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Episode 35: Sleeping Pills

What are the common sleeping pills used for insomnia? When should they be used and what should you look out for when using sleeping pills? We address these questions and more with the help of Prof Wallace Mendelsen who also discusses the history of using substances to help with sleep, which puts current practice in perspective.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline / Chapters:
  • 00:00 – 02:29 Introduction
  • 02:29 – 31:03 Theme – Sleeping Pills
  • 31:03 – 32:33 Clinical tip
  • 32:33 – 35:33 Pick of the month
  • 35:33 – 36:45 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: Napping

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Prof Wallace Mendelson has more than forty years of experience in sleep research and clinical care. He is retired professor of psychiatry and clinical pharmacology and former director of the Sleep Research Laboratory at the University of Chicago, and former president of the Sleep Research Society. Among his honors is the William C. Dement Academic Achievement Award from the American Sleep Disorders Association/American Academy of Sleep Medicine as well as a Special Award in Sleep and Psychiatry from the National Sleep Foundation, and he is a distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Mendelson has authored or co-authored four books related to sleep, co-edited another, and published over 190 peer-reviewed papers on various aspects of sleep research. His website, describing his interests, a blog devoted to literature, as well as a downloadable curriculum vitae, can be found here.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

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The post Sleep Talk: Episode 35 – Sleeping Pills appeared first on SleepHub.

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Episode 34: Measuring Sleepiness

How is sleepiness measured? Can sleepiness from different causes be differentiated? What new tools are being developed? These are questions that come up in clinical practice every day and are important when putting together treatment plans for people with symptoms of hypersomnolence (sleepiness) or hypersomnia disorders. We address these questions and more with the help of Assistant Prof David Plante from University of Wisconsin.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 – 02:11 Introduction
  • 02:11 – 19:11 Theme – Measuring Sleepiness
    • 02:11 – 04:13 Introduction
    • 04:13 – 16:51 Interview – A Prof David Plante – measuring sleepiness
    • 16:51 – 19:11 Discussion
  • 19:11 – 21:44 Clinical tip: Acknowledge uncertainty
  • 21:44 – 25:05 Pick of the month:
    • 2144 – 23:54 Moira – Social jetlag in Australian adults
    • 23:54 – 25:05  David – Dopesick – Book
  • 25:05 – 26:27 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: Sleeping pills

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Assistant Prof David Plante is the Medical Director of Wisconsin Sleep  and Professor of Psychiatry at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Dr. Plante is a clinician-scientist with a broad background in sleep and psychiatric research that has shaped his translational perspectives on biomedical investigation.  Dr. Plante completed his clinical sleep medicine fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, followed by a dedicated research year sponsored by a physician-scientist training award from the American Sleep Medicine Foundation (ASMF), under the mentorship of Dr. John Winkelman.  Since commencing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2010, Dr. Plante has continued to conduct translational research at the sleep-psychiatry interface.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

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The post Sleep Talk: Episode 34 – Measuring Sleepiness appeared first on SleepHub.

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Binge drinking or using illicit drugs can have a significant impact on your sleep.

Binge drinking can have significant effects on sleep long after alcohol is out of your system. Similarly, many illicit drugs can impact sleep long after their other effects have worn off. The effects of binge drinking and illicit drug use, can be the start of sleep problems for many people I see in my practice. Despite no longer binge drinking or using drugs, they have ongoing symptoms of disturbed sleep and insomnia. For others, the sleep disturbance that occurs can result in ongoing use of alcohol or drugs to prevent the withdrawal insomnia that occurs after a binge or drug use.

How does binge drinking effect sleep?

Binge drinking, or drinking alcohol in excess with the aim of becoming intoxicated, has significant short and long term health effects. With regards to sleep, recent studies have shown that binge drinking can result in a substantial reduction in the normal ability to either fall asleep or gain the restorative benefits that normally come from sleep.

A study published in 2013 looking at just over 14,000 young adults showed that binge drinking was associated with disturbed sleep even when correcting for mental health problems associated with binge drinking. A similar study in just under 5,000 older adults showed that those that indulged in binge drinking twice a week or more were 84% more likely to have sleeplessness and insomnia compared to those who did not binge drink.

