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Six variations of play!

Work on visual discrimination, figure ground, visual form constancy, eye-hand coordination, manual dexterity, two-handed activity, executive functioning skills, process skills, socialization skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

In the box: 6 double-sided wheels, 100 picture cards

Eye 'N Seek is a figure ground game with a "twist", and six variations for play! The big plastic eye on the front of the box is intriguing, but is just a decoration.

The goal of the game is to find the image(s) from the picture cards faster than your opponent(s). The wheel cards measure about 6.5" x 6.5". One side of the card is green and the other side is orange. Each side is covered with small images, but also include three oval windows. You can see these windows better in the image above than in my picture below. However, there are more small images that show in the windows than in the image above, more like my picture below. Also, the windows on the orange side are bigger than the green and show more images. There is a movable circle printed with these small images inside the card. Put your finger on the side of the wheel and pull down to make the wheel inside turn and change the images you see in the oval windows. 

The picture cards come in two colors, green and orange, 50 of each color. The green picture cards each show one image and will be played with on the green side of the card. The orange picture cards each show two images and will be played with on the orange side. 

Left: Wheel card.                                                    Right: Picture card.
 Play:
  • Variation 1 
    •  Mix 18 cards and stack them in the middle.
    • Give each player a wheel card.
    • Players all look on their wheel card for the image on the top card. Turn the wheel as mentioned above to make the images move across the three windows. Play either all green cards, all orange cards, or a mix of the two. Player with the most cards after all 18 have been found is the winner.
  • Variation 2
    • Play as in variation 1, except the last person to find the image gets the card. Person with the fewest cards at the end is the winner. This variation will take longer and may have a lot of down time as you wait on other players.
  • Variation 3
    • Players take turns being the leader for each round. The leader looks at his card and describes one of the images in one of his windows. Don't name the item, just give description clues like it wears a hat and it lives in the snow. The first player to find a matching image on his card gets a point. First person to win five points is the winner.
  • Variation 4
    • Randomly choose 6 cards and place them in a line so that all players can see them all. Use either all green cards, all orange or a mix. Players race to find images from the cards. When a player finds an image, they take the card. Do this three times, making a total of 18 cards. Player with the most cards at the end is the winner.
  • Variation 5
    • Players take turns being the leader for each round. The leader will look at his card and pick out any one image. They will tell the first letter of the image they are looking at. The first player to find any image that starts with the same letter wins a point. First player to earn five points is the winner.
  • Variation 6
    • Players take turns being the leader for each round. The leader will look at his card and pick out any one image. They will give a word that rhymes with the picture. The first player to find any image that rhymes with the leaders word gets a point. First player to win five points wins the game. 
 If you are interested in purchasing this game or just want more information, click on the image below.



 

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A train-themed one-person logic puzzle. All aboard!
Work on visual discrimination, spatial relations, eye-hand coordination, coordinated use of both hands, logic, problems solving, visualization, executive functioning skills, process skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

In the box:  Train cars, 9 shape pieces, book with 48 challenges

Another one-person logic game from SmartGames. So looking at the box on Amazon I wondered how difficult this would really be. Sometimes SmartGames put ages on their puzzles that seem too young to me, and sometimes they say rather simple puzzles can go up to adult age. On inspection, I have this game pegged for my kids with moderate to mild cognitive disability or higher functioning who are very weak in spatial relations and problem solving skills. With that said, lets take a look in the box.

There are three train cars with working wheels and each car has cut out holes in them that hold the different shaped pieces (see image above). The holes are cut out in the shapes of square, circle and star. The locomotive holds one piece in the back. Then there is a car that holds three pieces and one that holds two pieces. There is nothing to hook the cars together with, although some of the pieces are tethered together with an elastic cord and if those pieces stretch across two cars, then they are pretty much tethered together. The train cars are hard plastic.


There are nine pieces and they feel just a little bit rubbery. Four of the pieces have a different shape on each end (see the individual green piece in the image above). There are two individual pieces, two strings of two pieces held together with an elastic cord and one string of three pieces held together with an elastic cord. When you look at the solution, which shows the train from a birds-eye view, the shapes of the pieces will be pictured, not the shapes of the holes in the train. For instance, a piece may be a square on one end and a circle on the other. Therefore, if they want a circle to show, you may end up putting the square end into the square hole. You just have to remember that the puzzle image will show the finished product, not the shape that is going in. The shapes in the three piece car are square, star and circle. If the puzzle shows that car with square, star, square, then you will have to figure out which way the car is oriented. You will do that by looking at the color/shapes of other pieces and there will end up being only be one option that will work.

There is a spiral bound puzzle/challenge book with 48 challenges. The challenges are ranked into four categories and they get more difficult as you go, within each challenge and across challenge sections. Here is a breakdown of the challenges: 
  • 12 starter challenges - This is an introduction and these show you exactly where everything is.
  • 12 junior challenges - These show the order of the cars and the shapes of the holes. They are shown from a birds-eye-view. There will be anywhere between three and six holes and one, two or none of the piece colors are shown. The rest are in white for you to figure out.
  • 12 expert challenges - The whole train is shown from the side and all the pieces colors are shown in a single shape and all colors are shown. You figure out the shapes.
  • 12 master challenges - The whole train is shown from the side but they do not outline the cars. The pieces are shown as a single shape and one or more piece colors are shown. The rest are white and you figure them out.
Below is one example from each section, showing the first and last puzzles in the book.








They have done a pretty good job of grading the difficulty throughout the challenges. Each challenge page has a solution on the back. Solutions are all shown from a birds-eye-view and are very easy to interpret.

Object:
Place the pieces into the train cars so that they look just like the challenge.

Set-up:
Gather all the pieces and the challenge book.

Play:
Choose a challenge. Use the clues on the challenge to help you decide which pieces go where.

Try this:
  • Play with the train before you start. Look at the shapes and how they fit in the holes. Arrange the pieces in the holes so that the cars are tethered together and you can pull the train around for fun.
  • Practice putting the tethered pieces in the train before you start. The cord is too short to put the first piece in any direction but with the cord coming out the back. For some reason, a couple of the kids that I work with had a little difficulty figuring out this part.
  • Solve the first puzzle or two from each section while the individual watches. Talk about how you decide what goes where so they can learn the problem solving process. Model how getting it wrong is not failure, it can be a trial and error process.
  • Take out only the pieces that will be needed as you solve each puzzle.
  • Start by giving the individual one piece, or set of tethered pieces, as needed. Let them play with the piece(s) and decide which way to put it in the train. After they are figuring it out, then add more pieces as options so that they have to decide which piece(s) to use and in what order.
  • Model holding a new car still as a tethered piece is added to it. Since the wheels roll freely and the cord is short, it may be a little awkward at first.
If you are interested in purchasing this game or just want more information, click on the image below.


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Better than the original.
Work on visual discrimination, spatial relations, visual closure, eye-hand coordination, motor planning, manual dexterity, bilateral coordination, social interaction skills, executive processing skills, speed, process skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

In the box: 24 pattern cards, 30 cups, 1 bell

You may remember that I recently blogged about Quick Cups, a color sequencing, cup-stacking game. Quick Cups was useful to me in my practice and I really wanted to like it. However, the plastic cups in the game were black and the images in the sequencing pictures were brown. I was so bugged by this that I eventually donated the game to a thrift store, even though I liked the game otherwise. Then last week I stumbled onto Speed Cups. This appears to be the exact same game as Quick Cups, even down to the artwork on the cards, except that the artwork shows the images as black instead of brown. Really, if I'm honest, it's different shads of grey, but I'll take it! Most kids will understand that variation. 

Unfortunately this game comes in a small box and getting it to all fit back in after playing can take as much time as playing. SO, pay attention to how it is packed the first time you take it out. Then, no problem.

So instead of blogging again about what is basically the very same game, I will direct you back to my post about Quick Cups. There are lots of different ideas for playing with this game on my post. Just ignore my lamenting about the brown/black dilemma and know this brand is a much closer match.


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Recognize and match grocery items with this simple beginner's game.
Work on visual discrimination, visual memory, figure ground, manual dexterity, fine motor skills, palmar arch development, in-hand manipulation, executive functioning skills, process skills, socialization skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

In the box: 4 shopping lists, 2 shopping carts, 2 shopping baskets, 32 item cards

Shopping List is a memory/match game. Most memory/match games require you to find a matching pair (2) from memory. This game only requires you to find one matching piece to a picture card (shopping list) that you already hold. It has won several awards and is made in Britain. I mention Britain because there are a couple of words in the game that are not common to us in the U.S.: 1) shopping trolley (cart) and 2) aubergine (eggplant). 

All the pieces are 1/16" thick and should hold up very well. There are four shopping lists and each list has eight different items, making a total of 32 different products. Each list has six food items, a non-edible grocery item (shower gel, toilet paper, toothpaste and washing powder) and a miscellaneous item (toy monster, socks, book, game). For each of these 32 items there is a small matching card that you will put in your shopping basket or cart as the game progresses. These small item cards are blue with the words Orchard Toys written on the back so you can quickly and easily tell if the cards are right side up as you set up. They also have a thickness of 1/16" so they are easier to grip for pick-up than a flat card would be.

If you like this game, there are two add-on games you can buy that are related: fruits & vegetables and clothes. These game only have two carts, two lists, and 16 items each, but look to match the items in this game in size and shape.


Object:
Be the first to fill your basket/cart with the items on your shopping list.

Set up:
Give each player a shopping list and a shopping basket/cart. Place the item cards face-down in the middle of the players.

Play:
Players take turns turning over one item card. If it matches an item on their grocery list, they pick up the card and put it in their shopping basket. All other players should look at the card if it is not a match. The player turns the card back over and his turn ends. If someone else turns over one of your cards, remember where it is so you can pick it up on your next turn. Play until someone fills their cart and wins the game.

Try this:
  • Look at each shopping list or each item card before starting a game to make sure the player(s) know what each item is and is called.
  • Play with only the item cards that are needed if you play with less than four people for a faster game.
  • Play with one person and turn the item cards face up. Give them one shopping menu and a cart. Ask them to find the matching items and put them in their cart. If this is too many item cards to look over, start with only the eight item cards you need for one list and add in one or two per game to build up to being able to look over all of them. 
  • Place all the item cards face up and ask the player to fill their cart with their favorite things.
  • Place all the item cards face up and call out an item for the individual to find to fill the cart with all your favorite things.
  • Place all the items cards face-up. One at a time, give the player a list and a cart and let them fill the orders until they have matched them all.
  • Place one shopping list at a time in front of the player. Ask which foods you might eat for breakfast (orange, eggs, juice, apple yogurt, doughnut) or what you might eat for a lunch (orange, bread, tuna, banana). Of course these meals will vary by person.  
  • Set up by taking several item cards in the non-dominant hand and push them off with the thumb one at a time for the dominant hand to take and place. Or hold several in the dominant hand and push them off from there.
  • Require the player(s) to flip the card in place, in-hand as they turn it and place it on the table top for all to see (use the fingers, not just turn the wrist). Then pick it up and turn it in-hand to place it back down if they don't need it. Or do both in-hand without setting it down as long as all see the item card.
  •  Leave extra space around each piece during set-up if the individual will need extra room, so other cards around are not disturbed.
  • Clean up by picking up one item card and placing it on top of another card. Pick up those two cards and place them on another card. Pick up that stack of three cards and so on. How many cards can you stack and hold in your hand without dropping any? Put away in the box by handfuls.
If you are interested in purchasing this game or just want more information, click on the image below.
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Work on visual discrimination, spatial relations, visualization, eye-hand coordination, manual dexterity, fine motor skills, planning, logic, problem solving, process skills, executive functioning skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

In the box: Game board/box, 15 pegs, 40 challenge cards

I've written a lot about SmartGames, but they haven't cornered the market on one-person logic games. Thinkfun is also a brand that I love and the maker of Subtrax. Have you ever eaten at Cracker Barrel and played the peg game on the table while waiting for your food? If so, this is much like that game.

Self-contained in a plastic box that closes securely, this is a game that you could take almost anywhere. Measuring 7" x 5", the game pegs and challenge cards are stored inside and the playing board is the top of the box. The object of the game is to set up the pegs on the board according to a challenge card, then use one peg at a time to jump over other pegs until only the orange peg is left.



There are 15 pegs, 14 blue and 1 orange, and the challenges will use anywhere between 7 and all 15 pegs. Challenges will require anywhere between two and 10 moves to solve. Like checkers, you may jump more than one peg in a turn, and the orange peg may also jump the blue pegs. 

There are 40 challenges total and they increase in difficulty as you go. Solutions are printed on the backs of the cards. Cards measure about 2 1/8" x 3 1/8". Here is the first challenge with solution and the last challenge with solution.
 
LEFT: Challenge #1                    RIGHT: Solution

 
LEFT: Challenge #40                      RIGHT: Solution


Object:
Solve all 40 challenge cards by jumping and removing blue pegs until only the orange peg is left.

Set up:
Choose a challenge card and place the colored pegs in the holes on the game board to match.

Play:
Choose a peg and jump another peg (or more). Remove the peg(s) that you jump. Pegs may only jump adjacent pegs in the directions indicated by the lines on the game board. You may only move by jumping another peg and landing in an adjacent open hole. You may not jump over more than one peg at a time or jump over an empty hole. No non-jumping moves allowed. 

Check out other one-person logic games I have blogged about.

Try this:
  • Play a few games by following the directions on the solution side of the card to get the feel and idea of how to play.
  • Play a game while the individual watches. Talk through your thinking as you play so that they can learn the problem-solving process. Then set the same challenge up again and see if they can play alone.
  • Use the orange peg and two or three blue pegs. Set them up so that you can jump them all in one move leaving the orange one left. This may be an easier way to learning about jumping without extra pegs on the board to confuse.
  • Use the solution side only of the cards if an individual is not capable of playing. Set the board up as pictured and then follow the directions to complete the challenge.
  • Set up a challenge. You make the first move or two to help the individual get stated and see if they can finish it alone.
If you are interested in purchasing this game or just want more information, click on the image below.




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A farm-themed logic puzzle with 60 challenges. Yee haw!

Work on visual discrimination, eye-hand coordination, manual dexterity, fine motor, planning, problem solving, logic, executive functioning skills, process skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

In the box: Game base, fence pieces, 2 pigs, 2 sheep, 2 horses, 2 cows, 3 water troughs, challenge booklet with solutions

The farmer (you) would like to separate the animals in the field so that each animal type has their own fenced off pasture. To do this, you will have three pieces of fence. Place the fence piece(s) on the game base to make sure the horses, pigs, sheep and cows each have their own pasture and you have solved the challenge. I've written about SmartGames over and over, so you won't be surprised to find out Smart Farmer is a single-player logic game by them.

The game base is made of hard, green plastic and measures about 8.5" x 6.5". There is a permanent white fence around the game base. The base is full of hollowed out diamond, cross and small dash shapes (see image above). Animals and water troughs sit in the diamonds, and fence pieces can sit in the crosses and dashes. Two fence pieces may sit in a cross going in different directions. One fence piece is L shaped and the other two are straight, one straight piece being one section longer than the other straight piece. The fence pieces and animals are plastic and while not really bendable, they are very slightly flexible. The three water troughs are hard plastic.

There are a total of 60 challenges which get progressively harder as you go. There are 12 starter, 12 junior, 12 expert and 24 master level challenges. There can be either two, three or four different animal types on the field per challenge.  You will use either one, two or all three fence pieces to solve a challenge. The master level challenges also include water troughs, one for each animal type, which will be placed on the game board during set up. The challenges show the field from the "bird's eye view", a good opportunity to talk about how things can look differently as you look at them from different angles.

Object:
Complete each challenge in the book.

Set up:
Choose a challenge. Stand the animals on the base in the places you see them standing on the challenge puzzle. Place the fence pieces (and water troughs if using) nearby. 

Play:
Place the fence pieces on the board so that each type of animal is completely closed off from any other type(s) of animal(s). 

LEFT: Challenge 1.                                      RIGHT: Solution 1.

LEFT: Challenge 60.                                              RIGHT: Solution 60.

Try this:
  • Play with the pieces before starting a game. Show how all the pieces fit into the different shapes. Show how two fence pieces and sit together on a cross.
  • Start by solving a puzzle or two while the individual watches. Problem solve out loud as you go so the individual can learn how to use the process. Then take the puzzle apart and see if he can build it.
  • Place one piece of fence on the board (if more than one piece is used) and let the individual place the other piece(s). Once one piece is placed, the other piece(s) placement will be easier to figure out.
  • Stress how it is a trial-and-error process if the player starts to get frustrated when they can't figure it out right away.
  • Look down on the animals from the top and talk about how they will look differently in the puzzle book than they do from the side.
If you are interested in purchasing this item or just want more information, click on the image below.


