Loading...

Follow The Elliott Homestead on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
The Elliott Homestead by Shaye Elliott - 8h ago

Wondering what my kids do all day while I’m gardening? Here’s how they live childhood unplugged. Make sure to follow us on YouTube for weekly videos from the cottage.

The post Childhood Unplugged appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Gardener Hand Salve Recipe. 

My hands have spent the better part of each day these past few weeks sunken deep down into the warming soil. In fact, just today, they’ve planted three hundred red onion starts, dug up a few worms for early morning fishing tomorrow, transplanted forget-me-nots into the potager beds, and pushed a cart full of new lilac plants through Lowe’s. 

They’ve also mixed up sourdough focaccia bread for tomorrow’s breakfast, folded a few loads of laundry, prepared three meals for the family, held many little Elliotts…

… and probably wiped a snotty nose or two. 

Yes, my hands do much for me. And they often look it. 

At the risk of sounding vain, last week’s YouTube video highlighted my “Grandma hands” (as I affectionately call them). They looked like proper rough in that video, enhanced by the harsh sun rays and perfect shadows. I’m pretty sure I could all but use them to exfoliate my face at this stage of the year.

I’d like to argue that I’m far too busy sorting out the market garden rows and potager perennials to bother with my well-worked hands. And frankly, in some weird sort of twisted pride, I’m proud of them. They’re hard. A bit rough. Full of work. 

I think that’s a blessing. 

But then there are moments, such as the anticipation of Easter coming up this weekend, that makes me want to polish up a bit. As much as I love sweating in flannels, Levis, and muck boots, I’m equally excited to doll up in a pencil skirt and heels for a special occasion. I love getting ready for church and feeling clean and fresh and lovely. 

Except for my hands. They tell the truth of how I spend my days. 

Anyway… all that’s to say… I’ve been working on my hands these past few days so they’re ready for the Easter holiday. I bought some press-on nails. I’ve been scrubbing the dirt out from the creases on my fingers. And I’ve been using this gardener hand salve recipe each morning and night to ease the dry, rough skin. I thought you might enjoy it. 

Gardener Hand Salve Recipe

You will need: 

 – 1/2 cup sweet almond oil or jojoba oil

 – 2 tablespoons olive oil

 – 2 tablespoons beeswax

 – 30 drops Yarrow-Pom essential oil

*This blend naturally up-regulates the body’s protective transcription factors while activating skin-protecting proteins (inhibiting the enzymes that breakdown elasticity and collagen) with the added benefit of promoting collagen production. Basically, this means it does MAGIC for making your hands look younger. Each bottle of Yarrow-Pom will make about 15 batches of this hand salve. Point being: you’ll be set for a while. I use this oil on my face every night before bed. 

  1. Add the sweet almond oil, olive oil, and beeswax into a small glass bowl. Place the bowl over a small saucepan of boiling water – to create a double boiler of sorts. Heat the mixture just enough to melt the beeswax and stir to completely combine. Remove from the heat. 
  2. Add in the Yarrow-Pom oil and stir again. 
  3. Store in small glass mason jars at room temperature. 

There are some special whipped hand salves that feel like satin when you rub them in. This isn’t one of those. This is a simple gardener hand salve recipe that’s designed to sit humbly in a jar right by your bedside. It’s not meant to smell fancy (though you could certainly add any oils you’d like). It’s simply meant to be easy for you to make and to serve your hardworking hands well. 

I often wonder what Tasha Tudor’s hands felt like. The woman lived in her garden, much as I do this time of year, and work like that is certainly reflected in one’s body. I love that about life and particularly about older woman, like Tasha. The stories their hands… their bodies… could tell. 

They’ve served meals and ironed linens. They’ve born children and nursed for years on end. They’ve sworn, laughed, wept, and mourned. Their brains have learned, their hearts have loved, and their bodies have worked. 

One can only hope of such a gift. 

Enjoy the gardener hand salve recipe. 

The post Gardener Hand Salve Recipe appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I cannot foresee any day in the future better than this one. For as far back as I can remember, Stuart and I have been in a state of self-induced-chaos. Part of that is because we love to work. Part of that is because we’ve had to work to build the farm. 

It’s been three years now at Le Chalet

Our children are born, nursed, weaned, and sleeping through the night. All of my four chicks are under my wings as we go about our day tending to the animals and garden beds. They’ve labored alongside us, albeit with slightly less vigor (as they’d much prefer to collect the worm from the soil than plant the cabbages). Still, they’ve been with us on this property as we’ve built the chicken coop on a patch of bare soil, sunk perennials deep into the dormant soil, added over two dozen trees to the landscape, tilled and tended to the pastures, and orchestrated the renovation of the farmhouse interior. 

It’s fabulously imperfect, homemade, and crusty around the edges. I just don’t get it.

 

My newest fern is planted in a broken second-hand pot on the thrift-store cabinet in my kitchen window. The shelves below are filled with mismatched mason jars of every sort that we use for drinking glasses – the extras happily spilling over the on the floor which I constantly kick accidentally as I walk past. 

Crumbs fill the cracks of my hundred-year-old kitchen floorboards. 