The exact mechanism by which binge drinking impacts on sleep is not clear, but appears to involve disturbing brain mechanisms involved in sleep regulation. Melatonin, a hormone important in regulating the sleep-wake cycle can be suppressed by binge drinking. In a 3 day experiment, it was shown that binge drinking leads to reversal of the usual sleep-wake cycle on the second day after a binge, with rats not being able to sleep during the day (when they normally sleep), but wanting to sleep at night (when they are normally awake). Other research has shown that binge drinking increases adenosine levels. This can result in people falling asleep earlier, but then waking during the night and having trouble returning to sleep.

What effects do illicit drugs have on sleep?

Illicit drugs such as marijuana, methamphetamine (ice) and MDMA (ecstasy) are commonly used together with alcohol in binge drinkers. They can have their own effects on sleep. Illicit drugs can be grouped in to 2 main groups with regards to their effects on sleep:

  1. Stimulants (cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy) – These drugs all stimulate the sympathetic nervous system and increase wake-promoting neurotransmitters. In the short-term they can prevent sleep, keeping people awake for hours and even days at a time. But, in the longer-term and once the drug wears off, people often feel even more tired, sleepy and depressed than usual.
  2. Sedative (marijuana) – In the short-term, marijuana can help induce sleep. However, the problems come when people stop marijuana use as there is often then a withdrawal effect with rebound insomnia and poor sleep.
What can be done?

If you or people you know have been binge drinking or using illicit drugs and not sleeping well, it is important to seek help from their health professional.  There are many things that can be done to help with drinking, drug use and sleep such as changing behaviour and thinking around alcohol, drugs and sleep and modifying other lifestyle factors.  Implementing these strategies, together with more advanced strategies such as cognitive behavioural therapy, takes away the need for relying on alcohol or drugs as sleep aids.

In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) has published guidelines on safe drinking levels for adults. The recommendations are that for healthy men and women, drinking no more than 4 standard drinks on a single occasion reduces the risk of alcohol-related injury arising from that occasion. The NHMRC also recommends no more than 2 standard drinks per day to reduce the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury. A standard drink is defined as 10 grams of alcohol, which is 200ml of standard strength beer (5% alcohol), 80ml of wine (12% alcohol) or 25ml of spirits (40% alcohol).

For people who find they are already reliant on alcohol or drugs to help with sleep there is good research showing that working with health professionals experienced in the management of alcoholism or drug dependence can successfully get people off alcohol or drugs. If you or someone you know needs help with alcoholism or drug dependence there are good services available such as the ones listed below:

Related posts & links:
Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

The post Planning a big night out? Consider the impact on your sleep. appeared first on SleepHub.

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As you usher in the new year and set goals, it’s important to make sleep a priority.

Getting enough sleep and ensuring good quality sleep is a key to maintaining good physical and mental health. So before committing to getting up early for the gym each day, or starting your next diet, make sure sleep figures in your plans for the coming year. This time of the year, many of us are making new year’s resolutions. What do we plan to give up that we indulged in too often? What are we going to take up that we wished we had made time for this year? As we make these plans, it’s important to make sleep a priority rather than something that can be traded off, to make space in our schedule for other activities.

Not getting enough sleep has risks

Recommendations from professional groups including the American Academy of Sleep Medicine are that adults of working age should get at least 7 hours sleep each night. (see – How much sleep do I need?) These recommendations are based on research showing that people who average less than 7 hours sleep per night are at increased risk of problems, such as high blood pressure, depression and anxiety. This occurs even in people who don’t feel tired during the day.

It’s important to understand the difference between not getting enough sleep from being too busy or not allowing enough time for sleep, and those who allow enough time, but just can’t get to sleep or stay asleep despite their best efforts. For people with insomnia, that is, difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep, the risks of not getting enough sleep only appear to occur if they average less than 5 hours sleep per night.

Sleep quality is also important

Getting good quality sleep is just as important as getting enough sleep. Too often, I’m seeing people in my practice who haven’t been feeling well for years, and have been suffering from a sleep disorder such as sleep apnea or other medical disorders that can impact on sleep. They’ve been following a healthy lifestyle and getting enough sleep, but just not been feeling right. If this is you, see your health professional so that they can look for medical disorders and consider getting an opinion from a sleep specialist about whether you may have a sleep disorder.