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60 challenges feature colorful salamanders, frogs and dragonflies in this one-person logic game.

Work on visual discrimination, eye-hand coordination, spatial relations, visualization, manual dexterity, planning, problem solving, logic, executive functioning skills, process skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

In the box: 1 game board with lid, 5 puzzle pieces, 1 challenge/solution booklet

Another fun one-player logic game from SmartGames. SmartGames give you the opportunity to work on logical deduction and problem solving in short spurts in therapy, while still continuing to up the difficulty over time.

Color Catch features salamanders, frogs and dragonflies. The plastic game board has nine plastic, non-removable squares in blue, red, green and yellow. You can see seven of the squares in the game board above, two of the squares have been covered by a puzzle piece. The animals on the five black, plastic puzzle pieces (four rectangles, 1 square) are transparent. Therefore, the animals will be different colors, depending on which colored square they are placed on top of. There are a total of four dragonflies, 3 salamanders and two frogs.


There are 60 challenges total that fall into the categories of starter (12), junior (16), expert (16) and master (16). The puzzles in the starter section will show you animals and their orientation(s) to help learners get started (image 1 below). Each challenge in the puzzle booklet will show you colors for the five salamanders and frogs. Frogs and salamanders may also show a long tongue and a dragonfly at the end (image 2 below). In this case, a colored dragonfly must be next to that animal, oriented so the animal is facing it. Animals in the challenge that have an X next to them can be placed on the board facing in any direction EXCEPT looking toward a dragonfly. Dragonflies that are not used in the challenge can be placed anywhere on the board, except where a frog or salamander will end up facing them. Solutions are in the back of the book. There is only one solution per puzzle.


IMAGE 1           Left: Puzzle 1.  Right: Solution 1

IMAGE 2            Left: Puzzle 60.  Right: Solution 60.
To play, choose a puzzle from the challenge book. Solve the challenge by placing the pieces on the game base so that the animals and their colors match the puzzle printed in the book.

They call this a travel game, meaning it is portable and small. There is a plastic lid that sits on top of the game board and is tall enough so that you can carry the puzzle book inside. However, the lid does not snap on in any way. You will have to rubber band it if you carry the puzzle without the box.   

Try this:
  • Orient the board to the solution before starting. The board will be oriented the same way for all puzzles.
  • Start by working a few puzzles from the solution booklet. Work back to the puzzle and see how it matches.
  • Place all but one piece to a puzzle, let the player place the last piece. Place all but two pieces and allow the player to finish the puzzle. Work your way down until the player can solve the puzzles independently.
  • Open the challenge booklet anywhere except the starter section. When you open it you will see a total of four challenges. Set up one of the challenges on the game board (look at the solution to do it fast), then ask the individual which challenge matches the solution. Make it more difficult by setting up the puzzle and then changing the orientation of the board.
  • Work the puzzle yourself and talk out loud to model how to problem solve and eliminate pieces. Start sentences with "This can't go here because..." or "This one must go here (or may go here) because..." and then explain the logic. Then take the pieces out and ask the person to complete the same challenge.
    If you are interested in purchasing this item or just want more information, click on the image below.


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    Work on tactile discrimination, in-hand manipulation, coordinated use of both hands, manual dexterity, haptic memory, executive functioning skills, process skills, socialization skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

    In the box: 2 stockings, game board/spinner, 2 sets of 30 objects, 2 pawns

    A feel-and-find game. Like most feel-and-find games, the rules are simple and straightforward: Put your hand in the stocking and try to find an object by feel only.

    The stockings seem to be a good quality and they are long, measuring approximately 20" from top to toe and 3" wide. At this point, while the game is new, the stocking easily stretches but still fits snugly around your hand so that you cannot see inside at all.

    There are two identical sets of objects. If I had a complaint about this game it would be that I don't think the objects are that interesting or familiar to kids. Objects that will probably be less familiar to kids (at least at the start) include a poker chip, bolt, nut, washer, spring, golf tee, cork, and metal strip. Some of the familiar items include a plastic car, ping pong ball, lego brick, hair band, rubber band, domino, Scrabble tile, pawn, die and button. With that being said, there's nothing to say that you can't assemble your own identical sets of objects. In that case, you would not be able to use the spinner. 

