Loading...

Follow Sleep Junkies on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Sleep Junkies by Brett Blackman - 1w ago

The post How Does Stress Affect Sleep? appeared first on Sleep Junkies.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Last updated on April 23rd, 2018

More exercise needs more sleep. Professional athletes get around 10 hours per day to help them with recovery, muscle growth and tissue repair. Here’s why sleep is so crucial to your workout regime.

If you play sports, like to hit the gym, or do any kind of regular exercise, you probably take your fitness regime quite seriously.

If you’re preparing for a match or an event, it’s likely that you’ll focus hard on your training schedule and your diet. But what about your sleep?

Sleep – the new performance enhancer

In recent years the world of professional sport and athletics has started to embrace the science of sleep because of the many ways it can actively enhance performance and improve your sporting potential.

Sleep specialist and Olympic sports coach, Dr. Mark Rosekind recently said in the Huff Post that: ““As athletics become more and more competitive to where a millisecond can be the difference between a gold and silver medal, everyone is looking for any possible edge they can get — sleep is that edge.”

But even if you’re not a pro, sleep should a vital consideration as part of your overall fitness goals. All types of exercise take a toll on the body, and sleep and rest are vital for your recovery.

In addition, y0u need need to consider that exercising the wrong way can have a negative impact on your sleep. If you want to avoid post-exercise insomnia, you’ll need to get your workout timing right – stay hydrated and cut back on the caffeine.

Here’s a great infographic from The Sleep Matters Club, a lifestyle magazine of bed retailer Dreams, with a guide on how to recover after exercise and avoid post-exercise insomnia.

Transcript

We’ve all felt the benefits of a great night’s sleep. But it’s even more important for athletes to rest properly to aid muscle recovery and growth after exercise.

Training, tossing & turning

After a big race or heavy training session, sleeplessness can occur. This is also known as post-exercise insomnia.

Ways to prevent post-exercise insomnia

  • Work out no less than 3 hours before bedtime
  • Drink lots of water before, during and after exercise
  • Only consume caffeine before your exercise, not continuously throughout
  • A hot bath/shower will prepare your body for sleep
  • For a comfortable sleep cool your bedroom to between 15-20°C

What happens in your body during exercise?

  • Dehydration from sweating
  • Caffeine consumed through energy drinks/snacks
  • Increase in heart rate & core temperature
  • Suppressed melatonin production
  • Stimulated nervous & endocrine systems

How does this affect your sleep?

  • It’s difficult to lower your core temperature when you’re dehydrated from endurance exercises. Dehydration also raises your heart rate, meaning no sleep for you!
  • During exercise, we produce the stress hormones cortisol and norepinephrine. Put simply, the body stays hyped even after the race is over!
  • Cortisol also stops the production of melatonin, a.k.a. the sleep hormone. Bright lights at the gym will inhibit melatonin production, too.

Deep sleep

During sleep, we pass through various stages, all of which play a role to restoration. Stages 3 and 4 of non-REM sleep, also known as ‘deep sleep’, are the most important for muscle recovery.

Ideal sleep time

8-10 hours

Anything longer can reset your body clock and damage your sleep cycle the following night. Anything shorter may not give adequate time for your body to fully recover from the stress of training.

What happens during deep sleep?

  • Blood pressure drops
  • Breathing becomes deeper and slower
  • Blood not used in your resting brain is sent to muscles
  • Muscles receive extra oxygen & nutrients which helps with healing and growth
  • Pituitary gland releases human growth hormone, causing tissue growth & muscle repair
  • New cells are regenerated & muscle tissue is replenished

More exercise = more sleep required

Physical activity puts stress on the muscles and nervous system. This is rebuilt during sleep.

When it’s most important

  • Strength or weight training
  • Periods of extra training leading up to an event
  • Endurance tests like marathons

Why it’s most important

Repair

During strenuous workouts, muscles build up microscopic tears. Sleep helps to heal those tears as your body produces larger molecules to repair muscular, immune and nervous system problems.

Growth

The body needs to synthesise proteins faster than it breaks them down to build up muscles. Sleep is the best time for the body to use absorbed nutrients for this protein synthesis as it’s the longest we go without eating.

Did you know?

Building muscle mass is also known as hypertrophy

Make the most of your training with a great night’s sleep – the results should follow!

The post Working out might be a waste of time if you don’t get your sleep right appeared first on Sleep Junkies.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Every year, around this time, millions of hay fever sufferers experience disrupted sleep as a result of the increased pollen count. Runny and stuffy noses. Itchy eyes. People with hay fever are well aware of such symptoms, which often seem to accompany the arrival of warm weather. Do hay fever and other allergies affect sleep?

In the United Kingdom, 1 in 5 people grapple with hay fever, while an estimated 40 to 60 million U.S. residents have the condition.

But, what is hay fever? A lot of people might discuss it, but many might not know what exactly it is. The condition is a common one and can affect different areas of people’s lives, including their sleep.

What is hay fever?

Hay fever is a common term for a condition known as allergic rhinitis. Simply put, hay fever is an allergy. Very often, it’s an allergy to pollen. Plants release pollen as part of the fertilization process. This release can wreak havoc with allergy sufferers as they inhale the pollen and their immune systems work to fight it.

What is Hayfever? - YouTube

The pollen from hay fever comes mostly from three sources:

  • Trees. Pollen from trees peaks late in the month of March to the middle of May in the United Kingdom.
  • Grass. Pollen from grass most irritates hay fever sufferers from the middle of May to July.
  • Weeds. Pollen from weeds is particularly prevalent from the end of June through (and including) September.

Other things prompt hay fever, such as mould, yeast, animal dander, and dust mites. These allergens can trigger hay fever that lasts for longer periods than pollen-produced hay fever, which is sometimes known as seasonal hay fever or seasonal allergic rhinitis.

>> You might like: How Do You Stop Allergies From Ruining Your Night’s Sleep?

What are the symptoms of hay fever?

No matter what you call it or what causes it, hay fever can produce some nasty, uncomfortable symptoms, including:

  • Sneezing
  • Running noses
  • Blocked noses and sinuses
  • Itchy and watery eyes
  • Breathing problems
  • Headaches
  • Post-nasal drip (mucus running down the throat)
  • Sleep problems and fatigue
  • Snoring

Less common symptoms include:

  • Facial pain
  • Problems with the sense of smell
  • Increased risk of ear infections (in children) and sinus infections (in adults)

Since it can affect the lungs, hay fever can also make asthma worse and more difficult to control.

Such symptoms can interfere with people’s daily lives. Constantly needing facial tissues to wipe noses is inconvenient. Staying in bed because of headaches and tiredness can prevent people from taking care of their families, fulfilling their responsibilities, attending school, or going to work.

How does hay fever interfere with sleep?

But, staying in bed just to get one’s daily sleep can be a problem for a person with hay fever. That’s because hay fever, like other allergies, can dramatically affect a person’s sleep.

Most people lie on their backs when they sleep. This position places their heads at the same level of their bodies, which can be problematic for people with blocked noses. And, instead of breathing through their noses as they usually do during sleep, people with hay fever might breath through their mouths, which can irritate their throats or make their already sore throats even more sore.

Post-nasal drip and the need to wipe noses can also keep people up at night and make them tired during the day. If they nap during the day to try to catch up on sleep, these naps might interfere with their sleep and disrupt their usual sleep patterns.

People suffering from sleep problems sometimes turn to sleep aids, such as sleep medications. But, this solution can create its own risks as people might become dependent on such medications and develop a sleeping pill addiction.

In addition, sleep medications might interfere with other medications a person might be taking to combat their hay fever. Hay fever medications sometimes make people drowsy. If people combine them with sleep aids that are intended to make people drowsy, this double dose of drowsiness can produce a dangerous effect. Also, since alcohol is a depressant, people should also avoid drinking and using hay fever or sleep medications at the same time.

