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While basic addition is introduced in Kindergarten, first, second and third graders often need intervention for addition facts. Having a toolbox full of addition facts strategies will help make the students more comfortable adding which can lead to fact fluency.

Addition Facts Strategy: Put Together Students can use the the put together strategy by drawing or using manipulatives. This is part of the Write and Wipe Bundle.

The very first thing for kids to understand is that the addition symbol means they should put things together. Manipulatives are great for this strategy. Put some in one hand. Then, some in the other hand. Put them together. This can easily be done with rekenreks, cups, and more.

Students can use the the put together strategy to write equations. This is part of the Write and Wipe Bundle.

While introducing “put together” I like to have students practice writing the equation. This can be done on white boards or these write and wipe cards. I know sometimes teachers want students to be quiet at centers but I encourage the students to read the cards to each other. The more they use math vocabulary the easier math becomes to understand.

Addition Facts Strategy: Part Part Whole This is part of the Addition for the Google Classroom resources.

Part Part Whole is basically the same as the put together strategy with a specific graphic organizer. This strategy will come in handy when working on subtraction. This strategy can start out with manipulatives and then move to numbers.

Addition Facts Strategy: Number Line This is part of the Addition for the Google Classroom resources.

Number lines can be provided with numbers or blank (open number line). When I first started teaching in the late 90s, we always provided the numbers. As open number lines became part of our curriculum, I’ve really fallen in love with the flexible thinking I see with kids, especially with two digit addition and up.

If you are teaching kindergarten or first graders who write slowly, a number line with numbers provided can be practical. If your kids are a little older and comfortable writing numbers quickly, I recommend moving to open number lines.

This instructional powerpoint is teaches students how to use an open number line.

The beauty of number lines is that students can start to see how taking a number and counting on can be a time saver. If you’ve ever sat with a kid who counts every number, you know how slow and tedious it can be. “3+6 1,2,3…4,5,6,7,8,9” With a number line, the child can point to 3 and count on six more.

Addition Facts Strategy: Take the Bigger Number and Count On

If we take that same problem, and get the kid to circle the bigger number, we can help them speed up the process. Now they can point to the bigger number on the number line and only hop three spaces.

This can be done while counting on fingers. It helps with some kids to add a gesture to saying the largest number. That gesture can be making a fist like a Rock Paper Scissors movement. It can also be “put the bigger number in your head” by tapping their temple. The key is to say the bigger number and then count on.

This strategy becomes especially important when the sun is more than ten. Many kids get stuck because they relied on counting both numbers on their fingers and then run out of fingers they feel like they don’t know how to add anymore. The sooner we teach students to count on the better.

Addition Facts Strategy: Turn Around Facts This is part of the Addition for the Google Classroom resources.

I always introduce this activity with kids holding white boards or number cards that show an addition fact. We talk about who can trade places and have the answer still be true. This is their first introduction to algebraic concepts but they don’t really need to know that.

This student is playing a turn around game from my Magical Addition to 10 resource.

Once kids realize that 2+7 has the same answer as 7+2, they feel like they’ve learned a secret. They love how quickly they can find sums and their confidence grows.

This is a great time to introduce flexibility with the equal sign. 7+2=9 is the same as 9=7+2. The earlier this concept is introduced, the better.

Addition Facts Strategy: Make Ten These strategy mat instruction sheet is part of my Adding Animals resource.

Understanding the numbers that make ten will make adding larger numbers and flexible thinking so much easier.

For kids who use their fingers, there is a simple trick.

3+_=10

Show 3 fingers. How many fingers are down? That is the missing number because you have ten fingers.

Kids love to draw that Friends of Ten rainbow. If you draw it, have them look for patterns.

Another great way to practice this strategy is with a ten frame and red yellow counters. Drop ten counters, write the addition problem that makes 10.

Addition Facts Strategy: Make Ten to Add Nine

Once students are good at the making ten strategy they can apply it in many ways.  One way to use the making ten strategy is to use it to add 9.  If you were to try to teach the strategy by explaining it with words, it could be very confusing for kids.  But using a ten frame to demonstrate the strategy can help kids find their own words.

