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Richard Jacobs

“Tell someone you love them, every day.”

It’s week two of our month of slow relationships, and this episode we’re looking at family: kids, parents, siblings, and all those broader relationships (including friends who feel more like favourite cousins) that make up the family tree. Families are not always neat and tidy, and there are countless ways to create one, but hopefully there will be something in this episode that resonates with you, whatever your family situation.

How to slow down family life when you’re a parent to young kids is one of the most common questions we’re asked, so that’s where we begin today’s episode. (Non-parents take heart though! We soon move into other family relationships.) We’ve covered slow parenting in many an episode before and you can find links to a lot of those in the show notes below, but we also share a few important reminders and tools here as well:

  • kids are not slow and living slowly with kids can sometimes feel super difficult (to near-impossible)
  • embrace boundaries around your family’s time and technology to regain headspace and energy
  • drop the expectations of what a slow family life “should” look like
  • don’t be afraid to say no
  • let boredom happen

Relationships with siblings and parents can be one fraught with past hurts, differences of opinion and vast distances, but many of us still crave closer, deeper connections. This usually requires vulnerability and honesty, and in so many cases we’re scared to be the first to take that step. We talk about some ways to start those difficult chats, but come to realise that above all, time is the key. Making and allowing time and creating a safe space for deeper conversations and connections helps to create stronger bonds, and it’s in those moments of turning up for people that we build trust, intimacy and the kind of relationships we crave.

Of course not every family situation allows space for honest, deep conversations, and we also talk about what to do when there isn’t as much connection within a family. Ben talks a lot about resilience, and the importance of being tolerant, open and then resilient enough to always try to end interactions on a positive note, no matter what the difference of opinions might be. This is easier said than done in some situations, but putting love above differences in opinion isn’t always easy, but it’s a choice we can all make.

We finish the episode by getting a little smushy, as we talk about ways to maintain connection when there’s a great physical distance between family, and then share the value of affection within all familial relationships (YES hugs are always on the cards).

So what’s this week’s action? Tell someone you love them, every day. And let us know how that feels – get in touch on Facebook or Instagram and share the love.

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode:

Slow living with kids episodes:

Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post Slow Families – A Deep Dive in to Slow Relationships appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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Renee Fisher

“Single task your relationship.”

Annnnd we’re back. It’s the first week of July, and while we’re due for a Slow Experiment, thanks to book tour commitments and a tight travel schedule, we’ve decided to keep walking that tilting-into-slow-living walk and take the pressure off. Instead, July will be a deep dive into relationships. Specifically, how we can bring slow to our relationships. Romantic, family and friendships old and new, each week we’ll be exploring ways you can create deeper connections with the people around you.

After Episode 242 was released a few weeks ago, where Ben shared his story and we spoke some uncomfortable but important truths about the past seven years, we received so much feedback and a whole heap of relationship-oriented questions, we could see that this was another area of slow living (and just plain old regular-paced living too) that isn’t spoken about enough. So let’s do it, friends.

This week starts with some smooching and some loving and me using the term “hook-up culture” about 28 times (sorry) as we look at how to bring slow to our romantic relationships. Ben and I talk about our own relationship, and acknowledge up front that our experience of the dating scene is quite old-fashioned. In fact, I thank all the love gods that there was no swiping right back in the early 2000s when we first met.

However, we do talk about the fact that a lot of dating technology doesn’t necessarily support people looking for a deeper, more meaningful connection and offer some suggestions for those of us who are looking to spark connection in other, non-Tindery ways.

We also talk about the importance of entering into relationships and getting to know people with a focus on intention over the endgame, and how presence and time helps to cement trust. The same principles apply to people already in a long-term relationships, and intention, turning up and building trust are where it’s at. Perhaps not surprisingly, we also advocate to drop the distractions and be present with your partner, and truly believe that turning up is vital in building a solid, steady foundation.

In the spirit of Episode 242 we also bring up some of the challenges we’ve faced in our own relationship, talking through some of the biggest obstacles and lessons we’ve faced over the past 18 years (what? 18 years? Aren’t I, like 25?) and finish up with a reminder that romance is constantly evolving.

