Loading...

Follow The Bark Magazine - Dog Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

He fetches balls. He sits when asked. He shakes hands. Labrador mix Lucky is a polite gentledog with good manners—as one would expect of a canine his age. He is estimated to be seven years old and is mature, patient and well-behaved, but he also loves going for walks, playing fetch and running around the yard like a youngster. If that’s not the best of both worlds, what is?

Lucky is a live-in-the-moment, carefree kind of four-legger, and so he is always happy to have visitors who keep him company during his stay at the animal shelter. He knows he is a little down on his luck right now, but—in true Labrador fashion—he likes to look on the bright side: He has his own kennel with his own bed to sleep on, he has food and water and he has people looking after him.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Promising, and exciting. Those are the words used by Dr. Stephanie McGrath to describe new findings from a trailblazing pilot study to assess the use of cannabidiol, or CBD, for dogs with epilepsy.

McGrath, a neurologist at Colorado State University’s James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital, led a small study with 16 pet dogs to assess the short-term effect of CBD on seizure frequency.

Based on her research, McGrath found that 89 percent of dogs who received CBD in the clinical trial had a reduction in the frequency of seizures. Nine dogs were treated with CBD, while seven dogs in a control group were treated with a placebo.

The research took place from 2016 to 2017, and results are published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Summer brings with it an expectation of sweltering temperatures, sometimes to the point of danger.

As temperatures climb, remember that if you are hot, your pet is probably feeling even hotter. Dogs and cats generate more heat than people and usually also have a thick layer of fur to trap that heat inside.

Dr. Christine Rutter, a clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, has some tips on identifying signs that your pet may be too hot and suggestions on ways to keep them safe and cool on hot summer days.

While people sweat all over to get rid of excess heat, dogs and cats are only able to sweat through their paw pads.

Most pets rely on panting to cool down, but animals with shorter noses, like Bulldogs and Persian cats, tend to be less heat tolerant, meaning they have a harder time getting rid of excess body heat.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Is sleeping with your dog a good idea? Science says yes!

There is an active debate in the pet community about whether or not co-sleeping with your dog is best practice. Some studies show that sleeping with your dog can result in a bad night’s sleep.

However, there are numerous other studies that tout the benefits of letting your dog sleep in the bed with you. For example, sleeping with your pup has many mental benefits such as an increased feeling of safety and comfort. People suffering from PTSD found that sleeping with their pet helped diminish nightmares.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Joint pain is one of the most common issues I see in the dogs I treat in my veterinary clinic, and it can even emerge at a young age in some animals. But the signs of joint pain can be difficult to spot. So as a loving pet parent, it’s important to know what to look for. Here are 7 signs your furry little one may be suffering from joint pain.

1. Reluctance to Move

As dogs develop joint problems, they may show a noticeable decrease in activity. They’re less likely to climb up and down stairs, leap onto the couch or jump in the car.

2. Limping

If you dog has difficulty moving his joints, it may cause him to limp. The limp may be more apparent when your dog first rises after a period of rest, and fade a bit once he’s gotten the hang of moving about.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The 12-year-old, 94-pound dog at the Arizona Humane Society was the longest resident

It took 276 days, but grumpy ol’ Gus has finally been adopted! Gus came into the Arizona Humane Society (AHS) in Phoenix, Arizona on July 31, 2018 after being found nearby in Glendale, Arizona. During his stray hold, no one ever came forward for the 12-year-old Australian Shepherd mix who was living with a bit of arthritis and dental issues, both of which were treated through the Arizona Humane Society’s trauma hospital.

His size (94lbs, probably more now due to the amount of treats staff and volunteers gave him!) and fluffiness alone were enough to draw people to him, but it didn’t take long for AHS staff and volunteers to love Gus, but boy, he did not necessarily love us. 

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In Mexicali, an uncontrolled epidemic of Rocky Mountain spotted fever has affected more than 1,000 people since 2008.

Researchers examined dogs, ticks, and surveyed households in 200 neighborhoods. Half of the neighborhoods in the study had diagnosed human cases of the disease. The team discovered that even though citywide only one in 1,000 ticks were infected, there were neighborhoods at very high risk where almost one in 10 ticks were infected.

“If you live in one of these high-risk neighborhoods and you get five brown dog tick bites, that means you have a pretty good chance of being exposed to Rocky Mountain spotted fever,” says lead author Janet Foley, with the department of medicine and epidemiology at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Dog's name and age: Maisey, 1 year

Nicknames: MayMay, Goosey Neck, Prancy Pants

Adoption Story: Maisey was spotted on Petfinder when she was a small pup. Maisey lost most of her back leg when she was born and her other back leg is deformed. After surgery in Tennessee to remove the rest of her half leg, she was then sent to Connecticut to be adopted. I’d had my eye on her for over a month and when her first adoption event happened, I rushed to see her. Luckily she was still there and I became her lucky new mama!

Maisey loves all people and dogs (cats too!) She’s like an ambassador at the dog park making sure she greets everyone. She loves to play!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

One of our small dogs tends to get very excited—very excited—when it’s time for a walk, or dinner, or play, or pretty much anything that looks like it could be fun. She spends a lot of time in a state of eager anticipation—“oh boy, what are we going to do now?!!?” If we’ve been quiet for a while, and then get up preparatory to doing something, she does her happy dance. And if it’s anywhere near the time when something else usually happens, it’s a happy dance with vocals! (Unfortunately, one of our other little dogs has learned how much fun this can be and tends to follow her lead. Luckily, the two other dogs tend to take things as they come).

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Dr. Stephanie McGrath, a neurologist at Colorado State University’s James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital, has revealed initial findings from a groundbreaking study to assess the use of cannabidiol, or CBD, for dogs with epilepsy.

Based on her research, she found that 89 percent of dogs who received CBD in a clinical trial had a reduction in the frequency of seizures.

“Overall, what we found seems very promising,” she said.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview