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Every year the High Performance Program holds a silent auction fundraiser at the Canadian Orienteering Championships. This year, the silent auction will be on Saturday, July 27th in conjunction with the Canadian Orienteering Championships banquet.

Members of the High Performance Program will be donating items, but we greatly rely on and appreciate donations from the orienteering community and their family and friends.

If you would like to donate something, here are a few ideas:
  • Could your club donate an entry to an upcoming event? 
  • Are you a crafter – can you donate something like a pair of home-made mittens or a hat? pottery? weaving? sculpture? jewellery? 
  • Are you a foodie – can you donate a jar of home-made jam, a batch of cookies, a ready-to-go home-made baking mix, some home-made granola? 
  • Do you have a cabin or cottage that you could donate a gift certificate for a weekend or a week’s stay at? 
  • Do you live in a tourist destination and could offer B&B for a weekend or longer? (especially great if it was in conjunction with future orienteering events) 
  • Are you an artist – do you have a sketch of an orienteering scene, or a great photograph that you could put in a frame? 
  • Could you ask your local running/sport store to donate an item? 
  • Do you have a new unused item kicking around your house that you would love to get rid of – it might just be someone else’s treasure! 
  • Other ideas? Think about what you would like to bid on. 
If you have an item to donate, you can bring it with you to the Canadian Orienteering Championships or send it along with someone who is attending. The HPP is very appreciative of all the support we receive and we look forward to seeing you in Quebec! 
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We are searching for a new High Performance Committee (HPC) Manager. 

The job description can be found here. The High Performance Committee terms of reference can be found here. It is a paid position (hourly wage to be discussed) that is done remotely. The position is for up to 4 hours per week (attendance at HPC meetings is expected when possible, but is not paid).

Candidates should submit a letter of interest outlining why they are suitable for the position to hpp@orienteering.ca by April 22, 2019.
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Orienteering Canada’s High Performance Committee is seeking applicants for the volunteer positions of team manager and coach for the 2019 World Orienteering Championship in Norway (August 12-17, 2019 with a training period up to a week before) and Junior World Orienteering Championships in Denmark (July 6-12, 2019 with a training period up to a week before).
Email applications to hpp@orienteering.ca by April 1, 2019.
Details are available at these links:
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Orienteering Canada’s High Performance Committee is seeking applications from athletes to become members of the 2019 High Performance Program (HPP).

All athletes who meet the eligibility requirements and who have a strong desire to improve their abilities with a long or short term goal of representing Canada in orienteering are encouraged to apply to the HPP. Those wishing to compete in JWOC, WOC, World Cups, WUOC or World Games are required to be members of the HPP. Membership is from December 1, 2018 to November 30, 2019. There is a fee of $100 to join the 2019 HPP.

In order to be accepted to the HPP, athletes must:
● be at the Learn To Compete, Train To Compete , or Train To Win stages of Orienteering Canada’s LTAD model,
● have competitive results in M/W17-18, M/W19-20 or M/W21E at major national and/or international events,
● develop a training plan, together with their HPP Coach, that targets the physical, technical, tactical and mental aspects of orienteering
● be prepared to put in the required training to compete at or near an international level in accordance with the above mentioned training plan,
● demonstrate a desire to represent Canada in international competition,
● have orienteering training as a main focus, and
● successfully complete the HPP application process

More information and complete details about the application process are in the 2018 Athlete Handbook which is now available on the High Performance Program page.
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When I heard that NAOC was going to be in Whitehorse, I was ecstatic! I was super excited to show everyone my home terrain and what Whitehorse has to offer. As it got closer to the day I got more nervous by how many people signed up - where are they all going to stay!? Turns out we can accommodate over 570 athletes.

Okay enough about logistics, let’s talk racing!  The first race on the agenda was the Long. I am pretty darn happy that was the first race, as doing a long 2-3 races in is very gruelling. I made a few bobbles right off the bat but figured it out after that, for a while. I always tell myself take the first 2 controls slow, get used to the terrain, but sadly I don’t always listen to my advice.  To make up for my first two mistakes I made sure to take the next control (the long leg) very easy, safe and smart. Everything went to plan! I had a route, attackpoint and a catching feature.

Thanks to Jim Hawkins for catching a finish smile!

The rest of the race went okay, mistake here, overshot there, but otherwise steady. Then I got to 17! I still mentally kick myself for that control, ahhhh! I navigated 13-16 without a hitch but I didn’t have a strong attackpoint and I started to second-guess myself. I relocated twice and both times I found the men’s elite control. When I was bailing for the 3rd time I finally figured out where I was and found it.

After a not great start to NAOC and my cold getting worse, I changed my strategy for the middle, slow and steady - because you can’t physically push. I messed up 1 again but the rest of the race was a lot smoother. For the first 5 controls I was running with Emily Ross, but we took different routes to 6 and didn’t cross paths again. I caught up with two other women for a while around 13 and ran with them to 14. Coming out of 14 I knew my route and the ladies were a little in front of me (hard to push up a mossy hill when you are coughing up a lung)! When I finally got up the hill I was super confused because I should have seen them but they were nowhere to be found. This made me second-guess my self and my route but I kept going and double-checking everything. The rest of the race was good and slow.

The National teams lined up for the mass start
The 3rd race of NAOC was the team relay, I was feeling really sick but I still wanted to race. The map used was the local Biathlon range and trails; this is a special map because of all the animal statues out in the forest and lots of trails. My team was Kendra Murray, Tori Owen and myself. Ken was first, me second and Tori was last. To make things more interesting the club relay was running at the same time so you had people running everywhere. I ran a pretty clean race just couldn’t push it. USA 1 was 1st place, Emma, Pia and Emily were 2nd and we came 3rd.

Tori finishing strong during the relay
The final race was the sprint in the lovely town of Carcross, I hope everyone enjoyed the mayhem in Caribou commons because I did! This was an interesting sprint because it started in the forest, then went urban and finished in the forest again. We had fun obstacles of tourist, dogs and railway crossings.

I had had a lot of fun racing in my hometown and really appreciate all the long hours that everyone put in to make it happen!

-Jennifer MacKeigan
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Second day of competition. Pia, Adam, Robbie, and myself (Tomas) were off to Virpimäki for the middle. We were spoiled with an unusually luxurious quarantine; a tiny storage warehouse scattered with open drums of chemicals, half-eaten sandwiches, and dead mice. The sun hadn’t let up so hydration was super important.


The terrain consisted of medium hills covered with mossy rock faces, dried-up marshes, sparse boulders, and decently runnable forest broken up by large cut blocks.


Looking back, I wasn’t super well prepared for this race. Not only was I still recovering physically from JWOC, the terrain and map were also a big change from Hungary. The forests were faster and the contours and rock features were much more subtle. On top of things, the thought of having a GPS to broadcast my every move was just a bit unhinging. Nevertheless, I went into it intending to get use to the new environment and enjoy the experience of running on Finnish soil for the first time.


I had good flow going for the first half of my run. My bearings, however, were a bit off. Probably because I didn’t have the extensive visibility I did in Hungary. It was crucial to not get caught up looking for smaller features. The rock faces and marshes were useful even though the dryness and moss made them look pretty similar. At the start of the next half, I cut through a large patch of deadfall, and that’s when the heat and fatigue started to get the best of me, leading to some pretty embarrassing mistakes.


All the Canadians were pretty pooped by the end of their runs. Pia’s race was unfortunately cut short by an injured ankle. In the end, we all had positives and negatives to take from our races and were looking ahead to the rest of the week.

Results: Men Women
GPS: Men Women
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The World Orienteering Championships (WOC) in Latvia are fast approaching!

We have 4 Canadian athletes competing this year: Jennifer MacKeigan, Will Critchley, Damian Konotopetz, and Graeme Rennie. Both Damian and Will have competed at several WOCs previously while this is the first year for Jen and Graeme. Raphael Ferrand is returning as the coach. Nevin French is the team manager. There are 345 athletes from over 49 countries competing! 

The schedule is:


Date
Race
Race Time (local time)(7 hours ahead of Eastern time, 10 hours ahead of Pacific time)
Canadian Runners
Saturday, August 4th
Sprint Qualification
9:00 – 11:30 (2:00 - 4:30 Eastern, 23:00-01:30 Pacific the day before)
Jennifer MacKeigan, Damian Konotopetz, Graeme Rennie
Saturday, August 4th
Sprint Final
15:00-17:00 (8:00-10:00 Eastern, 5:00 - 7:00 Pacific)
TBD (top 15 from each qualification heat race)
Sunday, August 5th
Sprint Relay
17:00-18:10 (10:00-11:10 Eastern, 7:00-8:10 Pacific)
No Canadian team
Monday, August 6th
Rest Day


Tuesday, August 7th
Middle Distance
12:00-17:30 (5:00-10:30 Eastern, 2:00 - 7:30 Pacific)
Jennifer MacKeigan, Damian Konotopetz
Wednesday, August 8
Rest Day


Thursday, August 9th
Relay
14:00-18:00 (7:00-11:00 Eastern, 4:00 - 8:00 Pacific)
Will Critchley, Damian Konotopetz, Graeme Rennie (running order TBD)
Friday, August 10th
Rest Day


Saturday, August 11th
Long Distance
12:00-18:00 (5:00 - 11:00 Eastern, 2:00 - 8:00 Pacific)
Jennifer MacKeigan, Will Critchley

The sprint races are in Riga--Latvia's capital city. The forest races are 50 minutes away in Sigulda. 

You can follow along during the week on the event website. They will have live results, blog, TV, and GPS tracking (purchase may be required for live TV and GPS--it looks like it is 20 euros for the entire championships or 6 euros per race to use LiveOrienteering.com's services). You can also find old maps and the terrain description for each of the event on the event website. 

It's always an exciting week to see the top orienteers around the world compete! The organizers have a hashtag #WOC2018Latvia, and have a Twitter and Facebook account. World of O often has excellent coverage as well. And of course, follow along on Orienteering Canada's social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) and cheer on our athletes. Go Canada go! 

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LongThe first event of this year's Junior World Orienteering Championships in Hungary was the long, and it was really was long with the longest distances of any JWOC ever. This was due to the flat, open and very runnable terrain. As this was my (Rachel) first JWOC I was a little nervous for the event especially the quarantine and extra long call-up and all of the extra stuff going on before the start of the race. After the first control where I was a little flustered from being at my first Junior Worlds, I found a good flow and was really happy with the rest of my race. Thankfully, the weather wasn't so hot as the organizers had said it might be and was more like 26 degrees instead of 40 degrees.

The terrain was a mix of planted forests in nice blocks and very open grasslands somewhat like Kamloops if it were squished so that the highest hills were only around 10 meters high. It made for orienteering where there was very limited route choice as going straight was almost always not only very possible but also the fastest option by far. The trails were also very sandy so did not make for fast running as one might expect based on Canadian orienteering.
A map snippet of the middle of the W20 course. The leg from 3 to 4 was a long leg through the planted forests and out into the more open grasslands where as usual straight was the best option.

Me and Jan with the old school results board in the background. Each athlete had a board that they then printed your time onto and slotted you into the correct spot. Our team's best placing of the day was Jan's 13th place (despite him being shown in 14th on the board) making it the best Canadian male result at the Junior World Orienteering Championships.

Sprint
Following the long we changed gears to the shortest and fastest event of the week. The sprint featured a complex multilevel area with added man-made fences to complicate matters. Have a look at this loop throughout the levels and see what seems like the best route to you:

The sprint wasn't the best race of the week for me as I mispunched when I didn't see a control and had the surprise of finding out that there had been a control number 15 that I had in fact not been to. This was overshadowed by cheering for and watching Emma to her 6th place finish. It was very exciting to have a Canadian as a part of the medal ceremony.

Emma on the podium and a happy Canadian team.