About to set your alarm to get up early to go to the gym? Think again.

Both sleep and exercise are important for maintaining physical and mental health.  However, often people can prioritise one over the other and lead to situations where they are sacrificing sleep for exercise.  What is the right balance and how do we make sure that we do not overly focus on one of these to the detriment of the other and impact on our health and wellbeing?

Anna Almendrala wrote a great post in The Huffington Post discussing current research on sleep vs exercise. I agree with her summary of the current state of the literature. Surprisingly, there is little data to guide us.  There are certainly lots of individual studies on sleep or exercise showing the benefits for health with either more sleep or more exercise and detriments to health when we miss out on either sleep or exercise.  However, there is not good data showing what happens when we trade one off for the other. Like all things it makes sense to keep things in balance.  Ensuring reasonable amounts of sleep as well as reasonable amounts of physical activity rather than overly prioritising either of these.

From a sleep point of view, some exercise is good, more is not necessarily better and morning exercise is preferable to evening exercise. So if the only time you have to exercise is in the evening, go for it. Whilst evening exercise can lead to activation of the sympathetic nervous system making it hard to switch off or wind down, it’s still better than not exercising at all.

So what should my sleep goals for the new year be?
  1. Make sleep a priority – The key to sleeping well is to make sleep a priority, rather than trading off sleep to do more of other things, be that exercise, diet, personal development or work.
  2. Ensure adequate opportunity for sleep – Aim for at least 7 hours sleep per night. This means allowing around 8 hours in bed, with some time for winding down before getting in to bed.
  3. Do something about poor quality sleep – If you feel that you’re not sleeping well, or still feeling tired despite getting at least 7 hours sleep per night, or not able to sleep, do something about it. Talk to your health professional and consider seeing a sleep specialist.
  4. See sleep as only one part of health and wellness – To feel our best we need to have balance and not be overly focussed on only one aspect of health. To often I see people who are very focussed on one aspect of health such as exercise or nutrition or sleep, but not paying enough attention to other areas.

The Sleep Wellness Quiz has been developed to help prioritise your goals to improve your sleep and health. Take the quiz and use the results to help set your sleep goals for the new year. Let us know how you go.

Related links: Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created the SleepHub site and online community.

Check the SleepHub FAQs or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep. Click through to the Quiz.

The post Make Sleep a Priority This New Year appeared first on SleepHub.

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Episode 33: Sleep in Depression

What changes in sleep are seen in depression? Is the sleepiness seen in people with depression different from other forms of sleepiness? What can be done to improve sleep disturbance and sleepiness in depression? We address these questions and more with the help of Assistant Prof David Plante from University of Wisconsin and Associate Prof Sean Cain from Monash University.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 – 02:50 Introduction
  • 02:50 -32:40 Theme – Sleep in Depression
    • 02:50 – 04:31 Introduction
    • 04:31 – 18:27 Interview – A Prof David Plante – sleep in depression
    • 18:27 – 19:27 Discussion
    • 19:27 – 29:50 Interview – A Prof Sean Cain – anti-depressants, light and circadian rhythm in depression
    • 29:50 – 32:40 Summary and where to find more information
  • 32:40 – 33:11 Clinical tip: Don’t under-estimate the role of anxiety
  • 33:11 – 35:51 Pick of the month:
    • 33:11 – 34:02 Moira – Sleep deprivation and depression in adolescents
    • 34:02 – 35:51  David – Bipolar mood and lunar cycles
  • 35:51 – 37:15 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: Measuring Sleepiness

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Associate Prof Sean Cain has many years of experience in the field of sleep and circadian rhythms research in both animal and human models. Dr Cain is currently the president of the Australasian Chronobiology Society. He has trained in the conduct of human circadian rhythms and sleep research at Harvard Medical School where he studied the impact of sleep and circadian misalignment on health. Dr Cain is an Associate Professor in the School of Psychological Sciences at Monash University. Sean has many years experience in the field of sleep and circadian rhythms research in both animal and human models and is the primary investigator on a number of grants. Follow Sean on Twitter at @circadian247

