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One of the best things about a change of season is that you and the furkids get to shake things up and turn the boring old routine that was summer into brand new activities and goodies that make for a whole new set of memories. To get you started, we’ve put together a virtual box of autumn doodads for dogs (and you) to get the inspiration going.

BEDS, BLANKETS, BOOTS AND COATS

What better time than autumn to do a complete bedroom revamp for the canine kids? Here are the Autumn 2017 décor trends that are likely to give fuzzy family members a warm feeling inside.

  • Contrasting the cold, hard metal and plastic that dominate our world, the Tactility Trendwill bring soothing textures into the home with the use of soft throws and fluffy stools.
  • The Cosy Hovering Trendwith the hanging of swing chairs on the patio, encouraging relaxation with a book. The feeling of suspension creates a space of comfort.
  • Neutral pastels continue this sense of calm into the bedroom area with the popularRose Gold Trend – used in home and décor accessories.
  • For the Urban Jungle Trend, we reconnect with the natural world by bringing greenery and wooden features into the home.
You and your pooch can find your inner autumn decorating mojo and stay right on trend by visiting our selection of great online shops. And don’t forget to order in towels for the wet season – we recommend the Microfibre super absorbent pet towel and the Buddy & Friends Super Absorbent Pet Towel.

INDOOR GRASS

The fake stuff: When it’s too cold to go outside for older dogs and young pups, fake grass can be a good substitute. You can buy the Four Paws Wee-Wee Patch Indoor Potty Replacement Grass from apetslife.co.za. The patch looks and feels similar to real grass and is infused with antimicrobial agents and attractants to eliminate smells. Other suppliers:

Takealot.co.za
poochpatch.co.za
smartgrass.co.za

INDOOR ACTIVITIES

You’ll find a whole lot about this a little further on.

GOOD READS

Nothing says autumn like curling up on the couch with the furkids or on that patio swinging chair, snug as a bug, with a good book in hand. Here are a couple of good reads we’d recommend to get you started.

A Place Called Home: Toby’s Tale

By GA Whitmore

Every rescue dog has a story uniquely their own. Toby’s Tale takes you on a journey across the USA, and across the spectrum of life’s emotional and spiritual experience. Born on a small farm in northern California, Toby narrowly escapes the death sentence imposed upon him by his breeder. Through a series of events driven by good intentions, he finds himself in a Connecticut suburb where life with his new family soon collapses on him, and his newfound happiness is brutally destroyed. On his quest to find a place to call home, Toby encounters and endures the best and worst of humanity as he comes face-to-face with sorrow and joy, fear and courage, and ultimately, with the power of love.

Wish Me Home

By Kay Bratt

A hungry, stray dog is the last thing Cara Butter needs. Stranded in Georgia with only her backpack and a few dwindling dollars, she already has too much baggage. After a lifetime of family troubles, and bouncing from one foster home to another, Cara decides to leave it all behind and strike out alone—on foot. She sets off to Florida to see the home of her literary hero, Ernest Hemingway, accompanied only by Hemi, the stray dog who proves to be the perfect travel companion. But the harrowing trip takes unexpected turns as strangers become friends who make her question everything, and Cara finds that as the journey unfolds, so does her life—in ways she could never imagine.

TELLY WITH THE FURKIDS

Pitbulls and Parolees

An inspirational show that follows the day-to-day operations at the Villalobos Rescue Centre, including rescues of abused neglected, and abandoned dogs, and the centre’s efforts to adopt out dogs to new owners.

 The Vet Life

Doctors Blue, Ross and Lavigne have moved to Houston to open a full-service veterinarian hospital and animal shelter together. The series captures the doctors’ lives as they juggle running a new business while managing their family life filled with spouses, parents, in-laws, children, pets and friends, as well as their intense moments saving the lives of animals at their clinic. Catch it on Animal Planet this autumn. Don’t have DStv? Catch our very own Dr Jen Stock, TEARS veterinarian, as she shares the highs, lows and dramas of being a welfare vet on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tears_vet/

Animal Cops Houston

This is an American documentary that takes place in Houston, Texas and focuses on the work of the Houston Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Not always an easy watch, but there’s loads of inspiration in every episode.

