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Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks.

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review
  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post #43: Evil and Redemption appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks.

Adam Andrews received his B.A. in Political Economy and Christian Studies from Hillsdale College in 1991. He earned his M.A. in History from the University of Washington in 1994, and is currently a candidate for the Ph.D. in History. He is writing his doctoral dissertation on the history of American higher education. Adam is a Henry Salvatori Fellow of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, and was a founding board member of Westover Academy, a Classical Christian school in Colville, Washington. He is the assistant director of the American Council for Accredited Certification, a non-profit professional certifying body.

His Mission

Adam with his wife, Missy, founded the Center for Literary Education in 2003 to help parents and teachers provide high-quality instruction in the important disciplines of the mind.

Many of these disciplines have been lacking in American education for decades, and a return to greatness in the next generation requires that we reclaim them. The Center for Literary Education exists to help parents and teachers give their students facility with ideas, making it possible for them to rise to positions of influence and authority in their society.

We believe that influence and leadership opportunities will eventually go to those who know how to handle ideas, and that education, if is to be rightly so called, must deal with ideas first and foremost.

Since the beginning of human civilization, men of influence—leaders—have always concerned themselves with ideas; they have been familiar with the eternal questions, familiar with the usual answers, conversant with the long-running debates. The record of their intellectual journey remains for us to contemplate, written down in the literature of the western world. The ability to read and understand this literature is a necessary and crucial part of a sound education.

In the American literature of last 150 years, we find one of the most chilling portraits of the crisis of modernity ever recorded. Some of the greatest writers of this period, from Stephen Crane and Jack London to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, provide in their works a window into the plight of the modern soul. Having denied the relevance, authority, and very existence of God, many such modern authors floundered in their search for someone to replace Him. Their works thus powerfully demonstrate the consequence of such a denial: the destruction of certainty in all its forms.

To a great extent, we 21st century Americans live in a world bequeathed to us by the thinkers of our recent past: a world devoid of certainty. We must look to a new generation of leaders to help us restore the philosophical and spiritual foundations of our culture. Leaders of this new generation will depend upon a sound literary education: the ability to interact with the arguments of history’s most thoughtful men.

The Center for Literary Education strives to help produce such leaders by equipping parents and teachers to understand, analyze, and interpret great literature, so that they can pass these critical skills on to their students. To this end, it provides seminars and curriculum materials designed to make the basic techniques of literary analysis clear and accessible to teachers and students alike.

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review
  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post #42: Adam Andrews and the Elements of Literature appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks.

Taking a side street off of the topic of moral imagination, we are discussing Ashley’s thesis concerning the idea of a canon of humanity. In the current Classical homeschooling climate, the focus has been on the advancement of Western Culture. However, Classical Education is not tied to an earthly structure but is based on more lofty ideals. Join us while we explore the topic!

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review
  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post #41: A Canon for Humanity: Finding Unity in Diversity appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks.

In this chapter of Tending the Heart of Virtue, the focus comes to two of the most universal themes found in literature: love and immortality. Through the classic childhood tales: The Velveteen Rabbit, and The Little Mermaid, Guroian dives into the heart with the topics of love and immortality with a reminder to rest in our Creator’s love and mercy. 

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review
  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post #40: Love and Immortality appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks.

Brandy Vencel is the thinker behind the Afterthoughts Blog and host of the Scholé Sisters podcast. She pretty crazy about educational philosophy in general and Charlotte Mason in particular. She wishes she could spend more time studying but her vocation as wife and homeschooling mom of four children ages 10-16 dictates otherwise.

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review

Thank you for your interest in leaving a rating or review for The Classical Homeschool Podcast on iTunes. Here’s how you do it:

  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post #39: Brandy Vencel on Parenting and the Moral Imagination appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks.

Cindy Rollins homeschooled her nine children for over 30 years using Charlotte Mason’s timeless ideas from the beginning. She is a writer, speaker and hopefully an encourager.  She is the author of Mere Motherhood: Morning Time, Nursery Rhymes, and My Journey Toward Sanctification; A Handbook for Morning Time, and Hallelujah—A Journey Through Advent with Handel’s Messiah, co-owner of the Mere Motherhood Facebook group with her good friends Angelina Standford and Lynn Bruce. Her heart’s desire is to encourage moms. She lives in Chattanooga, Tennessee with her husband Tim, dog Max, and however many children happen to be home.

You can find her at her  website cindyrollins.net  where she publishes her newsletter Over the Back FenceFacebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/cindyordoamoris/Twitter: https://twitter.com/CindyOrdoAmorisMere Motherhood https://www.facebook.com/groups/meremotherhood/

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review

Thank you for your interest in leaving a rating or review for The Classical Homeschool Podcast on iTunes. Here’s how you do it:

  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post 38: Cindy Rollins and Shakespeare appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks.

In chapter four of Tending the Heart of Virtue, the focus comes to companions and those that offer us formation. Through the classic childhood tales: The Wind in the Willows, Charlotte’s Web, and Bambi, Guroian unpacks the differences between those we call friends and those that mentor us.

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review

Thank you for your interest in leaving a rating or review for The Classical Homeschool Podcast on iTunes. Here’s how you do it:

  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post 37: Understanding Friendship and Mentorship appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Is now available in Itunes & Stitcher. We would love to know what you think, so leave us a review and rating on ITunes!

Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks. We will also be drawing from Guroian’s other work, Rallying the Really Human Things.

Join us and our guest, Heidi White, for a conversation on reading the Bible as literature. Exploring an ancient concept from the Desert Fathers up to the current Classical Education movement, this episode focuses on the need for metaphor in our lives.

Heidi White is a teacher, writer, and homeschooling mother. She is the Deputy Editor of FORMA Journal, the magazine of the Circe Institute, and a weekly contributor at The Close Reads Podcast Network. She speaks and writes about education, literature, and the Christian imagination. She lives, writes, and teaches in Colorado.

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review

Thank you for your interest in leaving a rating or review for The Classical Homeschool Podcast on iTunes. Here’s how you do it:

  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post #36: Heidi White on the Bible as Literature appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Is now available in Itunes & Stitcher. We would love to know what you think, so leave us a review and rating on ITunes!

Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks. We will also be drawing from Guroian’s other work, Rallying the Really Human Things.

In this episode, we are exploring how the hero’s quest and the need for adventure can impact our parenting styles as well as the interior narrative. Sometimes, as adults we forget how much of the journey our children have to do alone. We have few precious years in which to be their guide. How does the literature we read to them and for ourselves shape that hero’s quest? How does the moral imagination shape itself when we think of our own lives in view of the hero? 

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review

Thank you for your interest in leaving a rating or review for The Classical Homeschool Podcast on iTunes. Here’s how you do it:

  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post #35: The Hero’s Journey and the Moral Imagination appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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Is now available in Itunes & Stitcher.

Welcome to Season 4 of The Classical Homeschool Podcast. At the Classical Homeschool Podcast, our heart is to take on the work of wrestling through the, sometimes difficult and philosophical, ideas presented throughout the classical education movement and bring them down to earth, specifically and practically for the classical homeschooling mom. This season we are focusing our efforts on understanding the moral imagination in relationship to classical education with our spine text of Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian and, of course, Norms and Nobility by David Hicks. We will also be drawing from Guroian’s other work, Rallying the Really Human Things.

Dr. Vigen Guroian is Professor of Religious Studies in Orthodox Christianity at the University of Virginia, the same  school from which he received his B.A. in 1970. In 1978 he received his PhD from Drew University. He is the author of nine books including the noted Tending the Heart of Virtue: How Classical Stories Awaken a Child’s Moral Imagination and Rallying the Really Human Things: Moral Imagination in Politics, Literature, and Everyday Life.

He has contributed over 200 articles to journals, magazines, books, encyclopedias, and newspapers on a wide range of subjects including morality, ethics, liturgy, marriage and family, children’s literature, the sexualization of the modern American university, and bio-ethics. He has been featured on NPR’s Talk of the Nation as well as Chuck Colson’s Break Point.

Before joining the faculty at Virginia, he was for many years Professor of Theology and Ethics at Loyola College in Baltimore, Maryland. Since 1986 Dr. Guroian has been a member of the faculty of the Ecumenical Institute of Theology at St. Mary’s Seminary and University. For the academic year 1995–1996 he was named the Distinguished Lecturer in Moral and Religious Education at the Institute.

Dr. Guroian is a permanent Senior Fellow of the Russell Kirk Center for Cultural Renewal, a Senior Fellow of the Center on Law and Religion of Emory University, Senior Fellow of the Trinity Forum, and a Richard M. Weaver Fellow.

Dr. Guroian’s books Inheriting Paradise and The Fragrance of God, both Christian meditations on gardening, have earned him invitations to speak and give readings at churches and gardening groups in the U.S. and Great Britain.

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ESV

Leave a Rating or Review

Thank you for your interest in leaving a rating or review for The Classical Homeschool Podcast on iTunes. Here’s how you do it:

  1. Click on this link to go to the podcast main page.
  2. Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
  3. Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

The post #34: Interview with Vigen Guroian appeared first on The Classical Homeschool.

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