This is part of the Addition for the Google Classroom resources. Addition Facts Strategy: Doubles

Doubles are having two groups of equal size. It starts introducing the concept of equal groups and prepares kids for multiplying by twos.

This is part of the Addition for the Google Classroom resources.

Addition Resources

Listly by mercedesamca

Are your students fluent in addition facts? Students will add within 5, add within 10, make ten, and add within 20 using several strategies in Google Slides. Animated directions allow students to work independently on Part Part Whole, Number Lines, Turn Around Facts, Ten Frames, Twenty Frames and more.

Adding Animals focuses on addition within 20 with a focus on the facts between 11-18. These facts have one digit addends and two digit sums. Students who rely on ten fingers to add to 10 often struggle with these facts. This packet contains a leveled time test motivation system.

Magical Memorization Add to 10 Flash Cards, Quizes, Games, and More I designed this packet for a group of first graders that were struggling to memorize Addition Facts to 10. I wanted to break the goal down into small manageable chunks. To memorize addition facts to 10, there are 35 facts (and their

Introduce adding one digit numbers on open number lines with this animated PowerPoint. First, how to add on a number line is introduced. Then, students will play Beat the Clock. The students will try to draw on their number line to find the answer

These write and wipe sets make great first grade math centers to help your students become fluent in addition. Simply laminate and cut. One set provides pictures and the students write the equation and sum. The other set provides the equation and students draw the pictures and write the sum.

These write and wipe sets make great first grade math centers for addition fact fluency. Simply laminate and cut. One set provides pictures and the students write the equation and sum so they can add within 20. The other set provides the equation and students draw the pictures and write the sum.

These write and wipe sets make great kindergarten and first grade math centers for addition fluency practice. Simply laminate and cut. One set..

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Preparing to head  back to school?  Establishing clear expectations and procedures will lay the foundation for a calm productive year.

When I mentor new teachers, the most important way I can help them is in supporting them to set clear expectations and procedures.  A teacher can have the most amazing academic lesson planned, but if he or she doesn’t have classroom management, the lesson gets lost in the chaos.

With so many standards and so little time to teach them all, teachers often feel like they don’t have time to stop and teach students how to behave.  The reality is though, taking a little time to set clear expectations and procedures will add valuable time into your lessons every day.

Clear Expectations

The first thing to set is 3-5 clear expectations.  Some people use the words expectations and rules interchangeably.  Having overarching expectations helps to encompass many more behaviors than specific rules.  For example, saying “Be Safe” covers rules like walk in the classroom, don’t tilt your chair, keep your hands to yourself, and many more.

Take time to have a class discussion about the expectation and what it means.  I like to have students list examples and non-examples to make the expectations clear.  Here is one example:

Clear Procedures

Establishing clear procedures will set the tone of your classroom.

The first time my husband volunteered in my room, my students made him aware of some of our procedures.  I was teaching second grade at the time and we were having centers while I met with leveled reading groups.   I had him sit at a center where the kids would play a game from one of my Super Stars Skills packets.  My husband is by nature a rather loud and fun person.  As he was playing a game with the students, he cheered really loudly for one of the students.  Their reaction was priceless.  The quiet buzz of the class went silent as they looked at me waiting for me to give him a reminder.  This was the loudest anyone had ever been in class.  I had to try really hard not to laugh.  I just smiled and said, “Mr. Hutchens doesn’t know our procedures, maybe you can teach him.”  One of the kids in his group said, “Mr. Hutchens, when we have centers we have to use our indoor voices because the other teams are trying to concentrate.”  He laughed and said, “I’m not very good at being quiet.”  The kid looked at him very seriously and said, “We’ll help you.”

Here is an example for when the office makes an announcement over the loud speaker.  If we don’t teach the kids to freeze and listen, we miss the announcement because they go quickly.