GROOMING

Waterless shampoos for dogs and cats are a great way to freshen up between baths in the colder weather. Ask the advice of your groomer or vet before choosing a waterless shampoo for your dog or cat.

Coats

Some people think that dogs with long coats need a minimum of grooming during the cold, wet season. But thick coats can be more of a curse than a blessing if not kept in a healthy condition. Hair that becomes matted does not insulate the dog from the cold; instead, matting is painful and can hide hot spots or lead to infections below the skin. So, keep up the grooming in the months ahead.

Winter bath time

Dogs sometimes need more grooming in winter, particularly if they walk through mud and spend more time indoors which can lead to an increase in “doggie” odour. When bathing your dog in winter, make sure they’re completely dry before going outside. This is especially important for small breeds or short-haired dogs. If your habit is to let your dog air-dry, it’s best to blow dry her, as long as she isn’t terrified of the blow drier, in which case, use a super absorbent towel to dry her off and keep her in a warm room until she’s completely dry.

Winter haircut

You might think that cutting your dog’s coat in the cold weather compromises your dog because she needs her coat to keep warm. Although this is true, it’s also true that she if in a loving home, she isn’t living outside, but snuggled up with you in a heated house. If you’re worried that your dog will get cold on outings, you could consider a longer trim or a doggie coat.

Nail trimming

It’s likely that your dog might spend less time outdoors on walks or for play time in the colder weather. This means, your dog’s nails might need to be trimmed more often since they aren’t outside running and romping to wear them down. Check weekly, and once you hear that “click-click” on the bare floor, you’ll know it’s time to trim.

The post Autumn doodads for dogs appeared first on TEARS.

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TEARS Animal Rescue by Luke Kruyt - 3w ago

It had been a number of years since we had organised a Golf Day, but when one of our loyal supporters, Garth Richards from Graphic Laminates, contacted us and said that he wanted to do something to help us raise funds for TEARS, and mentioned the idea of a Golf Day, we jumped at the opportunity. Garth approached Clovelly Country Club, and the 30th November was secured, giving us just five months to organise the day. A golf organising committee was formed, and it was all systems go, to plan the special day.

The day, held at one of the most beautiful golf courses in South Africa, was a huge success and enjoyed by all. On offer for a Hole-in-One on the 8th Tee, was a motor vehicle, a Volkswagen UP, underwritten by Santam, and organised by Nick Stubbs of Lyall Morgan Insurance Brokers. Barons Tokai kindly provided the vehicle, sponsored the hole, and were represented by Gavin Coulson of New Vehicle Sales.  Although a few golfers came close to scoring a hole-in-one, no one “hit the jackpot”, but the anticipation as each golfer tried his / her luck generated much fun and excitement. Graphic Laminates had sponsored 12 Telescopic Flags, bearing the TEARS logo and tagline and as we stood on the balcony overlooking the course, the flags, which were lining the pathway to the course, waved in the breeze, creating a great sense of pride.

Other holes were sponsored by Bridge Fund Managers, Urban Brewery, Spilhaus Brewery, Old Mutual Insure, Classic Parasols, Carbon Cocktail, Falke, and Perky Pets.  We were overwhelmed by the kindness and generosity of other sponsors, corporates, businesses and contributors, who were all so munificent in providing prizes, Auction items, Raffle items, Goodie Bag items, and prizes for the golfers. Each golfer received a Goodie Bag, provided by Falke, which was crammed full of amazing donated “goodies”. There were 136 players in total, and everyone received a prize, which testifies to the big-heartedness of our supporters. At the prize-giving, we were entertained by radio commentator and raconteur of note, Robin Jackman, who amused everyone with stories of escapades experienced by him and fellow commentator Trevor Quirk, on the numerous national cricket tours wherein they were involved.

We extend our grateful thanks to all these caring sponsors, businesses and individuals, and thank Clovelly Country Club for their helpfulness and amazing hospitality, in hosting our Golf Day, which raised R130 000 in much needed funds. I express my heartfelt thanks to the Golf Day Organising Committee, comprising Garth Richards, Debbie Clark, Michelle Richards, Lesley Leask and Dave Mitton, who were so determined from the start, to ensure the success of the Golf Day. They put in a tremendous effort and worked hard, to ensure that the Golf Day would be a memorable day for everyone, and that TEARS would benefit handsomely from the funds raised. Others involved, behind the scenes, were our Admin Manager, Leone Gradidge, our Collections Officer, Patrick Currin, and our volunteer Designer, Lucy Mackay, and on the day we were aided by volunteers Jane Ginsberg, Danielle and Daniella.

To everyone who contributed to the success of our Golf Day, I convey my sincere thanks and appreciation. It is most heart-warming to know that so many people care and want to support our special organisation!

MARILYN HOOLE

The post TEARS Golf Day 2017 appeared first on TEARS.

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Whilst their love and loyalty doesn’t age, our pets certainly do, and often quicker than some pet parents realise. Cats and dogs are considered ‘seniors’ by seven years of age, and even as young as five for large breed dogs, like Labradors. And whilst ageing isn’t a disease, older pets are at higher risk of heart disease, cancer, arthritis, kidney and liver disease. During July, National Senior Pet Month, find out how to help prevent and manage common conditions for golden oldies.

You may believe your seven-year-old cat or dog is in its prime. However, on the inside, the picture can be quite different. Many conditions simply aren’t evident before irreversible damage has occurred. This is why a senior health screening is vitally important. An annual heath check at the vet is equivalent to you seeing the doctor about once in seven years!

Ask your vet about the IDEXX SDMA, an affordable new test that can detect kidney disease in cats up to four years earlier than before and up to two years earlier in dogs. Kidney disease is known as the silent killer because symptoms rarely show before it’s too late. Since the new test became available globally last year more than 350, 000 pets have been diagnosed with kidney disease that traditional tests would have missed. Early detection allows for prompt intervention which can extend life and improve the quality of those years.

With age, the optimal range for different nutrients becomes narrower, making it easier to tip into dietary deficiencies or excesses. “Providing the correct age-appropriate food for your senior pet is probably the simplest and most effective way you can make a difference to their health and well-being,” says Dr Guy Fyvie, Veterinary Advisor at Hill’s Pet Nutrition South Africa. “New Hill’s Prescription Diet k/d + Mobility combines the very best nutritional science to help older pets remain fit, active and healthy for longer.” Developed after more than a decade of research on ageing and the impact of nutrients on cell function, the new food will be available exclusively from South African veterinarians from late June 2017.

Several small meals a day may be easier on an older pet’s digestion. But avoid overfeeding – obesity can lead to numerous health problems and can shorten a pet’s life. Have fresh water available at all times – older pets’ are less able to regulate water balance and more prone to dehydration. Ensure food and water bowls are within easy reach of the elderly pet that may find it painful to bend, stretch or jump.

Go for walks and play together. Appropriate exercise will help you both stay fit and also keep the brain active, helping to avoid ‘doggy Alzheimer’s’.

So should your best friend be reaching that senior stage, it’s time for a visit to the vet and to make the seven-year-switch to the right food. Visit www.SeniorPets.co.za, a new website with more expert advice; ways to identify the ‘tell-tail’ signs of ageing; inspiring stories and tools to calculate your pet’s ‘real age’.

Seven Steps for Super Seniors:

  1. Most importantly, go to the vet for a senior health check and ask for an IDEXX SDMA test.
  2. Switch to a food specifically formulated for senior pets. NewHill’s Prescription Diet k/d + Mobility, available at vets in South Africa from late June 2017, has been developed after more than a decade of research and combines Hill’s best nutritional science to manage older pets.
  3. Have clean water easily available at all times and monitor water intake.
  4. Try to make your home more comfortable e.g. easy access to a warm bed, litter tray, food and water bowls; non-slippery floor surfaces; using ramps or steps as needed.
  5. Regular grooming including brushing the teeth and trimming the nails as needed.
  6. Consistent, gentle exercise and play is good for mind and body.
  7. Lavish love and attention.

Tell Tail Signs of Ageing 

Age-related changes start small and may seem insignificant. It may be as simple as a few grey hairs or being less excited about playtime or walks. Other ‘tell tail’ signs of ageing include:

1)    Sleeping longer or changes in sleep patterns.

2)    Stiffness, limping or difficulty rising from rest.

3)    Drinking more than usual.

4)    Increased urination or ‘accidents’.

5)    Weight loss or gain.