How can hay fever sufferers improve their sleep? Medication

As irritating and disruptive as hay fever-related sleep problems are, there are ways to treat them. As indicated before, many people turn to medications to deal with hay fever. These medications could be over-the-counter (OTC) medications that don’t require doctor prescriptions. They can also be medications that require prescriptions from doctors.

Allergy medications come in the form of pills, nasal sprays, eye drops, and films to place under the tongue. If asthma accompanies hay fever, people might use inhalers to treat the conditions.

Many hay fever medications are intended to calm histamines, chemicals in the body that can cause the immune system to overreact to allergy producers such as pollen. This is why hay fever and allergy medications are often known as antihistamines.

Such antihistamines can stop histamines from triggering the overproduction of mucus. Less mucus could mean an end to post-nasal drip, runny noses, and the need to constantly wipe one’s nose, which could lead to more restful sleep and fewer daytime disruptions.

Since a number of allergy medications make people drowsy, using these medications can provide the double benefit of treating allergies and promoting sleep.

Sleep environment

In addition to medication, changing one’s environment can help end hay fever and the insomnia it can create. People who struggle with hay fever and other allergies might want to consider investing in an anti-allergenic mattress. Two good options include:

  • Foam memory mattresses. Foam mattresses might be good for allergy sufferers because dust mites could find it harder to penetrate the dense foam of these mattresses.
  • Latex mattresses. Latex mattresses have antibacterial properties and are more moisture-resistant than other types of mattresses. Latex is another type of dense material that dust mites might have trouble penetrating, although some people might be allergic to latex itself, so it might not be the hypoallergenic solution for everyone.

Cleaning mattresses, bedding, flooring, and other materials and surfaces in the bedroom can also reduce or eliminate allergens in the area and promote better sleep for allergy sufferers. Speaking of cleaning, bathing or showering before bed and washing one’s clothes frequently are other ways to eliminate pollen.

Gadgets and technology

Avoiding conditions that trigger allergies is another way to avoid hay fever. How can you do this? Make science and technology your friend.

In addition to news about temperatures and precipitation, weather reports on many television and radio broadcasts and Internet sites now include information about allergens, such as pollen counts. You can even download apps for your electronic devices that include allergy and weather forecasts. These forecasts can help people determine if they want to stay indoors during times of high pollen counts.

If you’re a do-it-yourselfer, you might buy a dust sensor or an air quality monitor. If these devices determine that your air quality is indeed a problem, you might also want to consider buying an air purifier.

There are no guarantees that taking certain steps will cure hay fever and ensure a good night’s sleep, of course. But, trying some of these tips might help people explore what might be causing hay fever (or what ISN’T causing it) and help them decide on ways to treat it. This could possibly help allergy sufferers function better during waking hours and also help them sleep.

About the author

Pam Zuber is a writer and editor interested in health and wellness, substance abuse, and other topics.

The post Hay fever and sleep: How to cope this allergy season appeared first on Sleep Junkies.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Of all the positive things that come from cannabis one of those that is rarely spoken about it its ability give us a good night’s rest. It’s no secret that a bit of quality cannabis can put some of the most frequently bad sleepers out for the night. What you might not have known is how beneficial medical cannabis may be for sleep disorders.

Getting enough quality sleep is vital in order to fully restore your brain function to optimal levels. It is while we are sleeping that our bodies do its most vital healing and recovery work.

Unfortunately, there are many millions of people who are unable to gain these benefits. Many who seek medical help are given medications which provide no long-term benefit. Combating sleep disorders with medical cannabis might just be the thing they need though.

Of course, many people overlook these quality benefits and often don’t get enough sleep. This is by choice, though, there are others out there who don’t have that benefit. But using medical cannabis for a sleep disorder might be the best thing. The endocannabinoid system that exists within the body can be manipulated through the introduction of THC and CBD to produce positive effects in our ability to reach deep sleep and for regulating our circadian rhythms.