I’ve come to think of this “homegrown” farm much like the gardens that surround its walls. Each year, we’ve been able to layer in something else. Sometimes this is practical – like the roughed in laundry room we recently put in downstairs to get the washer and dryer out of the kitchen. Other times, it’s done for the pure magic of it – like sowing an entire half acre of bare ground in bee feed wildflowers and grasses. 

But can I be honest for a moment? 

This is the very first spring that I’m not drowning. In pregnancy or in nursing or in work or in projects. 

Lest you be fooled by my ability at the moment to see with a level head (this is a rare moment we must capture!) there is surely still work to do. But the work ahead feels much less daunting than the road we’ve traveled these past few years. 

I suppose that’s the whole point of spring, isn’t it? To bring us hope.

I don’t think it’s a coincidence we’ve chosen to celebrate the resurrection in the same month bulbs from the cold, dark soil burst into a breathtaking display. 

(In twenty years, can you imagine the display they’ll put on?)

Yes, despite our youth-raged culture, I’ll continue to argue that most things in life get better with time. The gardens are a prime example. Cared and cherished year upon year, they begin to dance in a way that’s unexpected and lavish. The tulips and snowdrops have begun to spread and crawl amongst the parsley and chives, the trees are slowly gaining height and changing the shadows they cast on the graveled pathways, and last year’s rose bushes are puffing up to fill their allotted spaces with more vigor and confidence. Though they’re still in their “childhood”, the gardens are already beginning to sing a new song this spring. One I haven’t heard before yet am eager to learn. 

Six new lambs are staking claim to the animal pen and each time I see their soft, curly, coats, I’m reminded of the year we lost our first lamb, Pocket, because we did all the things we shouldn’t have. And then, of course, there was the first time I milked our cow – a rhythm that my hands now know by heart. 

 

Even the market garden is putting it’s best foot forward this season after weeks spent laboring over its row formations last season. Many terrible years of attempting to grow carrots were put to death with our last carrot harvest – tender, sweet, moist roots that jetted down into the soil with healthy vigor (so much so we just finished eating the last of them from storage!). 

Does this mean we’ve actually learned? We’ve actually grown? We’ve actually developed? Is that even possible? 

I’ve been a novice at some many things for so long that it seems impossible for us to have any sort of knowledge valuable enough to share. But as I showed my bff Angela how to work a broadfork through the garden rows last week on her visit to the farm, it dawned on me: we’re no longer beginners. 

FAR from experts. 

But we’re no longer beginners. 

For the first time in our adult life, we get to move on to “the next stage”. Like many young couples, we moved countless times in our first few years. Starting over at each home became a tiresome and laborsome chore. In fact, I’ve never experienced a “third-year” garden like I am in my potager this very season, always moving before my gardens had a chance to develop beyond infancy. 

 

So here we are. Not at the beginning. Far from the end. Sandwiched in the middle where children grow, relationships with the land continue to develop, and wisdom from experience is applied to all manner of farm and kitchen tasks. 

I think I like it here. I think I really, really, really like it here. 

And Amen. 

The post I think I like it here. appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Question: How many seeds should I plant each spring? Answer: Error on the side of more, baby! Make sure to follow us on YouTube for weekly videos from the cottage.

The post Error on the side of more! appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Wondering what to order from Azure Standard? Here’s what I get! Yes, we still get a lot from the store. That is, until I figure out how to make olive oil in a Zone 7b garden… Make sure to follow us on YouTube for weekly videos from the cottage.

ORDER FROM AZURE STANDARD HERE.

The post What to order from Azure Standard. appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Elliott Homestead Cooking Community is a way for you to get brand new, whole food recipes delivered to your door every month. Every recipe is designed to be simple, nutritious, whole-food centered, price conscious, and delicious. This month on the blog, we’re featuring a special honey roasted hazelnut and beet salad. Enjoy! You can learn more about joining our Cooking Community here. 

Pictured below is the recipe card delivered to our member’s doorsteps! 

The post Honey Roasted Hazelnut and Beet Salad appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Elliott Homestead by Shaye Elliott - 4d ago

The Elliott Homestead Cooking Community is a way for you to get brand new, whole food recipes delivered to your door every month. Every recipe is designed to be simple, nutritious, whole-food centered, price conscious, and delicious. This month on the blog, we’re featuring my very favorite Einkorn Cream Puffs that we eat all the time. Enjoy! You can learn more about joining our Cooking Community here. 

Pictured below is the recipe card delivered to our member’s doorsteps! 

The post Einkorn Cream Puffs appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Elliott Homestead by Shaye Elliott - 4d ago

The Elliott Homestead Cooking Community is a way for you to get brand new, whole food recipes delivered to your door every month. Every recipe is designed to be simple, nutritious, whole-food centered, price conscious, and delicious. This month on the blog, we’re featuring the Tomato and Eggs Breakfast we eat all the time. Enjoy! You can learn more about joining our Cooking Community here. 

Pictured below is the recipe card delivered to our member’s doorsteps! 

The post Tomatoes and eggs. appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

How To Keep a Tidy Garden: This ain’t survival gardening anymore, baby! Does this mean we’re adults now? Make sure to follow us on YouTube for weekly videos from the cottage.

The post How To Keep A Tidy Garden appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Beneath our kitchen lies a hundred-year-old root cellar that you’ve never seen… see how we converted it and made the most of what this ‘ol farm has to offer.

The post We’ve never shown you this room before… appeared first on The Elliott Homestead.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview