonic has increased square footage and crop yield considerably.  With 20 workers, the farm is now able to produce 81 tons of greens annually. While this is a considerable yield by any measure, it amounts to just .015% of Singapore’s total cultivated crops. The goal is to eventually scale the operation to produce 5% of domestic crops annually.

Panasonic’s warehouse now grows 40 different crops (Swiss chard, romaine lettuce, mini red radishes, among others). By next month, the farm intends to begin cultivating 30 additional varieties. The farm’s brand Veggie Life has been selling greens to grocery stores ($5 for a 3-ounce bowl of salad). As of December 2016, greens are now sold directly to local restaurants.

So you may be wondering – why is Panasonic doing this? Farming seems so unrelated to their other electronics businesses. The answer is, not really. Panasonic’s Factory Solutions division sees value in this indoor farming project, and a potentially profitable extension of their expertise with engineering and manufacturing.

Alfred Tham – of Panasonic’s Agriculture Business Division – stated: “We foresee this business to be a potential growth portfolio, given the global shortage of arable land, increasing populations, climate change, and demand for high quality and stable food supply.” We think he is on the right track.

So how does Panasonic grow their crops? By using vertical farming techniques, indoor agriculture has numerous advantage over conventional (horizontal) farm. Vertical farming enables higher yield and overall efficiencies, and is the most sensible manner in which to farm in contained spaces like warehouses (or even inside homes). Although most of today’s vertical farms use hydroponics (no soil), Panasonic uses soil and nutrient-rich water to feed their plants.  But what is most crucial to indoor farming success is the light. Since warehouses receive little to no sunlight, LED lighting is crucial to the plants survival.

All plants at Panasonic’s farm are kept under LED grow lights. These LED lights operate within the warehouse 24-7 and illuminate at specific frequencies to encourage rapid growth. Similar to hydroponic growing, conditions at the warehouse are tightly controlled by the farm workers, ensuring temperatures, oxygen and pH levels are kept at optimal levels.  Indoor agriculture (and hydroponics) is entirely dependent on the conditions provided by the grower, whereas outdoor growing is much more dependent on the whims of Mother Nature. Thus, strict monitoring – or automated technology – must be in place to have a successful crop. If the right indoor conditions are providing for, agriculture is at its most efficient state with vertical agriculture.

Panasonic recognizes this.  They foresee societal benefits – as well as profitable opportunities – with vertical farming. If their experiment in Singapore is successful, this could have widespread implications.  Wouldn’t it be great to see vertical farms spring up all over the world? We feel that fresh, locally-grown produce should be accessible to everyone in these modern times. Vertical farming is one step in the right direction.

Many believe this type of farming is the future of agriculture. We wish the best of luck to Panasonic!

(to learn more about LED grow lights and vertical hydroponics, check us out at uPONICs.com)

The post Panasonic Ventures Into Vertical Farming appeared first on uPONICs, Hydroponics and Aquaponics Information.

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Image by luvjnx
Should Hydroponic Produce be labeled organic?

In Support of Organic Labeling for Hydroponics and Aquaponics Produce

In recent months, a passionate debate has been central to the agriculture community. It involved whether hydroponics (and aquaponics) should be included in the “certified organic” category by the USDA.

We emphatically say “Yes!”

In a recent CNN op-ed, Marianne Cufone (adjunct environmental law professor at Loyola University New Orleans), defended organic labeling for hydroponics, writing:

“a number of scientists, researchers, and industry experts support that many such farms are ideal for organic growing, because, among other benefits, they make smart use of resources and thus have less negative impact on the natural environment.”

According to the USDA, produce can be label “organic” if it meets the following criteria:

Assuming you are growing a non-GMO plant within a (non-soil) natural grow medium, while also using an organic nutrient solution (or, in the case of aquaponics, fish waste), it would seem logical that these crops should fall in-line with USDA’s requirements. However, there are those who disagree.

Matthew Hoffman, a Fulbright Scholar at the Norwegian Centre for Rural Research, argues that hydroponics in not on par with traditional organic farming methods, and shouldn’t share the same “organic” labeling. He states:

“Hydroponics in itself is the ultimate separation of food production from nature and the substitution of every last input with something that can be commodified and controlled without any need to care for the natural environment at all. [It] may be a fine way to grow food and it might be an important part of how cities feed themselves in the future, but it’s no more a form of sustainable agriculture than producing wood fiber in a laboratory is a form of sustainable forest management. Although the term organic has lost a lot of meaning since the federal standards kicked in, many supporters still associate it with a form of agriculture—one that as a system is intended to provide a range of land stewardship functions that are completely beyond the scope of hydroponic production.”

While Hoffman makes a valid case, we respectfully disagree with this conclusion. We feel hydroponics and aquaponics are very compatible with sustainable agriculture and stewardship of the land. While the growing environment is certainly more controlled as compared to soil-based farming, hydroponics and aquaponics teach the lessons of nature, and encourages urban dwellers –  and those without a plot of land – to garden and produce healthy, locally-grown food for their community. Hydroponics and aquaponics systems continually recycle water and nutrients in a manner that soil-based agriculture cannot. Further, yield is greatly enhanced, and one hydroponic/aquaponics system can produce much more food per sq. ft., year-round, and for years, than any soil-based farming. In our opinion, hydroponics and aquaponics are the embodiment of “sustainable agriculture” because it treads lightly on the earth, teaches self-sufficiency, and outmatching soil’s output.

