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Last summer, Geoffrey Owens, once a regular on the legendary Cosby Show, was seen working a — *gulp* — regular job at Trader Joe’s. The press quickly ran with the story, and people around the world began making negative comments about Owens’s situation. Owens ended up quitting his job because of all the unwanted attention.

However, there was a silver lining in all of this: Tyler Perry invited Owens to join the cast of his show, The Haves and the Have Nots.

Think about this: Press coverage put Owens’s name out there, and while there was a little turbulence at first, that coverage also led to a new job for Owens.

There’s a lesson here for every job seeker. Today’s job search is all about making yourself seen. If employers know who you are and what you can do, they’ll turn to you when they need someone with your skills.

So few job seekers use all the tools available at their fingertips to stand out. While different searches will require different strategies, there are a few easy steps almost anyone can take to maximize their visibility:

1. Showcase Your Personality on Social Media

As I always say, employers can’t train great personalities — they have to hire them. Why not spice up your public social media profile pages with exciting cover art and other details that showcase who you are as a person? Instead of coming across as a generic job seeker, personalize your profile and give people a reason to stay on your page a little longer. Tell a story about yourself — a sincere, personal story. Help employers see you as more than just another candidate.

2. Create a Facebook or Instagram Business Page for Your Job Search

Employers want to see your personal Facebook page because it tells them a lot about who you are, but your privacy settings say, “No way!”

No problem: You can create a public business page for yourself instead. This can be dedicated to your professional journey while keeping your personal page personal. Use your business page to share your professional musings and post content that delivers value to your readers and potential employers.

You can also use your business pages to run ads to better target employers on these platforms. Master entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk swears by Instagram ads for brands. Why shouldn’t you try a similar strategy to increase your own visibility?

3. Start a Blog

While a social media page can be a good supplement, your professional presence should really have its own headquarters on the web. A blog hosted on WordPress or a similar service is a great way to do this.

With your own dedicated site, you can control the positive professional narrative about your abilities, explore ideas, take your readers on your journey, and tell great stories about your achievements. At a basic level, a WordPress site costs less than $50 a year to maintain. That’s a small price to pay for a robust, multimedia professional portfolio.

4. Host a Local Radio Show

Does your community have a local radio station? Ask if you can host a weekly show.

Many cities have local stations that encourage community members to participate in content creation. Go ahead and get involved! You can use your show to interview employers and entrepreneurs, chat with industry experts, and answer questions from listeners. Not only will you create a valuable resource for your community, but you’ll also build a powerful channel for reaching potential employers.

5. Volunteer

Charity work is a great way to hone specific skills that can help you land your next job, even if you’re currently employed. If you’re not employed, it’s also a great way to gain additional experience and fill the gaps in your resume.

Additionally, Antonio Boyd, CEO, and president of The Think Tank Consulting Group, once told me that volunteering also enhances your understanding of people. This boosts your soft skills and makes you a better team player.

Finally, volunteering can also connect you with organizations you want to work for. By working with a nonprofit, you can meet local employers who support that nonprofit’s mission. These connections can be leveraged into job opportunities once you’ve demonstrated your value through your volunteer work.

When you’re building a stand-out brand, use these strategies plus any others that can help you broadcast your value effectively. Whatever tactics you choose, be sure they truly assist your job search and capture the attention of the right audience.

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Underemployment can feel worse than unemployment because there are traps. Your mindset is more important than strategy. In this last episode, I discuss 5 ways to rethink your next moves out of underemployment. 
 
 Here’s how you can join the conversation:
– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com
 
BLS reported May 3, “the unemployment rate declined to 3.6 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Notable job gains occurred in professional and business services, construction, health care, and social assistance.”
 
The only underemployment related stats are here:
“The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 4.7 million in April. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part-time because reduced hours or because they were unable to find full-time jobs.”
 