The endocannabinoid system

In recent years, medical researchers investigating the cause and solution to sleep disorders have been focused on the endocannabinoid system. This is network that exists throughout our body. It plays a significant role in circadian rhythms. Even as far back as the 18th-century cannabis was known as a chemical that could promote sleepiness and pain relief. And now that research has come more and more into the mainstream again with positive benefits for everyone.

The following are some common sleep disorders which medical cannabis may help fight against. Of course, self-medication is never recommended and a medical professional should always be consulted when embarking on any new treatment.

Insomnia

Approximately one in three people will suffer from insomnia or some variant of it in their life. Which means you’re likely to know someone who has or will have it. So it’d be best if you knew about the best ways to treat it. You might be tempted to get yourself a decent night’s sleep by taking sleeping pills or some other seemingly-effective treatment. But in the long term, these aren’t sustainable. Recently researchers found that CBD-heavier strains of medical cannabis could be beneficial for those in need of a good night’s rest.

Sleep apnea

Sleep apnea is a condition that you may not even be aware you have. When someone has sleep apnea their breathing repeatedly stops and starts while they are asleep. If you’re someone who snores very loudly and also feels groggy after a night’s sleep you may be suffering from sleep apnea and not even know it. Certain strains of medical cannabis have been found to improve conditions of those with sleep apnea. In a study that was published in Frontiers in Psychiatry, researchers found that using medical cannabis to treat sleep apnea patients played a significantly positive role.

Restless leg syndrome

It’s possible you don’t even know about this condition but could never put a name to it. As the name would suggest this is a condition defined by an irresistible urge to move your legs, often when you’re most likely to be trying to do the very opposite.

This condition has long flown under the radar of the mainstream but for those who suffer from it, it is very real. Because of that, there is a real dearth of information regarding it. But in an article from the Sleep Journal, it was found that medical cannabis used to treat six patients proved highly effective. More studies need to be undertaken to fully comprehend the implications but this is a great start.

Hypersomnolence

This particularly nefarious sleeping condition is characterized by a feeling of sleep or fatigue during the day and the need to take naps. Despite these naps, however, those suffering from Hypersomnolence gain no relief from the symptoms.

Even after their naps, they feel groggy and disoriented. By using medical cannabis they may, however, be able to stimulate their mind, increase alertness, and ultimately regulate their sleeping cycle so that it is more beneficial to them.

REM sleep behavior disorder

This is a little-known sleeping condition where you act out your dreams while you are still asleep. People who have this disorder may get out of their own beds, have a conversation, all while being completely asleep.

Although this might seem completely harmless it can be dangerous for the person who is asleep, while asleep they may injure themselves or others. Luckily, researchers in the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil discovered that treating patients with CBD quickly lost most of their REM sleep behavior disorder symptoms without suffering any massive side effects. This may mean that in future this sleep disorder will be a thing of the past thanks to CBD.

Chronic pain

Although not technically defined as a sleep disorder, having to endure serious physical pain can have detrimental effects on a person’s sleeping patterns. Circadian rhythms will undoubtedly be affected and the ability to reach deep sleep will be severely diminished. However, there are countless numbers of studies both being done to examine the benefit medical cannabis might have.

Cannabis treatment in the future

There is still a lot of work to be done but these are a few hopeful signs that certain strains of cannabis can help patients with sleeping difficulties. The use of medical cannabis for sleep disorders may end up being one of the most revolutionary ideas for some people out in the world with very few other choices available. With so much research to do and more being added regularly it’s only a matter of time before everyone understands just how much they could benefit.

The post Medical cannabis for sleep disorders – what you need to know appeared first on Sleep Junkies.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Earthing, or grounding is an alternative treatment for improving sleep quality and insomnia, based on the idea that our bodies are healthier when connected to the Earth’s natural electrical energy.