Important Procedures: Do Now / Bellringer

Having a procedure for when students enter the room is essential.  Students take different amounts of time to sit down and take out what they need.  You don’t want to just be standing there waiting.  This is why having a Do Now or Bellringer can be so critical.  Everyone comes in, gets to work right way.

Personally, I love digital writing prompts as a bellringer.  I have quotes to respond to in my Growth Mindset resource, my Quote of the Day resource, and many holiday themed quotes resources.  For the younger students, I like to use picture prompts.  I also sometimes play a video while kids walk to the carpet.

Sometimes, though, like during math, I don’t have a go to assignment.  So, in those situations, I use a digital Do Now slide to show on the interactive white board as the students enter.

Verbal directions don’t always sink in while students enter from recess, but having it posted where they can all see it helps the students know what to do and allows me to interact with students as they come in.

What if They Don’t Follow the Expectations and Procedures?

If a student doesn’t follow an expectation, like Be Safe, that is when you would give a warning, having a chat, have them appologize, or give a consequence.

If a student doesn’t follow a procedure, though, this is when you would have them practice again,  If a student runs in the hallway when the procedure is to walk, have them try again.  The student just turns around, goes to a location, and then walks to you.  The great thing about focusing on procedures is it isn’t personal.  This is how we do things.  If a student doesn’t have that down yet, then they get a chance to try again.

Returning the situation where my husband loudly screamed during center time.  The kids all looked at me because they wanted to see if I’d have him practice.  Sometimes a kid will yell loudly during a center, realize it, and look at me.  Then we could just exchange a look where the kid acknowledges that they need to remember to use the right volume.  For a kid who didn’t notice, I’d go to them or have them come to me.  I’d ask, “What kind of voice do we use during centers?”  If the child could verbalize the procedure (with the proper volume) then we’d be done.  If not, we’d practice saying a random word like banana loudly and quietly and decide which was the correct volume.  The key is understanding the procedure.  If a child looks like they think they are ‘in trouble’, I’ll be direct and say, “I’m not mad and you and you aren’t in trouble, we just need to practice this.”

Teaching Expectations and Procedures Throughout the Year

I certainly don’t want to spend hours and hours on the first day of school teaching expectations and procedures.  I like to plan out which ones I want to teach and have them available for when they come up in class.  I’ll usually teach one expectation a day during the first week of school, and then teach procedures as needed.  For example, the first time a student breaks a pencil, we’ll stop and introduce the pencil procedures.

I used to make paper anchor charts or just discuss things verbally.  Now, I like to use Digital Anchor Charts.  All the pictures in this post are from my Back to School Digital Anchor Charts resource.  At the beginning of the year, I’ll prep the slides and type into them as we have our discussions.  As the year goes on, we might revisit procedures that students are struggling with.  I may assign a slide in Google Classroom and let teams, partners, or individuals fill in the examples and non-examples.

Find all the digital anchor charts featured in this blog post in this resource.  They are all editable to fit your classroom needs. Free Sample

Want a free sample of the resource and a list of procedures to teach your class?

Additional Reading

These are two of my favorite books for classroom management.  The following links are affiliate links which means if you click and buy it today I will get a small percentage of the cost but it will not cost you extra.

The post Establishing Clear Expectations and Procedures appeared first on Surfing to Success.

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Surfing to Success by Mercedes Hutchens - 11M ago

Do you get tired of making copies?  It can’t just be me!  While I love the paperless movement, I resigned myself to the fact that I may not strive to be completely paperless but I do want to use less paper.  One of my favorite strategies for using less paper, is using Write and Wipe activities.

I’ll share my favorite tips and tricks and links to some items I’ve purchased.  I use affiliate links which means if you click and buy something, it won’t cost you extra but I’ll get a small percentage of what you spend.

Print Once Use for Years

A few years back, I bought these dry erase pockets.  That one little step saved me so much time.  I love using math mats and graphic organizers.  Now, I print them once, put them in these pockets and three years in, we are still using them.  These pockets are also great for games you want your class to play over and over.

Before I had the dry erase pockets, I used sheet protectors.  Put any paper inside and you can use it over and over.  They aren’t quite as easy to erase and the protectors get a little rough after a year of use.

The Plastic Debate

I’ll be honest, I think long and hard before laminating things.  Wrapping a piece of biodegradable paper in plastic means it will last forever.  So, for most things, I will print on card stock and not laminate. The reality was, though, that my kinders weren’t great about switching things in and out of the dry erase pockets.

The papers would end up covered in dry erase marker smudges from their grubby little fingers and sometimes they’d tear.

So, I decided to be conscientious and ask myself these questions before laminating.  Is this a skill that needs a lot of repetition?  How often will I use them?  Will these be used year after year?  Do we need to write on them? Now that I have that plan, I’ve let go of the guilt of laminating.

Write and Wipe Facts

My absolute favorite write and wipe activities are for math facts.  As students are pushed to go deeper in their thinking, they need a strong foundation.  Students who don’t have fact fluency get mental fatigue when asked deeper questions.

Check out all my Write and Wipe Resources on TpT here.

Write and Wipe Centers

I love using Write and Wipe cards as centers.  Kids feel comfortable working together and independently and I can focus on working with another small group without distractions.

Using Manipulatives

One of the great things about Write and Wipe Cards is that they can be used with manipulatives.  Instead of having kids draw pictures, they can use manipulatives.

I like to keep lots of different manipulatives around to keep repetitive activities fresh.  The kids love these craft jewels.  Other favorites this year were acrylic gems and pom poms.

Which comes first? The laminator or the scissors?

I used to cut, laminate, cut every time.  My husband, who loves to laminate and hates to cut, has convinced me to laminate and then cut.  At first I was resistant, but it turns out it is fine, especially in the home laminators.  I can’t believe I resisted getting my own laminator for so long!  Turns out it is worth the cost of doing it myself instead of using the old school laminator (double meaning there ;).  First, I can laminate one page right now.  I don’t have to wait until I have a bunch to do and time to spend in the staff room.  But, most importantly, the quality is so much better.  I don’t know about you but even the 3 mm laminating pouches are so much thicker than the lamination the school uses.

I’ve started making resources with my husbands hatred of cutting in mind.  Most of what I make can be cut on a paper cutter.  I also provide light gray lines for where to cut to make it as simple as possible (and so if the cut isn’t perfect you can’t really tell).  I recently discovered this paper cutter that has a magnetic bar to place at the measurement.  It is great not having to look at the numbers when cutting a large batch.

Dry Erase or Wet Erase?

We use dry erase markers a lot on my white boards and with write and wipe activities.  The kids think it is a special treat when I let them use the wet erase markers.  They love that they can get a spray bottle from under the sink, but they definitely need to be reminded that one squirt is fine.  By the end of the year, we start running out of good markers.  That is when I pull out the dry erase crayons.

They are a novelty at first, but they take a lot more elbow grease to erase.

Looking for the resources in these pictures?  Find them here:

Write and Erase Resources
Jun 22, 2018 - teacherspayteachers.com - 0

These 7 write and wipe sets make great kindergarten math centers for addition fluency. Simply laminate and cut. Three sets provide pictures and the students write the equation and sum to add within 5. Four sets provide the equation and students draw the pictures and write the sum.

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Jun 22, 2018 - teacherspayteachers.com - 0

These write and wipe sets make great kindergarten and first grade math centers for addition fluency practice. Simply laminate and cut. One set provides pictures and the students write the equation and sum and add within 10. The other set provides the equation and students draw the pictures and write the sum.

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Jun 22, 2018 - teacherspayteachers.com - 0

These write and wipe sets make great first grade math centers for addition fact fluency. Simply laminate and cut. One set provides pictures and the students write the equation and sum so they can add within 20. The other set provides the equation and students draw the pictures and write the sum.

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Jun 22, 2018 - teacherspayteachers.com - 0

These write and wipe sets make great first grade math centers to help your students become fluent in addition. Simply laminate and cut. One set provides pictures and the students write the equation and sum. The other set provides the equation and students draw the pictures and write the sum.

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React with Emoji
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