Highlights:
Find the April’s Bureau of Labor and Statistics report here
 
Underemployment
Part-time workers who can’t find full-time jobs in their field
People voluntarily work pt because they are in-between career decisions
People voluntarily pt because that is their decision – to work two or three pt jobs because they love those areas
 
 PayScale survey, 46 percent of respondents said they believed they were underemployed. Of those respondents, 76 percent said they felt underemployed because they were not using their education or training. While the Bureau of Labor Statistics does not measure underemployment because of “the difficulty of developing an objective set of criteria,” it is safe to say that underemployment is a severe social challenge harming our economy.
 
If you don’t want to be underemployed here are some tips:
 
  1. Fight the urge to be complacent or settle even if the opportunity is a lousy ft job
  2. As personal trials start to take up space, you can’t ignore the impact
  3. Embrace rejection, but it is not the verdict
  4. Learn more to develop professional, and be an asset to others
  5. It helps to prepare for a longer journey
 
Look for my summer content on the blog and don’t forget to sign-up for the newsletter! 
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The Voice of Job Seekers by Mark Anthony Dyson, Mark Anthony Dy.. - 2M ago

Career burnout is real, and most professionals are not sure what the signs or symptoms are if they experience it. Burnout hinders how you come across in networking or workplace environments. Join me and my guest, Rachel Montanez, as we discuss what career burnout looks like, how it would affect your sleep, and what you can do about it.

 Here’s how you can join the conversation:
– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com
More about Rachel:
Rachel Montanez is a career coach and a Forbes contributing writer. She also trains and speaks about career burnout in her articles on Forbes and on her blog, Sleep10to2.  Rachel has been a career coach for more than the last nine years helping job seekers find opportunities. The uniqueness of her expertise is her study and content regarding rest and sleep.
Here are a few highlights from our conversation:
  • Burnout is often paired with someone who is not enjoying their job
  • As a society, we’re starting to talk more about it
  • Job search while working should have a strategy for handling the stress
  • It would be useful to have a self-care strategy at the beginning of your job search
  • We discussed how do professionals set limits to avoid burnouts
  • Awareness on the burnout spectrum is a step toward managing potential burnout
  • Take a realistic synopsis of what’s going on at work – learn how the brain works – manage your energy
  • Small wins boost energy – get outside opinions (blogs, podcasts or other resources)

Two more shows before the end of the season. My annual podcast hiatus is from June 1 – Sept. 10. The newsletter will continue to be sent out to those on the mailing list at least once a month. I will continue to publish articles on the blog at least twice a month.

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The Voice of Job Seekers by Mark Anthony Dyson, Mark Anthony Dy.. - 3M ago
There are so many angles to explore while discussing institutional bias, and you can only talk about a few at a time. Lizette Ojeda, PhD. is my guest today to discuss research and strategies to overcome bias during a job search. 
 
 Here’s how you can join the conversation:
– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com
More about Lizette:

Career Psychologist for Executive Women in STEM who want to reignite their career, fulfill their true potential & have a balanced life. She is also a Professor at Texas A & M University. 

Highlights of our discussion: 
  • Studies show that during the hiring process ethnic names are at a disadvantage when compared to traditional Anglo-Saxon names
  • “We are all conditioned to have assumptions”
  • “…recognize it and act on it without letting it affect you as much as you possibly control”
  •   Biases vary by industry – gender, ethnicity, and race are enhanced if it’s a dominant male industry
  • Hair is a very personal thing and biases toward hair (like dreadlocks) make it personal
  • The song “Signs” was referenced during our conversation showing biases toward hair is nothing new
  • Location, area codes, are subject to bias because of where you live has a reputation
  • Episode 42 was referenced because of the discussion on name bias
  • Lizette shares several strategies on how people of color can find diverse, friendly companies
Two more shows before the end of the season. My annual podcast hiatus is from June 1 – Sept. 10. The newsletter will continue to be sent out to those on the mailing list at least once a month. I will continue to publish articles on the blog at least twice a month.
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When it’s time to job search, how proactive have you been? Aren’t you vigilant for future opportunities? Probably not. This is part of the conversation Chris Hensley and I had on his show on KPFT-FM and Money Matters Podcast.

