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There are tons of reasons why WordPress plugins are a necessity. They offer a ton of features and functionality that your site doesn’t have otherwise.

With plugins, you can customize the site you’ve already built to better suit your needs and serve your visitors. But you’ve probably heard that having too many WordPress plugins on your website is bad.

There are over 50,000 plugins to choose from, so it can easy to add a few too many to your pages.

But how many plugins is too many?

The short answer is that it depends on what your site needs. And the type of web hosting provider you use.

Before we get into the specifics of how many plugins you should have, let’s discuss the potential problems that having too many plugins can cause.

The Problem With Too Many Plugins

The problems caused by plugins will vary depending on which plugins that you have installed, how they’re coded, which ones are actually active, and more.

The largest problem with having too many plugins is that some can slow down your site.

Since 40% of visitors will exit a website if it takes longer than three seconds to load, watching the number of plugins you install is beneficial to your website’s success.

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Even more serious, some WordPress plugins can make your site more susceptible to security breaches.

Issue #1: Security Vulnerabilities

If your website isn’t secure, all of the hard work you put into creating your blog or designing an ecommerce store can be destroyed by hackers.

Attacks are coming quicker and faster every year. From 2015 to 2016, there was an increase of 32 percent more hacked sites. And it can cost tons of time and money trying to repair all of the damage.

At least 47 percent of all WordPress vulnerabilities are Cross Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities, according to Wordfence.

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This occurs when malicious scripts are added to the code of a plugin. Websites can also become compromised when plugins are outdated.

According to Sucuri, RevSlider, Gravity Forms, and TimThumb, accounted for 25 percent of all site hacks. All three plugins are out of date.

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A hacked website can destroy your brand’s reputation, as well as your privacy. But it’s important to remember that there are risks involved with whatever software you choose to install.

Issue #2: Site Crashes and Lack of Reliability

There are issues with even the most popular WordPress plugins, like WP Super Cache and W3 Total Cache.

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WordPress is an open source project, so people can use, change, and share all WordPress software. That’s also why most plugins are free.

Therefore, poor plugin codes that cause site crashes are possible.

These issues can quickly turn a great plugin into a harmful one, which can hinder site performance and page speed.

Issue #3: Bad Performance and Slow Page Speed

Fast page loading speeds are essential to keeping site visitors. But the more plugins you have installed on your site, the slower it will be.

The test your site, use a tool like Pingdom. Run a full page test to analyze your website’s performance and page speeds.

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For every plugin that you add to your site, more code is added to the browser. That’s more to process, so the less code there is, the better your loading speeds will be.

Now for the most important question of all: exactly how many plugins is too many?

How Many Plugins is Too Many?

There’s not a number of plugins that’s set in stone for all users.

It depends heavily on the kind of web host you use, though. For shared or budget cloud hosting, stick between 0 and 5 plugins.

If you use cloud hosting, VPS hosting, or a dedicated server, you can run anywhere from 5 and 20 plugins on your site without many issues.

Dan Norris, co-founder of WP Curve, recommends to never exceed 20 plugins.

Less is more, but there aren’t any hard and fast rules for how many plugins you can or can’t have. That’s why you should follow these tips to cut down on the number of plugins that you have on your site.

Only Use the Plugins You Need

Small blogs can get by with just a few plugins, but you might need at least 20 on a larger website.

A good rule of thumb is to only install plugins that you truly need. For example, if a plugin isn’t necessary to use a service, like MailChimp or Google Analytics, don’t install it.

You should also install plugins that you no longer need or use. If a plugin isn’t vital to your site’s functionality, go ahead and uninstall it.

Test out plugins before you install them on your site, too, to avoid problems before they start.

When you’re selecting the plugins to remove, be honest with yourself about which plugins are actually essential. There are a few must-haves to consider.

Blocking spam comments, for example, will keep your blog looking as professional as possible. Clean Talk is a great plugin for spam protection.

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You should also install a security plugin, which will help protect your site from malicious hackers.

This could save you millions since the average successful malicious hack costs companies an average of $4 million per attack.

All In One WP Security & Firewall and WPScan are two effective and trusted security plugins to choose from.

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You should also update your plugins on a regular basis.

Update Existing Plugins to Patch Vulnerabilities

Regular updates are released for plugins often. These updates include important patches that fix holes in a plugin’s security.

In 2014, more than 50,000 sites got hacked from a corrupt plugin, MailPoet. The problem came when a bug was found that enabled hackers to upload files directly to the users’ server to take control of the entire site.

That’s why you should update plugins as soon as updates are released. If updates are available, they will appear under the “Updates” section of your dashboard.

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Removing inactive plugins from your site is another quick way to boost your website’s security.

Take Inactive Plugins Off of Your Site

Inactive plugins can be used by hackers to gain access to your site.

Log on to your website and check out the “Plugins” section of your dashboard. Uninstall any plugins listed under the “Inactive” tab.

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Press “Deactivate” and “Delete” to remove a plugin and all of its files completely.

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Only Install Reputable Plugins

When selecting new plugins to add to your site, there are a few steps you can take to make sure that they are legitimate.

First, you should check to find out when the plugin was updated last. Some plugins are updated weekly.

If you find a plugin that hasn’t been updated in over a year, don’t install it.

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Some outdated plugins will warn you that they haven’t been updated so that you don’t have to go looking for the date, too.

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You should also check out the total number of downloads and reviews that a plugin has. Over 100,000 downloads and at least four stars is a good rule of thumb.

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Support for a plugin is essential because you need resources if you ever encounter a problem. Check out the “Support” tab for each plugin description.

It should take you straight to a forum or support page. If it doesn’t, don’t download the plugin.

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Review a plugin’s code before downloading to make sure that it’s as..

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Getting emails through your WordPress site is important. Whether someone is informing you there’s something wrong with your products, or just dropping by to say you’re doing a great job, you need to make sure you receive those emails.

Too often, our tests for if emails work on a WordPress site or in a WordPress plugin involve filling out a form, checking our email and seeing if it looks right. That’s not efficient and requires a proactive investment of human time. Let’s write a program to do it better and more consistently instead.

This article is about using testing emails. Most of it will be about writing automated integration tests with phpunit. There is also a short section about related tools. That covers local testing and cross-client testing lightly. Those are layers I’d recommend looking into adding after this layer is in place.