More to Hoffman’s point, we don’t feel hydroponics and aquaponics cheapens the organic labeling.  In our opinion, a hydroponic or aquaponics system that uses 100% organic components (like organic nutrient solution, fish waste, and recycled organic grow media like coco coir) produces 100% organic crops. Period.  The land is practically untouched and unharmed, maybe even less so than traditional organic farming methods. The best land stewardship practices are the one with the least amount of human intervention. Thus, a high-yielding hydroponic system shouldn’t be viewed as a cheapening of agriculture, but rather making the most of efficiencies found in nature without interfering with nature.

In our opinion, the main intent of organic labeling isn’t to teach lessons of land stewardship or traditional farming methods.   Instead, most consumers use labeling for transparency: to ensure their produce a free of prohibited substances, such as man-made chemicals and GMOs. We feel that, as long as a hydroponics or aquaponics systems are completely free of anything on the prohibited list outlined by the USDA, these crops are just as worthy of a “certified organic” label as any organically-grown crop from the in soil.

Mark Mordasky, owner of Whipple Hollow Hydroponic Farm in Vt., shares our opinion. He commented:

“We’re in a greenhouse. We’re not doing anything with the land, good or bad. We’re not irresponsibly using land. We’re simply choosing not to use land at all. Does that make us not organic?”

“If we had all of our nutrients organic, all of our pesticides and herbicides — whatever we’re doing to control disease was organic, and the medium itself that the roots are growing in is also organic, all the inputs are organic. The outcome, it seems to me, would be organic.”

We agree.

Maybe what is needed is a sub-category of organic labeling: “Certified Organic-Hydroponics,” “Certified Organic-Aquaponics,” or “Certified Organic-Soil.” This may appease everyone involved in the debate, and give consumers more transparency.

Where do you stand on this issue?

The post Hydroponics, Organic or Not? appeared first on uPONICs, Hydroponics and Aquaponics Information.

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Scotts Miracle-Gro Pays $77 Million for Botonicare

Last August, Scotts Miracle-Gro’s hydroponics subsidiary Hawthorne Gardening agreed to a deal to purchase Arizona-based Botonicare. Terms of the deal were not disclosed at the time, however, SEC filings have just revealed that Scotts paid $77.1 million, plus possible additional payments of up to $15.5 million based on hitting financial projections.

Botanicare has been a leader in the plant nutrient business for two decades – recording roughly $40 million in annual sales –  and are the latest company to be acquired by Scotts in the hydroponic space. Scotts – the 2.84 billion lawn and garden behemoth – recently paid $136 million for Dutch grow light company Gavita, and $130 million for California’s General Hydroponics. Scotts also invested in Boulder-based AeroGrow indoor gardening company.

The flurry of deal activity comes as large companies likes Scotts Miracle-Gro jockey for position in an industry expected to flourish as more states allow for the recreational growing and consumption of marijuana.  After all of the latest deals, Scotts (NYSE: SMG) has positioned itself to be a key beneficiary. Meanwhile, smaller companies have seen big paydays as the bigger players continue their buying spree before the marijuana industry hits primetime.

Botanicare’s founder Treg Bradley stated “I recognize that there is a consolidation happening in the hydroponic industry. As a first wave founder, one must know when to step aside and pass the baton to someone who has the passion, vision and insurmountable resources to take the company to the next level.”

Who will be next?

The post Scotts Miracle-Gro Pays $77 Million for Botonicare appeared first on uPONICs, Hydroponics and Aquaponics Information.

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The Kratky Method of Hydroponics has been hailed by many as revolutionary, and yet it is a marvel in its simplicity.  This method of hydroponics was developed by B.A. Kratky while at the University of Hawaii.  His method is contradictory to traditional hydroponics theory on several levels.  First, there is no active water movement, the water remains stagnant. Second, it does not utilize aeration pumps and stones. Third, it does not require the exchange of nutrient solution over time.  It is perhaps the simplest of hydroponics systems.

What is it good for?

The Kratky method is best suited for leafy greens such as lettuce.  To our knowledge It has yet to be proven to work with larger fruiting plants.

It is hard to imagine, but it actually works!

How does it work?

The process starts with the plant’s roots submerged in the nutrient solution within a bucket or other container. Here we start with seedling plants.

The miracle of this system is that as the plant begins to grow, it absorbs more and more of the water, and the roots above the lowering water line become aerial roots capable of absorbing oxygen from the airspace between the lid of the bucket and the water line.

Not only is there no need for pumps or airstone, there is also no need for pH adjustments, no need to top off the nutrient mixture.

By the time the water has been almost completely absorbed the plant is grown to full size and is ready to be harvested.

Conclusion

This method contradicts most of what we’ve learned over the years, but it works and we’ll be implementing it here soon! Stay tuned for updates.

Continue your pursuit of hydroponics knowledge

Check out our hydroponics systems and hydroponics system video reviews articles to take your hydroponics pursuit to the next level.

Thanks always for visiting and follow us on social media for more great hydroponics updates!

The post The Kratky Method of Hydroponics appeared first on uPONICs, Hydroponics and Aquaponics Information.

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