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Dog's Name                Chloe

Age of My Dog            7 years old

Gender                         Female

Breed                            Dorkie

Home                           Port Charlotte, FL

What you love most about your Heart Dog       Her personality!

Do you cook for your dog?   Yes, some.

Pawrent                       Thomas M

Is your dog a Heart Dog? Check out The Heart Dog Page to learn how to submit your furry canine to the pack. 

 

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By Guest Contributor, Ash Babariya

All dogs need their owners to think about their safety. But dogs that have disabilities, such as deaf dogs, need a little more consideration. These dogs can’t hear traffic, people calling after them, or other warning signals that would tell them that something is wrong. They rely on you to keep them safe while they navigate life without that sense.

Photo credit: Pixabay

1. Always Microchip Your Dog

No matter if your dog is hearing impaired or not, always make sure they are micro-chipped. This is the most important thing you can do for your dog’s safety. Not only does this make it easier for a lost dog to be reunited with their owner, but it also makes it easy to store medical information for a vet to discover. When the vet scans your dog’s microchip, the database from the microchip company will have a note that your dog is hearing-impaired or deaf. That ensures that your dog is given the proper care when you aren’t around, even if they’ve lost their tags.

2. Invest in Good Harnesses and Leashes

Always be sure that your hearing-impaired dog is on a leash, or in a harness. Invest in quality leashes and harnesses to make it harder for them to get away from you in public. 

3. Train Your Dog to Respond to Common Hand Signals

If you’ve ever noticed how people interact with dogs, you’ll know that many people rely on some common hand signals when giving verbal commands. For example, many people pat their hands on their thighs when saying “Come here”. Many people also put their hands up with their palms facing out when they want a dog to stay or get down. Teach your dog to respond to hand signals that they are likely to encounter around people who wouldn’t know that they are hearing-impaired.

4. Keep the Exits of Your Home Secure

One way you can keep a hearing-impaired dog a little safer is to ensure that the exits of your home are always secure. Lock the doors so that someone coming home can’t open the door and let your dog out on accident. You can also put up gates to keep your dog in a certain part of the house unless you are letting them outside. 

5. Be Sure Your Closest Neighbors Know About Your Dog’s Hearing

Let your neighbors know that your dog is deaf, and consider teaching them the basic hand signals you use to get your dog to stay or come here. Chances are if your dog gets out, one of the neighbors will be the first person to see your dog, and if they know how to get your dog to come to them, they may be able to bring the dog back home before he gets too far.

6. Give Company Some Ground Rules

Be sure that any company you have visiting knows that your dog should not be startled. Give them a few ground rules, like not grabbing your dog from behind, or always making sure your dog can see them before petting him. This will prevent anyone from getting hurt due to a dog being startled. Another good rule to tell visitors is to never wake your dog from sleeping.

7. Give Your Dog a Safe Place

Always make sure that your dog has a safe place that they can go to away from guests, especially children. While not all hearing-impaired dogs are startled easily, many are, and children are not always the best at remembering to not “sneak up on” a deaf dog. Give your dog a place in the home where they can go if they need to, like a kennel or a specific room.

8. Always Supervise Puppy Play Dates

Dogs are surprisingly vocal with each other when they play, and if your dog isn’t able to hear the warning growls or yips, they may push the other dog into becoming aggressive. It’s a good idea to always supervise when your dog is playing with a hearing dog, so that you can be sure that no one is getting annoyed and needs a break. Pay close attention to your dog and the other dog.

9. Always Check for a Shadow When You Go Outside

Be sure you are always checking that your dog isn’t following you before you go  outside. The biggest safety concern for a deaf dog is that they will get away from you, loose in an area where no one knows that the dog is deaf and not just ignoring them. If you go out to check the mail or run to the car for something you forgot, your dog may be following you without you realizing it. Get into the habit of checking before you open doors.

10. Learn to Communicate Environmental Changes to Your Dog

If you are out for a walk or playing at the park and something changes, be sure to let your dog know. Here’s a great example: You are playing with your dog at the park, and they are looking at the ball you just threw. You see a small child approaching the two of you, likely to ask if they can pet your dog. Be sure to grab your dog’s leash, and then point their attention to the child so that they aren’t startled by the child’s presence. Simply ensuring that your dog is aware of changes around you can help them feel more comfortable and less likely to be startled.

Improve Your Dog’s Safety to Improve Their Life

These tips are great ways to keep any dog safe, but especially a dog that is hearing impaired. Simply taking a little more time to be careful with where your dog is, how others interact with your dog, and how well your dog knows what is going on around them, can make a huge difference in a deaf dog’s quality of life.

Sources:

Ash Babariya is the co-creator of Simply for Dogs and a life-long dog lover. Ash’s many adventures at the local dog park with her Boxers, Janice and Leroy, have turned her into the local “crazy dog lady”. She shares those adventures, as well as her research into the world of dogs, around the web to promote well-informed pet owning. Ash, Janice, and Leroy share a home in the Midwest with a brood of hens, all sorts of wild critters, and the occasional litter of puppies.

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Photo credit: PXHere

Every afternoon a group of dogs gather under the old oak tree up on the hill where they have the perfect view of their neighborhood.  They rest under its shade while they wait for the children to arrive home on the big yellow bus. 

There are quite a few dogs living in this neighborhood. Of course there is Kirby, a little Dorkie who lives with his human mama. There is Kai and Dovah, two huskies that live with their human mama. Jack and Toby, a chocolate lab and a golden lab, who live with their human dad. Mr. Magoo, a schnauzer, who lives with his human pawrents and three children. He is considered the wise one since his human dad is a professor who loves knowledge.  Mochi, a standard poodle, who lives with her two dads and two children that came here from far away countries. And finally the fashionable yorkie trio, Douglas, Basil, and Annabelle, who live with their human pawrents. There are also a few cats and even a hamster but that’s another story.

Most afternoons are lazily quiet but on this particular day there was a lot of commotion at the house next door to Kirby’s house. Big trucks and cars were in the driveway and people were unloading lots of boxes and furniture. The dogs knew a family was finally moving into the empty house that had seemed sad for such a long time.  They saw several bikes and toys which made Kirby very happy.  He loved all of the children in the neighborhood, especially since he didn’t have any children of his own.

Suddenly Mr. Magoo grunted in dismay which immediately alerted all the other dogs. “What is it?”, Toby asked. “Oh dear”, said Mr. Magoo, “They have a dog but not just any dog, it’s a pit bull.”  All eyes turned to see the large dog walking up the walkway to the front porch. Kirby thought she was very beautiful with her gray and white fur covering a sleek muscled body. She was wearing a pink collar with a pretty pink daisy. “She looks like a nice dog. What’s wrong with a pit bull?”, he asked as he watched her enter the house with a young boy holding the end of her leash.

Mr. Magoo, being very concerned, told them everything he knew about pit bulls from what he had heard and what he had seen on tv.  The more Mr. Magoo talked, the more worried Kirby became. Such a bad dog was now living right next door to his house.  How would they keep all of the children safe? How would he keep his mama safe? Most of all would he make it to the old oak tree since he would have to walk right past the pit bull’s house, not once, but twice every day.

The new family had four young children. Kirby was always a bit confused whenever he saw them playing in their backyard with the pit bull. She did seem to care about them. She was always so gentle with them. Over the next few weeks there were many times Kirby ventured into the neighbor's backyard with his mama. He really liked the children and the pit bull never acted like she wanted to hurt him.  Kirby learned her name was Daisy which sounded like a sweet dog's name, but just the same, Kirby was afraid thinking maybe she only acted good when her people were around.

The first time he went into her yard Daisy eagerly trotted toward him to say hello but she stopped as he ran behind his mama's legs. She saw his body trembling and the fear in his eyes. She kept her distance from him from that point on. She wasn't the type of dog to hold a grudge so, as she watched him play with her human children, Daisy knew she would protect him if the need ever arrived.

It quickly became a daily ritual when the dogs would meet at the tree and then watch Kirby leave his house to join them. He was now always the last one because he waited until the very last minute to summon up all of his courage. He would walk to the end of his front yard near the street always seeing Daisy waiting on her front porch. Knowing she was watching him Kirby would take a deep breath and fly like the wind running as fast as he could across her yard not slowing down until he knew he was safely past any danger. He never noticed her prance down the steps, lower her head with such sadness as he zoomed by, and then slowly walk back up the steps to her porch. She never tried to catch him but he just thought that was because he was one of the fastest dogs in the neighborhood.  All of the dogs on the hill would bark and wag their tails as soon as he made it which made him look very brave indeed. Mr. Magoo had told them how mean pit bulls were so inside he knew he was so very afraid of the day she might catch him.

This went on for weeks and weeks until the night Kirby’s world would be turned upside down. The night that would change everything in the neighborhood. No one noticed Kirby running into the woods behind his house just as the sun was setting. No one except Daisy, the pit bull who lived next door.

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What Are Primalvore Broths?

Primalvore Bone Broths are pure hydration with great benefits made for all stages of a dog’s life. There are so many uses such as a warm or cold drink to quench thirst, to keep sick dogs hydrated, to rehydrate freeze dried foods or dehydrated foods, or as an extra boost of nutrition when poured over dry kibble.  I make my own bone broth and chicken stock which I use as a base for almost all of our homemade meals and as a liquid replacement in many of our dog treats.

Who Is Primalvore?

Primalvore's mission is to promote healthy eating for our canine companions. The approach is simple: create delicious and functional supplements, meals and treats made with thoughtfully sourced ingredients that are always wholesome, sustainable and human grade. 

The Products

As of right now they offer four flavors: beef, chicken, duck, and turkey. The bones used are certified organic and natural which means there are no antibiotics or hormones used in the range free, grass fed animals. 

The broths are gently heated with a combination of time, temperature and pressure to create a shelf stable bone broth that has an 18 month shelf life without the use of additives or artificial ingredients.

All of the broths contain only four human grade ingredients and are processed in a USDA/FDA approved facility.

What Are The Ingredients?

Beef Bone Broth: water, organic beef bones, collagen peptides, organic turmeric.

Chicken Bone Broth: water, organic chicken bones, collagen peptides, organic turmeric.

Duck Bone Broth: water, organic duck bones, collagen peptides, organic ginger.

Turkey Bone Broth: water, organic turkey bones, collagen peptides, organic turmeric.

What Are The Health Benefits?

These broths are rich in amino acids such as arginine, glycine, glutamine and proline.  Collagen peptides are known to boost protein, glucosamine, chondroitin and other nutrients that support good joint health, shiny coats and strong nails. The process of breaking collagen into small chains increases the bio-availability of the key nutrients in collagen.

Turmeric contains Curcumin which is a potent anti-inflammatory and antibacterial agent that shows promise in the prevention and treatment of cancer among other conditions. It is generally found to be safe for dogs and cats with veterinarians frequently recommending the addition of turmeric (up to a quarter of a teaspoon per day for every 10 pounds of weight) to a dog or cat's diet if they have been diagnosed with cancer. If you follow Doug English, Holistic Veterinarian in Australia, then you know he recommends Golden Paste with literally thousands of pet parents claiming amazing results both as maintenance against cancer and treatment for cancer. He has proven it works to reduce arthritis inflammation and pain in pets. 

Ginger is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory used to treat digestive upset, nausea, gas, motion sickness, heart problems, joint inflammation due to arthritic conditions, to reduce fever, and is also effective as an anti-infective, especially against viruses. It can decrease blood sugar levels, and increase absorption of all oral medications.

How much To Feed and how to Store?

20 lb .......... 1/4 cup (2 oz)
40 lb .......... 1/2 cup (4 oz)
60 lb .......... 3/4 cup (6 oz)
80 lb ............... 1 cup (8 oz)
100 lb ....... 1 1/4 cup (10 oz)
120 lb ....... 1 1/2 cup (12 oz)

Each gusseted bottom stand up spouted pouch with re-closable choke proof cap contains 12 oz  for $8.99 which provides an average of 6 servings for small to medium dogs or 2 servings for large to extra large dogs.

These pouches can be stored at room temperature for up to 18 months.  Watch the expiration date printed along the back of the pouch.  Once opened keep refrigerated and use within 7 to 10 days.

What Does Kirby & Kenzie Think?

I haven’t cooked with it, although I can, but they have enjoyed cups of the broth licking up the very last drop.  A great test of how tasty it is was when we recently cooked them their own steak on the grill.  I cut up the meat into bite size pieces and poured the broth over.  Honestly I expected them to pick out the meat first and then slurp up the broth. Surprisingly they both slurped up the broth first and then ate the meat.

Kirby enjoyed every last drop

Kenzie kept her face completely submerged in the bowl until the last drop

Final Word

Primalvore has created a shelf stable broth without the use of additives or artificial ingredients. The packaging is made without BPA's and is easy to open and reseal.   I especially appreciate how easy these pouches are for travel.

I highly recommend making your own broths and stocks to keep a steady supply so these products are the next best thing.  The simple list of ingredients makes me quite happy! Bone broth and collagen peptides not only help the joints but they also heal the gut and boost the immune system.  Kenzie has a luxtating patella so I’ve been adding collagen peptides to her meals since we brought her home. Both dogs get their golden paste daily which contains turmeric and ginger.

Kirby and Kenzie love the taste, I love the healthy ingredients. It's a win-win! I know I will be stocking up on the duck broth since duck is quite expensive.  

Disclosure:   We received these products to review and were not compensated in any other way. Our opinions are solely based on our experience with the product(s) and knowledge of the company which we approve. 

 

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