We also invite you to be aware of your expectations in your relationships this week, and to explore finding joy and depth in the ordinary, everyday moments because in our experience, those ordinary, everyday moments are the bread and butter of a relationship. Finding joy in them means finding joy in every day.

Also: here’s to more loving.

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post Slow Romance – A Deep Dive in to Slow Relationships appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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Orlova Maria

“Zero waste life means not only reducing your waste, but also not wasting your life.” Anita Vandyke

The term ‘zero-waste’ is so emotive isn’t it? It simultaneously sounds wonderfully inspiring and overwhelmingly difficult, bringing to mind tiny jars of rubbish and endless hours of DIY.

I personally love seeing those glass jars containing a year’s worth of rubbish and have definitely been known to make my own deodorant and toothpaste, but I’m always thrilled to meet a zero-waste advocate who understands how overwhelming ‘zero waste’ can seem to those just beginning the journey.

Enter my wonderful guest this week, Anita Vandyke, a zero waste activist, literal rocket scientist, medical student, author and all-round breath of fresh air. Anita brings a new, more practical perspective to the zero waste lifestyle, and in this episode she and I talk about her journey to living a zero waste life, the impact of her cultural and familial upbringing on her choice to simplify life, tips for helping people get started and so much more.

Anita talks about her life a few years ago as a self-described ‘maximalist’, how she went from working in corporate engineering at the height of her career to being burnt out, and having to quit her job and step back for six months to think about what she wanted in life.

She talks about her cultural background, as her parents immigrated to Australia from China during the communist regime, and how this informed her value of money, power and status in her early 20s, as well as her work ethic, but also how her upbringing cemented her understanding of living minimally. She talks about her discovery of this very podcast during that six month break, and how this, combined with other resources, volunteering, meditating and economic necessity started her on the journey of simplifying her life and decreasing her waste.

Now Anita is studying medicine and has just written a book, called ‘A Zero Waste Life: In 30 Days’. Her scientific background means her approach to zero waste living is incredibly practical, with a creative, problem-solving bent to help you make small changes in your everyday life. Her focus is accessibility, and I really love her three-tiered approach to adopting zero waste strategies to any issue: 1) dipping your toe in, 2) living low waste and 3) living zero waste.

This podcast is full of so many nuggets of wisdom and great ideas for approaching a slower, more simple life. Start where you are, take stock, ask for help and stick to the 80/20 rule are just some my main takeaways. If you’re looking for further inspiration and advice on how to begin or level-up your own zero waste efforts, I can highly recommend Anita’s new book (which is being released on July 4th – only a few days before the North American release of my second book, SLOW.)

Enjoy!

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post The stress-free guide to zero-waste living with Anita Vandyke appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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“Living at the edge of your comfort zone is not going to be comfortable, but that’s where you expand, that’s where you grow and learn and change.”

Today’s episode is a little different. After some 200-odd episodes of the poggie, where I’ve shared so much of my own journey, so many of my own struggles and discoveries and lessons, we were well overdue for an episode where the focus was solely on Ben.

Over the years I’ve been asked many times about what this whole slow living thing has been like for him. What it’s like for someone who works in the corporate sector, for someone who worked long hours, someone who didn’t have the privilege of taking a few years to find out what was important and then gradually put it at the centre of his life. For someone who is married to me.

So today, I ask him all those questions. And honestly, it gets a little raw.

I’m not going to tell you any more about it because it really is worth a listen, but I do want you to know that this was a really enjoyable, uncomfortable yet comforting, healing, illuminating conversation for both Ben and I, and I’m genuinely thrilled to be able to share it with you.

Thank you for being here. xx

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post An interview with Ben appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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“Radical transformation doesn’t happen overnight. It starts with one small change, and then another one, and then another one.” — Rob Greenfield

Over the years I’ve found that one of the biggest obstacles to making positive change is a sense of hopelessness. What can I do? What difference will I make? Why does it matter? Who cares what one person does?

I’ve asked myself those exact questions countless times as I’m faced with the impotency of my own efforts. Whether it’s reducing plastic consumption and waste, making ethical clothing and food choices, supporting organisations trying to make a difference or showing kindness in the face of anger or aggression, I so often falter when I realise that me and my changes are merely a single drop in a very large ocean. I may pat myself on the back for avoiding plastic for an entire day, only to walk home and see hundreds of straws and cigarette butts littering the street. Boom. Demoralised.