The global sleep industry is enjoying a renaissance. The growing demand for sleep aids and devices have turned sleep into a $100 billion market in the US alone.

But alongside the prescription drugs, over the counter sleep aids, mattresses, pillows and hi-tech sleep gadgets on the market, people are also seeking out other methods to help them get some quality sleep.

These alternative sleep-promoting techniques may lack scientific efficacy, but that doesn’t prevent millions from jumping on the alternative sleep-therapy bandwagon.

Take for example, the recent YouTube-inspired ASMR phenomenon, or the growing popularity of mindfulness, meditation and sleep yoga. Everywhere you look, its seems that there’s a new way to help you fall asleep.

Another alternative sleep therapy that’s risen to fame in recent years is earthing, popularized by actress Gwyneth Paltrow and her Goop lifestyle brand.

What is earthing?

Earthing (sometimes called ‘grounding’) is based on the idea of improving your health and wellbeing by utilizing the earth’s natural electrical energy.

Advocates of earthing claim that connecting your body to an earthed surface is extremely beneficial to your health, and that the earth’s natural electrical energy can help neutralise free radicals, inflammation, and disease in the body.

This concept, that nature is a healing force is not a new one. It’s a widespread, and ancient belief. Whether it’s the Ancient Greeks, or modern day Japanese ‘forest bathers‘, for millennia humans have acknowledged the inseparable relationship between humans, nature, and health.

What is Earthing? - YouTube

EXPLAINER VIDEO FROM EARTHING.COM

Earthing falls neatly into this category of nature-inspired health therapies. And although research is limited at present, it hasn’t prevented the spread of a growing community of  earthing devotees who claim the practice has been found to reduce chronic pain, encourage deeper sleep, increase energy levels, lower stress, aid in muscle recovery, and relieve muscle tension.

How to practice earthing

The simplest way to try earthing for yourself, is to simply go outdoors, and walk bare foot in direct contact with the ground, ideally for at least thirty minutes. But there are other ways too, such as:

Sleep grounded: the main benefit of practicing earthing whilst asleep is that you remain grounded for a long period of time. You can buy conductive sheets, pillows, earthing sleeping bags and grounding mats to help facilitate this

Using an earthing aid: earthing has become a big industry and there are accessories for just about every occasion, skin patches, car seat pads, floor mats, and mouse pads are just a few ways you can practice earthing on a daily basis

Earthing footwear: special shoes containing copper plates allow you to walk around without having to be barefoot.

Swimming: being submerged in natural bodies of water, ideally saltwater is another recommended earthing technique.

The discovery of earthing

The modern concept of earthing was borne in the late 1990s, via former cable television executive named Clint Ober, often described these days as the ‘father of Earthing‘.

Ober knew that a well-earthed television cable produced a high-quality image by preventing electrical disturbances and signals from leaking out.

Ober also noticed that most people he knew wore synthetic-soled footwear which insulated them from the Earth’s current. He began to wonder what effect, if any, this widespread but relatively recent disconnect with the earth had on the human body.

Great video on Earthing / Grounding with Clint Ober and Dr. Christy Weston - YouTube

Because synthetic-soled footwear is made of non-conductive materials, Ober realised that most humans would in turn be less grounded.

Ober decided to pursue his curiosity and began some experiments to look at the effect of grounding on human health.

Ober examined how being grounded affected people’s sleep quality. Throughout his studies, he found that participants slept better and had a reduction in aches and pains when they were grounded and connected directly with the Earth.

After years of research, Ober received scientific support when the 2004 Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine published one of his studies. The report stated, “Earthing during sleep resynchronizes cortisol secretion more in alignment with its natural, normal rhythm.”

Since then, more research has been carried out, although these have been mainly small scale studies, some of which have been funded by the Earthing industry itself.

Earthing and sleep

While some critics have said there is not enough evidence to support the positive effects of earthing, there are several studies that have investigated how Earthing has impacted the lives of the sample groups.

In one study focused on sleep quality, a group of 60 people experiencing chronic pain and poor sleep quality were examined. Half of the group slept with an Earthing sheet on their bed, while the others slept with a placebo sheet.

Participants who slept with an earthing sheet stated they experienced reductions in chronic pain, respiratory issues, arthritis, sleep apnea, and hypertension. The other participants, who slept on a placebo sheet, did not experience an improvement in their symptoms.

Sceptics of earthing have argued that the concept has grown in popularity due to the commercial opportunities it could present for companies. Critics have also stated the studies completed by Ober were not well enough designed to deliver conclusive results.

Like many other alternative health options available today, further research over time will help to fully investigate and report the effects of earthing on sleep quality.

The idea of earthing outside, and making the effort not to be distracted by devices such as a cell phone or laptop, supports the common advice people receive about reducing electronic device use before bed time for better quality sleep.

The growing earthing community

Earthing has grown in popularity in recent years notably down to the celebrity Gwyneth Paltrow claiming it has helped her improve her mood and overcome various health issues including insomnia and inflammation.

Paltrow’s lifestyle and wellness brand Goop have helped popularize the earthing movement by promoting the “intuitive assumption that connecting to the energy of the planet is healthy for our souls and bodies”.

Earthing products

If you’re unable to go outside to experience earthing, there are several products available to bring the benefits of earthing inside your home. These products include earthing mats, earthing sheets, earthing patches, earthing throw blankets, earthing body or wrist bands, and earthing yoga and fitness mats.


With the ability to try earthing by simply stepping outside (if weather permits) and feeling the Earth beneath your feet each day, it’s certainly a viable option for people searching for ways to improve their sleep quality without medication.
Click for more resources on Earthing

Articles:

The Healing Effects of Grounding the Human Body: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/the-healing-benefits-of-grounding-the-human-body_us_592c585be4b07d848fdc058a

Skeptics Dictionary http://skepdic.com/earthing.html

Earthing: Science or Marketing? http://genegeek.ca/2014/01/earthing-science-or-marketing/

Neurologica Blog https://theness.com/neurologicablog/index.php/earthing/

Earthing Studies:

Earthing (Grounding) the Human Body Reduces Blood Viscosity—a Major Factor in Cardiovascular Disease, 2013, Gae´tan Chevalier, PhD, Stephen T. Sinatra, MD, FACC, FACN,

James L. Oschman, PhD, and Richard M. Delany, MD, FACC. The Journal of Alternative and Complimentary Medicine. URL: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/acm.2011.0820.

Prevalence of insomnia-related symptoms continues to increase in the Finnish working-age population. Kronholm, E., Partonen, T., Härmä, M., Hublin, C., Lallukka, T., Peltonen, M. and Laatikainen, T, 2016, J Sleep Res, 25: 454–457. doi:10.1111/jsr.12398. URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jsr.12398/full.

The Biologic Effects of Grounding the Human Body During Sleep as Measured by Cortisol Levels and Subjective Reporting of Sleep, Pain, and Stress, 2004, Maurice Ghaly, M.D., and Dale Teplitz, M.A.The Journal of Alternative and Complimentary Medicine. Source

About the Author
With a keen interest in holistic health and wellness, Nicola Smith works with clients in the health and wellness industry providing copy that engages audiences and helps businesses grow. Her goal is to help people have a holistic approach to their health, and inspire others to simplify their lives, pack a suitcase, and book a ticket to somewhere they’ve always wanted to visit or live. You can also follow her adventures on Instagram @luggagelifestyle.

The post Earthing: revolutionary sleep therapy or a bunch of Goop? appeared first on Sleep Junkies.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
More exercise needs more sleep. Professional athletes get around 10 hours per day to help them with recovery, muscle growth and tissue repair. Here’s why sleep is so crucial to your workout regime.

If you play sports, like to hit the gym, or do any kind of regular exercise, you probably take your fitness regime quite seriously.