 Here’s how you can join the conversation:
– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com
Here is more information about Chris:

His show on the KPFT-FM platform is also published as his podcast. By day, he is the president of his financial company,  Houston First Financial Group. He is committed to the coaching process, guiding others to achieve mastery of skills and realizations of their own goals and objectives. His podcast has more than 225 episodes. 

Here are a few highlights from the show: 
  • Most professionals are only engaged in their career when it’s time to job hunt
  • Job search is hard and it takes time
  • Networking, referrals are essential
  • General resumes are lost in the black hole of online applications
  • Customized resumes to each company increase chances
  • Many layers to the hiring process
  • Discern and examine job advice, not all of it fits you

If you haven’t signed up for my email list to get my free eGuide, 219 Easy Modern Job Search Tips for 2019, then you can get it immediately here! You can also get up-to-date job search tips through this newsletter!

Three more shows before the end of the season. My annual podcast hiatus is from June 1 – Sept. 10. The newsletter will continue to be sent out to those on the mailing list at least once a month. I will continue to publish articles on the blog at least twice a month.

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We’re one, but we’re not the same

We get to carry each other…

One, U2

Over the years, I weight-lifted alone, but when I needed a spotter, there were people at my gym who helped me. Spotters are essential when the weight becomes too heavy. This year, I hurt my shoulder lifting weights even though I had someone to help. The injury wasn’t serious, but it could have been worse without help.

I learned to cope with it and the occasional throbbing, and it hasn’t stopped me. I can do other workouts and avoid that body part, which is what most people would do. Or I can do a different exercise requiring me to recruit other muscles to help that muscle.

If my body were my marriage and my shoulder were my job search, I would need my spouse to compensate for encouragement and strength when my job search was difficult. When I exert more with my weaker shoulder, I experience discomfort and more pain. So I need her to give me her version of a deep tissue massage on demand (asking oh so nicely). I do it for her when she needs it. At least that’s the way it should be. Right?

We’re taught in school, Sunday school, and marriage counseling that two are better than one in school, fitness, and business. Then how is it weirdly practiced when it comes to marriage? Studies show a two-person leadership team thrives, so why can’t marriage? It’s almost like we have this limiting belief that marriage cannot possibly benefit the careers of both spouses. When it comes to marriage and the careers of spouses, it gets weird, but it shouldn’t be.

I agree with experts: Constant communication is key. I found eight ways your marriage empowers your career when communication is a priority:

1. Your spouse knows how your strengths and weaknesses manifest

After the first six months, spouses discover how each other’s strengths and weaknesses affect their relationship. They will tell you honestly (although not always in the best way) what it looks like to them. Don’t take years to trust their judgment about what it looks like to others. It’s possible to look one way to employers and another to your network. Just as in weight-lifting, you need the spotter for the rep you can’t finish.

2. Access the power of your spouse’s network

You never know who your spouse is connected to in their network. You double your network and maybe your “net worth” in opportunities. And remember both sets of parents in having an immediate reach of contacts. For your in-laws to say they would like to refer their son-in-law or daughter-in-law carries weight.

Read 10 Ways Your Spouse Can Boost Your Career

3. Tell the truth

It’s always best to surround yourself with people who will be direct and truthful with you. In so many words, the times when I said the load was too heavy, like a spotter she shouted, “You can do it!” Everyone needs a spotter like her. This “spurring on” works best when more time is spent building each other up. Tearing down your spouse is easy because you know where the weaknesses are — but build each other up quickly with the truth, so those weaknesses are stronger than before. The process hurts but mostly needed to help your spouse’s career goals.

4. Bring out the best

Through competitive agitation or spurring one on to do their best, a spouse has a way of pressing the right buttons. It doesn’t always take someone understanding the full scope of the other’s profession.

Everyone needs courage, patience, persistence, perseverance, and resilience. A spouse in more ways than one inspires like no one.
Click To Tweet

5. Sustain positivity

Your home is your refuge from work and frankly from the rest of the world, due to a unique but powerful character trait stemming from both people. When the home environment is fun, inspiring, and peaceful, it is a powerful tool to help during a long and discouraging job search.