The tests in this article will be using the WP_UnitTestCase, which extends PHP Unit’s base test case. Before getting started, you’ll need to have tests set up the way that WP CLI would set them up for you. This was covered in a recent Torque article Iain Poulson and you also might want to read Pippin Williamson’s series on unit testing in WordPress.

The Mock PHPMailer

When writing tests for code that integrates with other systems it’s common to create “mock” objects. These are objects that have the same public API as the object they are standing in for, but don’t create side effects or add additional dependency complications to the test. A true mock is really only possible when all the code involved is object-oriented and every object’s public API is defined by an interface. That doesn’t describe WordPress.

That doesn’t mean you can’t create mocks in WordPress. The libraries BrainMonkey and wp_mock help with mocking many WordPress APIs, including hooks.

WordPress’ unit tests ship with a mocking tool for the PHPMailer instance that wp_mail uses. When using WP_UnitTestCase, an instance of MockPHPMailer is substituted for the global instance of PHPMailer that is normally used by wp_mail(). MockPHPMailer extends PHPMailer, and also tracks all of the email sent through it. That allows us to test the result of wp_mail and PHPMailer given arguments passed to wp_mail. This article is mainly about how to setup and use that.

The accuracy of a mock limits its usefulness. By using the mock for wp_mail that core uses, we know that our tests are as accurate as WordPress core’s wp_mail tests. Doesn’t make them perfect. Practically speaking, it does make it a pretty reliable way to test. At the end of this article, there are links to other tools you can use to add additional testing layers on top of this method, but I would start with this method.

We can retrieve that instance using the function tests_retrieve_phpmailer_instance(). We’ll look at how to do that now.

Creating A Test Case

It’s a common pattern to have one abstract class in your plugin’s test that is your base test case. That class would extend WP_UnitTestCase. Then, if needed, you can extend that class to create a base for a specific type of test.

Let’s start by creating Email_Test_Case:

<?php
/**
 * Test case -- step 1
 */
abstract  class Email_Test_Case extends WP_UnitTestCase{
    /** @inheritdoc */
    public function setUp(){
        parent::setUp();
    }
    /** @inheritdoc */
    public function tearDown(){
        parent::tearDown();
    }
    
}

Right now, this doesn’t add anything new, it’s just a start. The setUp and tearDown methods that we are overriding from the parent class are used to reset everything in between each individual test. Since WordPress uses a global for PHPMailer, the mock mailer can track every email sent. That’s useful, but also we want to make extra certain that everything is reset in between tests.

We can use the function reset_phpmailer_instance to put a new instance of MockPHPMailer in the global used by wp_mail. Let’s do that in setup and teardown, just to be safe.

<?php
/**
 * Test case -- step 2
 */
abstract  class Email_Test_Case extends WP_UnitTestCase{
    /** @inheritdoc */
    public function setUp(){
        parent::setUp();
        $this->reset_mailer();
    }
    /** @inheritdoc */
    public function tearDown(){
        parent::tearDown();
        $this->reset_mailer();
    }
    /**
     * Reset mailer
     *
     * @return bool
     */
    protected function reset_mailer(){
        return reset_phpmailer_instance();
    }
    /**
     * Get mock mailer
     *
     * Wraps tests_retrieve_phpmailer_instance()
     *
     * @return MockPHPMailer
     */
    protected function get_mock_mailer(){
        return tests_retrieve_phpmailer_instance();
    }
}

I created a method for resetting the mock for two reasons. First, I’m repeating code. More importantly, I may later want to extend this class to run tests using a different way of mocking PHPMailer or a different way of sending email than PHPMailer. This allows subclasses to change this behavior in those situations.

Those reasons explain why I also created a wrapper around the function for retrieving the MockPHPMailer instance. Also, my way has a more explicit return phpDocBlock annotation than core uses, which makes using it in phpStorm easier.

Writing Integration Tests For WP Mail

Before we go further, we’ll need something to test. Let’s create a function that sends an email, and lets us change who is goes to, the subject and the body:

function slug_send_email( $to, $subject, $message, $headers = '' ){
    wp_mail( $to, $subject, $message, $headers );
}

This function doesn’t return anything. We can’t unit test it. But we can test the effects it has on the system it integrates with — WordPress’ phpmailer. Let’s create an integration test for each of the three features — recipient, subject and message.

All of these tests can live in one class, let’s create it, extending our test case:

Now we can write some tests.

Testing The Email Subject

Let’s start with the email subject because it’s the simplest. We’ll need to send the message then compare the subject that was captured mock mailer object’s subject to what we expected to be sent.

For this, we can use the mock mailer’s get_sent() method. This returns the first message sent through this mock mailer. We can optionally ask it for other messages, but we’re intentionally resetting the mailer between tests.

The get_sent() method returns an array of information about the email. One of the indexes is the subject. We can use that to get the subject of the “sent” message.

<?php
public function test_subject(){
    $to = 'Someone W. Someone <hi@example.com>';
    $subject = 'subject';
    $message = 'message';
    slug_send_email($to, $subject, $message );
    $mailer = tests_retrieve_phpmailer_instance();
    $this->assertSame($subject, $mailer->get_sent()->subject );
}

In this test, we set up all of the arguments for the function we’re testing in variables. Then we use those to call the function. Then we capture the mock mailer instance and get its subject. Keeping the arguments for our function in variables makes it easier to use them as the expected value for an assertion.

Testing The Email Body

Testing the email body is going to be similar. I don’t think testing with just one line of content is a fair test. So for this test, we’ll use multiple lines. That does make things a little complicated, as comparing whitespace is tricky.

One of the extra assertions we get from using WordPress’ test case, is the assertDiscardWhitespace test. This tests the contents of strings as being the same, minus whitespace:

Testing The Email Recipient

Testing the email recipient is tricky. Emails can be provided as an email address or in Name <name@example.com> form. Also, we can pass a single email address or an array of one or more email addresses to the to the argument of wp_mail and therefore the to argument of the function we’re testing.

We’re going to need one test for each of these cases. Let’s start simple, no name, just email. For this test, we use the mock mailer’s utility function get_recipient() to get the to. In this context, that function returns a standard class object. We can check the address property:

Once we know that works, we can add a layer of complication by setting the name and email. We’ll need a similar assertion as the last test, but this time we’ll check name instead of the address.

Now for our last test, we’ll send the email to multiple recipients.

Going Further

At this point, you should be wondering what if the multiple recipients are in a mix of the two forms. Or what if some of the messages in the array are invalid. Those are good thoughts. You should add those tests.

What about cc, bcc, attachments and other headers? I’d recommend taking a look at core’s mail tests and see how you can use a similar approach with the actual code you’re testing.

Other Email Testing Tools

This article is about integration testing WordPress emails. We’re testing your code’s integration with WordPress’ email feature. That’s an important part of testing email functionality. One advantage of this approach — that no external servers are needed — is also a limitation. Once these types of tests pass, it is important to also test real servers and real clients.

Mailhog is a useful tool for local development. It prevents emails from actually sending, instead, they are stored locally. You get a simple, and extensible UI that provides an email client-like way to see emails sent in your local environment.

MailTrap is a service that provides an actual SMTP server designed for use in automated testing. To be honest, this is the one tool in this article I haven’t used. I’m putting it in because it’s on my list of tools I’d like to explore more as I improve this type of testing in my stack, so I wanted to share.

What I have used, and have gotten a lot of value out of, as part of manual QA is used . This service is like Browserstack, but for email. You send your email to one address and they show you what it looks like in all of the email clients and even highlight possible issues in a useful summary.

Email Is Hard, Testing Help

It’s not naming things or cache invalidation, but I have found emails to be one of the trickiest things to work with as a developer. I spend a lot of time with them given what I do — contact form plugin and email web app.

These are the tools that helped me take control of the situation when testing by sending myself and email didn’t scale anymore. It’s gotten more complex over time. Automated integration testing and manual testing of designs — when they change — using Email On Acid — or a similar tool is probably sufficient. Whatever you decide you need to keep your WordPress email system reliable, I hope this helps.

Josh Pollock

Josh is a WordPress developer and educator. He is the founder of Caldera Labs, makers of awesome WordPress tools including Caldera Forms — a drag and drop, responsive WordPress form builder. He teaches WordPress development at Caldera Learn.

The post How To Test The Emails WordPress Sends appeared first on Torque.

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One of the most frustrating things about WordPress is that parts of the WP Admin are difficult to find – if not outright hidden. That makes getting things done not so easy or intuitive.

But as with any application, some elements of the User Interface need to be hidden or obscure for various reasons. Usually, it is because a function or feature is not frequently needed until it is. That’s when the hair pulling begins.

Don’t end up hunting around for that WP Admin element as if you’re looking for lost treasure. Here are the most common hidden gems of WordPress that sooner or later you’ll need to use.

All of the following are a part of WordPress Core and have nothing to do with what your theme or any plugin may add to your WP Admin.

WP Admin? That’s where you end up when you log into your site.

Screen Options

This is a little gem is hidden in plain view.  In the upper right-hand corner of just about every page in your WP Admin is a Screen Options button. It’s the way to modify whatever is on that page.

Here are some examples of what Screen Options are.

1 screen options - Vimeo

Drag And Drop Features

Did you know that parts of the WP Admin can be moved around to suit your needs?

2 drag and drop - Vimeo

I left out moving menu items and widgets into place because that’s probably more intuitive than what I showed in my video.  And keep in mind that some plugins have draggable elements that may not be so easy to see at first glance.

Hovering Over

I assume you know that you need to hover over the links on the right side of your WP Admin to see submenus. But did you know about this?

3 hover - Vimeo

Not shown in this video, is that the same thing happens when you look at the list of your users. You’ll need to hover over a user’s name to edit or delete a user account within your site.

Bulk Actions? Say What?

Ever wonder what Bulk Actions do? When I first started with WP, I didn’t use it for a long time because I could not figure out what it was or how to use it.

I think it’s a bit obscure and not so intuitive. In my video, I show you how to use it to save time when working with multiple pages or posts simultaneously.

4 bulk actions - Vimeo

You’ll see Bulk Actions show up in various places in the WP Admin.  It’s a great way to update all of your plugins in just a few clicks.

What About Gutenberg?

This Spring, WordPress will roll out an entirely new editing system. It features a very clean workspace without a lot of UI that is hidden until you hover over some part of it.

5 quick look at gutenberg - Vimeo

The key concept behind Gutenberg is the use of blocks which allows various types of content to be inserted into blocks. In the years to come Gutenberg will usher in entirely new ways to create content and developer websites. Stay tuned!

Conclusion

What may be obvious to some WordPress authors, may be completely hidden or confusing to others. While that’s true to the design of any user interface, WordPress presents its own unique challenges. Overcoming those challenges will make it easier and more satisfying to use WordPress.

Bud Kraus

Bud Kraus has taught web design and WordPress for over 20 years in New York City and for his online students. He is the creator of the WP A To Z Series, a free WordPress training service. He works with small businesses and their sites too.

The post The Hidden Gems Of WordPress appeared first on Torque.

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There’s no doubt about it: Site performance is crucial to the success of your website. Today, over 25 percent of users will leave a page if it takes more than 4 seconds to load. And a delay of just a second can compound with dropped conversion rates, decrease your page views, and increase your bounce rate. A delay of two seconds could make your bounce rates spike up 103 percent. All these factors combined lead to user dissatisfaction, and for ecommerce sites, high shopping cart abandonment rates.

Most users also expect the same speedy experience from your website on mobile, meaning your site should also be responsive and mobile-friendly. And since mobile users now make up over 50 percent of web traffic, this demographic should definitely be considered when optimizing your website.

These facts have been time-tested and remain true not just for WordPress, but for all websites. Web leaders like Walmart, Amazon, Yahoo, and Google have demonstrated that a speedy website means real dollars and cents.

Yes, site performance can truly impact usability, revenue, and brand reputation among your users, not to mention search engine rankings and bounce rate. Knowing this, improving site performance may seem like an insurmountable task. Fear not: A few key performance tricks can help shave seconds off your page load time, improve user engagement, and boost SEO.

Cache pages

WordPress, being a PHP-based Content Management System, uses PHP to generate pages as users request them on your website. This involves executing PHP code and running queries to your WordPress database to gather page data, before serving it to your website’s end user. Understandably, this process can be slow. Enter page caching. Page cache systems store the page generated by PHP as a static file for faster access. That means cached pages can be served in a few milliseconds, compared to a few full seconds when generated as new. Below is a comparison of an original view, which used PHP to generate the page (no cache), compared to a repeat view (using page cache).

You can see the total time to serve the page was .08 seconds when cached, compared to almost 1.5 seconds without cache. That’s a savings of 1.415 seconds, or 94.5 percent.

Not only is this a better user experience, this also frees up resources to allow your web server to handle more concurrent requests. Speed and scalability are a winning combo!

If you host with WP Engine, their Evercache system takes care of page caching for you automatically. When hosting elsewhere, you can check out caching plugins like WP Super Cache, W3 Total Cache, or WP Rocket.

CDN

While page caching takes care of caching all the page requests on your website, using a Content Delivery Network, or CDN, helps ensure all your static assets are also cached. Static assets include images, JavaScript, and CSS files used by your website. CDN services will typically cache these assets for several days, since these types of files rarely change (i.e. you typically wouldn’t replace one image with another of the exact same name in the same directory). And, CDN also stores these static assets on a network of servers worldwide, for faster access from any part of the world. That means users worldwide will be able to load your pages quickly, without the major latency that can result when loading content from halfway across the globe.

Run a site speed diagnosis

One of the most informative ways to improve your site performance is to test your front-end site speed with a diagnostics tool. When testing in this way, you can see what specific steps you can take to optimize your site, not generic advice.

Tools like WebPageTest, WP Engine’s Speed Tool, Page Performance, or GTMetrix can also provide key insights for front-end optimization.

Compress images

One of the most common areas for improvement in regard to site speed is oversized images. According to Soasta, images account for 62 percent of a website’s total load time. Often times images on your website are being manually resized by HTML or JavaScript, which means your end-user’s web browser has to work harder to download those large images. By simply compressing the images you can increase front-end speed considerably.

There are several plugins that will automatically optimize your images for you upon upload. Or, you can choose to optimize images locally before uploading them to your website.  Read more about how to compress images on your WordPress site.

Minify & combine JavaScript and CSS

Another important step in front-end optimization is to limit the number of files your end-user’s web browser needs to download in order to show your website. The fewer scripts and styles total, the fewer connections your end-user’s web browser needs to make to view your page. And better yet, minifying those assets reduces the total number of bytes the browser has to download and store, making for a faster loading experience overall.

There are many plugins to help optimize your website’s scripts and styles in this way–most notably, Autoptimize and BWP Minify. Both these plugins will help combine your scripts and styles together, and remove excess spacing so a web browser can download and interpret them faster.

Use PHP 7

With PHP 7, your website could load twice as fast. And yet, the majority of WordPress sites are still using PHP 5.5 or 5.6. A simple step in boosting speed is to upgrade the PHP version for your website.

First, check to see if your site is compatible using a PHP Compatibility Checker plugin. Once you are sure everything checks out, ask your web host how you can get PHP 7 for your website. If you are not sure which version your website is using right now, you can use a PHP info file to find out.

Choose a responsive theme

The WordPress.org theme repository offers a plethora of mobile-compatible themes completely for free. Since WordPress natively now manages mobile aspects like choosing the right image size for the right device, if your current theme doesn’t have a responsive design it may be time to re-evaluate.

Responsive themes make for better user experiences, help build trust among your users, and load faster for users on mobile by getting them to the right version of your site the first time, at the same URL as your desktop site.

Optimize your database

Your database feeds content, settings, and user information to WordPress to feed to your end users on your website. Keeping it clean is one way to make that information funnel run more smoothly and quickly. A clean database helps WordPress find the content it needs faster and speeds up searches.

Reducing database bloat by cleaning out old posts and pages is one way to get started. In addition, using an object caching layer can help by caching the results of common queries to your database for faster access. But converting your database table storage engine to InnoDB could also speed things up significantly. Learn more about database cleanup to boost site performance.

Go Headless

Headless WordPress has been all the rage lately, and for good reason. If you haven’t heard, “Headless WordPress” means “no front end.” Or rather, that you are using a JavaScript app as the “front end” that end users interact with. The app then communicates back with your WordPress back end for data, content, and user information.

What attracts many users to this concept is the unique ability to build with JavaScript which is lightning fast, but to still use WordPress for the intuitive back end for content management purposes. JavaScript apps are not only more quick, they can also be more user-friendly by allowing for a more mobile-like experience. You could even make an iOS or Android app, wherein your “front end” is really the app being downloaded to your end-user’s device. Learn more about Headless WordPress solutions.

Delete unused items

It is good practice to regularly audit the plugins, themes, users, and content on your website and deprecate items which are no longer used. Even if plugins and themes exist that are not being used, it can add to the bulk of website content being loaded. Some plugins and themes add rows, data, and settings to your database that never gets removed–sometimes even after deleting the plugin or theme! And remember, if you remove posts, pages, or uploads, be sure to add a redirect to the page users should find after removing them.

Limit or remove comments

One of the most common causes of bloat on a website is an overabundance of spam comments.  Bots and spammers can hit your website hard, commenting thousands of times across your website. An easy way to manage this issue is to either turn off comments altogether from your Settings > Discussion page, or to limit comments to only real customers by adding a captcha form. A captcha will deter fake users and spam bots from posting on your content by challenging them with an equation or image. And using plugins like Akismet will help by holding comments for moderation, and easily deleting any spam comments you have already accrued. Last, if you have a lot of real users posting comments on your website, you might consider only showing 10 or fewer comments at a time to prevent extra long load times. Select the option in Settings > Discussion to break comments into pages of 10 or fewer, with the latest showing first so your readers see the most recent and relevant comments.

Lazy-load long pages

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Doing business is almost impossible without being on the Internet. So why do Freelancers and Agencies hear from potential clients that they don’t need a website at all?

People strive to simplify their life, so they opt for using services like Facebook Pages, Wix or Weebly. What clients don’t know is that WordPress is just as cost effective as these services, but much more scalable.

There are things that prove WordPress is better than the rest. This list is all you need to convince clients to stick with the world’s biggest CMS:

  • Security
  • Backups
  • Updates
  • Tests
Security

Hardening of WordPress and servers is a huge topic, but, to be honest, basic hardening against automatic attacks should not take more than 15 minutes for a  mid-level WordPress Developer. Here you have some examples:

  • do not use a login that is the same as the domain name
  • use strong passwords for WordPress, the hosting and the database
  • use separate databases for every website with a username that is different than the database name
  • use a separate domain hosting providers
  • use a custom table prefix
  • check the source of themes and plugins
  • change the default salts of WordPress Security Keys
  • restrict access to some files and folders like wp-config, .php, .htaccess and readme.html
  • hide the version of WordPress
  • secure the WordPress login page with basic authentication or change the default path of wp-admin
  • remove the XMLRPC

Services like Wix and Squarespace don’t allow you to take security into your own hands. With WordPress, you can trust a developer or host to make sure your site is being monitored every day.

Backups

The most valuable thing in backing up your site so you don’t break anything when you make changes. How to do it?

  • Create it automatically
  • Create it using a daily, weekly or monthly schedule.
  • Check the integrity of every file, to make sure that they weren’t changed in the meantime.
  • Store it outside of your server and hosting company (for example on an encrypted Amazon S3 cloud)

WordPress allows you to easily put backups into place. Because the CMS is so versatile, you can customize every piece of your site.

Updates

WordPress is the most popular CMS in the world. More than 29 percent of websites are built with it. It is created by a group of well-trained developers, which review the code every day. If they find a bug, they report it or fix it.

There is an entire team dedicated to finding and eradicating bugs on WordPress. The same can’t be said for the other options.

Scalability

The dream of many site owners is to turn their personal site into a website. With WordPress, you can manage a blog or portfolio or an enterprise site, all with one platform.

WordPress websites can handle much more traffic than the other options.

Conclusion

These reasons and many more show that WordPress is the right choice for any client of any size. It is the only option for a full-featured, customizable, secure site.

Every business needs a website to stay relevant. If you intend to grow, you need to be on WordPress. The proof is in the 29 percent of the web already using the CMS.

Dominik Kawula

WordPress Project Manager. Back-end developer and UX/UI bug hunter. Marketer and PR expert. Works for Perfect Dashboard (Enterprise Project Manager) and cooperates with Play (the biggest polish carrier, WordPress Project Manager). Co-organizes the biggest WordPress conferences in Poland: WordCamp Poland and WordUp Cracow. In free time, he likes making photos using the mobile phone and co-manages @IgersKrakow profile on the Instagram.

The post How to Convince Your Clients to Stay on WordPress appeared first on Torque.

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There are few things more demoralizing than returning from a nice New Year’s break to a mountain of work. Although we’d all like to take another holiday come February, the sad fact is that this is not a tenable solution. So how do you deal with burnout effectively?

The solution may appear cliched on the surface, but it’s actually very sound. Simply take a deep breath, step back, and assess your entire workload methodically. Having a plan in place for how to deal with a high workload can work wonders when it comes to alleviating stress.

In this article, we’ll look at how you can manage your New Year’s workload efficiently. We’ll also provide handy techniques and resources that can help you get through your backlog with your mental health intact. Let’s get started!

What ‘Burnout’ Means (And How It Can Severely Affect Your Health)

The word burnout gets thrown around a lot. We generally use it to refer to a feeling of exhaustion and lethargy, as well as a subsequent longing for a vacation. However, it’s actually much more of a serious issue and, if left unchecked, can seriously impact your mental health.

Burnout is essentially chronic stress that is brought on by a number of factors, either individually or combined. In a broad sense, it’s typically the result of overworking. What’s more, you’ll find that those with a high-achieving personality suffer from burnout symptoms the most.

Burnout can generally by recognized via these three tell-tail signs:

  1. Physical and emotional exhaustion.
  2. A detachment from others, along with a more cynical attitude towards life in general.
  3. Feelings of underachievement, and possibly a sense of helplessness toward your situation.

The early part of the year is typically the season for burnout, as workloads are inevitably high. For some, working intensely to ‘wind things up’ before the holidays takes its toll, and some even fail to ‘switch off’ during the time that should be reserved for relaxation. Returning to a backlog of work in the new year can manifest the symptoms described above.

Given that 13% of adults have trouble unwinding outside of work, it’s important to nip burnout in the bud before it starts. What’s more, the World Health Organization report that up to 12 billion working days will be lost over the next decade to depressive illness – and burnout plays an important role in that figure.

How to Manage a High Workload In the Short-Term (4 Key Methods)

There are ultimately two factors to consider for stopping burnout: what you do to relieve your workload now, and how you make sure it doesn’t become an issue in the future. We’ll begin with the short-term solutions, before moving on to the more permanent fixes.

1. Consider Your Personal Mindset

Taking the old developer adage of “garbage in, garbage out”, if you have a negative mental attitude, it will take a toll on your overall outlook. A key component of handling short-term stressful situations is taking some time to put yourself in a more positive frame of mind.

To do this, you’ll want to work on keeping yourself calm despite your external situation. This involves breathing deeply, slowing your thinking down, and shutting off to get your mind in order. This process may sound a little hokey if you aren’t used to it, but detaching yourself before diving in (even if that means just sitting in a quiet room for ten minutes) can really sharpen your focus.

2. Prioritize Your Workload

Another simple task to get you primed for handling a high workload is to prioritize efficiently. If you analyze why your workload is high, you’ll often find that it’s in part due to tackling non-urgent tasks before the more urgent ones. This tendency is understandable, as picking off low-hanging fruit is a tempting tactic. However, if this method is used for procrastination, it can cause problems further down the line.

Ultimately, you’ll need to consider what is essential to complete right now, what can be deferred until later, and what isn’t a priority at all. How you do this will be based on your own particular concerns, such as deadlines and the needs of your clients and colleague. However, looking into techniques such as the anti to-do list can provide you with some needed inspiration.

3. Structure Your Working Day For Maximum Efficiency

Once your work is suitably prioritized, the next consideration is how you’ll get it all done. This will involve becoming stricter about how you structure your working day.

Of course, the way you organize your day and prioritize tasks will depend on your unique circumstances. However, it’s worth looking into various popular strategies, such as the Pomodoro technique. Just remember that the primary concern is to make sure you can remain efficient, productive, and relatively unstressed.

4. Lean On Your Working Colleagues to Get Over the Hump

Finally, don’t dismiss the potential of leveraging your colleagues to get out of a tight spot. Trying to be self-sufficient is another reason why your workload might be too high, so bringing colleagues onboard (if possible) can help immeasurably.

Of course, the key phrase here is “if possible”. Freelancers won’t have this luxury, for example. If that isn’t the case for you, however, outsourcing your work to others could temporarily ease a sticky situation. There are potential downsides to outsourcing, such as the potential for a drop in work quality and even profits. However, it should be stressed again that this is a temporary solution to an immediate problem. Our advice is to factor in some ‘checking’ time. That way, you can make additional passes to ensure quality, once you receive the freelance work back.

For those working on a team, discussing your workload with a superior should always be the first step. They may not even be aware of your current situation. By bringing it up with them, you’ll more likely receive the help you need to get through the rough patch.