If you’re preparing for a match or an event, it’s likely that you’ll focus hard on your training schedule and your diet. But what about your sleep?

Sleep – the new performance enhancer

In recent years the world of professional sport and athletics has started to embrace the science of sleep because of the many ways it can actively enhance performance and improve your sporting potential.

Sleep specialist and Olympic sports coach, Dr. Mark Rosekind recently said in the Huff Post that: ““As athletics become more and more competitive to where a millisecond can be the difference between a gold and silver medal, everyone is looking for any possible edge they can get — sleep is that edge.”

But even if you’re not a pro, sleep should a vital consideration as part of your overall fitness goals. All types of exercise take a toll on the body, and sleep and rest are vital for your recovery.

In addition, y0u need need to consider that exercising the wrong way can have a negative impact on your sleep. If you want to avoid post-exercise insomnia, you’ll need to get your workout timing right – stay hydrated and cut back on the caffeine.

Here’s a great infographic from The Sleep Matters Club, a lifestyle magazine of bed retailer Dreams, with a guide on how to recover after exercise and avoid post-exercise insomnia.

Transcript

We’ve all felt the benefits of a great night’s sleep. But it’s even more important for athletes to rest properly to aid muscle recovery and growth after exercise.

Training, tossing & turning

After a big race or heavy training session, sleeplessness can occur. This is also known as post-exercise insomnia.

Ways to prevent post-exercise insomnia

  • Work out no less than 3 hours before bedtime
  • Drink lots of water before, during and after exercise
  • Only consume caffeine before your exercise, not continuously throughout
  • A hot bath/shower will prepare your body for sleep
  • For a comfortable sleep cool your bedroom to between 15-20°C

What happens in your body during exercise?

  • Dehydration from sweating
  • Caffeine consumed through energy drinks/snacks
  • Increase in heart rate & core temperature
  • Suppressed melatonin production
  • Stimulated nervous & endocrine systems

How does this affect your sleep?

  • It’s difficult to lower your core temperature when you’re dehydrated from endurance exercises. Dehydration also raises your heart rate, meaning no sleep for you!
  • During exercise, we produce the stress hormones cortisol and norepinephrine. Put simply, the body stays hyped even after the race is over!
  • Cortisol also stops the production of melatonin, a.k.a. the sleep hormone. Bright lights at the gym will inhibit melatonin production, too.

Deep sleep

During sleep, we pass through various stages, all of which play a role to restoration. Stages 3 and 4 of non-REM sleep, also known as ‘deep sleep’, are the most important for muscle recovery.

Ideal sleep time

8-10 hours

Anything longer can reset your body clock and damage your sleep cycle the following night. Anything shorter may not give adequate time for your body to fully recover from the stress of training.

What happens during deep sleep?

  • Blood pressure drops
  • Breathing becomes deeper and slower
  • Blood not used in your resting brain is sent to muscles
  • Muscles receive extra oxygen & nutrients which helps with healing and growth
  • Pituitary gland releases human growth hormone, causing tissue growth & muscle repair
  • New cells are regenerated & muscle tissue is replenished

More exercise = more sleep required

Physical activity puts stress on the muscles and nervous system. This is rebuilt during sleep.

When it’s most important

  • Strength or weight training
  • Periods of extra training leading up to an event
  • Endurance tests like marathons

Why it’s most important

Repair

During strenuous workouts, muscles build up microscopic tears. Sleep helps to heal those tears as your body produces larger molecules to repair muscular, immune and nervous system problems.

Growth

The body needs to synthesise proteins faster than it breaks them down to build up muscles. Sleep is the best time for the body to use absorbed nutrients for this protein synthesis as it’s the longest we go without eating.

Did you know?

Building muscle mass is also known as hypertrophy

Make the most of your training with a great night’s sleep – the results should follow!

The post Working out might be a waste of time if you don’t get your sleep right appeared first on Sleep Junkies.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview