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Guys I found this PDF here and it gives you a detailed breakdown of what skills you should have for each CEFR level, eg. watching tv, listening to announcements, reading for correspondence, understanding instructions, informal conversation with friends etc. So if you’re not sure what level you might be, or you’re not sure what to aim for to improve your level, have a read!

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Post-2010 (or new generation) Malayalam cinema for you to get started:

Ohm Shanthi Oshaana

Bangalore Days

Charlie

Ennu Ninte Moideen

Maheshinte Prathikaaram

Usthad Hotel

Mumbai Police

Mosayile Kuthira Meenukal

Kammattipaadam

Premam

Rani Padmini

Kali

Salt N’ Pepper

Sapthamashree Thaskaraha

Pathemari

Thira  (I can’t find a legal stream but it’s on torrent and illegal streaming)

Picket 43

Mili

Pranchiyettan and the Saint (can’t find legal stream)

1983

22 Female Kottayam (can’t find legal stream)

Take Off (in theatres now)

Pranayam

North 24 Kaatham

City of God

Ozhimuri

Love 24x7

Drishyam

Angamaly Diaries (in theatres now)

Iyobinte Pusthakam

Manichitrathazhu (a classic you should try to track down)

Nandanam (another classic)

Enjoy!

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iamlearningkorean:

etudehaus:

For all you international kpop fans out there who’d like to learn Korean (for multiple reason I guess?), I have collected a large collection of online textbooks, websites, resources, and blogs that can help you achieve your goal!

online textbooks: [ all the downloads are pdfs, no .rar files! ] 

websites:

Apps: [ some may only be available for iphone or android and not both so bear with me ]

  • pop-popping korean (iOS + android)
  • tengugo hangul (iOS + android)
  • kdrama talk (iOS only) 
  • Neme Korean (iOS + android)
  • KORLINK by Talk to Me in Korean (iOS + android)
  • Learn Korean by Bravo Language (iOS + android)
  • Korean Flashcards (free on android only, $4.99 on iOS)
  • Learn Korean 6000 words (android only)
  • TOPIK One (iOS + android)
  • Dongsa (iOS + android)
  • POPYA animals & fruits + vegetables (iOS + android)

misc. resources:

blogs: [ most of these seem pretty active as far as i can tell ]

HAPPY STUDYING EVERYONE!!!

Thank you!!

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ayearinlanguage:

A Year in Language, Day 314: Wampanoag

Note: This post was originally scheduled for Thanksgiving, but I’ve fallen behind on posts and so “promoted” it to the nearest empty slot. Enjoy!

Wampanoag, also known as Massachusett or Wôpanâak, is an extinct-ish (more on that later) Algonquian language. This was the language of Squanto, known to most from the quasi-historical Thanksgiving Story.

The Wampanoag were a loose confederation of tribes living in what is now Massachussets and Rhode Island. While the Wampanoag did have a concept of Wampanoag identity and unity, each tribe was also distinct and spoke their own dialects. Internally they referred to their languages by how intelligible they were, distinguishing between similar dialects, not so similar dialects, and foreign languages. The Wampanoag were quite quick to adopt the writing system of the alphabet and made good use of it for their own documentation. The first Bible ever published in the North America was a Wampanoag translation. Unfortunately the corpus of Wampanoag text remains rather small as the Wampanoag themselves were driven nearly to extinction by disease. Squanto himself was the last living Patuxet, having been overseas when the disease hit. The language and people persisted, though the language did not survive to make it into the 20th century.

The language itself is highly synthetic, wherein words inflect to a high degree for both grammatical information (i.e. it’s role in the sentence) as well as derivation (making verbs from nouns, places from objects, etc.) Like other Algonquian languages it has a gender system based on animacy. The writing system is distinctive for its use of the letter “8” as a letter, hence “Massachusett” is written “Mâsach8sut”. Originally it was “oo” and over time the “o"s merged and stacked.

Revitalization began in the 90’s with the linguist and Mashpee Wampanoag Jessie Little Doe Baird. Using legal documents and books preserved from over a hundred years ago she was able to publish a modern grammar and dictionary of the language and has worked to establish an immersion school. Thanks to her and the efforts of her fellow tribesmen and there are now several living native Wampanoag speakers. If you would like to help contribute to this cause, I’ve included a link to the website: 

WÔPANÂAK LANGUAGE RECLAMATION PROJECT

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Arabic Collections Online:

wonderful-language-sounds:

The Arabic Collections Online has over 10,000 Arabic language books that have been digitized and are available free to read. The books are available in over 6,000 subjects and are available as PDF files as well.

“The mission statement behind the ACO aims to digitize, preserve, and provide free open access to a wide variety of Arabic language ebooks in subjects such as literature, philosophy, law, religion, and more. Important Arabic language content is not widely available on the web, and ACO aims to ensure global access to a rich Arabic library collection. Many older Arabic books are out-of-print, in fragile condition, and are otherwise rare materials that are in danger of being lost. ACO will ensure that this content will be saved digitally for future generations.”

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…materials? Like on YouTube, Instagram or just on here? :3 Thanks!

Hey!

There is a youtuber, whom I watch, from Belgium who managed to self teach himself greek, named Fred Grün.

Here’s the video detailing his experience; https://youtu.be/CGsIKNSY_Cg

As he advises, the Hellenic American Union has made available a number of podcasts for learning greek, which can be found by following this link; http://www.hau.gr/?i=learning.en.podcasts-in-greek

Before everything, I strongly, strongly suggest that you learn the greek alphabet if you don’t already, before you begin taking any courses. It will make the process so much easier. It is also relatively easy, as greek has very strict rules when it comes to spelling and pronunciation, unlike English lol.

Miss Ruby has a detailed, although a bit unprofessional, guide to greek, including the greek alphabet; https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvr6SVtSPETocx8Sz1TERpb6YOgbkXPGC

Here’s another crash course-y greek alphabet guide; https://youtu.be/0bsj_7vM1Dg

If you’re familiar with Duolingo, there is also a greek course you can take there. If you don’t already know, Duolingo is a language learning app, available in both play store and ios.

For vocabulary, you can always request word lists surrounding a certain theme from me, and I’ll make sure to deliver. Instead of that, you can also binge- watch the entire “Learn greek with Lina channel”, but I recommend getting a grasp of basic grammar first, before jumping in. Things like conjugation, the fact that greek genders all nouns etc, might make no sense to you if you look at them with no context.

Also, there are plenty of cheap tourist guides with simple greek phrases, but they are based on memorising phrases instead of understanding their structure, don’t rely much on those.

There is a subreddit, if use the site reddit, called r/greek, which is a community, based on helping each other solidify their skills, and get in touch with native speakers.

And finally, the instagram account learngreekwithstefanos (https://instagram.com/learngreekwithstefanos?utm_source=ig_profile_share&igshid=62qdsr6hmpjy) has some nice exercises and notes.

Of course, search tumblr with the tags “greek”, “greek language” or something similar for more of those.

If you have any more knowledge on the matter, please reblog and add more resources!
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I’ve never studied Belarusian before, but I tried to find some good resources for you.

1) http://www.belarus-misc.org/bel-mova.htm

This one has a bunch of links to radio shows, grammar books and learning materials.

2) http://en.m.wikibooks.org/wiki/Belarusian

Wikibooks is a good place to start with grammar! I see quite a few lessons on here, so I would definitely take a peek at this link.

3) https://en.glosbe.com/en/be/

English-Belarusian dictionary

4) http://www.surfacelanguages.com/language/Belarusian

Basic phrases and words to learn simple vocabulary

5) http://www.memrise.com/courses/english/belarusian/

There are only a few Belarusian memrise courses, but it’s better than nothing ~

Let me know how it goes!!!

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rahaflearns:


Motivation is an important element of the language learning process. In this busy world it’s hard to keep a consistent level of excitement in learning a new language. Certain parts of every language can be a stumbling block, If you feel like giving up, it doesn’t mean that it’s time to quit. It might just mean that it’s time to take a closer look at what motivates you.  
I will try and give you some tips on how to stay motivated when learning a foreign language. Hope you’ll find them useful!