6)    Changes in behaviour

7)    A duller coat, lumps or bumps

8)    Coughing, panting more, or shortness of breath.

9)    Appearing confused or disorientated.

10)  Bad breath, red and swollen gums, difficulty chewing or changes in eating habits.

NB: Many changes will not be evident on the outside! A senior health check is vital.

The post They might be turning grey, but their last years can be golden appeared first on TEARS.

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Thank you to our wonderful supporters who entered their beautiful pets in our TEARS Calendar 2018 photo competition and made it a tremendous success. We had so many amazing photos to choose from, that our judges had an incredibly difficult time picking the winners! We’re thrilled to be able to announce the winners below…

Please note that the TEARS Calendar 2018 will be on sale at various outlets from September 2017 – we’ll keep you posted.

#TEARScalender2018

The post TEARS Calendar 2018 photo competition winners! appeared first on TEARS.

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MAY MONTH-END MADNESS at TEARS Valyland Bookshop. 50% off all stock from 25 to 28 May. Cnr Ivanhoe & Upper Recreation Rd, Fish Hoek. Shop hours – 9 – 5 Mon to Fri ; 9 to 1 Sat & Sun

Want to adopt a bunny that’s not only gorgeous but beautifully crafted and delicious to eat? This bunny, created by Liesbet Schietecatte of #StocksArtisanBelgianBakes, is built with vanilla biscuits made with free range eggs, fresh butter and vanilla seeds; and royal icing covered with delicate rice paper flowers.

You’re automatically entered into the raffle when you buy an item at our TEARS Valyland Bookshop 50% off sale from 25 to 28 May or from the TEARS table at the Cape Farmhouse Boot Sale on 28 May.

You can still be in the running to win the bunny without making a sale item purchase, by buying a raffle ticket for R10 at either event. We wish you the very best of bunny luck!

The post May month-end madness and raffle appeared first on TEARS.

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By Barbara George

Each cat is unique and will deal with winter based on a number of factors; their age and state of health, sufficient food and clean water, adequate shelter, their environment and the number of hours of daylight. These factors can change rapidly at any time.

Cats instinctively adapt to the change in seasons by adjusting their behaviour and feeding patterns. As with most animals, they live ‘in the moment’ – considering what has to be done now in order to survive in the best possible way. While we know that cats do experience emotions, these are not wasted on factors they cannot change, like the weather. Their bodies are designed to withstand heat and cold, within reason, if they are healthy and have the necessary resources.

Indoor cats will deal with winter differently to those who live outside. They have access to a more stable environment and a predictable source of food and warmth.

That super winter coat

As the weather cools and days grow shorter, cats will begin to grow a thicker undercoat as a protection against the cold. For indoor-only cats this may not be as noticeable since their need for extra warmth and protection is far less than that of the outdoor cat.

The fluffy undercoat traps air around the body. The outer coat protects the undercoat, and the air it contains, from the outside temperature. This means cats have the ability to keep their body temperature steady in cold and hot conditions. Wind and rain are more of a problem than the cold; wind will blow the warm air out of the undercoat and fill it with cold air, while rain will soak the undercoat and leave the cat cold and wet.

The importance of a winter nap

They will look for warm and sheltered places to rest so as to minimise the loss of heat. These places may be different to those chosen in warmer months, partly for the shelter offered and partly due to a different variety of prey to be caught.

It is important for cats to keep their bodies warm as this allows them to be instantly active in the event they need to move; either to catch prey or to escape from danger. Shorter hours of natural light also trigger an instinctive reflex to seek more food. They will eat to store fat for warmth and to act as reserves if they are unable to catch prey.

Retaining flexibility and mental alertness

Cats may appear to behave differently in cooler weather. Really they are just adapting to less daylight and conserving energy that may be required to find food. Outdoors there is less happening, so generally less stimulation; this is Nature’s way of helping them to conserve energy.

Depending on their metabolism and available resources, cats can be more or less energetic during colder weather. They may need to use different tactics to catch prey, or feel the need to conserve their bodies. Indoor cats may need to work off the extra energy gained by eating more food. It is important for all cats to keep mobile in order to retain their flexibility and level of mental alertness.

Cats most vulnerable in winter

Kittens, young and old cats, and those with injuries and illnesses are most at risk during cold weather. If outdoors, they may need assistance with shelter and food.

The best way to help your cat through winter is to keep him dry, provide a number of sheltered warm places to sleep, have sufficient appropriate food available, and keep him mobile.

About Barbara George

Barbara qualified with a Best Practice Certificate in Advanced Cat Behaviour from the Ethology Academy in 2008, and as a TTouch Practitioner 1 for companion animals in 2009. The focus of her work are cats and animals who are ill or injured and she visits clients in their own homes or wherever an animal is recovering.

Barbara can be contacted on barbara@ttouch.co.za or on 082 491 2309 and 021 531 6612.

The post How Cats Instinctively Adapt to Seasonal Changes appeared first on TEARS.

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We’ve come up with six ideas for active games you can play with your dog that will engage and stimulate him, physically and mentally; making days spent indoors as a result of bad weather, every bit as fun as being outdoors.

Sniffer Dog

Teaching your dog to discover prizes using only her nose is a great game for the body and mind. This exercise can get your dog excited about solving the problem of the hidden prize. Set up a bunch of boxes or see-through containers (start with at least four or five) upside-down next to each other and, without your dog seeing you hide it, place a prize (a favourite toy, a bone or treat) under one of the containers. Next, encourage your dog to smell the boxes and when he (hopefully) pauses at the one with the prize, lift up the box and enthusiastically congratulate him on his discovery. Let him eat the treat, fetch the toy, or indulge in whatever prize he’s found. Soon, your dog will know what’s expected of him during this game and be excited to sniff out the prize. Keep adding more boxes and space them at farther intervals to increase the challenge as you’re his scent work improves.

Seek

If your dog knows that “find it” or a similar command means to look for something hidden, then hide-and-seek is a great indoor game to play. Show your dog what it is you’re going to hide — a favorite toy, or even a person — and then put your dog somewhere where she can’t see you. Hide the item, then fetch your dog and tell her to find it. Give her vocal clues if she needs help, like “gooooood” when she gets closer or “uh ooohhh” when she mvoes farther away. Give hints if needed, by pointing or walking toward the hiding place, until she’s grasped what the game is about. When she finds the hidden object, make a really big deal of how brilliant she is. Eventually, she’ll get faster and faster, looking and finding. As your dog improves, be sure to challenge her by getting creative about where you hide the toy to keep her engaged.

Jungle gym

Training your dog to perform new tricks, like high-fives or lying down, is a great mental exercise. Training them to do tricks that require both physical and mental skill is even better; and perfect to pass the time on a rainy day. You can begin by teaching your dog to go under and over objects or through spaces, giving her loads of praise and she makes small gains.

Set up an item like a kitchen chair, a stool, or some other sturdy object on legs. Next, teach your dog how to crawl under the object and stay there, crawl all the way through the object, walk around the object, and how to jump over it entirely. Clicker training is especially effective for this since your dog has to work out what you’re asking of him, using your click-n-treats as a guide. Once he knows how to go over, under and through, you can ask him to do combinations before he earns his reward.

A good way to increase the challenge and fun is letting your dog figure out what it is he should do with this object for himself, and he earns rewards (a click-n-treat) for creative behaviours.

This sort of game should always be fun, never forced, keeping in mind that dogs are easily bored. This is also not a good game for dogs who suffer from any sort of joint degeneration.

Stair Run

If you have a stairwell, make it a game to run up it and burn some serious energy. To get the most exercise from this game with the least risk to your dog’s joints, start at the bottom of the stairs. Put your dog in a sit-stay, and throw a toy up to the top landing. Make it more exciting by creating some build-up, saying, “Reeeady…. ready….. GO!” and let your dog dash up the stairs to retrieve the toy. Encourage your dog to come back down the stairs at a slower pace, since it’s the downhill climb that risks injury. Allow your dog to stop playing when he’s tired or bored.

NOTE: This is only for dogs who are older than a year, once the joints have finished developing. You can cause long-term injury playing this game with younger dogs as their joints aren’t sufficiently developed to take the impact.

