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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago

Michael: The response to whistleblowers – shooting the messenger – is about what happens when people find that their “not-knowing” is challenged. One of the responses in the NHS is to become forceful in blocking unwelcome knowledge.

David: The experiences that nurses have on the ward is fundamentally counter to the motivation for entering nursing in the first place which is caring for ill and vulnerable people.

Michael: As welfare systems themselves become persecutory people now feel not simply that there’s a problem of how do I cope with the patients but how do I cope with the authorities that are supposed to be managing care.

David: These defences don’t work at the end of the day. They give rise to anxiety themselves. Our defences make things worse.

To hear the full conversation between Michael Rustin, David Armstrong and Elizabeth Cotton go here.

To listen to the podcasts of this conversation click on the links below:

1. Social defences against anxiety
2. How do people cope with anxiety at work?
3. Getting defensive
4. Shooting the messenger
5. Managerialism makes us mad
6. Why work affects us deeply
7. Crisis can be energising
8. We are anxious about losing our professional identities
9. How do we learn new ways of working?
10. How can we build relationships at work?


Surviving Work in Healthcare is a free online resource Surviving Work in Healthcare designed for people working on the frontline. The website is a joint project by Surviving Work and the Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust offering podcasts, videos and survival guides that take a jargon free, de-stigmatizing and practical approach to addressing the real problems of working in healthcare.

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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago

This book review of Sharon Blackie’s book If Women Rose Rooted was published in Unspychology’s latest edition on climate change.

As a woman writer, I don’t slag off other women’s books and use the Feminist Fight Club rule of thumb. This book however rattled my cage as it is an uncomfortable hippy read for a trade unionist for whom everything in politics is a chess move. There’s nothing like a Celtic folk story to expose my psychic thuggery.

If Women Rose Rooted is a book about women’s lives and their relationships with the land. There are conversations with contemporary women, mixed in with ancient stories of the cycles of life. There is actual poetry and whole paragraphs on hormones. The blatant spirituality of this book evoked an immature reaction in me. Blunt, concrete, questions to try to put this book into a political position and work out what side Black is on.

Exhibit A: Housing. Throughout the book there are stories of women who have regained their belonging by moving to rural retreats. As someone who doesn’t own anything I’m more than a bit curious where did they get the money? If I could afford a shabby-chic bunker in Gloucestershire, where I grew up, I would go. Right now. But I rent in London and increasingly stare over the abyss of insecure housing. Like most people living in London I can neither afford to stay or go.

I can give you the exact coordinates of the place where I belong. It’s along the river banks and cool woods of the Coln valley. Only problem being is that my entire generation had to leave because the county has become the Florida of the UK. Second homes, retired rich folk, bankers. That’s not resentment, its an important point that this is a part of the country where the rivers are running dry because there is no stewardship along the public and private waterways. To preserve the Coln river would require belonging and the responsibilities this implies, not just owning something.

Exhibit B: Jobs. Nowhere in these radical stories of reinvention is the issue of earning-a-living discussed. Coming from a trade union background that’s a big premise taken out of the meaningful-life equation. As a writer who survives by wage labour these women who have found their voice without finding a basic income are objects of my quite significant envy. It’s also an unnecessary evasion, as environmentalists have under-utilised leverage through the potential for green jobs. Although the trade union proposal for 1 million climate jobs was met with indifference and then a financial blocking by the last government, the reality is that for ordinary folk to really support environmental change the link to jobs is key.

Exhibit C: Husbands. I’ll run the risk of sounding absolutely beaten-up by life, but my next question is about all these husbands casually thrown into the mix of these women’s stories. The contemporary cast are all married. I’m not against marriage but we live in a society where 2 million people stay in bad relationships to keep their homes. Belonging has become a dual income project. I’m just saying that because I think it makes a difference to the credibility of our narratives.

I’m half way through the book clocking up a critique angrily scribbled in the margins and then two things happen.

Firstly, I went to see the Inconvenient Truth sequel. The film is a recap on climate change and a whizz through Gore’s diary of high level meetings and carrying out his training programme. Bad supporting roles for women as professional politicians in the current blow-dry-figure-hugging-n-heals leadership uniform. No frizzy hair or hot flushes here. As the film was shown across the UK on the same night, there was only a sad trickle of debate on social media. Nothing radical happening here, just a bunch of over-40s talking to the usual suspects. The thuggish part of me noted that the tickets were £18 a pop, missing the unavoidable truth that young people don’t have the money to engage with this particular demographic. Worse is the political tiredness promoted in the film. Despite his old school charm, there’s something really dodgy about a political punch line that its our primary responsibility to monitor the psychopaths in power and engage in representational systems. As a response to climate change this falls flat to say that the democratic crisis that feeds the environmental one can only be solved by voting and lobbying. Gore makes the joke that he’s a ‘recovering politician’ as if somehow he was not a key player in the political class that created the conditions for this democratic deficit. In one way this story is too old, an outdated view about how environmental change will come about, but in another way this story is not old enough. For change to take place it will need to appeal to the profound and deep need that we all have for care and caring.

The second thing that happened was the story of a woman being shoved onto a road by a jogger running across a London bridge. I couldn’t stop watching the video of a man casually jogging past another man and then just shoving a young woman randomly into a road, with a bus narrowly missing her head. The story that emerged was that this man was a banker. True or not, it made a shockingly banal and coherent narrative. Nobody was surprised that now the veneer of equality has been peeled off our society, real hatred emerges. I’m guessing I’m talking to the converted here, but its worth pointing out that misogyny exists unchallenged in our society in a way I have never experienced in my lifetime. In one sense we are tapping into previous generations, going backwards rather than going forwards on the equality stakes. At which point the radicalism of this book hit me.

So, defences down, let me tell you about this book.

The book describes the pilgrimages that we are all able to make in these times when so much is being lost. The chapters describe a primitive journey; of travelling the wastelands, entering the ‘cauldron of transformation’, finding the pilgrims path, entering the enchanted forest and fertile fields, then the mountains. The colours of dark old landscapes that we can return to, to fuel us emotionally and psychically. Stories of the menopause, of love and betrayal. Of the wisdom of growing up, of age.

This is a book that tells stories, to stimulate and provoke the creation of our own narratives within which we can find a home. A place where women are not redundant, if they no longer strive to be represented or believe in having-it-all fairy stories. The book offers new stories of women who found a place to belong and with it a profound reorientation to the earth. Old stories of Celtic folklore, of witches and wise old women. Yes, stories that value old women. A vivid vocabulary of deep wells and dark caves, fruits and of our bodies. Of a maternal love for the planet, caring about what happens next and to the next generation. It is a book that offers a taste of a different way of feeling about our environment. To feel an enchantment, not the rush to formulate yet another strategic campaign.

There are sections of such profundity it’s like taking a bullet.

“Scream if you will, but let yourself fall. We have to let ourselves fall. If we want to become Voices of the Wells, we need to plumb their depths. And in order to kick-start the process of transformation to which we’ve now committed ourselves, we have to destroy old ways of thinking, remove old limits. So grope your way blindly into the darkest cave, let yourself sink to the bottom of the deepest lake. Jump into the black, bottomless well.”

It captures beautifully the drama and the ordinariness of the cycle of life. That things become lost, things die, that learning and change are painful and involve an acknowledgement of the dark stuff of the heart. These sections of the book feel like a familiar walk along the line between depression and the depressive position, a fearful line between despair and hope. A long way from the optimism of popular psychology and the happy-ever-afters.

At the end of the book is a postscript “The Eco-Heroine’s Journey: A Guide”. Oh how my heart sank. As someone who writes ‘Survival Guides’ with a sarcasm health warning, I needed this section not to be a retreat into a psychic cul-de-sac of positive psychology. I’m happy to report that this chapter is safe and useful, no checklists or tick boxes, rather a series of questions for the reader to think about how these epic stages in our journey exist in our own lives. I found it quite helpful to think about how these ancient stories of women’s journeys could be mirrored in my own life. Radical even to think something so desperately uncool, thoughts that you wouldn’t say out loud or on twitter.

This book caught me off guard, back to crying on the tube and staring out of windows during meetings. Back to the brave and foolish emotional journey of psychoanalysis that preoccupied my life until last year. Back to a relationship with depression and a lovingly brutal understanding my own grim story. Back to an acceptance of the blood and guts of bodily experience that underpins our internal and external worlds. Back to a period of burnout after years of activism, and learning through that loss. The realisation that my actual relationship with the planet can’t be fitted into this very limited political model that I learned to navigate. This book speaks to me, that as a woman of a certain age my survival depends on the defence of my capacity to care about the next generation. To keep my heart beating, my blood pumping. To continue to care.

There’s a quietness about whether Sharon has kids that at the beginning of the book I felt was an evasion. By the end of the book I felt this wasn’t the right question. This book is confident. A confident discourse on what it would feel like to be unashamed of being a woman finding her way towards belonging. With or without a mortgage. Some books are both timeless and exactly of their time.

To read Unpsychology click here.

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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago

The ABCs of Therapy

www.thefutureoftherapy.org

A. Click here for everything I know in one website

B. Click here for everything I know in one video

C. Click here for everything I know in one infographic

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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago

It’s unavoidable to point out that many therapists aren’t earning enough. A staggering 18% of our survey respondents earn less than £300 per week, with an average income of £401-500 after tax. This is partly explained by one third of people working part time – with most people we interviewed saying that this was their primary way to cope with the increased distress and pressure at work – but the problem of income also relates to two key trends; the growth of unwaged work and self-employment. 

Our survey shows that 21% of therapists work unwaged as honoraries but interestingly only 15% were trainees, with 6% representing an emerging group of mainly senior clinicians working for free – most working in the Third Sector and the NHS towards the end of their careers, presumably funded by the remaining NHS pension fund. The NHS and the Third Sector are quietly sustaining many services on unwaged work with 15% of honoraries estimating a loss of income of over £401 per week. It’s worth pointing out that as our professional bodies require clinical hours for training and professional registration we have the curious situation that the bodies charged with protecting the profession are undermining it if the future therapeutic workforce will need to be people only from affluent backgrounds.

Apparently you really do have to marry a rich man to be a psychotherapist in the UK.

To see our data on honoraries click here or the infographic below.

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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago
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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago

The unacceptable working conditions of mental health workers means that the UK could be within a decade of genuine therapeutic professions dying out, according to the Surviving Work Survey, carried out by Dr Elizabeth Cotton. The Survey results are published online today, 13th November 2017 at www.thefutureoftherapy.org.

The website provides a unique insight into the crisis in mental health services and the experiences of people working on the frontline. The survey, conducted by Dr Elizabeth Cotton in 2016, founder of www.survivingwork.org and academic at Middlesex University, reveals mental health workers suffer from a lack of job security, low pay, poor management as well as having to deal with the significant pressure of working in this field of healthcare.

Key results are as follows:
–  21% of therapists are working unwaged as honoraries
–  30% of therapists are self-employed and 91% of self-employed therapists work in multiple settings
–  over half (54%) of respondents are working in multiple jobs
only a quarter (25%) of concerns about patient safety were adequately resolved. This went down to 8% in the case of concerns about working conditions
–  6% of senior clinicians said they were working for free
–  when asked what intervention would improve their working life, 52% respondents said “better management & funding”, a response to the growth in failing       performance management systems

The survey reveals some worrying trends for the future provision of quality mental health services. In addition to the profound downgrading and demoralisation of clinicians, with 60% of therapists over the age of 47 the sector is an ageing profession. If we add the widening jobs gap and lack of promotion for senior professions, the sector will over the next ten years face a crisis of developing experienced and qualified therapists to manage the mental health crisis in the UK.

Commenting on the survey, Dr Cotton said:

“As a nation we might be becoming obsessed with mental health, but the debate about the welfare of the people delivering those services is strikingly absent. Unfortunately therapists are the least likely to talk about their working lives. What emerges from our survey is a very depressing and complex picture. Our findings present a bleak prognosis for earning a living as a therapist in the UK.

“Job insecurity is a major theme with many therapists on precarious contracts, with a rapid rise in self-employment. The results also reveal the growth of unwaged work, widespread across the NHS, IAPT services and the Third Sector. Therapists said they had to work part-time as a primary way to cope with increased distress at work. Respondents also raised concerns about private and third sector contractors and the growth of short term therapy that is being championed by the government within the NHS.

“If trained professional therapists cannot earn a decent living, when the current 21% of psychotherapists who are 57 years or older retire, who will provide services for the one in four of us who experience mental health problems?”

The results of the survey can be accessed at www.thefutureoftherapy.org with short infographics, data and quotes as well as an eBook looking at trends in the sector.

The survey results will be launched on the 16th November at the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust. A video and podcast of the event will be available at www.thefutureoftherapy shortly after.

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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago

At the next Tavistock Policy Seminar, I will be presenting the results of the 2016 Surviving Work Survey, which looks at the future of work in the therapeutic sector.

At last.

In my defence, it’s taken a year of graft to analyse the data and interviews so that it does some justices to the material. Over 1500 people working in mental health from across the UK answered some blunt questions about their working conditions, incomes, concerns and experiences.

The results of the survey will be launched at www.thefutureoftherapy.org on the 13th November, full of stories from the frontline. Because of the widespread concerns of therapists about victimisation, all of the responses are anonymised. The site has no names, no workplaces, no identifying information at all.

What it does show is a dramatic picture of the emerging sectoral trends in the profession: the growth of self-employment and unwaged work, performance management and the tyranny of targets, the downgrading of work and the role the therapeutic training and professional bodies in this state we’re in.

The survey results offer no happy ever afters, rather a chance to talk about how frontline workers prepare for the future of work in the current crisis, based on some actual facts.

Because most of the respondents live outside London we will be recording the event. However, as these discussions go, friendly faces are seriously welcome. It would a complete pleasure to see you there.

Speakers

Elizabeth Cotton is a writer and educator in the field of mental health at work. Previously she was head of education of rite Miners’ International and is now a Senior Lecturer at Middlesex University specialising in employment relations and mental health at work. Elizabeth is founder of Surviving Work, an intervention and critical resource for working people on how to do it. Her new book Surviving Work in Healthcare (published by Routledge) offers a critique of healthcare management and offers an alternative model of solidarity at work. Without a hint of irony, it has been nominated for the Chartered Management Institute’s book of the year.

Julian Lousada is a psychoanalyst, organisational consultant and a founding partner of Peoplein-systems. He is a former clinical director of th adult department at the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust. He was previously chair of the British Psychoanalytic Council.

The future of therapy

Thursday 16 November 6-8pm
The Tavistock Centre, 120 Belsize Lane, London NW3 5BA

To book your free ticket click HERE.

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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago

In the summer of 2017 Good Work: The Taylor Review of Modern Work Practices, set up to inquire about the future of work in the UK was published. To add toothless insult to un-inquiring injury, the report offers us no genuine insight or protection from the low wages and job insecurity that have become established over the last three decades in the UK.

The report makes continual reference to “The British Way” of managing this decline, which for the comparative employment relations scholars amongst you will leave nothing but a deep sinking feeling. Inevitably as Brexit unfolds, we will slip away from the welfare capitalism of Europe, to the AngloSaxon liberal market economics that have been a car crash for decent jobs, let alone good ones.

The inquiry received wide research-based evidence – and drew on the extensive precarious work scholarship that could inform this important inquiry. The lack of recommendations based on this knowledge raises the question who benefits from this report?

The report has been politely described as a missed opportunity. A less polite response is that it is a policy sleight of hand delivered to protect the vested business interests of the ‘gig’ economy. The digital tech sector, retail giants, private employment agencies and the thousands of consultancies and business courses designed to manage the decline of work.

The road to precarious work is not lined with good intentions, its lined with no intentions at all.

Even my mum doesn’t think that good jobs can be secured in the UK in the absence of a national industrial strategy. Although the report appeals to people finding more meaning in their work, the political economy point is that there is no meaningful work when the state washes its hands of setting the foundations on which good jobs can be created. The state is left entirely off the hook in joining the dots of the housing, decent jobs and skills crisis in Britain. Totally ignoring the genuine potential of active labour market policies in construction, such as direct labour organisations where local groups create local housing, or the now-shelved strategy of creating one million green jobs in the UK to address climate change and develop a new generation of decent jobs.

So long long-term job creation.

Despite the report’s admittance the state has to plug the National Minimum Wage gap by funding the welfare bill and tax credits for hard-working-people-in-poverty, the report makes no real mention of trade unions. This is likely to be for ideological reasons, but the pragmatic reason why they should be referenced throughout this entire report is that, if the entire history of employment relations is anything to go by, trade unions are the only show in town for collective bargaining. Without them wages just don’t get negotiated upwards.

Au revior social partnership.

The final insult in the report is that it has the nerve to underline the role of individual ‘resilience’ and development of ‘soft-skills’ as a response to the abdication of the state’s governance of work. It’s predictable that such an significantly failed inquiry gets slipped in just before the summer break. We’re tired and hot, no union can organise a sustained campaign and the policy machine goes off to their second homes.

I just can’t imagine how the next generation of workers will ever forgive us.

This eBook is made up of a series of blogs by practitioners and thinkers in the field of workplace relations to think about how to make friends and influence people in context of precarious work. Contributions were written by Helen Spandler, John Grahl, Jane Tinkler, Annette Clancy, Xavier Eloquin, Chris Manning, Philip Stokoe, Julian Lousada, David Morgan, Steven Toft, Clive Morton, Gillian Proctor, Ruth E Jones, Ian Simpson, Keith Venables, Marianna Fotaki, Miguel Martinez Lucio, Julia Macintosh and me.

The blogs were serialised through the LSE’s Business Review and www.survivingwork.org covering the heart pumping stuff of bullying, perversion, the realities of working in groups and how to get on with the people around you. Many of the contributions focus on healthcare and mental health services and our attempt here is to raise awareness of the realities of a downgraded and demoralised sector. We wrote this not to depress you, but to help you develop a realistic survival strategy grounded on an up to date picture of the future of work.

To download the eBook click HERE.

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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1w ago

Tired of clever-things-said-in-debates-designed-to-miss-the-point, 2017 was the year I stopped reading or turning out on rainy Tuesday nights for events where nothing actually happens. Looking back over the last 18 months of social carnage we’ve been forced to dig deep just to defend the basics. Oh, you know, challenging sexual harassment in our workplaces or finding ways to help the people around us who have fallen off the welfare grid.

On the off chance that you’re returning to humanity punching and spitting this week I want to tell you a story about why the contact between us matters.

In the run up to the American elections and the Brexit vote, a group of us ran a project in London called Thinkers in Residence. The project involved six months of conversations about racism, migration, politics and despair mixed in with stories of dads and jobs, a London now passed and the people we love. These conversations were recorded and archived along with blogs and images on the online archive here. On the final day of the project, just five minutes before we end our final recording, a young woman who I had never met before joins the group. As I turn off the recorder with probably a touch of self-satisfaction, she grabs my arm and says “Is that it? (Angry eye popping pause) I want my money back”.

Rather than saying what first came to mind (“get in line sister I feel that way about life”) for the first time during our project I was unable to find any words. Stunned by the spite, and poleaxed by the profundity of what she had just said.

It’s probably predictable that when you run a project that audaciously invites people into a public space to say what’s on their mind an attempt will be made in last few minutes to hijack the love and generosity of the people involved. Sometimes this involves what can only be described as a psychic dump and run – when someone decides to try to, well, shit on it.