Read Why Has Your Spouse Lost Her Mind When You Lost Your Job

6. Carry each other

Marriage requires 100% out of each, not 50–50. There are times when you’ll need to carry each other in your job search and workplace trials. The strongest marriages thrive by both spouses carrying a load physically, financially, and spiritually at some point. One may have a more responsive network than the other. “Your network is my network” should be the attitude.

7. Be a cheerleader/coach/encourager

My wife is the greatest source of encouragement I have. My mom is an excellent source, but no one energizes me like my wife. Conversely, no one can crush my feelings like my wife. When I had times of unemployment, I stayed on her good side as much as possible, which meant more than spending much of my time looking for a job.

Letting the frustration from your job search come to your home to ransack it is a mistake. You need all the encouragement you can get.
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8. Buffer the blows

When a job seeker senses things are terrible, the working spouse can help put things in perspective. All of us need a listening ear to make sense of nonsense and help defuse bombs before they go off. There is no such thing as a smooth job search.

When one spouse is going through a job search, then both are experiencing the effects. It can consume both spouses if it becomes a slow process. That is why it’s better for both to work as a team to shorten the search. Most people think about their contributions in one way, but there are many ways to lessen the stress and anxiety of uncertainty. One thing for sure: It’s helpful for the job-seeking spouse not to go it alone.

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How is your financial footing? Is your job search financially ready? Are you taking on a new position and need to make sure you have the right benefits for you? I talked with Aja (ah-jah) McClanahan to discuss things you to consider preparing for a job search, during a job search, accepting an offer, and at the start of a new one.
Got comments about the show? Here’s how you can join the conversation:
– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com
Here is more information about Aja: 
Aja is the founder of Principles of Increase, a site that helps people dump financial habits and debt, make extra money and build wealth. Her blog has many helpful tools and resources to improve your financial journey. She’s been featured in Inc., Yahoo Finance, and MarketWatch.
Here are a few highlights from the show: 
  • Aja offers advice for those who do Air BnB as an example of how companies were helping those who were on Federal furlough
  • Talking to creditors – They are often helpful
  • Being a saver is creating a good financial habit
  • Digit and Tip yourself apps are helpful to save money
  • Hide money from yourself
  • Aja explains how her kids make money for their future
  • Move tax-deferred accounts with your jobs with comparable accounts – “Don’t forget the loot!”
  • Have an exit plan before it’s needed on how you want to move your money
  • Negotiating: You don’t have to take the “boilerplate” offer
If you haven’t signed up for my email list to get my free eGuide, 219 Easy Modern Job Search Tips for 2019, then you can get it immediately here! You can also get up-to-date job search tips through this newsletter!
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Editor’s note: This week’s article is written by Brad Miller, TheMilitaryGuide.org

Veterans leave the military equipped with a variety of life and job skills that most professionals don’t possess. For that reason, businesses actively target recently discharged veterans when recruiting talent.

But if you’re a former service member, you still need to advocate for yourself in cover letters and interviews to make sure potential employers know exactly why you’re valuable and how your military skills can fulfill the company’s needs.

The good news is, you can answer the age-old interview question, “What are your strengths?” with several of these significant reasons why any company should consider hiring you — and other veterans.

Listen to Career Transition Strategies for Military Veterans

Veterans have strong job experience

The U.S. military invests a lot in training its members. Regardless of position or specialty, it’s guaranteed that a person in any branch of service receives superior training and comes out with top-notch skills. For example, depending on your military job, you may carry such certifications as:

  • Medical skills — first aid, CPR, or AED use
  • Security skills — handling detainees, maintaining public safety, or operating firearms
  • Construction skillsoperating heavy equipment, estimating budgets, or oversee completion of projects
  • Inventory management skills — keeping track of gear, sensitive equipment, or weapons

Due to the intense and thorough training received throughout a military career, veterans emerge well-prepared to fill jobs across many industries. On a résumé, a skill may look “too military”; however, you can often persuade an interviewer to dig a little deeper. Once they grasp exactly how your military skills and experience transfer to their industry, they’ll see why hiring you can be the right decision.

Veterans possess highly sought-after ‘soft’ skills

While hard skills are necessary to do a job, they can be taught, or existing skills enhanced through education and additional training. However, soft skills are another story: These are often innate qualities or ones instilled by repeated lessons — and not everyone has them.

