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For mass communications majors at college, getting a television or radio reporting gig was a major career stepping stone. I was not one of those mass communications majors, but when I saw a job posting for a reporter position with a radio program, I decided to apply.

I knew the competition would be substantial, and that I would be at a disadvantage. I was a communications major, but not a mass communications major. Most of those students had experience writing copy and talking in front of cameras. Even if they had only practiced in simulations, they still had more experience than I had.

But I knew I had a few things going for me: gumption, a recorder, and a profound sense of curiosity. I also paid attention to detail. The application process required candidates to submit sample interviews, which I did. An associate dean at my university was kind enough to give me 20 minutes of his time to discuss his enthusiastic study of ghosts. I knew I had nailed a topic no one else would think of.

I got the job, beating out the dozens of mass communication majors who applied. Anne, the news director at the program, told me I was the only candidate to submit an interview. She said she kept telling applicants, “You have to go and talk to people!”

Being compensated for doing something I loved was a dream come true. That job had everything: flexibility, fun, and adventure. It also taught me a few valuable life lessons that I still carry with me:

1. Your Job Search Won’t Be Comfortable

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The associate dean gave me an impressive interview, despite my fear and anxiety. The collaboration accomplished precisely what the employer wanted to see — but it was still a harrowing experience.

Don’t expect to operate from your comfort zone during your job search.
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2. Treat People Extraordinarily Well

I eventually got a chance to work with the dean of the college for a week, and it set up some other related job opportunities. I only had this chance because I treated people well and focused on my relationships at work.

Don’t view jobs as one-off events. See how they can have long-tail effects on your life and…
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Listen to Giving Women The Courage to Negotiate Salary

3. Be Ready to Prove Your Worth

Landing a job will require some evidence of your value — like the interview I did with the associate dean.

There are other ways to showcase your value, such as social proof on your website or LinkedIn profile. Online assessments and behavioral testing are becoming more common parts of the hiring process as well, so you must be ready to perform on demand in order to show employers you have what it takes to succeed.

Read Be a Consultant, Not a Job Seeker nor Anything Like Your Competition

4. Adopt a Consultant Mindset

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Unless you’re aiming for a contract job, you need to show you can do more than just fix a single problem.

You want to prove that you can collaborate with various partners in your organization in order to…
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For example, the news director was impressed that I interviewed the associate dean for my demo tape. I learned later the dean was at the top of his field, and I was fortunate to get any time at all with him. The dean was also impressed: He thought my genuine interest in his studies offered a value rarely available to him.

Read 10 Ways to Stay in Demand for Your Work – And Career

5. Do Great Work t0 Stay in Demand

It takes time to master your profession or craft. You won’t immediately be the best, but you can build a portfolio of white papers, articles, videos, interviews, and other relevant projects that show off your skills. Without my interview with the dean, I probably would not have gotten the job. Regularly producing great work is how you stay in demand.

Your road to job search success can be difficult at times, but it doesn’t have to be unproductive. Do great work and forge valuable relationships with like-minded people — even when you aren’t looking for a job. This is how you will stand out and get noticed before you even need to be.

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Remember Bo Jackson? He was one of few professional athletes to play and excel in his career at two different sports – baseball and football.

What does Jackson have to do with your career? It’s simple, really: His example teaches us what it means to be in demand. Jackson so proved and maintained his excellence that teams in both the MLB and the NFL wanted him on their rosters.

Staying in demand is the key to a successful career. If you want to stay in demand, you need to take a page from Jackson. Your strongest skills must be evident in all that you do. You must exploit their value, showcase them to the world, and create demand for yourself.

Here are some steps to take in order to create – and sustain – demand for the value you produce as a professional:

1. Stay Focused on the Value of Your Work

Most of us need to be reminded occasionally of what our work means and how it impacts others.

Find out how your work improves other people’s lives, and keep this in your sights at all times.
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2. Keep Proof of Your Best Work Close By

You will have to show others your best work – not to brag, but to illustrate your value. Share proof of your best, most recent work on your social channels. Use the channels where your work is most likely to reach its intended audience.

3. Know Who Appreciates Your Work and Why

You may have to do a little schmoozing in order to better understand whom your work reaches and whom it serves, but that’s okay.