How to Eradicate Burnout For Good

While your short-term sanity is important, your long-term goal should be to make sure burnout doesn’t affect you moving forward. This should be the case regardless of whether you’re a freelancer, independently contracted, or employed full time. Naturally, you will want to implement one of the short-term solutions we discussed above before considering long term strategies. If you’re a freelancer, you may also need to think about hiring an employee to help ease the burden.

Once your New Year’s backlog is clear, you can start making sure you don’t find yourself in the same situation in the future. With that in mind, here are some tips to consider:

  • Take a look at how much work you can reasonably handle and strictly adhere to that limit, at least until you’re comfortable you have the additional capacity. Learning to say “no” is a key skill for any hard-working person.
  • Next, consider developing a more permanent way of handling high-pressure situations. Meditation is a prime example of a technique that can reduce your stress levels and enable you to remain balanced mentally.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask colleagues for help, and welcome collaboration. For example, you could join forces with a graphic designer to create site mockups, or hire an accountant to look after your books.
  • Develop honest and open communication with your work colleagues or other freelancers – kind of like a buddy system. Maintaining good communication can help ensure that you don’t fall into the same trap again the next time your workload starts to rise.

Getting to this point is a sign you’re on the right track to eliminating burnout for good. However, stress and pressure will still be a factor – these things are inevitable in all facets of life. The goal is to better manage them day-to-day, and make sure that the tougher periods are marked by productive and concerted effort, rather than panic and an inevitable bailout from others.

Conclusion

Given that billions of days per year are lost to poor mental health, keeping your nerves intact is essential for being able to maintain your living – especially if you’re a freelancer. Burnout can affect anyone, and if you’re already feeling the strain a few weeks into the new year, it’s time for a change.

This post has looked at burnout – including what it is, and how to better ensure that you don’t have to deal with it in the future. In particular, we’ve covered four ways to tackle a high workload calmly and efficiently:

  1. Develop a more positive personal mindset.
  2. Ascertain what work is high-priority, and focus on that first.
  3. Create a structured working day, to increase productivity.
  4. Use your colleague’s less taxing workloads to ease yours, if possible.

Do you have any thoughts on burnout and its effects? Let us know in the comments section below!

Featured image: moritz320.

John Hughes

John is a blogging addict, WordPress fanatic, and a staff writer for WordCandy.

The post How to Cope With New Year’s Burnout appeared first on Torque.

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WordPress is a global platform. With over 29 percent of the Internet, a lot of those users aren’t in English speaking countries. In fact, since 2014, there are more downloads not in English than in English. While WordPress defaults to English, it supports many languages and there are many great ways to translate WordPress post content.

WordPress’ translation-friendliness is not just necessary for global growth, but it fits with our community’s values of inclusivity and accessibility. One of the many prospective changes in accessibility I’ve had as a result of being involved in this community was that I need to conceptualize translation as an accessibility issue.

Making your site available in the languages of the customers you serve is essential if your audience is multi-lingual or if your site is in a country that mandates sites or types of site be available in more than one language.

To learn more about how to plan translations, implement them on your WordPress site, and keep them up to date, I spoke with two experts in the field — Lauren Jeffcoat, a customer support representative at WPML, the WordPress Multilingual Plugin created by OnTheGoSystems and  Jean-Francois Arseneault, a Managing Partner at S2B Solution, a Montreal-based web development agency who also offers SatelliteWP, a WordPress site maintenance service aimed at small businesses and web agencies.

What Common Mistakes Do You See WordPress Site Builders Make That Complicates The Translation Process?

Lauren: The most common mistakes I see are with language/plugin configuration, compatibility, and translation quality.

When configuring the site, there are some things to keep in mind when beginning translation. URL structure, permalinks, custom post type slug translation, etc. These types of issues can cause problems if you decide to change these settings after your translations have been created.  It helps to plan ahead, especially when translating a complex site to many different languages.

Another common problem that I see is plugins or themes that are not compatible with WPML. This can be something as minor as a translated string not showing up or can be as complex as causing a Fatal Error on the site when the conflicting plugins are activated.  We try hard to work directly with as many authors as we can and offer the Go-Global program to help make it easy to create Multilingual-ready themes and plugins.

Lastly, I see a number of issues when website builders opt to use machine translation over human translation.  Machine translation often results in incorrect, poorly translated content and can come across as spammy. This can hurt your SEO and also your online reputation. It’s important to take the time and money to invest in excellent, quality translations from a native speaker in the target language.

Jean-Francois: The most common issues we’ve seen over the years are two-fold.

The first issue would be plugins or themes that do not follow localization recommendations as outlined in the WordPress Plugin Developer Handbook. When that’s happened, at times, we’ve had to fork the plugin and adjust the offending PHP functions so it would follow i10n standards, while we would wait for the developer to amend their code and provide an updated version.

The second is not a mistake per se, but the fact that WPML has a rather imposing presence in the multilingual plugins dept., and as such, many developers feel it’s important and useful to make their plugin WPML-compatible. The issue arises when working on an existing site, perhaps a complex e-commere install, and that *one* plugin you’d need isn’t WPML-compatible, therefore cannot be used.

How Can People Identify The Languages Their Customers Or Likely Site Visitors Need?

Lauren: One thing to consider is how many languages  your budget can afford to be translated to and your team can support. If it doesn’t make sense to translate to 10 different languages, or that is not within your budget, start small with the language(s) of your main target audience.

If you are selling online, it’s important to sell to your clients in their native language, because many buyers will only want to purchase products in their native language.  You can determine where your customers are coming from by reviewing site analytics, but also keep in mind that a lack of traffic from different language speaking countries could in fact be due to a lack of translated content in those languages.

If you are just looking to expand to other languages and don’t have a target demographic, you can research to see which countries are using the internet the most here.

Jean-Francois: Of course, the region in which you offer your services will often dictate which languages you might be expected to support. In our home province, it will be French and English, whereas a business located in southwestern US will most likely consider English and Spanish.

If a client has been using a comprehensive analytics solution (Google Analytics, Piwik, etc), these will typically gather browser-based information, as well as clickstream data.

Armed with this information, and assuming that a significant portion of visitors will use a browser in their native tongue, we can have a good idea of which languages our visitors speak. The clickstream can help us see if visitors switch language (and therefore URL), as they access the homepage (or any page from search engine results).

How Can I Keep My Content Translations Up To Date Most Efficiently?