    The spinner lists every single object included in the game and, after you spin, will indicate which object you will be searching for. There are also 4 blank spaces on the spinner so that you can add your own items if you want to the mix. However, once you write on the spinner I don't think you will be able to erase it, unless you write very lightly with a pencil. The instructions say that if you don't want to add your own items, when a player lands on a blank space they can choose which item the players will search for. The spinner is printed in English on one side and in french on the other side. The arrow moves freely. There are 11 footprints that run down the left and right sides of the spinner. This is how you will keep score. Advance your pawn from the bottom footprint to the top footprint, one at a time, as you win each round (be the first to find an object). First one to the top (11 footprints = 11 points) wins the game. You can see the spinner size in the second image below.



    Object: 
    Be the first player to win 11 points.

    Set up:
    Add one set of the 13 objects to each sock. Give one sock to each player. Place the spinner between the players. Each player chooses a pawn and put it at the bottom of the footprints, on the circle marked START HERE. Place the die near the spinner.

    Play:
    Players always start their turn by spinning the spinner. The spinner announces that object shown on the spinner and both players put their hand in their sock and start searching. The first player to pull out the correct object wins one point and moves his pawn to the next step up on the side of the spinner. If a player removes the wrong object, he simply puts it back in the sock and keeps looking. If the spinner lands on the hand symbol, players must use their non-dominant hand to search for the object. Spin one more time to find the object you will search for. If the spinner lands on the foot object to search for, the winner will receive two points for that round. Play until someone has 11 points and wins the game.

    Other feel-and-find games include Ned's Head, Boa Bella, Monkey Beach and What's in the Cat's Hat?

    Try this:
    • Don't bother to buy the game. Find two sets of identical objects around your house and put them into your own pair of knee socks to play.
    • Familiarize yourselves with the objects before playing. Look at, name and feel each object. Can they remember them by feel the next time you play without the review?
    • Start with fewer objects. Play several games and add one more object to the sock for each game.
    • Let the player play alone. Place one set of objects into the sock and then use the other set as visuals. Choose an object, show it to the player and let him feel for it.
    • Assemble three sets of your own objects. Use a set for each sock and one set as a visual to show what to search for.
    • Put your hand in the sock. Pick up an item, feel it, name it, pull it out and see if you're right.
    • Choose a few objects for the group, maybe four or five. Show the player the items and ask them to memorize what is there. Put one less than the items you showed into their sock, but do not tell them which item has been withheld. Ask them to put their hand into the sock, feel what is there, and name the item that is not there.
    • Put all the items into the sock after the player can name them without looking. Let them put their hand in the sock, pick up one item, name it, and pull it out to see if they were right. Can they identify all 30 items correctly?
    • Place all the items in the sock. Ask the player to put their hand in and find something round, something made of metal, something stretchy, something made of wood, etc.
    If you are interested in purchasing this game or just want more information, click on the image below.


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    Pack the items strategically in the suitcase so you can close the lid.

    Work on visual discrimination, eye-hand coordination, manual dexterity, fine motor, planning, problem solving, logic, executive functioning skills, process skills, socialization skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

    In the box: 4 suitcases, 52 packing pieces, 30 challenge cards, solution booklet

    Imagine that you're in a competition and the grand prize is a dream vacation to one of 30 different destinations. Of course before you can take off you'll have to pack a few things, and this is where Get Packing gets fun. The first person to successfully pack their suitcase and shut the lid is the winner! Good luck, I know you need the break :)

    This is definitely a one-of-a-kind game. Included are 4 plastic suitcases and 52 plastic pieces for packing. The suitcases are shallow and the pieces must fit in exactly for the lid to close. Not for those who frustrate easily as you may end up putting in and taking out the same pieces several times as you try different ways to pack. Each challenge will have 2 layers of items in the suitcase.

    There are 13 different items to pack and four of each (up to four can play). The 13 items are bug spray, pool float, swimsuit bottom, teddy bear, flipper and snorkel, driving mask, sunscreen, sun hat, swim trunks, flip-flops, t-shirt, sunglasses. There are 30 round challenge cards and a solution booklet. Each card will show either seven, eight, or nine items to pack. The instructions offer two different variations: 1) Even the playing field between kids and adults by requiring the adult to play with their non-dominant hand, and 2) Set a timer for 30 seconds and try to pack the suitcase before time runs out.


