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The Jewish Journal has created a lovely centerpiece that’s perfect for Tu B’Shevat aka the New Year for Trees. Consisting of branches, yarn, and pom-poms, even the least artistic among us can easily make it.

This would be a fun and affordable activity for the whole family, especially if you have a bunch of mismatched, leftover yarn hanging around. For those who are more ambitious, add sequins and/or glitter!

The post Tu B’Shevat Craft – Easy Branch Centerpiece appeared first on The Jewish Lady.

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A disastrous appearance on The View has showcased the deeply anti-Semitic views held by Women’s March co-founder Tamika Mallory. Given an opportunity to renounce her support for Islamic extremist Louis Farrakhan, she refused, confirming that she indeed called him “The Greatest of All Time” years ago and still holds that opinion today. 

Mind you, this is a man who constantly attacks Jews and Israel, who leads a group that’s on the terror watch list, who tweets insane statements like “Jews are termites…Jews are slave masters…Hitler was a wonderful man…” and other offensive garbage.

Mallory, along with her equally atrocious co-founder, Linda Sarsour, are some of the worst anti-Semites I’ve ever seen! Their March has never been about helping women; rather it hurts women by promoting a dangerous and biased agenda. 

Even though this information has been public record since 2017, the most liberal members of the Jewish community refused to believe the truth, choosing instead to be apologists for these sick people. However, even they have their breaking point and it seems that all Jewish support for the Women’s March has evaporated (as it should). 

Rabbi Hirsch summed it up best, explaining why his congregation wouldn’t participate anymore: “In the aftermath of Pittsburgh, anti-Semitism can no longer be a narrow concern. If you tolerate or are sympathetic to those who are prejudiced against Jews, we cannot stand with you. If you deny Israel’s right to exist, we cannot stand with you.”

A splinter group, the “Women’s March Alliance,” will be holding a competing event in NY this weekend and some Jews have endorsed the counter-march. Personally, I want nothing to do with either group. They do not represent me or my views. Instead of encouraging unity, as Americans and as women, they want to divide us.

I would strongly encourage everyone to boycott the Women’s March crowd, especially the Jewish community. Their values are NOT our values. We should only associate with good groups that promote true empowerment for all women, not a select bunch of lunatics and radicals. 

The post The Jewish Community Must Boycott The Women’s March appeared first on The Jewish Lady.

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Spirit airline markets itself as a budget-friendly, no frills carrier. While none of their customers expect luxury, they do expect—and should receive—common courtesy. One family is sharing their nightmare experience of being terrorized by a flight attendant who called them “Retarded Jews.”

All of their troubles stemmed from a dispute over a car seat. Mr. and Mrs. Beck had received approval for the seat from a gate agent. The flight attendant, however, not only refused, but was extremely rude.

The Becks complied, even though it was a huge hardship since they were traveling with 3 children, aged 3 and younger, including a 6-week-old baby. As if that bad treatment wasn’t enough, it got even worse!

During the flight, Mr. Beck attempted to change seats so he could sit with his wife. A male flight attendant threatened him with arrest, becoming confrontational when the Becks protested and begged to stay together. 

Needless to say, this was shocking to everyone on board and others have expressed their outrage. “It was clearly anti-Semitism, a personal thing,” one passenger stated. 

After their flight from hell landed, two police officers and two Spirit supervisors escorted the family off the plane and they were told that their return tickets had been cancelled.

I can not wait to see how Spirit is going to explain this kind of abuse. Treating a young couple, with little kids, like that is beyond bad for their public relations. I would never fly this garbage airline after hearing such a disgusting tale of bigotry.

The post Jewish Family Terrorized During Spirit Airlines Flight appeared first on The Jewish Lady.

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One of the most ridiculous articles I’ve ever seen, “The Five Best Christmas Books For Jewish Kids,” has been featured on Tablet. Subtitled “Using literature to help your spawn feel less left out,” it’s obvious that the author has no respect for this important topic.

She begins by recalling that she was “super envious” of kids who celebrated Christmas when she was young, but now she feels, “Rather than wishing for more public acknowledgment of Hanukkah, I’d prefer less public celebration of Christmas.”

Ok, so she wants less celebrating and this will be accomplished by recommending that Jewish children read books about Christmas. Talk about illogical!

As for her book list, it includes such gems as My True Love Gave to Me: Twelve Holiday Stories which is an anthology of stories about “diversity, characters of color, the teensiest smidgen of horror, gay boys, magical realism, Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, and fantasy.” (No, I have no idea what that means and I doubt anyone else does either.)

Another charmer is Dear Santa, Love, Rachel Rosenstein. This book features a young girl who repeatedly writes to Santa, begging him to come to her house, even though her parents inform her that will never happen. Nothing they say matters, and Rachel is only “comforted” after learning that her Muslim, Chinese, and Hindu classmates are also excluded.

Strangely, the author of the book post loves this, claiming, “You know what? Hanukkah is not as awesome as Christmas. Which is as it should be! Parents: Teach your kids about false equivalencies. Teach them that life can disappoint; acknowledge that sometimes you just have to sit with your discomfort.”

Absolutely awful, terrible, misguided advice from someone who is clueless. 

I don’t understand why Jewish kids—or adults, for that matter—need to feel sad, bad, unhappy, and/or envious over Christmas. It is NOT our holiday. There is nothing wrong with Christians enjoying Christmas, but we are not supposed to be involved. We have our own holidays; we have our own traditions; we have our own faith. Anyone who whines and pines over Christmas is Jewish by birth and Secular by choice. Those of us who practice Judaism as a religion do not wish for Christmas. Hanukkah is not a substitute, there is no such thing as a “Hanukkah Bush” or any other quasi-Christmas type of nonsense. 

“We can’t help what we feel,” the author laments about her inability to enjoy Christmas. Well, personally, I don’t feel that way and most Jews don’t either. We don’t covet that which is not ours; rather, we revel in what makes us unique. There are Jewish holidays all year-round that we can enjoy. December 25 is just another normal day to us.  

Instead of envying Christmas, the author should learn about her own traditions and embrace those. Stop trying to be someone else. Accept that being Jewish does mean being different and that’s ok. Jewish kids need Hanukkah books, not books about Christmas!

The post Jewish Kids Do NOT Need Christmas Books appeared first on The Jewish Lady.

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I can honestly say that this has been the most amazing Hanukkah I have ever celebrated—and it had nothing to do with gifts.

Long-time readers will recall that 3 years ago, I mentioned my best friend’s struggle with breast cancer. Since 2015, she has been through literal hell, fighting such a horrible disease and watching her personal and professional life disintegrate because of it.

Since we live on opposite sides of the country, it has been so hard for me to support her. Yes, we talk and text daily, yet it never seems to be enough. I did go to California when she had surgery, but every day since, I have missed her and thought of her, prayed for and with her, and felt incredibly guilty I couldn’t do more.

Last Monday, I got the surprise of my life when she showed up at my door, with her kids, totally unannounced! (To me, anyway). It had all been arranged between her and my hubby, as a combo Hanukkah/birthday surprise (My B-day is 12/12). Neither one of them is good at keeping secrets, so this was a major coup!

I was so shocked to see her, literally close enough to hug, that I started to cry! The tears of joy have flowed regularly during her visit, along with tons of laughter, cooking together, shopping, some crafts, and endless good conversation. 

This is truly what life is all about—people. The people we love, being there for them, allowing them to be there for us, and sharing our lives. 

Did I intend to take an entire week off from blogging? No way! But I’m so glad I did, because I will cherish these memories forever. Currently, she is in remission, but there is no guarantee for tomorrow. No matter how much time we have, whether it’s a long life or a short one, we need to make each day count.

Too often, Hanukkah centers around lavish displays and expensive presents, rushing around, feeling overwhelmed, and not enjoying the celebration. I’ve done that in the past and it was miserable! That’s why I’m so glad that this year was different, it was all about relationships, and finding fulfillment through that. 

Gifts are great, don’t get me wrong, but things will never replace people. Family, friends, and faith should be our focus. I am so grateful to God that I have all of that in my life, and so much more. 

The post The Most Amazing Hanukkah appeared first on The Jewish Lady.

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Some of the things people debate about are pretty silly, such as how “Hanukkah” should be spelled. Yes, there are many ways, but it all means the same. Personally, I have only seen “Hanukkah” and “Chanukah” commonly used. (For what it’s worth, auto-correct will reject anything else.)

I prefer the version without a “C” because most people who aren’t Jewish don’t know that it’s silent and that makes things tricky. To keep it simple and easy to read/pronounce, the simplest version is best—Hanukkah.

I’d love to know how you lovely folks spell it. Leave a comment and let me know which version you like.

The post How Should “Hanukkah” Be Spelled? appeared first on The Jewish Lady.

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