Over-delivering is more than just an extra scoop of ice cream – it’s a way to build intimate…
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4. Reward Constructive Feedback

Constructive feedback can be tough to swallow, but it’s necessary. Most importantly, pay attention to the source of the criticism. Can you accept constructive feedback from someone who may not care about the outcome? If you can, and you can respond positively to that feedback, you can stay ahead of your competition. Thank people for their critiques. Doing so will build goodwill and show others you are serious about what you do.

5. Engage in Meaningful Conversations

Good networking isn’t about getting things from people. Good networking is an exchange of value. When you make connections, look for ways to build trust – not just for now, but for the long term. Also, give as much as you’re getting – if not more.

6. Anticipate Your Professional Peaks and Valleys

All careers have periods of thriving and periods of decline. Layoffs and terminations happen to even the best of us people. Stay connected to the meaning of your work. Respond quickly and appropriately to both good and bad news.

7. Become Your Own Master Publicist

Your future employers and business partners want to know you. The more people rave about you, the easier it is to build trust.

When you have people bragging about the value you deliver, new opportunities will come to you.
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Why not lend your voice to a podcast, magazine, or television interview? Get your message out there, and get other people spreading it for you.

8. Share Your Stories

Your message, voice, and delivery matter to the people in your network. People want to know how you got to where you are. Part of why people invest emotionally or financially in anything is because they understand the journey and want to be part of it. Get your message out there through relevant, engaging stories. People will listen.

9. Connect With Experts

Whom you meet matters. It is essential to forging relationships with hiring managers and executives. They may not hire you, but they can certainly help you on your journey in some way or another. Employers who offer insights into their hiring practices on LinkedIn and other platforms are valuable. If you’re bold and tactical, you can engage them.

10. Give Without Expecting to Get

Word spreads when you give more than you take. People care more about your generosity than your skills. If you prove you are personally driven to create value for others, people will be impressed – and they’ll want you on their side.

People won’t demand you if they don’t know or trust you. You must create demand. It won’t show up at your door. Put your work out there. Connect with employers, referrers, and other people in your industry. Make yourself available to others – the people who want you in their network, the employers who could use your skills, and the people who need your help.

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About today’s special show! 
For this last episode of the season, I am replaying my appearance on the “Repurpose Your Career” podcast. Here are the questions we’re answering:
1. I am a 61-year-old floor installer. I have been doing this since I was a young man. I have worked in other parts of the industry like sales and distribution but I like to work by myself. I no longer install carpeting because of the weight.
I do not know much longer I can continue to do this. I am incredibly good at finding the best methods to install the ever-changing product offerings that the vinyl and wood flooring industry come up with every year.
What can I do? I cannot physically keep this up.

2. After years of corporate training, I took time off to raise my daughter. She is graduating from high school in two weeks and I am ready to get back into training.

A few of my challenges:
I haven’t used much of the new technologies since 2008
I haven’t spoken in from an audience since 2009
I haven’t worked since 2009
Not sure where to begin.
Thanks for your help in advice.
Name redacted.

3. I am 65 years old and I have been an IT consultant/Interim CIO for the last 25 years.

I want to finish my career as a full-time employee as a CIO at a small to medium size business. I am completely unable to convince people that I am worth the risk. I have worked in so many industries that everyone says I do not have the necessary industry experience and I get passed over.
What should I do?
You are more than welcome to join the discussion. Here are three ways you can:

– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com

Season Finale
Thanks so much for listening to the award-winning “The Voice of Job Seekers” podcast! I’m Mark, your host, and I’m always Hacking and reimagining an easier job search process for you! I bring you relevant and relatable voices to help me clear the path for you to discover successful ways to find the job you’re meant to have.
This is the last show of the season, and of course, another year of modern job search tips and techniques was explored and many of you have implemented successfully.
Listen, just because the podcast will be on hiatus until September 11, doesn’t mean content will stop coming your way on TheVoiceofJobseekers.com! Articles, guides, and even video will be coming your way. Let me give you an idea what will be coming for the new season starting Sept 11.
  1. More panel shows
  2. An updated job search guide for 2019
  3. I am hoping to do one or two live events
  4. Shows where I was interviewed on another podcast or radio
  5. Q & A episodes
There will be eight shows in the fall (possibly more) but they will be every other week except for Thanksgiving week where November will have one episode.
Today, again, the last episode for this season will be a Q & A with Marc Miller, the host of the Repurpose Your Career podcast. You’ll note the show notes are brief because Marc had already created very detailed show notes for the episode to follow the link there to read it in its entirety.
If you have not signed up for the free 118 Job Search Tips for the Modern Job Seeker in 2018, follow the link for in the show notes.
I would love your feedback for the show, articles, videos or if you have suggestions for next year’s show. Use my contact information, and I’ll be happy to discuss.
In the meantime, have a great summer, and don’t be shy to say hi on the social networks.
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Job seekers who want to take charge of their online job searches need to start applying search engine optimization (SEO) techniques to their social media profiles – especially LinkedIn. Employers are using Google to vet you. When they enter your name, there’s no telling what they might find. The negative comments others have made about you could derail your job search.