Read The Military to the Civilian Job Market Transition

According to one survey, a whopping 93 percent of employers said soft skills are an “essential” or “very important” consideration when they look to hire new employees. Many of those employers also said these attributes are hard to find in job candidates. When interviewing, you should be able to explain to potential employers that veterans tend to possess the top soft skills they’re seeking:

  • Problem-solving — You instinctively know how to troubleshoot because the military trained you to do so, often under intense pressure. One survey found that  62 percent of employers sought candidates with strong problem-solving skills.
  • Leadership — Military members are trained to lead by example in any given role. You instinctively understand how direction, delegation, inspiration, and motivation are all important leadership tools.
  • Time management — The military runs by the clock, and employers who hire veterans can rest assured that their team members will make the most efficient and valuable use of their time. You’ve become highly skilled at getting things done because punctuality is ingrained by rote as part of the military timetable.
  • Communication — In the armed forces, teams rely heavily on communication to complete a mission and/or remain safe. This means you understand the importance of clear communication and pay careful attention to what is said. Poor communication leads to misunderstandings, and there is no room for that in military missions.
  • Adaptability — Considering that active-duty military members relocate or move every three years on average (not including deployments in between), potential employers should understand how effectively veterans adapt to change — in this case, relocation, frequent travel, or off-site meetings — without complaint. Organizational change is often cited by employers as a tough challenge to overcome, making veterans a perfect choice in such situations. You not only adapt to changes; you’re typically able to lead people through them.
Veterans strengthen your team

When employers are looking for a motivated and ethical person who’s willing to work hard, you can assure them that hiring a former service member makes good business sense. Built on the foundation of a strong work ethic, the collection of positive attributes that veterans possess is often hard to find in other candidates.

  • Well-versed in teamwork You thoroughly understand how to cooperate as a proactive, positive and diligent team member. Ingrained feelings of responsibility toward fellow team members make veterans especially considerate when working with others.
  • Able to work independently — Military members are also trained to be able to work independently when needed. This makes you a valuable solo asset as well as a useful leader.
  • Adept at conflict resolution — Living a military life usually means you’ve faced serious conflict. Every military branch trains its members to navigate conflict and find a workable solution. Let potential employers know that conflict resolution is a huge strength they can find in their veteran hires.
  • Strong performers under pressure — Military life comes with pressure; it’s a part of the job description. You well know the implications of tight schedules and limited resources. After surmounting sometimes-literal life-or-death situations, veteran hires often easily transition to coping in high-pressure business environments.
  • Quality customer service skills — You’re used to cooperating with others, and your strong communication skills transfer nicely to customer service jobs. Veterans often excel at managing customer communication and interactions.
  • Dedicated to following protocol — Without rules or accountability, things fall apart; you’ve likely learned this throughout your military career. Veterans understand the importance of regulations and protocols, having lived through conditions with and without them. As a result, most vets adapt to their place in an organization and take job responsibilities seriously.
  • Possess an accelerated learning curve — As military policies and missions change, so do your job requirements. Remind potential employers that former military members are used to consistently demonstrating an aptitude for quickly learning new skills and concepts.

Employers that actively recruit former service members find they acquire employees who are able to take on leadership roles right from the start. Even if they don’t, these employees tend to advance quickly due to their personal attributes, belief systems and willingness to dedicate themselves to doing a good job.

You can use your job search and interview process as an opportunity to advocate for yourself and other former service members — all the while educating potential employers about the many good reasons to consider hiring a veteran. Former military members retain the “mission” mindset, meaning they focus on “achievement, cooperation, and personal development” — all important attributes that make a workplace better, stronger, and more competitive.

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Not everyone enjoys college basketball, but the NCAA’s March Madness tournament is an exciting thing to watch. I, personally, get hooked on the enthusiasm of the fans. I also love those last-minute game-winning shots, especially when the home crowd rushes the court to celebrate.

In stark contrast to the spirit of March Madness, your average job search is rarely a celebratory affair. The experience is intense, but for many, it’s more like torture than a basketball tournament.