On-On

This exercise encourages running and practicing quick recall. In essence, it makes coming to you when called, so much fun to do. You’ll need a partner for this. Each of you gets a pocket full of treats. Start across the room from one another. One person calls the dog and rewards him with a treat, then the next person calls and rewards. Get farther back so that soon you’re calling from different rooms, and then from all the way across the house or apartment. The more your dog runs around the house, the better since you’re trying to maximise exercise and minimise food intake. Once the game is going and your dog is excited, only treat every other or every third recall and use loads and loads of praise and excitement or a tug toy as a reward the rest of the time. You can increase the excitement your dog feels playing this game by calling to him and then starting to run away, so your recall is also a game of chase. This is a great game outside of the house too, so when the rain stops, keep it in mind for using it at the park or other places as well.

The post Autumn indoor activities for your dog appeared first on TEARS.

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As with humans, not all dogs are created equal in the hair department. This begs the questions: do some dogs feel the cold more than others? The answer’s, yes, of course. We’ve put together a list of dogs who are less likely to safely tolerate dropping temperatures. Other factors that affect a dog’s resistance to cold are age, health and weight.

Chihuahua: this small breed of dog needs help keeping warm in winter with soft beds, extra blankets and coats for outdoor activities. This includes the long-coated variety. Since they’re low to the ground, make sure to dry their bellies when they come in from outside and on the coldest days make use of indoor grass patches.

Jack Russel, Fox Terrier and Rat Terrier: small in size and a thin coat makes it difficult for this breed to retain body heat on cold days.

Grey Hound: tall and slender, with short hair and a lower fat to muscle mass ratio, Grey Hounds battle to retain  body heat and can be at risk of hyperthermia if they spend too much time outdoors without the necessary protection. Winter coats, boots and super absorbent towels should be the order of the day.

Saluki: similar to the Grey Hounds, these long, slender dogs are powerful and muscular but lack the body fat and the sort of coat that retains heat on cold days.

Yorkshire Terrier: while this breed usually does have a long coat, the hair is relatively thin and offers very little protection against the cold.

Whippet: keep your whippet extra toasty as temperatures drop.

Miniature Pinscher: another breed with low body fat and a thin coat that feel the cold.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier: staffies, much like the Pitbull, have a hard time regulating body temperature and should be kept warm in winter.

Pitbull

Usually pitbulls have the body mass that may seem as if they’d do well in winter, but this category of dog is known for battling to regular their body temperature. Another danger, is that pitbulls are often kept outside as watch dogs. They should never be forced to spend a winter without adequate protection from the elements.

Puppies and kittens

Of course, puppies and kittens, regardless of the breed, should never be outside on those winter days as their size and growing bodies are highly susceptive to the cold. Make sure they don’t wander too far, dry them off well after outdoor play and keep them especially warm at night.

WONDERING WHAT YOUR DOG’S COAT TYPE IS?

Long haired

Long haired dogs are sometimes ‘fashionable’, but there can be many problems associated with such breeds. Ticks and fleas are more common and they can be difficult to both detect and remove due to the long hair.  Long hair can also hide unhealthy skin conditions and they can develop to a more serious stage before they are noticed. They require more grooming, maintenance and care than short haired dogs. It is important to check the dogs coat regularly and establish a grooming routine to prevent matting and also to get the dog used to being groomed. Breeds include the Shit-zu and Red Setters.

Smooth Coat

The coat on these breeds is sleek and shiny; it appears more like a skin than a coat. These breeds do not need to be brushed every day, however, it is still beneficial as it helps to keep the oil evenly distributed over the coat and makes sure the coat is free of shed hairs and dirt. The basic tool for grooming a smooth coat is a bristle brush. These include the Weimaraner and the Great Dane.

Short haired

Short hair breeds will generally drop less hair and require less grooming, but there is still a need to get rid of dead hair and debris within the coat and this can be done by using a slicker brush or a soft brush. Short haired breeds with a dense undercoat will also require the undercoat to be groomed out on occasion using a brush known as a shedding rake to prevent mats from forming. These include breeds such as the Beagle and the Labrador retriever.

Wire Haired

These coats should be rough and bristly. The outer guard hairs that are straight in other breeds are harsh and kinked. One way to groom wire haired dogs is to pluck out or strip straggly hairs using fingers or a stripping knife. This will stimulate the dog’s skin allowing healthy new hairs to grow. These include the Fox terrier and the Border terrier.

Single Coats

Dogs with single coats have the outer guard hairs, but lack the inner layer of undercoat. Single coated breeds should never be groomed when their coats are dry as this may cause the coat to break. It is advisable to spray the coat first with water or conditioner. Matting in single-coated breeds is a big problem. These breeds include the Afghan Hound and Maltese Terrier.

Woolly or Wavy

The wavy coat is characterised by curls. This type of coat tangles and knots easily and has a tendency to become dry. Before brushing the coat should always be sprayed with some sort of conditioning spray to avoid breakage. This includes Poodles.

Double

Most of the herding and working breeds, as well as many of the sporting dogs have double coats. Such coats developed because of the purposes for which they were bred. Most double-coated dogs were intended to remain outside and work no matter what the weather. Double coats consist of outer guard hairs, with an inner layer of shorter, finer coat called undercoat. This undercoat can be fine or downy, thick or thin. These include the Samoyed, Rough collie and Old English sheepdog.

Corded

These breeds have curly coats that are allowed to mat forming ‘cords’, similar to dreadlocks. These cords create a weather resistant shield in herding and some hunting breeds. Dogs with corded coats require baths to keep their coats clean and odour free. Corded coats take hours to dry following each bath. This includes the Hungarian Puli and the Komondor.

No coat or hairless

The skin of these breeds must be maintained just as other breed’s coats are groomed.  They need regular baths and moisturiser and possibly sunscreen in hot climates. These breeds include the Chinese Crested and the American Hairless Terrier.

The post Do certain dog breeds feel the cold more than others? appeared first on TEARS.

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Autumn’s the perfect time to take your cuddles with your catkids to a whole new level. The rise and rise of popularity across the globe in cat furniture design, purchase, DIY and gifting tells us that cat lovers love to give and get creative. Autumn 2017 cat home décor trends leave the world in no uncertainty that felines are the lords and ladies of domestic bliss. Here are some of the latest spot-on trends to inspire a winter symphony of purrs and get your fingers twitching.

LORDS & LADIES OF THE LIVING ROOM

Autumn 2017 feline furniture trends see the rise of modern, chic pieces that not only seamlessly fit into a contemporary home, but actually become focal points. In Britain the Bark and Miao PadPod is all the rage – a contemporary, luxury cat bed with a sleek, shiny outer shell and padded interior walls available in striking colours to fit right in with your interiors. It’s slightly elevated – a feline preference, according to its designers. Germany’s Jerry’s Cat Cave, combines sleek design with ease-of-use – this bed is designed with a snuggly mattress for large breeds or two cats, while the plastic cave is sturdy and easy to clean.

South Africa’s holding its own with Benji + Moon Cat Cocoons produced by local crafters helping to uplift communities, in collaboration with felt artist Ronel Jordaan using all natural materials that are cool in summer and cosy in winter. Each cocoon is made by hand using only eco-dyes and eco-friendly processes. Visit www.benjiandmoon.co.za for more info about this great home-grown product.

INDOOR CAT GARDEN

When it’s too wet and cold for cat to spend time out of doors, or if you have an indoor cat or live in a flat, an indoor cat garden can bring your cat hours of comfort, stimulation and even health benefits. Here are our tips for creating an indoor cat garden.

Planter: use one that is tall enough for your cat’s head to reach the plants, but small enough so that there isn’t room for your cat to use it as a litter box or walk in it and make a mess. A window box planter is a good option.

Garden soil: organic soil will ensure that pesticides do not get into your cat’s system.

Starter plants: many plants are toxic to cats, so the first thing you should do is make sure the plants you use are cat-safe – here is a selection of common plants that are safe to use:

Wheat or Oat Grass
Mint
Marigolds
Rosemary
Silver Vine

Lemongrass
Parsley
Tickle My Fancy
Valerian

Catnip
Zinnias
Thyme
Spider Plant

Indoor grass patch

Kunduchi is a super grass that helps cats expel fur balls. It is a highly nutritious living supplement for cats and adds roughage to their diet. If you live in a flat or have an indoor cat, why not make your own grass patch which can be kept on a balcony or patio. Simply buy a plastic concrete mixing tub from your local DIY shop and add a grass sod cut to size. You’ll need to replace the sod every two weeks or so but the enjoyment your cat will get from this little patch of heaven is well worth the cost.

