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Cocktail Of The Day- because it’s always cocktail hour somewhere in the world. Folks, we have officially had three days of sunshine here in Vancouver so this little spring cocktail tour feels less like a hopeful sham and more like reality. So let’s continue, shall we? I give you the Birds and the Bees from the fine folks at Keefer Bar. A long-time local favourite of Vancouverites and roaming cocktail-lovers alike, Keefer was just named one of the best bars in Canada and this bevy right here is a great example of why. They are consistently innovating and bringing a sense of creativity to everything they do behind the bar. This one just one of an amazing selection of seasonal cocktails from their recently updated spring menu.

Birds and the Bees

1 oz wild turkey bourbon
0.5 oz pisco
0.5 oz yellow chartreuse infused with shiso
1 oz lemon juice 0.25 oz chrysanthemum honey syrup (2:1)

Shake all ingredients over ice and strain over fresh ice into a rocks glass. Garnish with a shiso leaf

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In many of the interviews I’ve done with bartenders over the years, I often ask about the one cocktail book that should be behind every bar. Jeffrey Morgenthaler’s The Bar Book has been named more times than I can count. It has spoken to a generation of bartenders that have put stock in Morgenthaler’s accessible, technique-driven approach to the craft.

It has been three and a half years since I last sat down with Jeffrey Morgenthaler to talk about The Bar Book. And now with the release of Drinking Distilled, we decided to catch up again at Clyde Common to chat about his new book, his future plans and the new rules of drinking. 

In ten words or less, describe Drinking Distilled.

“How to drink good.” As opposed to “how to drink well”. It’s not about how to drink elegant cocktails or anything. It’s how to be good at drinking.

Why this book and why now?

Because there haven’t really been any great primers on how to drink. I think it’s time to re-address the rules of drinking because – with this whole cocktail renaissance – you see all these things like “Real men drink Old Fashioneds but they don’t take rocks in their whiskey,” or “A gin martini should never be shaken,” or “A vodka martini is not a real martini.” All these kind of bullshit articles you read by grumpy old men who think bars used to be so much better before cell phones were invented, and they fucking weren’t. So, maybe it’s time for some updated rules. As you would expect coming from me, they aren’t the same old hashed out drinking rules you see time and time again.

Did you feel like you were the person to write the book or that the book needed to be written and so you did it?

I felt like I was the person to write the book. I guess I have the authority to talk about a lot of these things having done it for so long. Armchair commentators with an overly romanticized idea of what a bar should be kinda bore me.

What lessons did you take from writing your first book that you took into writing your second?

I just learned how to write a book. That’s why I brought Martha (Holmberg) in for the first book because I didn’t know how to write a book. She really taught me how to structure it, organize it, how to put together a pitch, everything from top to bottom. That really helped. Now I feel like I know how to write a book. It made it so much easier to learn that process so I’m thankful for that time we had to work together.

Was there anything that you wanted in the book that didn’t make the cut?

No actually! Well there was one thing. I wrote a whole long thing about absinthe that didn’t make it in because we decided that absinthe was a little bit passe, it’s a little bit specific. Absinthe doesn’t really fit into normal drinking. Nobody really drinks absinthe anymore.

Are there any albums or specific music you listen to while writing?

I usually write in the morning and mornings are always spent listening to Nick Drake.

Bartending and the craft cocktail scene has changed significantly since you first started in the industry. What do you see as the most positive change? What change would you still like to see?

The most positive change is obviously that you can get better drinks most places. When people come into Clyde and ask “Do you have fresh lime juice or is it sour mix?” I’m like, “Are you kidding me!?” I had this guest the other night ask me if we make our margaritas fresh or with margarita mix. It’s 2018! Applebees makes their drinks with fresh juice. You can get fresh drinks at the airport. I think that’s the biggest thing that’s pretty cool.

The downside ties back to the book. I think that people have forgotten how to drink. When we were doing brunch at Clyde I would get guys coming in drinking Manhattans because they were “cocktail snobs.” Drinking Manhattans with their brunch. That’s not what a Manhattan is for. That’s not what brunch is for. You’re like crawling out of a restaurant at 2 o’clock in the afternoon because you had four Manhattan’s. It’s a stupid way to drink but they were so young and they started with craft cocktails. Nobody told them that there’s a right and a wrong way to drink cocktails, a right and a wrong time to drink cocktails.

Was there a book or an inspiration you drew upon for Drinking Distilled?

I looked through a bunch of my favourites. One of them was Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. If you’ve never read the first third of Trader Vic’s before he gets to the recipes, I highly recommend it. It’s amazing. Also William Grimes’ Straight Up or On The Rocks.

How do you see the role of the bar and the bartender changing in more intense political times? Or do you?

I don’t. I think that people lean on the bar and the bartender a little more during challenging times but that’s what we always say in the business. When times are really good or when times are really bad that’s when we do the best. It’s when times are just mediocre that bartenders are poor.

What’s your favourite word?

Dipshit.

What’s your least favourite word?

Kumquat.

What turns you on?

I’m not telling you that.

What turns you off?

People that don’t even try to be intelligent. They don’t even have to be intelligent, but when they don’t even try, it’s such a major turnoff in every sense. Not just in the sexy sense but, you know, as a human, that makes me want to turn away from you.

What’s your favourite curse word?

Dipshit

A sound or noise that you love?

Probably the sound of a fan in a bedroom. I need it to fall asleep.

A sound or noise that you hate?

Babies crying.

A profession other than your own that you’d like to attempt?

Writer.

A profession that you’d hate?

Architect.

If heaven exists, what would you like God to say when you arrive?

We’ve saved you a seat at the bar.

Which talent would you most like to have?

I wish I could play piano.

The strangest talent that you already have?

I’m actually a former diver. In highschool I was on the swim team and I became the one-man diving team. California. It’s that kind of place.

Your favourite fictional hero?

I really like the Fletch books. You know Fletch the movie with Chevy Chase? Classic 80’s. That’s actually a terrible movie taken from a series of books that are fantastic. He’s kind of a flawed hero. That’s one of my favourite fictional heros. He’s a reporter.

What is your most treasured possession?

Probably my house.

What keeps you up a night?

I worry about how to make my bartenders’ lives better.

What is your biggest character flaw?

I’m pretty bad at letting other people help me.

The character flaw that bugs you most in other people?

People that drink and drive.

What do you want to be remembered for?

Just all the stuff that I’ve shared over the years for bartending and cocktails. That’s why I do it – just to help. So I’d like to be remembered for that. And the book and the blog and all the things I’ve done to try to help.

Thus concludes the formal questions. Anything else you’d like to add about the book?

So there’s a neat thing about the book that a lot of people don’t know. The illustrator is one of my former bartenders and she left us to become an illustrator. I had always wanted to have my first book illustrated and they didn’t let me. The pictures turned out great but I always wanted to have an illustrated book. So when we were putting together the deal and the proposal, without her knowing, I was fighting to try to get her the job. She didn’t have a huge portfolio so it was like going back and forth with the publisher . They finally said yes. I hadn’t even asked her if she wanted to illustrate my book. I got to call her up one day and say “I don’t know if you want it but I got you a job illustrating my next book.” And she was really excited about that.

I knew she wasn’t going to say “No, fuck you,” but if she had, we would have just gone back to the drawing board. I really wanted to work with her again.

So what was the process like between you two to come up with the illustrations?

My editor and I knew that there were going to be 30 illustrations so we singled out 30 things that we wanted illustrated in the book. It was a big process. I had to write the book first. So I wrote it and then we edited it and then we started going through it. There was a back and forth between my editor and I trying to narrow it down and then we went to Sami with the 30 things we wanted illustrated. And then she got to suggest changes as well. She had a very concrete list with notes. She and I talked it out and she did sketches and that was kind of the process. It was fun. She’s awesome.

What’s next for you? Are you just going to keep chilling behind the bar?

Yeah! I still work full-time. I’m just going to keep bartending. I have another book idea that I can’t tell you about.  My plan is to do serious book and then fun book and then serious book and then fun book. My next book will be more applicable to professionals. This one’s for home people, mostly. Bartenders will get a kick out of it too because it’s written by a bartender and I speak bartender.

Anything else about your career? The Portland bartending scene?

I don’t really go out. I probably know more about the Berlin bartending scene, I spend more time in Berlin bars than Portland bars. I mean, everyone is doing great here. It’s a thriving community.

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Cocktail Of The Day- because it’s always cocktail hour somewhere in the world. Continuing out tour of spring cocktails being served up around the city- say hello to The Rainmaker. Rangoli Head Bartender Andrew Schneider gives vodka cocktails a great name with this light and beautiful sipper. The only possible problem- they go down a little too easily; however, this cocktail pairs perfectly with warm, sunny days and a gentle spring breeze.

