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Product snapshot:

Vitalife is a new premium range of whey and collagen protein sports supplements, to assist with muscle and bone recovery from activities including gym, cycling, swimming and golf. The gender-specific versions have key vitamins and minerals to promote overall health and wellbeing. There are slight nutrient differences between the male and female versions. This is to give both men and women targeted nutritional support because, after all, we have different needs.

Why choose Vitalife 40+?:

Research indicates that eating or drinking 20g of high quality protein (such as whey) soon after exercise accelerates muscle recovery and repair. Further, when you prepare Vitalife Men 40+ protein powder with milk you’ll be consuming more than 3g of leucine – a branched chain amino acid shown to accelerate protein synthesis and therefore aid muscle recovery.

Collagen is the latest sports nutrition supplement gaining much attention. Research has validated that the co-ingestion of collagen with calcium can assist with strengthening ligament and bones. This is particularly important as we age, given the high rates of osteoporosis in both men and women. Vitalife Men 40+ provides 5g of collagen protein as well as 296mg calcium (the equivalent of a glass of milk). Evidence has also shown that collagen may play a valuable role in injury prevention and tissue repair.

Additionally, the powder is a good source of fibre. Fibre not only loves your gut, but it can also serve as your great protector. In fact, it has been shown to reduce the risk of chronic diseases as well as certain types of cancers. By and large, most Australians fall well short of their fibre requirements. So fortifying a sports supplement with added fibre gets this dietitian’s tick of approval.

Who should take this product?

Vitalife will appeal to active men and women who are after a quick and convenient post-workout or post exercise protein shake.

Sporty people have higher protein requirements than those who are more sedentary. Protein rich foods include meat, fish, chicken, dairy, eggs, nuts and seeds, tofu and tempeh, legumes and beans. Eating a variety of these foods at each mealtime will ensure that active people can easily hit their protein targets. However, there are times when eating whole foods is not convenient. That’s when a protein shake complete with other nutritional goodies provides a quick, convenient and effective solution.

Further, some research has shown that consuming a high-quality protein prior to bed helps to stimulate muscle protein synthesis rates overnight, thus helping to repair and grow your muscles while you sleep. As Vitalife contains both quick and slow digesting proteins, you’ll be supplying your muscles with a steady source of amino acids to work their magic overnight.

Pros:

✓ Impressive nutrient profile

✓ High quality protein

✓ Good source of fibre

✓ High calcium + collagen content to promote bone health

✓ Great tasting – flavours include chocolate (Men 40+) and vanilla (Women 40+)

✓ Low lactose

Cons:

✗ This is not a high carbohydrate supplement, so will not accelerate replenishment of muscle glycogen levels

Product availability:

Vitalife Active Nutrition is available exclusively in the health food aisle from selected Coles supermarkets and Coles online and retails for $30 for 420g.

Preparation Instructions:

Mix 3 heaped tablespoons of Vitalife Active Nutrition powder with 250ml of cold milk into a shaker and shake well. Best taken within 30 minutes of exercise.

Final word:

It’s clear that taking Vitalife Active Nutrition 40+ can tick more than just the protein box. The combination of fast and slow acting proteins, calcium, fibre and collagen plus a host of other nutrients makes it one of the more impressive sports nutrition powders on the market.

Ingredients:

Vitalife Active Nutrition Premium Protein Blend (66%) (Whey protein concentrate, calcium caseinate, collagen protein), acacia fibre, maltodextrin, skim milk powder, cocoa powder, natural flavour, vitamins and minerals, natural guar gum, anti-caking agent (551), natural stevia extract, choline.

Nutrition info per 35g serve of Men 40+:

499kJ, 21g protein, 1.1g fat, 0.5g saturated fat, 4.7g carbohydrates, 2.4g sugar, 3.9g fibre, 0.7g lactose, 150mg sodium.

Note: Vitalife also has a product for Women 40+.

For more information visit: http://www.vitalife.com.au

This is a paid partnership with Vitalife.

The post Vitalife Active Nutrition 40+ review appeared first on The Nutrition Guy .

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Ingredients:

  • 4 frozen bananas
  • 1/2 cup soy milk
  • 1 tsp. vanilla essence

Method:

  • Combine all the ingredients in a food processor or blender and blitz until smooth
  • Serve immediately.
  • Optional toppings include: candied walnuts, strawberries, chia seeds and cacao nibs

The post Three-ingredient banana nice cream appeared first on The Nutrition Guy .

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On Dietitian’s Day recently, it seemed timely to reflect on my career so far. It’s been a wonderful (almost) six years. It hasn’t all been a bed of roses, but I wouldn’t have scripted it any differently. I’ve been fortunate enough to have had so many wonderful and unexpected opportunities and I sometimes find it difficult to explain exactly what it is I do for a living.

A dietitian can work in a clinical setting, community health centre or in a food service role in a hospital. However, there is also a role for dietitians in the food industry, media, and corporate health, at sporting clubs, in private practice, in aged care facilities as well as in childcare centres. I have been fortunate to have already had a taste of so many of these roles.

When I was at university, there was very little talk of dietitians working in the media or food industry. And there was ZERO talk of how dietitians could position themselves on social media. The focus was on traditional dietetic jobs in the clinical, community and food service fields. These days, aside from working in private practice, I don’t fit the mold of your run-of-the-mill dietitian. Not that I set out for it to be like that; I had no idea what my career would look like, and I was comfortable with that.

A huge part of my development as a dietitian has been to be open to any opportunities that came my way. Currently I consult to a range of food brands and companies, develop recipes, and have an active voice in the media and on social media. I still see clients in my private practice, too.

My day-to-day work varies immensely. Some days I’m in the kitchen (my other office) developing recipes using nutritional supplements, peanut butter, honey etc. And other days I’m sitting by my computer writing reports, articles or media pieces. A week later I find myself gearing up for a media interview or working on a presentation. And, of course there are days where I’m sitting across from private clients or residents in a nursing home. It’s very much a mixed bag, and that’s exactly how I like it.

Some of my favourite career highlights include:

  • Appearing on My Market Kitchen
  • Presenting at conferences and recording webinars
  • Talking to corporates about nutrition
  • Meeting with clients one-on-one
  • Creating healthy recipes
  • Attending events, conferences and study tours
  • Working with food brands to tailor their nutrition claims and messages
  • Collaborating with other dietitians on social media
  • Working under the head dietitian at Hawthorn Football Club
  • Writing for health publications
  • Recording guest podcasts
  • Mentoring new graduates
  • Meeting with students
  • Speaking to journalists about newsworthy nutrition topics and trends

The changing landscape of my profession means that dietitians are forced to continually reinvent themselves. Yet, there are so many opportunities awaiting dietitians and nutrition professionals. It’s about being proactive, creative and positioning yourself in a way that appeals to prospective clients or employers. I often find that the key is to think outside the box.

I would not change my experiences for the world. They have shaped me into the dietitian I am today. I’m very proud of what I’ve been able to achieve and I’m excited about what the future holds – even if that means I have to go back to the drawing board from time to time.

I reckon being a dietitian is… drum roll… pretty unbeatable.

The post Reflections on being a dietitian appeared first on The Nutrition Guy .

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The Nutrition Guy | Blog by Thenutritionguyadmin - 3M ago

Ingredients:

3 beetroots

2 x 400g tinned chickpeas, rinsed and drained

2 x garlic cloves

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

Juice from 2 lemons

1tsp. cumin, ground

2tbsp. tahini

Salt and pepper to taste

Method:

  • Place the beetroots into the Magimix Cook Expert steam basket and steam for 40 minutes, or until tender (steam at 100°C).
  • Remove beetroots from the steamer and set aside for 5 minutes or until cool enough to handle.
  • Wearing kitchen gloves, peel beetroot and transfer to food processor.
  • Add chickpeas, garlic, oil, lemon juice, cumin, tahini and salt and pepper to food processor and blitz until smooth and well combined.
  • Garnish with chopped parsley and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.
  • Serve with crackers, pita bread or oven-baked tortilla chips.

Recipe created for Magimix.

The post Beetroot hummus appeared first on The Nutrition Guy .

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The Nutrition Guy | Blog by Thenutritionguyadmin - 4M ago

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups wholemeal spelt flour
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 tbsp. Nuvia stevia
  • 1½ cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • ½ frozen peas, thawed
  • 1/3 bunch kale, shredded
  • 1 tbsp. chives, finely chopped
  • 100g feta cheese, crumbled
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tbsp. lemon rind
  • Salt and pepper

Method:

  • Whisk milk and egg in a mixing bowl
  • Sift flour and baking powder in a large mixing bowl and add stevia.
  • Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients and slowly add milk and egg mixture and whisk until well combined.
  • Gently fold in kale, chives, peas, feta and garlic.
  • Add salt and pepper
  • Heat a large frying pan over a medium heat and grease with spray vegetable oil.
  • Spoon batter into pan and cook for 2-3 minutes or until bubbles appear on surface. Flip and cook for a further 2 minutes or until cooked through. Transfer to a plate.
  • Repeat with remaining mixture.

Serve with side salad and garnish with crumbled feta and chopped chives.

Makes 8 fritters.

Originally published on Nuvia.

The post Kale and feta fritters appeared first on The Nutrition Guy .

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The Nutrition Guy | Blog by Thenutritionguyadmin - 4M ago

Ingredients:

  • 1tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 leek, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled, finely chopped
  • 2 celery, finely chopped
  • 1 zucchini, chopped
  • 1L vegetable stock
  • 400g can diced tomatoes
  • 1½ cups spiral pasta
  • 400g red kidney beans, rinsed, drained
  • 1 cup fresh parsley, finely chopped

Method:

  • Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion, leek, carrot, celery and zucchini and cook, stirring often, for 10 minutes or until the vegetables are soft.
  • Stir in stock and canned tomatoes and bring to boil.
  • Add pasta and parsley and simmer for 20 minutes or until pasta is al dente.
  • Add kidney beans and stir through
  • Divide the soup into serving bowls and top with grated parmesan cheese, sour cream and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Serve with crunchy sourdough bread.

Serves 6

Originally published on Mad Millie

The post Vegetable minestrone soup appeared first on The Nutrition Guy .

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