Lauren: When any content is updated on the website, the translated content should be updated also. WPML offers an easy interface to show translators which content has been changed and needs updating. Aside from updated content, you can make sure that the WordPress .po files are current by keeping up to date with updates.

Jean-Francois: There are various types of translations for a multilingual site, and they will live in different areas in a WordPress install.

While WordPress itself provides translations files (PO/MO) for most languages, some plugins may not bundle the language one needs. In that case, using tools such as POEdit or Loco Translate will provide means to generate the missing translation files, which will be stored in wp-content/languages/plugins/. Following each new major version of a plugin, one would then have to review the existing translations and add, adjust or delete translations as needed.

As for the content itself, that will always be stored in the database, regardless of the approach used to translate, whether that be a plugin like WPML / Polylang, or using the Multisite approach. Reviewing translations should only be required when new content is added, or when making changes in a language which should be duplicated to the other languages.

Where Can I Find Good Translations Services For WordPress?

Lauren: I recommend using professional translation services whenever possible. WPML has partnered with over 40 professional translation companies. This means that no matter what your budget or expertise, we are able to match you with an excellent translation service that provides high quality translations that are quick and affordable.  We can also match a service based on area of expertise or language.

If opting not to use professional translation services, then be sure that local translators are proofreading the translated content and I always recommend a second translator review the content as well.

When using .po/.mo files for translation, be sure they are downloaded from a good source.

Jean-Francois: Up to now, we’ve always worked with local translators, whether it be for French, English, or Spanish, and the reason is simple : we understand the importance of context and culture. Of course, those translations were meant for Canada-based visitors.

Had it been for use in another country, I would have favored working with translators familiar with the culture of the targeted country… the simplest details can make a difference when trying to connect with a reader : using the right expression, when to use word contractions, familiar vs formal writing style… all these make a difference.

Stay Global

I’m finishing up this article on my way to WordCamp US 2017, where over a thousand WordPress professionals will gather from all over the world. And yes, our major event of the year is in English, like our software defaults to.

But, this group and the tens of thousands of people like us throughout the world will be making sites for people who speak a wide variety of language. So don’t forget to make sure all of your code is translation-ready and our sites are available in the necessary languages.

Josh Pollock

Josh is a WordPress developer and educator. He is the founder of Caldera Labs, makers of awesome WordPress tools including Caldera Forms — a drag and drop, responsive WordPress form builder. He teaches WordPress development at Caldera Learn.

The post WordPress Translation is an Accessibility Issue, Don’t Fall Behind appeared first on Torque.

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After a while, every website needs a redesign. Trends change, UI/UX features evolve and it’s only fitting that you keep up with them. However, you have strong rankings, traffic is growing as well as the profits, so it’s understandable that you are worried. It’s not uncommon to make mistakes during redesign that can cost you all that you’ve achieved so far.

These are some of the things you can do to prevent an SEO disaster while doing a website makeover.

Crawl the website

Before applying any changes or even prior to planning the redesign, crawl your website. This step will give you information about the structure, URLs, and metadata of your site. You will need all that information to know what to do and update once the new website is up.

Tools like Screaming Frog will help you get those reports, so you can export them to spreadsheets and evaluate what you should do. Never start redesigning before you have a sound plan in place so you can avoid as many mistakes as possible and maintain the same quality of SEO.

Perform an audit

Google Analytics is an important tool which will show you a list of pages ranked on Google. This is useful because you can have insight into which parts of your website are doing great and which need some adjustments.

Namely, it will provide you with information on all the pages that people have visited on your website and landed there through Google search. Based on this data you can review the strategies and implement the ones that work. There are also some other tools you can use for audit besides Google Analytics, it all depends on your preferences.

Inbound link analysis

Inbound links are those URLs from another website pointing back to your own site. So you can imagine the loss if you don’t check all these links during the redesign. Although 301 redirect will take care of this in some manner, it is also important to perform the analysis, too.

It will make sure that all the inbound links work and that you didn’t lose them since that can be damaging for SEO. Tools like Moz Open Site Explorer and Ahrefs will help you do this and keep all your inbound links safe and sound.

301 redirects

It’s important to maintain the same URL structure since it will save you a lot of time. But sometimes that’s not an option and you must change a few things. Since doing it wrong can cause problems, this SEO step should be done carefully. Implement 301 redirects for all the pages with new URLs so visitors land in the right place.

Failing to do so can cost you traffic from inbound links and set you back considerably when it comes to SEO. If you’re not sure how to do this properly, contact professionals like GWM or study the tutorials like SEO Starter Guide by Google.

New sitemap

Users very often do not create a new sitemap, since they believe that 301 redirect is enough for Google indexing. Updating the existing sitemap will make it easier for search engines to find the new URLs, but it will also be helpful to you for any future changes.

This means that you have to crawl your website one more time after the redesign. Match the old crawl with this new one so that you make sure that all the URLs are properly ranked and indexed. Another plus side of this step is that you will see what’s missing and needs replacing on the new website.

Backup everything

Backup is always important when you work with sensitive and important data. So it’s only normal that you have to also backup the old website before you replace it with the new one. This will keep your old files and databases safe and close by if you need them. Only after you’ve backed up everything can you publish your new website by replacing the old files.

Lastly

Don’t be surprised if your redesigned website experiences some fluctuation. This is completely normal and expected. It will also be minimal if you have implemented the advice from this article and thus kept most of the SEO intact.

David Koller

David Koller is a passionate blogger and copywriter for Media Gurus, mainly interested in SEO and Digital Marketing.

The post Avoid SEO Disaster While Redesigning Your Website appeared first on Torque.

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We’re currently living in a time where brands rely on the powers of SEO and UX to make their brand and content stand apart from the rest of the competition. Not only do people want to stand apart from the rest on their field, but they also want to entice the biggest audience as well.

Over the last few years, website design has changed, many trends have come and gone. The same goes for SEO keyword trends. It’s impossible to predict the future, but we can still make some design worthy guesses about it.

In this article, we’ll be focusing on how you can balance SEO and UX.

What Is SEO?

SEO means Search Engine Optimization, it’s generally known as the practice of increasing the quantity and quality of traffic to your website or blog through organic search engine results. This can generally be done by including words that are trending in your industry and by also interacting with your community. By making sure you do this you’re bound to see how fast your audience will grow in a short amount of time.

What Is UX Design?

User experience design includes a bunch of different disciplines—such as interaction design, information architecture, visual design, usability, and human-computer interaction. When people discuss UX design, you’ll often see people discussing ways to make the way people interact with a website simple and easy, sometimes even fun. UX will help your site be remembered and loved by the community that supports you. When you incorporate UX design into your site, you’re already ahead of the curve.

Balancing Usability

According to Moz when it comes to the quality of the site and balancing these two elements: “Usability and user experience…provide an indirect but measurable benefit to a site’s external popularity, which the engines can then interpret as a signal of higher quality. This is called the “no one likes to link to a crummy site” phenomenon.”

It’s up to you to find how you can incorporate SEO keywords into your blog while still making the blog stand out and function smoothly. A great way to do this is by making sure your blog has white space, this will allow the reader’s eyes to breathe, allowing for a more relaxing experience, while still being able to highlight the SEO keywords.

They Won’t Suffer

While yes, you will come across times when dealing with your website design where you might need to sacrifice UX for SEO and vice versa, but being able to find what works more in favor for your brand does not mean the two elements are not balanced.

When your blog or website takes advantage of UX and SEO, it’s up to you to find out exactly what will work the best with you and your brand. Every brand is very different, so it’s common that you won’t know what exactly works for you until you actually try it and see the response.

How To Find The Middle Ground

The middle ground to balancing SEO and UX design is to ensure that you’re retaining visitors on your site. If you can entice an audience to stay, not only will that show SEO that you’re site is of interest to the individual because they spent a longer time there, but it also speaks well for your design, because of the interaction with the individuals and the time they dedicated to that specific page.

A few great ways to incorporate a nice balance goes as follows:

  • Make sure your logo and navigation are clear so the user knows where they are.
  • Get rid of clutter, make sure everything has a purpose, which can ease the UX design and amplify the use of SEO keywords.
  • Try designing your site in any easy to use fashion so you can find the perfect balance that works for your unique niche.
  • Use subheaders in your blogs so you can organize your content, perfect to keep people engaged, this will also allow you to use more SEO keywords!
Conclusion

Whether you’re just starting out with a website or blog, or you’ve been around for awhile and want to refresh your work. It’s up to you whether or not you go out there and find what kind of balance of SEO and UX you will feel is the perfect fit. Like we mentioned before it is very important that you find what works for you because every brand is different.

Hopefully, these tools will stay with you and you’ll be able to make a difference with your brand. Get out there and reach a bigger audience, you got this!

Irina Vi

My name is Irina, I am a certified specialist in advertising and public relations, journalist. For over two years I have specialized in design issues in various fields (interior design, web design, graphic design).

The post How To Balance SEO And UX Design appeared first on Torque.

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Doc’s WordPress News Drop is a weekly report on the most pressing WordPress news. When the news drops, I will pick it up and deliver it right to you.

WordPress 4.9.3 Breaks Auto-Updates - YouTube

This week Doc talks about how WordPress version 4.9.3 breaks the auto-update feature and how 4.9.4 fixes it.

Doc also covers the recent Browsealoud plugin hack, which used a supply chain attack to take advantage of site visitor traffic for cryptomining purposes.

WordCamp Europe is looking for volunteers.

Don’t forget to nominate your favorite plugins for our Plugin Madness competition.

Love WordPress News, but hate reading? My name is Doc and this is Doc Pop’s News Drop.

If you watched last week’s News Drop then you may have noticed that as I was talking about WordPress version 4.9.3, an even newer version of WordPress came out. So I had to awkwardly add a note about the new version as I was editing the video. WordPress 4.9.4 only fixed one bug, so why was it so important that it was released within 24 hours of the previous update.

While WordPress 4.9.3 fixed 34 bugs, it ended up breaking the automatic update feature that many sites rely on to keep on the current WordPress version.

I’m a big fan of this auto-update feature and highly recommend most people leave it on. This feature only updates minor versions of WordPress by default, so if you had the feature on, it would have auto-updated from 4.9.2 to 4.9.3 last week, but that’s the version that broke auto-updates. Because of that, many users will need go in and manually update to version 4.9.4 to restore the auto-update functionality. Luckily, most WordPress sites may not be affected. If you are running a managed WordPress hosting for instance, there’s a good chance that your host would have manually updated your site to 4.9.4 for you.

If you aren’t sure if you were affected, I’d recommend simply opening your WP Dashboard and confirming you are on 4.9.4 or higher.

Speaking of updates, WordCamp Europe is looking for volunteers.
This year’s WordCamp Europe will be hosted in Belgrade Serbia on June 14th through the 16th. Last year’s event had 1,900 attendees, which is even more than WordCamp US, so it’s safe to say this is going to be the largest WordPress meetup in the world. In a recent post, the organizers put out a call for photographers to volunteer to document the event. If you are interested, you can go to 2018.europe.wordcamp.org for more info.
Our website, Torque Magazine, is actually a media partner for this event, so I’m hoping to visit Belgrade myself and share as many video interviews as I possibly can. I shot 8 interviews at WordCamp US last year.

In security news, cryptomining attacks are on the rise. On Sunday, researchers discovered that Browsealoud, a popular accessibility plugin, was compromised in a Supply Chain Attack. When installed, Browsealoud could read or translate text on your site out loud for site visitors, but the site relied on a Content Delivery System to do all the processing so your site didn’t have to. When visitors came to an affected site, the malware would use that visitors CPU to mine for cryptocurrency.

Luckily all that would have been affected is a slower computer and a higher energy bill, but apparently the hack could have been much worse. For example, it could have been collecting highly sensitive personal information.
Over 4,000 sites were affected by this hack, including the UK National Healthcare service and several Australian Provencial Government websites. Once a CDN host is compromised in a supply chain attack, sites reliant on that host, like the Browsealoud plugin, would have been affected immediately, but in this particular case the malware was detected and fixed within 4 hours of being compromised.

And just a final reminder that plugin madness is just around the corner, voting starts on March 5th, but if you haven’t yet, please be sure to visit PluginMadness.com and nominate your favorite WordPress plugins.

That’s it for this week’s News Drop, as always, I wanted to say thanks to all of you who have liked and subscribed to our videos. It’s great to see those numbers on the rise.

You can get more WordPress news from our website, Torquemag.io and stay tuned next week for more WordPress news.

Doc Pop

Doctor Popular is an artist and musician living in San Francisco. As a full disclaimer, he is neither a doctor nor popular.

The post Doc Pop’s News Drop: 4.9.3 Breaks Auto-Updates, Browsealoud Breaks Government Websites, and WCEU Call For Volunteers appeared first on Torque.

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