In today’s episode I explore this issue with my guest, the inspiring and change-making Rob Greenfield, a self-described ‘dude making a difference’, and someone with a fascinating perspective on what is required in order to have a positive impact on the world.

Rob is an activist, environmentalist and legend, and is very good at raising people’s awareness of an issue by doing big, bold things to grab our attention. In 2016 he collected the amount of rubbish the average American creates in a month, strapped it to his body and wore it around New York City like a big old swollen trash suit. It’s a sight to behold and certainly succeeded in gaining attention to the massive issue of plastic waste.

But on the flip side, he’s also been the person making small, consistent change in his own life and in today’s conversation we talk about why that’s such an important lesson to learn, and one which will often lead to bigger changes down the line.

10 years ago Rob was living what he calls a “typical American life”. He was driven by money and ideas of success, obsessed with his car and didn’t consider the impact of his choices on the planet or the people around him. As he began to travel and broaden his horizons Rob began reading books and watching documentaries about the state of the world, and the more he learned, the more he realised he had to change.

So he did. Slowly, one step at a time. Rob talks about the fact that making positive changes in your life is a has a snowball effect, and we both agree that while this slow steady approach might seem frustrating or overwhelming at first, it really is the only way to go.  He breaks down the changes he made, and how these eventually fed into the big, bold experiments and projects he’s become known for.

We also talk about how he communicates these changes to the people around him, the idea of comfort zones, change and societal norms, as well as the need to practice compassion and get good it at, just like building any other muscle or skill. He shares an amazing story about a man named Guitar Johnny, that has stuck with me for many months and is such a simple and beautiful example of what it looks like to live with compassion and forgiveness.

It’s incredibly inspiring to hear Rob share so honestly about his life, and is a much-needed reminder that we can all make choices in our daily lives to have a more positive impact on the world.

I’m also really excited to see how Rob goes with his next project – growing or foraging 100% of his food for a whole year, and I’ve linked to this project in the show notes below.

In the meantime, I hope you enjoy this episode and take solace in the knowledge that every single change matters. No matter how big or small.

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post Rob Greenfield on the enormous power of small changes appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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Wang Xi

What an unexpectedly beautiful ride this month of daily creativity has been! In today’s poggie Ben and I wrap up our May experiment with a recap of our own efforts and realisations, as well as a whole heap of fascinating research in to the benefits (both obvious and not-so-obvious) of cultivating a daily creative practice.

I began this experiment with a particular creative output in mind (starting a novel for 8-12 year olds) but have delighted in the way my practice has evolved as I’ve begun to let go of perfection, expectations and particular outputs. Over the past couple of weeks I’ve moved away from writing the story down, instead choosing to make it up it chapter-by-chapter every night as I put the kids to bed. And can I tell you, that shift has been both challenging and liberating.

Some nights I’ve got the goods and will lay next to the kids for half an hour, building and weaving a new world for all of us to explore. Other nights it comes slow and clunky, and I find myself asking for their ideas to fill some of the gaping holes in my story. And while I used to think that was a failing on my part (if I can’t do it perfectly straight away then what’s the point?) but this experiment has shown me that the benefits of creativity are rarely attached to the final outcome. Instead, daily creativity has seen me increase my compassion and empathy, feel more playful and content, and I’ve rediscovered the joy of process over product.

These benefits are reflected in the research into the benefits of creativity, and Ben and I spend the rest of the episode diving in to what those benefits are and why they’re so important. The ones that blew my mind most of all:

  • drawing, painting, sculpting and expressive writing have all been proven to help people deal with and process different kinds of trauma, by allowing them to access and express emotions that can be difficult to articulate otherwise
  • writing by hand can help boost memory and effective learning (as opposed to typing, which doesn’t have the same impact)
  • play-acting or theatresports can lead to improved psychological wellbeing, problem-solving and word recall, with the benefit lasting up to four weeks
  • expressive writing can help with chronic pain management
  • music therapy has been proven to boost the immune system in some participants, as well as change and improve responses to stress
  • expressive writing has also been linked to the increased production of a white blood cell called the CD4+ lymphocyte, which is key to a well-functioning immune system (or put another way: writing actually helps our bodies build a stronger immune system…)

Now I don’t know about you, but this list of benefits blows my mind. To see not only that creativity can help us to feel better emotionally, but is also good for us physically is just incredible and is certainly not something I expected when we started the experiment a few weeks ago.

But like so many elements of slow living, we now find that there is a strong thread that connects so many parts of life: Creativity impacts our mental health. Walking in nature can help us fight off a virus. Deep breathing can reduce stress. Sharing a kindness with a stranger can increase our sense community. The more we experiment, the more connections we discover and the more convinced I am that slowing down and learning to live more intentionally really can help us change the world.

Now, if that sounds a little too lofty for you (perhaps you’re thinking, “I don’t even have time for five minutes of creativity, I don’t think I can manage changing the world!”) we also round out today’s episode with a list, courtesy of Psychology Today, of ways to incorporate creativity in to your daily life, no additional time or equipment necessary:

  • if you find yourself disagreeing with someone, choose to respond in the exact opposite way you normally would and see if the shift in perspective changes things
  • take a different route to work
  • spend time daydreaming and see if it allows you to reframe a problem you’re trying to solve
  • get ahead on a project you’re working on, and avoid the creativity vampire that is deadline procrastination
  • think about a problem you’re trying to solve before going to bed, and let your brain churn it over while you sleep

We’ve loved watching your #slowexperiment posts on Instagram this month (so many delicious cakes and gorgeous gardens!) and would love to know how you found the experiment. Did you discover, or re-discover, a creative passion? Did you unlock an unexpected benefit of creative time? Did you struggle with perfectionism or playfulness?

In the meantime, enjoy the episode and, as always, thank you for listening.

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post Daily Creativity: Part 5 – A Slow Experiment appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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rawpixel

One of the things I’ve struggled with for many years (all the years maybe?) is play. To allow myself to let go, get silly, not worry about the optics or the outcome or the why of what I’m doing, and just tap in to the playfulness of the moment.

Ben and I recorded a month-long experiment back in 2016 where we tried to play every day, and it was both wonderful and difficult. I’m not sure if it’s the perfectionistic tendencies I’ve had since I was a kid, or if it’s fear of looking silly or making a mistake, or even simply a lack of practice, but I found it really challenging.

This months’s daily creativity experiment is proving much the same as over the past four weeks I’ve had to learn to let go of the end product and learn to enjoy playing around in the process. Unlike the play experiment, however, this time I feel like I’ve finally figured out why it’s important to simply play around. It’s not so that I can ‘achieve’ playfulness or get that giddy high I sometimes get when playing hide and seek or sketching something random that caught my eye, but so that my brain can revel in the unstructured. So that I can roll around in ideas and playfulness and be free to connect dots in more creative ways…or not.

Letting go of outcome is undoubtedly a challenge for many of us in a world that is transfixed by product and end result (and the quicker the better thankyouverymuch) but what I’ve realised this month is that forgetting about output and audience, and doing something just for the joy of it is a challenge worth exploring.

In today’s poggie Ben and I talk about our creative practice over the past week, and I share specifically how I’ve been practicing playfulness and perfectionism. And here’s a hot tip for you: off-the-cuff story-telling is a great way to let go of being good.

We talk about the notion of self-worth and why it’s been important for me to acknowledge and shift my view of my own worth in order to let go of some of the perfectionism I’ve carried around, which brings us to the idea of courage and creativity and why I think the two are closely intertwined. It turns out that letting go of output, turning inwards and simply revelling in the process of creating brings us closer to our own struggles, fears, beliefs and judgements, and by choosing to obsess over the end result, we can keep those things at a distance. When we let go of those fears and judgements, even for a few moments a day, we are being courageous. We are learning to be honest with ourselves. We are fully embracing what it is to be whole and flawed and human, and while it’s challenging, I truly believe it’s so worthwhile.

I know many of you also struggle with playfulness and letting go of the end result (the emails and messages we received after the play experiment back in 2016 are a testament to that) so this week we’d love to offer up a little challenge – if you struggle with playfulness, try setting an alarm and spending 10 minutes doing something fun and playful. Simply let go of judgment and try to find the joy in the challenge. It might take some practice, but as someone who struggles with play I’ve never once regretted making the time for it.