Assistant Prof David Plante is the Medical Director of Wisconsin Sleep  and Professor of Psychiatry at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Dr. Plante is a clinician-scientist with a broad background in sleep and psychiatric research that has shaped his translational perspectives on biomedical investigation.  Dr. Plante completed his clinical sleep medicine fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, followed by a dedicated research year sponsored by a physician-scientist training award from the American Sleep Medicine Foundation (ASMF), under the mentorship of Dr. John Winkelman.  Since commencing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2010, Dr. Plante has continued to conduct translational research at the sleep-psychiatry interface.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

SaveSave

The post Sleep Talk: Episode 33 – Sleep in Depression appeared first on SleepHub.

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Episode 32: Rhythm and Blues

What really is the relationship between light, the circadian rhythm and mood? How might modern anti-depressants alter that relationship? We address these questions and more with the help of Associate Prof Sean Cain from Monash University.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 – 04:48 Introduction
  • 04:48 -33:07 Theme – Rhythm and Blues
    • 04:48 – 25:13 Interview – A Prof Sean Cain – Light, sleep and mood
    • 25:13 – 30:03 Discussion and where to find more information
  • 30:03 – 30:57 Clinical tip: Beware SSRIs in eveningness-types
  • 30:57 – 36:51 Pick of the month:
    • 30:57 – 32:17 Moira – Melatonin for delayed phase
    • 32:17 – 34:16 David – The Science of Sleep – Wallace Mendelson
    • 34:16 – 36:51 Sean – Magnetoreception in birds
  • 36:51 – 38:02 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: Sleep in depression

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Assoc Prof Sean Cain has many years of experience in the field of sleep and circadian rhythms research in both animal and human models. Dr Cain is currently the president of the Australasian Chronobiology Society. He has trained in the conduct of human circadian rhythms and sleep research at Harvard Medical School where he studied the impact of sleep and circadian misalignment on health. Dr Cain is an Associate Professor in the School of Psychological Sciences at Monash University. Sean has many years experience in the field of sleep and circadian rhythms research in both animal and human models and is the primary investigator on a number of grants. Follow Sean on Twitter at @circadian247

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

SaveSave

The post Sleep Talk: Episode 32- Rhythm and Blues appeared first on SleepHub.

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Sleep DownUnder 2018 – meeting highlights

Highlights from the Sleep Down Under 2018 meeting in Brisbane. Topics highlighted are narcolepsy, insomnia, sleep health, obstructive sleep apnea and the effects of caffeine on sleep.

For our monthly in-depth podcast Sleep Talk, go to SleepHub.com.ausubscribe via iTunes or your favourite podcast app, or download the Sleep Talk app from the iOS app store.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 – 01:30 Caffeine and sleep
  • 01:30 – 03:26 Narcolepsy
  • 03:26 – 06:29 Insomnia
  • 06:29 – 08:39 Sleep health
  • 08:39 – 10:12 Obstructive sleep apnea
  • 10:12 – 11:02 Subscribe to Sleep Talk podcast and attend Sleep DownUnder 2019
Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenter:

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or other podcast episodes.

SaveSave

SaveSave

The post Sleep Talk: Sleep DownUnder 2018 – meeting highlights appeared first on SleepHub.

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Episode 31: Sleep 2018

Interested in the latest research on sleep discussed by world experts? Check out this update from the Sleep 2018 meeting in Baltimore. With the help of Dr Simon Frenkel (Sleep Physician), we discuss the latest in sleep research, new sleep products and thinking in the management of sleep disorders.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 – 01:50 Introduction
  • 01:50 – 03:59 What’s news in sleep?
    • Sleeping Beauty diet
    • Magpies netball and sleep
  • 03:59 – 25:07 Theme – Sleep 2018
    • 03:59 – 06:20 Introduction
    • 06:20 – 17:10 Sleep loss
    • 17:10 -21:40 Insomnia
    • 21:40 – 24:10 Sleep technology
    • 24:10 – 25:07 More information on Sleep 2018 meeting
  • 25:07 – 26:55 Clinical tip: Shift circadian rhythms faster
  • 26:55 – 28:55 Pick of the month:
    • 26:55 – 27:26 David – Update on narcolepsy treatments – Julie Flygare
    • 27:26 – 28:55 Simon – Guidelines for treatment of nightmares
  • 28:55 – 30:28 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: Rhythm and Blues