PUZZLES

Food puzzles allow your cats to work for their meal. While these can be purchased in numerous styles, there are many DIY guides on building your own, using household materials.

Dry food: puzzles can be made by cutting holes in various objects that can be found around the house, including yogurt containers, toilet paper rolls, egg cartons, margarine tubs, or water bottles.

Wet food: food puzzles aren’t only used for dry food. To make a wet-food puzzle, use an ice cube tray or muffin pan, and place yogurt lids over the individual cups to increase difficulty.

CAT EXERCISE WHEEL OR IMAGINATIVE SHELVING

We love the idea behind the cat exercise wheel! Tests show that the cat wheel has proven to not only enhance the physical wellbeing of cats, but helps indoor cats to feel calm and to relax.

You can buy online although the cat exercise wheel will set you back a bit. To buy locally, contact Lorraine on 083 337 6593 or Erich on 083 457 4953 or email catwheel@awesomebengals.co.za. International distributors, if you’re planning on an overseas trip, are onefastcat.com and gocatwheel.net. You can try eBay.com for a cheaper option.

Another great option to keep your cat physically and mentally stimulated is to use imaginative shelving around your home – here’s a little inspiration:

GOOD READING

The Lion in the Living Room: How House Cats Tamed Up and Took Over the World
By Abigail Tucker

A lively adventure through history, natural science, and pop culture in search of how cats conquered the world, the internet and our hearts. To better understand these furry strangers in our midst, Abby Tucker travels to meet the breeders, activists, and scientists who’ve dedicated their lives to cats. She visits the labs where people sort through feline bones unearthed from the first human settlements, treks through the Floridian wilderness in search of house cats on the loose and hangs out with Lil Bub, one of the world’s biggest feline celebrities. Witty, intelligent, and always curious, Tucker shows how these tiny creatures have used their relationship with humans to become one of the most powerful animals on the planet. The appropriate reaction to a cuddly kitten, it seems, might not be aww but awe.

You Need More Sleep: advice from cats
By Francesco Marciuliano

Our feline friends have spent eons observing, napping, pondering, napping, and taking notes about the human condition. In between naps, they’ve realized that we humans could use some catlike guidance when it comes to handling the ups and downs of life. In this book they’ve condescended to share their invaluable wisdom in short advice columns such as “Always Stay at Least 30 Feet from a Loved One” and “Never Let Anyone Dress You.” Whether it’s coping with romance, surviving a social gathering, or clawing your way to the top of the corporate ladder only to realise you can’t get down, the cats in this ebook will have you relaxed and ready to take on the world! Just after one more nap.

TELLY WITH THE KITTIES

My Cat from Hell with Jackson Galaxy

Ever owned a cat that wreaks havoc on a household to the point of breaking up relationships, or one whose violent actions sends its owners to the hospital? Cat behaviourist, Jackson Galaxy, deals with these issues every day, and in this series he lends his expertise to desperate families hoping to rehabilitate their furry companions. Catch it on DStv’s Animal Planet.

The post Autumn contraptions for cats appeared first on TEARS.

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TEARS Animal Rescue by Luke Kruyt - 3w ago

This May, get a whisker-friendly #HillsKittyBowl free when you buy any Hill’s Feline bag, 1.3kgs or larger.

Available from participating veterinary outlets on any bag of Hill’s Science Plan, Ideal Balance or Prescription Diet cat food 1.3kgs or larger, the ceramic Hill’s kitty bowl (worth R80) is designed for your cat’s eating enjoyment, with a low lip and oval shape to accommodate the finest of whiskers.

A bowl of delicious Hill’s will have your cat purring with delight and gives you the peace of mind that comes from knowing your pet is getting the precise balance of nutrients needed for a long, healthy life. Hill’s is so confident your cat will enjoy Hill’s food, they offer a 100% money-back guarantee.

Terms and conditions apply. For your nearest participating practice or vet shop, contact Hill’s on infoza@hillspet.com or call 0800 228 783. For more info www.hillspet.co.za/News.

Be part of a community passionate about pets, and learn about Hill’s latest offers on Facebook www.hillspet.co.za/facebook, Twitter www.twitter.com/HillsPetSA or Instagram @HillsPetFoodSA.

www.HillsPet.co.za

www.HillsTransformingLives.co.za

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