That said, the interview process does have some things in common with a basketball tournament. Each candidate is scrutinized for strengths, weaknesses, and potential competitiveness. Those who make it through each round of the interview process will eventually emerge victorious above all competitors.

Read  7 Ways to WOW Employers This Year

Unfortunately, few candidates really understand their value.

My clients never seem to understand their full potential until I’ve worked closely with them to flesh it all out.

You don’t necessarily need a career consultant to cheer you on through the job search. You can capture the exciting spirit of March Madness in your own job search by following some of these tips:
Click To Tweet

1. Get Some Early Wins

In March Madness, the losers go home with no second chance. Similarly, when no one notices your unique abilities, you have no shot at landing your dream job.

You win when your achievements meet the employer’s needs. How can you score some early wins to really show off your skills? Schedule some informational interviews. Find employees at your target companies and network. Get that first request for an interview.

Read 8 Ways to Foster Effective Job Interview Conversations

2. Get Your Team Involved

It’s rare for an individual to carry their whole team all the way to the championship. Making it that far takes everyone doing their part.

You, similarly, need a job search team. Career coaches, references, supportive network contacts, and even the people who watch your kids while you go on interviews – they are your team. You must keep all of your teammates engaged and enthusiastic in order to succeed.

3. Out-Compete Other Candidates

You need to compete to land the job. You need to impress the potential employer more than anyone else does.

To do this, you need to know what your competitors are doing and how they are winning over employers. The point is not to copy your competitors. On the contrary, you will need to do better than they do; you will need to exceed the employer’s expectations.

The winner in any job search is the one who delivers the most value to the employer.
Click To Tweet

4. Use Your Timeouts Wisely

During March Madness, coaches wait to use their timeouts until doing so is critical. Similarly, the use of timeouts at the right moments is crucial to your job search success and your well-being. Take timeouts wisely. Give your body and mind time to re-energize when need be.

Listen to  You’ll Need These Linkedin Strategies for Job Search Readiness with Marc Miller

5. Finish Strong

Even if your interview went well, you must accept your competition might do better. The little things matter. Thank-you notes, follow-up calls, and how you treat the people with whom you come in contact make all the difference. Your best bet is to connect with interviewers and potential referrers on social media and through personal contact. Keep the relationships warm.

Those of us who watch the NCAA tournament understand the enthusiasm, drama, and unpredictability of March Madness. The competitive spirit makes it exciting for us fans.

Many job seekers enter “Job Search Madness” knowing others are doing the same, but few understand the competitiveness needed to win over employers. Just as you expect a team to compete in order to win the tournament, you should expect to put in the same kind of effort to position yourself as the best candidate.

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The Voice of Job Seekers by Mark Anthony Dyson, Mark Anthony Dy.. - 5M ago
My guest, Dr. Nichelle Manuel, says “data is the new currency.” I believe she’s right and today’s show reflects the importance of a proactive role for your life and career.
Got comments about the show? Here’s to be a part of the discussion: 
– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com
Here’s more information about Nichelle Manuel:
Nichelle received her doctorate of business and management information systems from Argosy University. She has been in the IT field for the last 20 years and current serves several educational roles including the Keller Graduate School of Management.
Here are some highlights from our discussion: 
  • The importance of cyber security is similar to eating healthy
  • Data is the new currency
  • Compromised private data could change your life, hackers can rearrange your data
  • It could take years to fix credit, Social Security reports when it’s been hacked
  • The use of duckduckgo.com, better in masking your search and protecting privacy
  • Job seekers are often the most vulnerable to scams – need to be proactive
  • Turning off bluetooth, use VPN – get the paid version
  • Nichelle recommends using IP Vanish for public Wifi or payments online at home
  • She says there is no such thing as anonymity
  • Consider using a password manager – at least with 24 characters for each password
  • Take extra precaution – 2 step authentication
If you haven’t signed up for my email list to get my free eGuide, 219 Easy Modern Job Search Tips for 2019, then you can get it immediately here! You can also get up-to-date job search tips through this newsletter!

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