  • Remember why you started.
    What made you start learning in the first place? Friendship? Love? Family? Self-improvement? Travel? Work? The reasons for learning a language are varied and often personal. Remember your reason. Use it to motivate you to keep going, keep learning and keep improving. 
  • Be clear about your goals.
    Defining your language learning goals is another important element of staying motivated and focused on whatever it is you’re trying to achieve. What does success look like for you? Try to visualize it. Write it down and come back to it regularly to keep the mental image of success fresh in your head. Every time your motivation decreases slightly, remind yourself of what achieving your goals looks and feels like. 
  • Don’t aim for mastery. 
    They say that the perfect is the enemy of the good. This is doubly true when it comes to language learning. The language learner who progresses the most is usually the one who takes the most risks, makes the most mistakes, fails the most often - but doesn’t give up. Communicating is messy, creative work, and you’ll hold yourself back if you strive for perfection. There’s no need to drill yourself until you’re exhausted. Do your best and move on. Give yourself permission to be “good enough”. 
  • Talk to people. 
    While it can be scary talking to people in a foreign language, it can also be exhilarating to put what you’ve learned into practice! Languages exist because humans are driven to communicate. What better way to apply what you’re learning than by talking to an actual human being? No matter your level, you’ll progress more quickly - and be more motivated to keep learning - if you find a patient conversation partner, either in person or online. You’ll find that most native speakers are thrilled to speak their language with you. 
  • Don’t compare yourself to other people.
    Instead of comparing yourself to other language learners, compare your current level to your level in the past, for example last month or last year. That way, you will be able to see the extent of progress you’ve made and boost your motivation. Always comparing yourself to other people can have the opposite effect.
  • Make language learning part of your routine.
    You don’t want learning a language to become a chore. There’s nothing less motivating than learning something just because you feel you have to. The key is to transform your thinking about learning so that you don’t see it as an addition to your day but as an intrinsic part of your day. There are various things that you can do to help make language learning part of your routine:
  1. Read for 20 minutes on the train/bus to school or work.
  2. Listen to a podcast or anything in your target language for 5-10 minutes you are walking.
  3. Work in your textbook when you find yourself free at random times of the day
  4. Write a page in you notebook just before going to bed.
  5. Chat with a family member or a friend (it better be a native speaker) in your target language whenever you get the chance to do so.
  • Don’t Give Up.
    There is a Japanese proverb which neatly reflects another major component of language-learning success “Fall down seven times, get up eight”.
    The proverb reminds us to have a holistic and realistic view of the learning process.
    see this Learning language and time management .

Always remember that without a real desire to learn, you’re going to be fighting an uphill battle. 

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iwearplaids:

The malayalam song playlist that I promised @puppyloveblog24 a long time ago. Sorry about the short delay. These are some (very few) of the ones that I think you will enjoy. 

2000-2010

Evergreen songs (the ones that came out before me)

Other band songs/cover that I really like : 

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svensklangblr:

TV:

Sveriges Television, sweden’s biggest tv channel, they have lot’s of different programs, such as Rapport, which is great to watch if you want to understand current news in swedish. here is Pippi Långstrump, here is Madicken and here is Vi på Saltkråkan, bc i love them. most of SVT can only be viewed from inside sweden though

RADIO:

Sveriges Radio, sweden’s official radio network. my personal favorites are Konflikt (a program about international conflicts and relations), and P2 Klassiskt, they air classical music and talk about classical music, it usually centers around airing music, but they do also talk about it, and hey, classical music never hurt anyone. there are a million different programs to pick from though!

LITERATURE:

some of the most notable swedish writers and literature includes: 

Nils Holgerssons underbara resa genom Sverige by Selma Lagerlöf, 

Röda Rummet, Hemsöborna, Tjänstekvinnans Son (and about 50 others) by August Strindberg

Den sista athenaren and Singoalla by Victor Rydberg 

Solägget, Tant Grön, Tant Brun och Tant Gredelin, Sagan om den lilla, lilla gumman and not least Tomtebobarnen by writer and illustrator Elsa Beskow

Doktor Glas, Den allvarsamma leken and Gertrud by Hjalmar Söderberg

Vilhelm Moberg’s Utvandrarna, Invandrarna and Nybyggarna. 

Bröderna Lejonhjärta, Pippi Långstrump, Barnen i Bullerby, Emil i Lönneberga, Madicken, Karlsson på taket and a million others by Astrid Lindgren

nowadays sweden is known for producing thrillers and crime novels, but i’ve never been interested in that so i don’t know a lot about them, i don’t think it would be hard for you to look up though

MUSIC:

you can check out this post for swedish music, Agnetha Fältskog made a lot of nice music with swedish texts before her success with ABBA, that i recommend! the melody is usually simple, the lyrics as well and they rarely contain slangs or words that you can’t look up, and her pronunciation is usually clear! and, she sings beautifully and i luv her

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