If you want to increase the quality of your job prospects and ensure a smoother job search, you…
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Proactive SEO efforts may produce short- and long-term positive results in the way employers view your job candidacy. If you don’t have an online presence, you can’t compete in today’s job market. Even more important than just having a presence, however, is having the right strategy for your presence. The impression you create on LinkedIn and other sites can either help or harm your candidacy, depending on the steps you take.

Listen to LinkedIn SEO with Susan P Joyce

So, how can you use SEO to ensure employers find you – in a positive light, no less – on Google?

Susan P. Joyce is the founder of Job-Hunt.org and owns WorkCoachCafe.com. She is a personal SEO researcher and writer. I talked to Joyce to glean some insights on using SEO in your job search:

1. Google Yourself

Joyce states there are several reasons to Google yourself, including:

– To ensure your name is not associated with any unsavory acts, such as crimes (Even if you haven’t run afoul of the law yourself, someone with the same name could have.)
– To ensure there is no negative information about you in the search results
– To decide how you want your name to appear to employers
– To plan how you will distinguish yourself from competitors

If you have a common name, you may need to add a middle initial or middle name to distinguish your professional presence.

“Find one version of your name that’s relatively clean on Google, and use that version of your name for all of your online professional visibility, badges at meetings, and business cards,” Joyce says. She also recommends using this version of your name on job applications and resumes.

2. Use Several Different Browsers and Search Engines

Joyce recommends searching your name using a few different browsers (Chrome, Safari, Firefox, etc.) and a few different search engines (Bing, Yahoo, Google, DuckDuckGo, etc.). Different browsers and search engines may return slightly different results, so you will get a fuller picture of your online footprint by running multiple searches. The goal is to ensure your LinkedIn profile is the first result no matter what engine or browser a prospective employer uses.

Listen to Defensive Googling and The Obsolete 40-Hour Work Week

3. Conduct a Private Search

For best results, Joyce recommends using incognito mode – or “private browsing,” as it is called on Firefox – to conduct your searches. This private mode prevents your cookies and browsing history from impacting your search results. In essence, your SEO research will be purer – but not perfect. Joyce says it is beneficial to conduct such a search once a week.

4. Update Your Terminology

If you have degrees or certifications from years ago, they may make you appear irrelevant if they contain outdated terms. For example, Joyce mentions “management information systems” (MIS), which has largely been replaced today by “information technology” (IT).

If you’re still using “MIS,” you have “1999″ written all over yourself. Find out what terms employers are using to describe your position, certifications, and skills. Use these terms on your LinkedIn profile and elsewhere. You may want to try several searches with alternative terms to see which is best for SEO purposes.

5. Effectively Use the Headline and Summary Spaces of Your LinkedIn Profile

Joyce notes many people don’t make full use of their LinkedIn headlines, which she describes as “a billboard on a superhighway that’s empty.”

Simply listing your title is a waste of space, and it won’t distinguish you from the competition….
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Use terms associated with your profession that will help you appear in employers’ Google searches.

Improve your LinkedIn and social media SEO by using the steps highlighted above. Employers will have an easier time finding you, and the information they find will be positive. This, in turn, translates to an easier job search for you.

And one more thing: Make sure you have professional profile photos for each of your social media profiles. Profiles without photos are a little off-putting.

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The Voice of Job Seekers by Mark Anthony Dyson, Mark Anthony Dy.. - 1M ago
Removing bias from the hiring process is quite a task considering those who are still asking why. My guest this episode is Melissa Dobbins, founder, and CEO of career.place, whose purpose is to remove bias from hiring. She states on her website that she is “…radically reshaping the hiring process through the synthesis of science and technology…” Her goal is to show hiring companies how to remove bias from the hiring process.
You are more than welcome to join the discussion. Here are three ways you can:

– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com

More about Melissa:
Through a SaaS-based offering, my company provides a fresh approach that is unbiased and focuses on what matters most when hiring talent. Career.Place removes bias from the hiring process by not relying on the resume as the beginning piece of the hiring equation. Instead, career.place’s solution asks a series of questions from salary desired to take assessments, allowing only those qualified to advance.
She has been in product management for many years including her last position as a vice president.
Here are highlights from our discussion:
  • Melissa is influenced by her experience working with highly diverse successful teams and homogenous teams oblivious to bias
  • In her experience, homogenous teams was a vacuum of creativity because everyone thought alike
  • She says that diversity and inclusion positions and teams achieved a good start
  • Removing bias from the hiring process will mean removing the identities of the individuals from the eyes of employers
  • The focus for employers is to focus on what individuals can do and the requirements to do the job, and everyone is treated fairly
  • We discuss racists vs. bias and how much of a challenge it is in the process – “No one wants to look in the mirror and think they are part of the problem.”
  • Melissa says, “Bias is the human shortcut.”
  • There needs to be more than blocking out the name on a resume to rid of bias in the hiring process
Reminder:

June 19 is the last show of the season until Sept. 11. I will send a newsletter the last Friday of each month. I have several projects and MAYBE products I am finishing. Sign up for the newsletter and/or connect with me on LinkedIn. I will be announcing update there.

I will also continue publishing articles and other content 1-3 times a week. See below for my social handles to connect with me there.

I am here for you! Use my contact information above to inquire about individual or group coaching. You can also sign up for my weekly newsletter at the top right of my page. I try to pack as much value in my newsletter to more than 2,000 subscribers as possible.

Grab my updated “118 Job Search Tips for the Modern Job Search in 2018” here.

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When it comes to your job search, job seeker, no one is going to amplify your best attributes, skills, and abilities but you. No one can better testify to your competencies than you can. Furthermore, employers will have doubts about you unless you’re proving your worth in one of two ways:

  1. a body of work showing the depth and breadth of the value you can deliver,
  2. or the testimonials of people who have witnessed the manifestation of your value.

If you are going to be your own hype man, you’ll need to be supremely confident. Take a cue from…
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You may laugh when you hear his name, but Flav is the only hype man ever inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Rather than just a sidekick, Flav was essential to the music and message of Public Enemy.

There are several attributes job seekers should pick up from Flav’s performance as a hype man, including:

1. Show Your Distinct Voice

“Distinct” does not mean “loud” or “constant.” Rather, a distinct voice is one that is clear and resonant. You won’t stand out by repeating what others have said. Your role as your own hype man is to show how your voice adds value.

Listen to B.S. Incorporated Will Make You Serious About Your Job Search and Career

For example, during Public Enemy’s performances, you heard two very distinct voices: Chuck D.’s authoritative bass delivering its message like “CNN for Black people,” and Flav’s commentary on Chuck D.’s rhetoric.

2. Accentuate Your Distinct Qualities

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Flavor Flav brought everything unique about himself to the stage, including his voice, energy, and message. You have to do the same: Don’t just amplify what you have – demonstrate how what you have to offer can add value.

Job seekers often fail to explain exactly how they can help an employer solve it’s problems –…
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3. Live Your Message

Flavor Flav wore a large clock around his neck during Public Enemy performances. Many people thought it was just a unique fashion statement, but it was actually a powerful symbol of Flav’s message. As he once put it, “Each minute we live, we got to live each second to our best value.” Similarly, your message as your own hype man must sync with your actions.

4. Be the Ying to the Employer’s Yang

How do you complement the employer’s mission and goals? Much like Flavor Flav complemented Chuck D.’s voice, you need to show employers how you can help heighten and further their missions.

Listen to Stress Less, Achieve More in the Workplace and Job Search

5. Energize Others to Take Action

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Flavor Flav’s energy inspired concert crowds; in return, the crowd’s growing enthusiasm generated more energy for Flavor Flav to feed on. You may not have an audience to cheer on your job search, but you can share your successes with the world.

Pay attention to referrers and those who say good things about your career exploits. Remember they…
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Your connections can help you prepare for interviews and remain sharp if you keep engaging them.