Free Association? How very dare you.

To be fair to this woman, she may have had a point. Generally when an institution asks you what you think, they don’t actually mean it. There is something slippery about setting up a project in the The Photographers’ Gallery, made up of the designed stuff of Thinker in Residence badges, a Thought Creche, a beautiful website and good coffee. Asking people what they actually think in this warm-bath institutional setting could be precisely the opposite of an authentic question – a kind of psychic slight of hand that people have become increasingly resentful of.

But despite these mitigating factors, what transpired was a series of politicised and transformative conversations between people who’d never met before. Literally the best conversation I’ve ever had about neo-liberalism was held while looking at a Donovan picture of Cindy Crawford and talking about the emergence of supermodels. Actually true.

There is also something about talking to random strangers that allows ‘expertise’ to be wrestled out of the hands of experts. This isn’t to say there aren’t people who know more about some things than others – but by being open to what anyone has to say, and to really give the time to hear them, you always learn something. I have been changed by listening to Greek teenagers talking about images of refugees and stories of boys-done-good who grew up in the 50s in Soho. The shared and growing realisation that we don’t have the leaders we deserve. The photographers and psychotherapists who continue to open themselves up to working through and finding meaning despite the dismal professional returns.

The surprises that came out in these conversations happen when our environments don’t reflect our realities – our minds start to work to fill in the gaps. Despite the populist pap we’re getting force fed in our political culture the fact remains that when representations of reality directly contradict our own experiences we get to work. It’s at this point that things turn 180 degrees and ideas and meanings get turned on their heads. Genuine transformational learning.

In a way it’s both ambitious and silly to run a project aimed to promote human contact. The uncomfortable act of talking to someone else and genuinely being open to what they have to say remains a real struggle for all of us. In the real world if you’re going to open up a Thought Creche you have to be prepared to take some shit.  Seriously.  Easier to retreat or withdraw than actually allow ourselves to be changed by other people. But as with all of the things we learn and create – this only ever comes out of an intercourse with life and actual other people.

Is that it? Yes, it definitely is. We are all we’ve got. Like dancing or sex, if you picture yourself doing it you go right off the idea. Better to just to get on with it.

Over the coming months conversations taken from the Surviving Work Library will be produced on this blog.

To see the Thinkers in Residence project archive click A Body of Work. The eBook includes contributions from Jason Evans, Marie Adams, Sally Weintrobe, Steve Fuller, David Morgan, Marianna Fotaki, Jonny Briggs, Del Loewenthal, Angela Eden, Oliver Whitehead and me. To download the eBook click HERE.

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Surviving Work by Elizabeth Cotton - 1M ago

Michael: The response to whistleblowers – shooting the messenger – is about what happens when people find that their “not-knowing” is challenged. One of the responses in the NHS is to become forceful in blocking unwelcome knowledge.

David: The experiences that nurses have on the ward is fundamentally counter to the motivation for entering nursing in the first place which is caring for ill and vulnerable people.

Michael: As welfare systems themselves become persecutory people now feel not simply that there’s a problem of how do I cope with the patients but how do I cope with the authorities that are supposed to be managing care.

David: These defences don’t work at the end of the day. They give rise to anxiety themselves. Our defences make things worse.

To hear the full conversation between Michael Rustin, David Armstrong and Elizabeth Cotton go here.

To listen to the podcasts of this conversation click on the links below:

1. Social defences against anxiety
2. How do people cope with anxiety at work?
3. Getting defensive
4. Shooting the messenger
5. Managerialism makes us mad
6. Why work affects us deeply
7. Crisis can be energising
8. We are anxious about losing our professional identities
9. How do we learn new ways of working?
10. How can we build relationships at work?


Surviving Work in Healthcare is a free online resource Surviving Work in Healthcare designed for people working on the frontline. The website is a joint project by Surviving Work and the Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust offering podcasts, videos and survival guides that take a jargon free, de-stigmatizing and practical approach to addressing the real problems of working in healthcare.

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