Middle Qualifier and Final
The middle had us taking military transport vehicles into a green maze of juniper bushes, for the final at least and a mix of juniper maze and open forest for the qualifier. As I found out, once you have lost your exact location in the maze of green it is very difficult to relocate without bailing, a sometimes difficult task when you are faced with what seems like no way out without bashing through thick bushes. The middle races were unpredictable with the green and the possibility of trapping yourself in the bushes by choosing the wrong macro route choice and mistakes very easily becoming major and very difficult to correct. The final saw a Hungarian winner for the women so their training in similar terrain must have paid off as it makes sense in terrain so unique to the area. Although, I doubt the Swedes have similar terrain at home and the men swept the podium so it can't just be that.

The military transport used to travel the last part of the drive to the middle and relay quarantines. The benches in the back were not padded and we were given dust masks by the organizers because of the amount of dust churned up by the trucks.

Relay
The last race for the week was the relay and took us back to semi-open terrain with fast running. It also brought the hottest day of the week. Even with dumping water on my head multiple times during my warm-up as well as during the race I dried off and was warm again with minutes. Many runners struggled with the heat losing focus and concentration as the race went on due to the heat and dehydration. I was running the third leg and it was cool to be able to see the runners coming through the stadium and cheer for my teammates as they went out on their legs. I ran alone for almost all of the race so I didn't have the excitement of running with a pack however there were elephant tracks through the grass and bushes in places that were helpful for getting through and knowing I was on the right track. I was really happy with my navigation and running in the relay and it was my best race of the week. The open grassland was more predictable and forgiving than the middle terrain and it was nice to be able to navigate at speed again. 

Emma running the first leg for the girls team.

Following the awards ceremony we were able to collect our names from the results board to take home with us. It was a bit of a free for all as everyone ran up to search for their name.

With our name boards after the relay.

After the relay there was the banquet and the team was dressed up in matching outfits even if it we didn't have a specific costume or weren't dressed up as something.



A big thanks to everyone who followed along with the team and our races at this years Junior World Orienteering Championships in Kecskemet, Hungary.
Back row left to right: David, Jan Erik, Tomas, Michael, Graeme, Christian, Jeff
Front row left to right: Meghan, Emma, Rachel, Sianna




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Have you been inspired by our athletes racing at major international events this summer? Would you like to help support them? One of our major fundraisers each year is the Silent Auction. Every year the High Performance Program holds a silent auction fundraiser at the Canadian Orienteering Championships. This year the silent auction will be at the North American Orienteering Championship's banquet on Monday, August 20th in the Yukon.

Members of the High Performance Program will be donating items, but we greatly rely on and appreciate donations from the Canadian orienteering community, their family and friends, and any out of country orienteers.

If you would like to donate something, here are a few ideas:


  • Could your club donate an entry to an upcoming event? 
  • Are you a crafter – can you donate something like a pair of home-made mittens or a hat? pottery? weaving? sculpture? jewellery? 
  • Are you a foodie – can you donate a jar of home-made jam, a batch of cookies, a ready-to-go home-made baking mix, some home-made granola? 
  • Do you have a cabin or cottage that you could donate a gift certificate for a weekend or a week’s stay at? 
  • Do you live in a tourist destination and could offer B&B for a weekend or longer? (especially great if it was in conjunction with future orienteering events) 
  • Are you an artist – do you have a sketch of an orienteering scene, or a great photograph that you could put in a frame? 
  • Could you ask your local running/sport store to donate an item? 
  • Do you have a new unused item kicking around your house that you would love to get rid of – it might just be someone else’s treasure! 
  • Other ideas? Think about what you would like to bid on. 


If you have an item to donate, you can bring it with you to the Yukon or send it along with someone who is attending. If you know what you're bringing, you can email jamackeigan[at]hotmail[dot]com. We can do some promotion of the bigger ticket items and have an idea of how many items we will have to set-up.

If you are coming to the NAOCs/COCs, please bid generously! Don’t forget your wallet and/or your cheque book. Cash or cheque is the preferred payment method, but we will be able to take credit cards.

Those of you who have been to one before know that the Silent Auction is a lot of fun, often with frantic bidding as time runs out. You never know what the highly sought after items will be. And if you can’t make it to the Yukon this year, there is always the option of allowing a trusted friend to bid for you! Just give a budget limit and an idea of what you want.

The HPP is very appreciative of all the support we receive and we look forward to seeing you in the Yukon! 
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