    Let's get packing! 

    Object:
    Be the first to pack your bag and close the lid to win a challenge card. Win three challenge cards to win the game.

    Set up:
    Give each person an empty suitcase. Give each person one set of items (one each of 13 different items). Mix the solution cards and place them face-down in the middle of the players. Turn the first card face-up. Each player finds the pieces shown on the card and places them by their suitcase.

    Play:
    On go, all players play at once. Work to get all your pieces into the suitcase so that the lid closes flat. Be quick, as the first one done will win the card.

    Try this:
    • Use the solution book and everyone pack one or two suitcases before playing the game to see how the pieces fit together in the bag.
    • Skip the game, just play with the suitcases and packing pieces. Pack one challenge card at a time and eliminate the need for speed.
    • Use the solution booklet for a faster game. Put all pieces into the suitcase but one. Let the individual place the last piece. Do another puzzle and place all pieces but two and let the individual figure out how to pack the last two. Then three, etc., until the individual is packing them all independently.
    • Pack a suitcase and problem solve aloud as the individual looks on so they can learn the process and how to think about it. Say things like "this piece won't fit here because" or "I need to look for a small piece to fit into this small space".
    • Pack a suitcase while the individual plays next to you. Let them copy your work while they learn.
    • Pack a suitcase. Place it near the player and ask them to pack a suitcase just like it.
    • Place the pieces on the table upside-down and ask the player to pick up one of each piece that he will need, turning them in-hand and placing them next to his suitcase right-side-up before starting.
    If you are interested in purchasing this item or just want more information, click on the image below.

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    Hand skills will be put to the test as you pick up miniature tools.
    Work on visual discrimination, figure ground, eye-hand coordination, fine motor precision, manual dexterity, tool use, motor planning, graded movement, socialization skills, executive functioning skills, process skills, play and leisure exploration and participation

    In the box: 50 plastic tools, 1 hook

    Fifty small, thin, light-weight plastic tools shaped like the real thing makes this game look fun right from the get-go. Included in the box are miniature rakes, hoes, crutches, ladders, wrenches, canes and shovels, to mention a few.

    Do you remember pick-up-sticks? This reminds me of pick-up-sticks because you have to pick up one tool at a time without disturbing any tools around it. This game is similar but a lot more fun because of 2 differences: 1) the pieces are all different shapes that keep them from rolling and may give you something to grip and 2) there is a hook with a very thin wire to help you pick the pieces up, if you are lucky enough to remove it before your opponent. The pieces fall into four different groups, depending on how difficult they are to pick up, and each group has it's own point value. The box reads "Steady hands not included".

    Do you see that hook on the end of the wire in the image at the top of this page? Well mine didn't have a very defined hook and nothing would stay on it so I attempted to bend it, thinking a wire this thin ought to bend quite easily.  Well it didn't, and that part at the very end of the hook that is curled under easily pierced my thumb, twice. I will leave it for my husband to figure out tonight. That man can fix anything. Off to find the Neosporin...

    Object:
    Have the most points when all of the pieces have been claimed.

    Set up:
    Empty the tools on the table and create a messy pile.

    Play:
    Taking turns, players will announce a piece that want to remove and then attempt to pick it up. If they are successful, without moving any of the surrounding pieces, the player claims the piece and the next player plays. If a player moves another piece at all while attempting to pick up his piece, his turn ends immediately. Play until all pieces have been picked up. Players add up their points using the scoring in the instructions. Highest scorer is the winner.

    Try this:
    • Practice picking up the pieces and using the tool before playing a game. 
    • Allow a person who picks up a piece successfully to keep going, picking up as many as he can in one turn. 
    • Allow anyone to use the hook at any time during the game.
    • Ask the player to describe how each tool could be used. You may get some fun(ny) answers here.
    • Sort the tools into piles by how they can be used. For instance, a shovel and hoe can both be used in the garden. The golf club and oar are both used for sports. Or all four can be used for outdoor activities. How many different categories can you come up with?
    If you are interested in purchasing this game or just want more information, click on the image below.

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