The purpose of the hype man is to get the audience excited about the featured performer. In Flavor Flav’s case, his antics created a compelling experience to deliver Public Enemy’s message. These days, job seekers must serve as their own hype men. It is not easy to do, but it is essential to a successful career trajectory.

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We know underemployment is hard to measure. Even the government has difficulty measuring it.

But that said, you certainly know when you are unemployed. It’s when you have a job, and it pays the bills for the most part, but your talents are worth so much more.

Read Three Signs Underemployment Has Stole Your Soul

Getting out of the underemployment trap requires a shift in mindset. You have to understand your day job as the one that produces a check, and your night job as the search for your truly desired opportunity. It will be hard to manage both tasks at once, but you can’t disengage from either your current job or your job search. Making the most of your time is vital to your success.

Perhaps you’ve already noticed that the job hoppers today tend to be the ones who win spikes in salaries and gain new marketable skills. Millennials and Gen. Z-ers have already figured this out.Click To Tweet

You want a sustainable opportunity where you feel useful and fairly compensated – and you can have it. Just do these eight things to help you leverage your period of underemployment to your advantage:

1. Create Solutions to Build on Over Time

Employers are looking for people who can apply new solutions to their business problems. To compete in the job market, you must be one of these people. The modern job search is not about tricks and tips, but about strategies and your network. Don’t look for jobs; look for opportunities to contribute and create your network. In time, this will lead to the career you want.

Listen to Underemployment Trends: Your MBA or JD alone is not Enough

2. Cultivate Your Voice

Don’t be afraid of positioning yourself as an authority as your network grows. As you gain more experience collaborating with people who are more experienced than you, your voice will increasingly stand out. Learn to speak when expected, listen when it’s unexpected, and master both when they are critical to your brand.

3. Pay the Price

I am not suggesting you take one for the team, nor that you make yourself a martyr. Rather, what I mean is that there will be a cost to you of some kind.

There are no shortcuts to career success, so expect pain, setbacks, and some discomfort as you search for the right job.Click To Tweet

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4. Use Your Strengths and Accomplishments as Motivation

Many things will pull you in different directions, but the core of your efforts must always be your desire to optimize your contributions to your industry. Your achievements can serve as daily reminders to motivate you.

5. Surround Yourself With People Who Will Support You

Don’t consider it a weakness to have people to remind you of your mission. All of us need people who can help lift us up when we can’t lift ourselves.

Read 6 Ways to Deposit Value While Under Employed

6. Be Uncomfortable With Comfort During Underemployment

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Persistence means trying different ways to open doors you find closed – or even break them down if need be. Don’t settle or wait for someone else to open the door for you. It will become a way of life, and you’ll pay for it in mediocrity.

7. Reconcile With Yourself 

Underemployment can be quite lonely, even if you’re around others who face the same challenge. You may feel alienated by people who wonder why you’re still “in that job.”

Surround yourself with those who understand what you’re doing. You need to hear the voices who are encouraging, truthful, and patient. Sometimes, there may be no such voices. In those instances, you have to reconcile with and rely on yourself.

8. Master Your Craft

You’re in it for the long haul, not just trying to “break through” to the next job. You should be crafting a body of work that serves as evidence of your value.

Build a network of people with whom you can share ideas and exchange value. Master your craft through constant work. Click To Tweet

Underemployment is not a sentence you are obligated to accept. It is a battle you can win. It is a season of life, and you can weather the storms it brings by proving your uniqueness.

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I was interview by James Parker of the Chicago Urban League a couple of weeks ago. This was on WVON Saturday morning’s program, “Let’s Get to Work.” Our discussion centered around helping our youth find jobs.

You are more than welcome to join the discussion. Here are three ways you can:

– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com

How do the youth get jobs for the summer or anytime? I suggest these methods of helping them find jobs:

  • Start in October, not March to find jobs
  • Look at the opportunities available daily
  • Work together with other parents for those 16-18. Share information
  • Initiate a group and share information
  • McDonald’s is not your only option even though it’s not bad at all
  • Startups would be a great resource for jobs
  • Find paying jobs and an internship (perhaps one of each)
Reminder:

I am here for you! Use my contact information above to inquire about individual or group coaching. You can also sign up for my weekly newsletter at the top right of my page. I try to pack as much value in my newsletter to more than 2,000 subscribers as possible.
Grab my updated “118 Job Search Tips for the Modern Job Search in 2018” here.

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When it comes to landing a job, interview prep is just as important as your resume. Hiring managers interview hundreds of candidates throughout their careers; they can spot your lack of preparation from a mile away.

Thea Kelley is an experienced career coach and the author of Get That Job! The Quick and Complete Guide to a Winning Interview. Recently, she was kind enough to speak with me and offer her advice on interview prep:

1. Be Real

Many job candidates prepare for interviews as if they’re bracing for the impact of a car crash instead of getting ready for a conversation. Hiring managers can sense how guarded you are when you walk into the room, and it doesn’t make you look good.

Kelley says it’s important the interviewer “feels like they’re connecting with [you] as a human being.” In addition to letting your guard down, avoid talking as if you’re some kind of job-seeking machine.

“Phrases such as ‘I possess the ability’ – who talks like that?” Kelley ponders.

2. Keep Your Language Simple

It’s okay to use a little industry jargon to demonstrate your knowledge, but don’t deliver memorized soliloquies or use large words that are unnatural to you. If you can answer a question using smaller, simpler, more direct language, do so.

I like using a recorder with coaching clients so they can hear their tone, vocabulary, and grammar and take corrective action if necessary. Every aspect of your delivery will face scrutiny in an interview, so pay attention to it all when practicing.

3. Display Your Emotional Intelligence

“Emotions can be beneficial for job interviews,” Kelley says.

Telling stories rather than dryly answering questions allows you to showcase your passion, enthusiasm, and even a little appropriate humor. This makes it easier for the interviewer to envision sitting next to you for eight hours a day.

4. Relax

Kelley points out world-class athletes who earn millions of dollars take the time to learn relaxation techniques. You, too, can benefit from practicing relaxation techniques before an interview. Kelley suggests using visualization to “imagine yourself in an interview and being authentic.”

5. Be Memorable; Tell Vivid Stories

Stories connect candidates to interviewers in ways that data can’t. They foster relationships and conversation, rather than inquisition. Storytelling is also a valuable way to work your own questions for the interviewer into the conversation.

Kelley says a list of attributes is not enough to demonstrate your fit or expertise. You must be able to show how your experience is relevant. Offering the interviewer vivid and specific examples makes your qualifications real and convincing.

Don’t just interview to pass a test. Interview to make it real, capture the interviewer’s imagination, and connect with them.

The article came from excerpts from my interview with Thea below:

This article was originally published on Recruiter.com!

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The Voice of Job Seekers by Mark Anthony Dyson, Mark Anthony Dy.. - 3M ago
How to stand out to employers online is frequent question and subject for job seekers. It’s one of the hardest things to do on the Internet since there is so much noise competing to be heard. The day has come to show how you add value to employers, peers, and prospective connections online.  There are job seekers who want to be noticed but not sure how they can be heard. I bought Hanna Morgan back on the show to discuss how to appeal to employers online.
You are more than welcome to join the discussion. Here are three ways you can:

– Call and leave a voicemail at 708-365-9822, or text your comments to the same number
– Go to TheVoiceofJobSeekers.com, press the “Send Voicemail” button on the right side of your screen and leave a message
– Send email feedback to mark@thevoiceofjobseekers.com

Hannah Morgan, the founder of CareerSherpa.net where she provides legendary advice on job search, personal branding, and online visibility and reputation management. She also writes about careers for U.S. News and World Report.
Here are some of our discussion highlights:
  • Become well known for something because it’s personal branding, but be the go-to source, be relied on
  • Treat people well, treat everyone with tact and respect
  • Likability factor is important – What’s the use of being the smartest in the room if no one wants to talk to you
  • Is what I am saying resonating with employers?
  • The airport test: Can I see myself stranded with this person?
  • Is getting attention means getting hired?
  • The right thinking process: job seekers should think long-term than for now
  • Become a facilitator – orchestrate introductions – bring people together
  • Lend your voice to the industry at large – productive relationships are long-term
  • A connection online means nothing without it going beyond
  • A newsletter to your contacts (through your website) keeps you and contacts engage
  • How to stand in your industry? Is each one different? Makes a difference in how often and who is your audience
Reminder:

I am here for you! Use my contact information above to inquire about individual or group coaching. You can also sign up for my weekly newsletter at the top right of my page. I try to pack as much value in my newsletter to more than 2,000 subscribers as possible.
Grab my updated “118 Job Search Tips for the Modern Job Search in 2018” here.

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