We round out today’s episode with a quick book tour update too. It’s getting closer now, and I think we should be able to share the majority of our itinerary with you next week!

In the meantime, enjoy your week and here’s to more play!

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4.5 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post Daily Creativity: Part 4 – A Slow Experiment appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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Sticker Mule

“The notebook is the place where you figure out what’s going on inside you or what’s rattling around. The keyboard is the place that you go to tell people about it.” — Austin Kleon in Episode 5 of Hurry Slowly

Are you a pencil and paper kinda person? Or someone who gets their creative juices flowing when they’re tapping away on their computer? Do you like old-school vinyl or are you a digital music fiend? Or, perhaps, like most people, a little of both?

In today’s episode Ben and I dive deep in to a topic I’ve been excited about since beginning the experiment: analog vs digital – which is better for creativity?

Before we get in to it, Ben and I talk about our experiences over the past week, as we’re now more than halfway through this month’s daily creativity Slow Experiment, and this week has brought some really interesting lessons for me personally, as well as what feels like a huge shift in the way I’m solving problems. I’ve found myself focusing more on the process rather than the output, my empathy has stepped up another level as I’ve been able to view things from different perspectives (particularly those of my kids) and excitingly, questions I’ve been pondering for months suddenly have clear solutions. This creativity thing has bigger benefits than I’d imagined!

If you’re subscribed to the Slow Post you may know that Ben’s challenge this week was to do something creative for himself, without an audience, and in this poggie he shares how he’s played around with skiing switch (backwards) and reflects on the joy of truly sucking at something.

Ben also identifies some of the different ways we can categorise creativity (cognitive v emotional and deliberate v spontaneous) and we share our experiences of each of these modes so far, before diving in to the big question of today’s episode:

Analog vs digital: which is better for creativity?

As a staunch advocate for pencil and paper, I’m not going to lie. I was hoping for a unanimous “analog rules” verdict in my research. It would make things so much easier! Instead what I found was that there really is no right or wrong. Our personal preference towards analog or digital is actually closely tied to how we best learn, and the truth is that everyone could probably benefit from dabbling in both means of creative expression.

We discuss handwriting, Austin Kleon’s wonderful dual-desk system, note-taking on a computer vs by hand, and the current hypothesis on why some people find creative thinking difficult to do while typing (hello, me!) and others who don’t find it tough at all (hello, Ben!) in this episode. There’s a lot of juicy ideas in here that may just help you unlock the daily creative practice, or at least begin to understand your personal tendencies towards digital or analog.

If you’re getting creative with us this week, why not try mixing it up again? If you’re always in analog-land, why not try creating using digital this week, and vice versa – if you’re a tech-head, why not try something a little more tactile?

Don’t forget to use the hashtag #slowexperiment on Instagram if you’d like to share, and stay tuned for next week’s episode all about letting go of ideas of “good” and “perfect” and getting back to creating, just for the sake of creating.

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post Daily Creativity: Part 3 – A Slow Experiment appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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Philipp Lublasser

“This is what slow is. It’s about diving deep. It’s about asking questions, if even the answers that we find out about ourselves aren’t ones that we love.”

Welcome to the second episode of this month’s slow experiment, where Ben and I are aiming to do something creative every day throughout May.

The last week has been really interesting for both of us and in today’s poggie we dive in to the patterns we’ve seen emerging in our own creative efforts and the changes we’ve each experienced, even in such a short period of time.

So far the experiment has had a bigger impact on my headspace than I expected, as it’s begun opening me up to see more creative opportunities in my days – problem-solving, parenting, the perspective with which I view the world.

We also dig deep in to the question of who, exactly, we’re creating for. I guess another way of saying that is we’re trying to figure out our Why of creativity. Because as people who both, at least in part, work creatively in their day-to-day jobs, we’ve discovered that it’s hard to remove the idea of creating for an audience from our efforts. Thinking about the end result or the output is ingrained in our thinking, and the frustration I’ve come up against every day is that this results-oriented approach stops me from creating with complete, playful abandon.

Ben talks a lot about the value of slowing down our creative efforts, which flies in the face of today’s hustling, deadline-driven world. Very rarely are we allowed to let creativity take time. Very rarely are we encourage to let go of our need to reach a deadline, and simply allow a solution take shape over days, weeks or even years. Again, the lesson here is learning to focus more on the process and less on the output.

So in the spirit of our discoveries this week, we’re going to try and mix it up and would love you to try too. If you’ve been creating just for you, try sharing your work – it doesn’t have to be online, you can just show a loved one. Or, if you’ve been creating with an audience in mind, this week try doing something just for you. Notice if and how this impacts the process and let us know!

Don’t forget to use the hashtag #slowexperiment on Instagram if you’d like to share, and stay tuned for next week’s episode all about analog vs digital in creativity.

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post Daily Creativity: Part 2 – A Slow Experiment appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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Kris Chin

“Everyone has the ability to think creatively, to view things through a different lens, to take things from a different perspective. And that to me is creativity.”

Welcome to May, and welcome to the next Slow Experiment of 2018!

March’s nature experiment was such an incredibly transformative experience that inspired so much change not only in myself, but also in lots of our wonderful listeners, so I’m equal parts excited and nervous to share this month’s theme with you. (Though if you listened to last week’s hostful episode you will have heard us talk about it a little already).

This month we’re experimenting with daily creativity, and I’m excited to share it with you because increased creativity was one of the biggest and most surprising benefits of our nature experiment in March and I think there’s so many common elements between slow living and creative living. But I’m also nervous about it because there is often resistance when people hear the word “creativity”. And that resistance often looks like one of these:

  • “I’m not a creative person. I can’t draw or write or sculpt or knit!”
  • “I don’t have time to be creative.”
  • “I used to be creative, before life got busy/the kids were born/work took up all my free time.”

And I get it. Even as someone who writes for a living, I often don’t feel very creative. “Be creative” feels like an additional item to add to the list of things I “should” be doing in order to live a well rounded life. But the more time we spend exploring slow living and all her elements, the more I realise that creativity is vital and it also has nothing to do with arts and crafts. It’s simply about encouraging thought, mindfulness and play, and by redirecting our focus, even for just a few minutes a day, to look at things a little differently. Which really, is what slow living is all about too.

So how do you join in? The good news is there are no hard and fast rules. This is an experiment, and all we encourage you to do is aim to do some kind of creative practice every day. It can be a specific creative project, but it doesn’t have to be. It’s more about approaching life through a more creative lens, rather than having an agenda or making anything for a specific audience (more on that next week). It might mean simply approaching an everyday task like getting dressed or making dinner as a creative act, rather than a chore. Or it might mean writing, sculpting, knitting, singing – whatever it is, it doesn’t have to look the same every day, it just has to happen.

Which brings me to the other side of resistance: time.

If you feel like you don’t have time to be creative, I’d recommend doing a brief audit of your daily inputs (e.g. social media, news websites, podcasts etc) and asking yourself if they fuel creativity or not. Then pick one, and swap out the time you’d normally spend doing it with a form of creative output for the month, and see how you go.

It doesn’t need to be hard or exciting or Instagrammable, honestly. Just creative. And if you’re still stuck for ideas there are some out-of-the-box suggestions on this month’s downloadable PDF, which you can find here.

So how will you flex your creative muscle? We can’t wait to see – if you’re playing along and feel like sharing, don’t forget to use the hashtag #slowexperiment on Instagram. And in the meantime, enjoy your creative play!

——

Head over to iTunes to subscribe to the show and play the episode.

Or you can listen to the show directly, simply by hitting the Play button above. Enjoy!

——

Things to Check Out After Today’s Episode: Keep Listening: Support the Show:

Recently we hit the mind-blowing number of 4 million downloads of The Slow Home Podcast! This is all thanks to your lovely self and the community of people who listen to the show every week, send in your questions and offer your feedback. I’m so grateful you’re here and part of this, and for anyone who has supported the show in any way over the past year – thank you so much.

If you do love the show and would like to show your support by becoming a patron, head over here to make a small monthly donation (as little as $1 a month) and know that any amount makes a huge difference to us being able to cover costs.

Most importantly, thanks for being here!

The post Daily Creativity: Part 1 – A Slow Experiment appeared first on Slow Your Home.

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