The Rainmaker

2 oz Vodka
0.75 oz Rose Bud Tea/ Cardamom Syrup*
1 oz lime Juice
6 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
3 cucumber wheels, muddled
Muddle cucumber in shaker, then add remaining ingredients.

Shake with ice, and strain into a collins glass with crushed ice. Decorate with cucumber and mint as desired.

Rose Bud Tea/Cardamom Syrup

500ml sugar
500ml hot water
1 teaspoon crushed green cardamom pods
1 tablespoon crushed dried rose buds

Steep the rose buds and cardamom in the hot water for 2-3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Strain the tea and then add the sugar. Stir until incorporated. Bottle and refrigerate. Keeps for up to three weeks in the fridge.

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Two for the Bar by Two For The Bar - 3w ago

Cocktail of the Day- because it’s always cocktail hour somewhere in the world. With spring in bloom around Vancouver, I thought I’d check out some of the seasonally-inspired cocktails our local bartenders are mixing up these days. First stop is Anh and Chi. Head Bartender Vanessa Coupar has put together The Drama Quy- a riff on a Bees Knees that is bright and floral and perfect to ring in the new season.

The Drama Quy

2 oz lavender infused tequila*
2oz lemon juice
1oz agave syrup

Shake all ingredients over ice, strain into a flute and garnish with a sprig of dried lavender.

*Lavender-infused tequila

For one 750ml bottle add 4 tbsp of dried lavender. Let infuse for 2 days then strain.

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You know what one of my favourite things about cocktails is? The happy accidents! The times where you mistakenly pour in rye instead of bourdon or you run out of one ingredient and sub in another just to discover (again) that necessity is the mother of invention. This is how many a cocktail have been born in our home.

For example, last week I was warming up a pot of mulled wine, following a classic Martha Stewart recipe. I had forgotten that I wasn’t working with a full 750ml bottle as I had used a bit for cooking earlier that day. As I added in the ½ cup of honey the recipe called for, I quickly realized that it was going to be way to sweet. Without a second bottle of wine on hand to balance it out, I decided the only logical answer was more booze- and not more of the brandy the recipe already called for. No! I decided what this simmering pot of spiced goodness really needed was bourbon. And somehow the minimal additional just pulled all the ingredients together beautifully.  I’m sure I’m not the first person to modify their mulled wine with a bit of whiskey and I certainly won’t be the last. But going forward, a splash of bourbon will always be included in my mulled wine recipe!

Recipe (Adapted from Martha Stewart):

The peel of one orange
The peel of one lemon
6 whole cloves
2 star anise
2 cardamom pods
1 cinnamon stick
1 bottle of red wine (cheap and cheerful- I used a Merlot)
6 allspice berries
½ cup of honey
¼ cup brandy
¼ cup bourbon

Combine all ingredients in a pot over medium heat. Once it begins to simmer, reduce to medium low and allow to slow simmer for 30 minutes. Strain out spices and peels. Serve in a mug or glass. Garnish with a cinnamon stick and a clove-studded orange peel.

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Bottom of the Barrel- where questionable spirits get a helping hand from some very skilled bartenders! Last time we paid a visit to Rod Redford at The Diamond where he was tasked with creating something out Palm Bay Key Lime Cherry. Up next is Matt Benevoli of Nomad Restaurant who was recently gifted a bottle of Russo Pistachio Cream.

Matt took this challenge by the horns and created something that’s not only palatable but that he’s really quite proud of (as he should be). It’s nutty, it’s effervescent, it’s original and it’s damn tasty! Benevoli suggests that this drink is best enjoyed while listening to it’s namesake song- Speak No Americano. Enjoy!

Speak No Americano

40ml Russo Pistachio Cream Liqueur
30ml Marquis De Villard VSOP French Brandy
10ml Alvear Medium Sherry
7.5ml Lemon Juice
7.5ml Wild Blossom Honey Syrup
1 egg white
Tonic Water

Dry shake all ingredients minus Tonic, add ice and shake well. Double
Strain into short Collins glass. Add Tonic Water to shaker, swirl with ice and pour over head of cocktail.

Garnish with pistachio dust on froth.

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Two for the Bar by Two For The Bar - 5M ago

Oh my gosh folks! Where have I been for the past couple of months. Great question! The answer is long and winding but mostly involves many a weekend spent eating, drinking and taking photos in Portland, OR (shocker, I know). For the past two years in a row, September has meant Feast PDX- the city’s food festival dotted with celebrity chefs, local makers, artisanal sandwich competitions and an entire evening dedicated to smoked BBQ. Count me in.

I returned for the second year in a row to photograph a few events, co-mingle with some fellow bloggers and of course, eat and drink all of the things.

Where I Stayed:
This time around I settled in at the Hi-Lo Hotel which just opened this year at the corner of SW 4th and Stark. The hotel is housed in the 1910 Oregon Pioneer Building and drew on the talents of local makers to furnish the new space. From Pendleton Wool blankets to Maak Lab’s shampoo and conditioner to reclaimed wood from Pioneer Millworks, the space really highlights some of the best the city and state have to offer.

My personal favourite touch were the swings in the lobby which I sat in every day while sipping on my morning coffee. Well…..that and the MASSIVE shower in my room. Seriously, I could have have fit my entire apartment in the bathroom (ok….not my entire apartment but definitely my kitchen). It was a luxury to come home to after a long day of shooting.

What I Did:
Because I was actually in Portland to photograph events at Feast, most of my time was spent doing just that….not that I’m complaining! Anytime I get to listen to people talk food and drink while sipping on a sampling of local beers and taking the occasional picture, I’m happy as a clam.

This year I photographed three events including a seminar on Beaujolais moderated Bon Appetit Wine Editor Marissa Ross (if you don’t know of her work, look her up! She recently wrote a book and she’s a hilarious human being).

And I wouldn’t be much of a cocktail writer if I didn’t attend a cocktail event, so I did! Demystifying the Cocktail with Daniel Shoemaker (owner of Teardrop Lounge and co-owner of The Commissary/Superjugoso) and Sean Hoard (formerly of PDT, Teardrop and current co-owner of The Commissary/Superjugoso). The two teamed up to teach a barful of eager imbibers how to drink well and how to communicate more effectively with your bartender. We all walked away happy, a bit tipsy and a lot more knowledgeable about how to be a rad bar patron that knows what they want. 

Where I Ate:
So the truth of the matter is I didn’t have a ton of spare time to hit up a bunch of restaurants on the trip but even on the busiest of weekends, there are a few spots that can’t be missed.

Little Bird Bistro’s burger is top of my list. On my first night in town, I sidled up to the bar by myself and savoured every bite of their burger ordered L’Americaine with a glass of red selected by the bartender to wash it all down.

I also always make time to visit the fine folks at Bar Casa Vale for a little chorizo-style charred octopus and a gin and tonic. And somehow, amid all of the hustle and bustle of the weekend, I managed to sneak away for a friend brunch at Milk Glass Market- my first visit to the cafe but definitely not my last. Just order anything on their buttermilk biscuits. You won’t be disappointed. I promise.

This is nowhere near an exhaustive list of my favourite spots in the city. I plan to post a more comprehensive city guide in the near future but in the meantime, never hesitate to email me if you’re headed to Portland. There are so many spots that are dear to my heart and I’m always happy to share with folks eager to explore the city! Cheers y’all!

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Two for the Bar by Two For The Bar - 7M ago

Three Parts is a column inspired by the Jack Rose Society- a group of bartenders in Boston that set out to test classic cocktail recipes until they landed on their favourite iteration. The concept is simple- we ask three bartenders to provide their preferred recipe for one classic cocktail. This week we’re looking at the margarita.

Beckaly Franks
Owner- The Pontiac

1.5 Derrumbes San Luis
0.75 dry curaçao
0.75 lime
1 tsp 2:1
Shake, rocks, grapefruit oil

“San Luis is the most vegetal mezcal I have ever had. It taste like pickled okra!!!! It also comes across more sweet on the palate (it is not sweet) so dry curaçao helps balance that out.  2:1 for viscosity and grapefruit for aromatics and bitterness. Grapefruit and mezcal hold hands. They just fit.”

Bobby Heugel
Owner- Anvil Bar and Refuge

1 oz Cabeza Blanco Tequila
1 oz Del Maguey Chichicapa
.5 oz Persian Lime (Standard American Grocery Store Limes) Juice
.5 oz Key Lime Juice
.5 oz Agave Nectar

Shake all ingredients with ice and dump into a rocks glass without ice, garnished with a Tajin and salted rim.

“If this is about the Margarita I’d make for myself, not necessarily the one I’d serve in a bar to a guest, that means I get to be a little pickier right? Well, here goes.

First, spirits – I like a basic tequila Margarita just fine, and I enjoy a more robust Mezcal Margarita as well. But rarely do people mix the two together to get the best of both worlds; that’s a mistake. The smokiness from the mezcal really helps cut the sweetness in a Margarita, but it can be overwhelming at times – particularly when it’s hot outside and you really want to emphasize the refreshing qualities of the drink. The 50:50 balance of the two is perfect however. I like Cabeza Tequila in Margaritas because of the higher (but not too high) proof and Del Maguey Chichicapa because of the iconic mezcal profile, which isn’t too mineral-driven (like those aged in clay – not the best for a Margarita) or too sweet.

Limes. It’s weird to me how neglected the evolution of citrus is as a topic in today’s modern bartending community. What we use as a standard lime today is a hybrid that was cultivated increasingly throughout the last century – reaching heights as globalization standardized  citrus sold in the US. Blending Persian and Key Limes is ideal for a Margarita – the Key Limes are bright and acidic and the Persian Limes have a great texture for mixing. Together, they make a better “lime juice” for Margaritas.

Sweetener. I know lots bartenders and Margarita peanut gallery members hate agave nectar and prefer an orange liqueur. I like Margaritas done in that style too, but I want something sessionable/poundable when I’m drinking Margaritas, and that to me means I want a friendlier drink that has a touch more sweetness. That’s why I opt for agave nectar, and if it’s good enough for Julio Bermejo, it’s good enough for me. After all, this recipe is just a riff on a Tommy’s Margarita anyway.

The dump. I don’t know – the shake and dump just tastes better than the shake and strain over fresh ice, which causes another washing of the drink to occur. People typically avoid this because the shaken ice tends to melt quicker than the fresh ice you would strain a cocktail over. Those people don’t know how to drink a Margarita.

Tajin. Who doesn’t like Tajin? And, I’ve always preferred my Margaritas with salt.”

Daniel Parker Guidry
Bar Manager-Bar Casa Vale

“The Margarita is one of my favorite drinks. It’s a quintessential cocktail for a reason. It’s also one of the only cocktails my dad ever ordered when we went out to eat at our family’s favorite Mexican restaurant. I love the margarita and short of using fresh squeezed juice, I’ll drink it in many of it’s forms. This is my recipe:

 1 1/2 oz. Blanco Tequila
1 oz. fresh lime juice
3/4 oz Cointreau
1/4 oz Oleo Saccharum
Prepare two lime wedges and pint glass with a salted rim, measure all ingredients into a dry shaker, add ice and shake, double strain into your prepared glass, and add bar ice. Garnish with two lime wedges.
 “There are two camps to the Margarita. Non-purists who grab any exotic fruit and squeeze it in for fun or add a touch of orange juice to brighten up the lime… On the other side there are the purists. It’s a classic recipe and anything that calls for more than tequila, lime, triple sec and agave or sugar is a derivative. Call it a Grapefruit Margarita or a Prickly Pear Margarita, if you must. I fall closer into the purist camp, but I want to reinforce the floral components of lime juice. The Margarita, however it came to be, is a daisy and daisy’s unify the spirit and sour ingredients with an aromatic sweetener, but triple sec doesn’t do it alone in my book. Introducing citrus oils to the mix only increases this agreement while amplifying all of their flavors. This is pure un-adulterated Margarita goodness.”
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Two for the Bar by Two For The Bar - 9M ago

Three Parts is a column inspired by the Jack Rose Society- a group of bartenders in Boston that set out to test classic cocktail recipes until they landed on their favourite iteration. The concept is simple- we ask three bartenders to provide their preferred recipe for one classic cocktail. This week we’re changing it up a bit and we’re asking cocktail writers and historians to weigh in on their favourite specs for a classic Manhattan.

David Wondrich
Cocktail Historian
Author- Imbibe!, Punch: The Delights and Dangers of the Flowing Bowl

“The Manhattan is not something I screw around with. Here’s my basic one, which I think is impossible to beat:

Stir well with cracked ice:

2 oz Wild Turkey 101 rye or Rittenhouse rye
1 oz Cocchi vermouth di Torino or Martini & Rossi red vermouth
2 dashes Angostura bitters

Strain into chilled cocktail glass and twist a swatch of thin-cut lemon peel over the top.

So this is a standard 2-1-2 Manhattan. But I’m not the most consistent of sorts, so I do like to vary it. Sometimes I add 1 dash of absinthe. Sometimes I make it the Manhattan Club’s way:

Stir well with cracked ice:

1 1/2 oz Wild Turkey 101 rye or Rittenhouse rye
1 1/2 oz Cocchi vermouth di Torino or Martini & Rossi red vermouth
2 dashes orange bitters (I use “Feegans” or Hermes, from Japan)

Strain into chilled cocktail glass and twist a swatch of thin-cut lemon peel over the top.

The standard 2-1-2, if you use a good, strong rye, manages to blend perfectly so no one ingredient dominates (I will never, ever use Carpano Antica in my Manhattans for this reason: it asserts its sweet vanilla nature far too much to blend). At the same time, it’s still a strong, forthright drink, where you can taste the rye.

The Manhattan Club version is also nice: the whiskey is less noticeable, but the vermouth doesn’t have the whole dancefloor to itself. The orange bitters make for a softer drink.

Shanna Farrell
Oral Historian, Berkeley
Author- Bay Area Cocktails: A History of Culture, Community and Craft

2 oz rye (playing around with different expressions is the fun of this recipe)
.5 oz sweet vermouth (either Cocchi Torino or Vermut Lacuesta)
.5 oz Nardini amaro
3 dashes orange bitters
Garnish with an expressed orange peel

“When I was first discovering amaro, we had Nardini on the shelf at the bar where I was working. It was my gateway to amaro-land and I haven’t looked back. I found it’s chocolate notes, hints of black liquorice, and hit of orange and gentian to be a lovely balance with the bitterness. Nardini remains one of my favorites because of its versatility—it’s delightful to sip neat, over ice, or mixed in a cocktail. As a rye drinker, I like to add it to my Manhattans to round out the spice from the spirit and give the drink some subtle complexity. The orange bitters bring it all together, and the orange essence give it an enticing aroma. Just typing this makes me want one. Too bad it’s 10am.”

Robert Simonson
Drinks+Liquor Writer- The New York Times
Author- Three-Ingredient Cocktails, The Proper Drink

2 ounces rye whiskey
1 ounce sweet vermouth
2 dashes Angostura bitters

Combine ingredients in a mixing glass filled with ice and stir until chilled, about 30 seconds. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a cherry.

“I drink a lot of Manhattans, and, while I have set proportions—which are classical in nature—I am not locked into specific brands of whiskey or vermouth. The Manhattan is a very democratic cocktail. Any decent expression of bourbon or rye, or sweet vermouth, can play and expect a decent degree of success. You don’t need top shelf whiskey, or rare or overproof stuff. Accessible and affordable brands of bourbon or rye will perform just fine. Same goes for the vermouth. While I drink bourbon Manhattans and rye Manhattans is equal numbers, I prefer the rye. Rye adds a necessary zip and spice to the mix. Rittenhouse, Sazerac, Knob Creek, Bulleit and Wild Turkey 101 are all fine. For the vermouth, I’ve used Dolin, Martini & Rossi and Noilly Prat. They all work. The resulting Manhattans all differ slightly is character, but none are bad. In ratios, however, I am unswerving. Two parts whiskey to one part vermouth. Always. And Angostura bitters. No other brand of bitters. Finally, the cherry must be homemade. It makes an enormous difference. Homemade cherries are very easy to make. They are worth the small effort that is required. And once you’ve made a decent-sized batch, you’re set for Manhattans for the rest of the year.”

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Bottom of the Barrel- where questionable spirits get a helping hand from some very skilled bartenders! Last time we paid a visit to Mike Shum of The Lobby Lounge where he was tasked with creating something (ANYTHING!) out of the shimmering vodka-based spirit known as Viniq. Up next is Rod Redford of The Diamond who has was recently gifted a bottle of Palm Bay Spirit- Key Lime Cherry…..

The best compliment I can give this cocktail is that I drank it all. It was like smoky blue Kool-Aid and I could have slammed three of them sitting poolside. If you’re in the hood, pop by The Diamond and ask Rod if he has any leftover Palm Bay. Something tells me he’d be happy to whip one of these bad boys up for you.

Recipe:

1oz Palm Bay Key Lime Cherry
1oz Mezcal
0.75oz Benedictine
0.25oz Blue Curacao
0.25oz Lime juice

Shake all ingredients over ice and strain into a chilled class.

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