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Dr Simon Frenkel is a Respiratory and Sleep Disorders Physician with more than 10 years experience. In addition to working at the Western Hospital in Melbourne, he is one of the Directors at Lung and Sleep Victoria where he consults in Respiratory and Sleep Medicine. His Sleep Medicine interests are diverse, with particular emphasis on non-respiratory sleep disorders and multidisciplinary models of care. He is actively involved in sleep education and is co-chair of the Sleep Physicians Council of the Australasian Sleep Association.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

SaveSave

The post Sleep Talk: Episode 31 – Sleep 2018 appeared first on SleepHub.

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Worried about adjusting for the start of daylight saving time?

On Sunday 7th October, in the early hours of the morning, daylight saving time begins in Australia (unless you live in QLD, WA or NT). At 2am, clocks shift forward an hour to 3am. If you are a good sleeper, you’re probably not reading this anyway, as you will generally be able to go to bed at your usual time (according to the clock), and get to sleep without a problem. However, if you have trouble sleeping, it’s important to have a plan to minimise the impact of this change on your sleep.

What problems might I run in to?

With the clock shifting forward an hour, the most common problems people run in to are:

  1. Not feeling tired at their normal bed time
  2. Trouble getting up in the morning
  3. Being anxious about what will happen with sleep

Shifting the clock forward 1 hour, is the same as shifting your entire schedule 1 hour earlier, or travelling 1 time zone to the east.

Going to bed

With the new time being 1 hour later, it’s likely that you won’t feel sleepy or fall asleep readily if you go to bed at the new time.  As such, don’t just go to bed at the same clock time out of habit, instead on Sunday night, aim to stay up an hour later. This has 2 effects:

  1. Helping you build up a little more sleep debt, making it easier to get to sleep and stay asleep
  2. Delaying your body clock, so that your internal clock also shifts 1 hour later

Over the next few days, as you begin to feel sleepy earlier, you can shift the time you go to bed earlier. This could be in half hour steps, or if you are more cautious go to bed 15 minutes earlier each day, and in 4 days you will have adjusted to the new time.

Most people can shift their body clock up to 2 hours later each 24 hours without much effort. We see this when we travel across time zones. Going from Melbourne to Perth, a 2 hour later shift, generally takes a only a day or two to adjust to. Interestingly people find travelling to the east or shifting their clocks earlier harder, and can generally only shift 1 hour earlier each 24 hours. So travelling from Perth back to Melbourne takes longer to adjust.

Getting up in the morning

It’s likely that you’ll want to wake later than your usual waking time, as with the time change, this will be an hour later. However, over a few days, this will shift and you’ll find yourself gradually waking earlier and earlier until your body clock adjusts to the new time.

It’s important to:

  1. Not sleep past your usual waking time. Have an alarm set for your usual waking time, so you don’t sleep past your usual time even if you have trouble getting to sleep or have a bad night
  2. Recognise that your alarm will be going off earlier than your internal clock is expecting for a few days, so you will feel more sluggish in the morning and take a bit longer to get going. You can counter-act that by getting out for a walk first thing in the morning, which will also help to push your body clock back to help adjust to daylight savings time.
Getting anxious about changes to sleep

People who have trouble with sleep can get anxious about changes to their sleep routine. They sometimes have very careful routines around sleep that they put in place to minimise the impact of day to day variations on sleep. When changes to these routines are forced upon them it can result in sleep-related anxiety.

The best way to address sleep-related anxiety, anticipating threats to sleep, is to have a plan and understand how sleep works, so that you can feel confident that although there will be some changes to sleep for a few days, it will quickly settle down and get back to normal.

What about my kids?

Children can take a few days to adjust to the changed time as well. This may mean they will be up later than usual, or have trouble settling at night for a few days. They will respond to the same measures as adults, so use the strategies above to help them shift to the new time with minimal fuss and impact on their or the family’s sleep.

Related links: Need more information on how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

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The post How do I adjust for the start of daylight saving time? appeared first on SleepHub.

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Episode 30: Traumatic Brain Injury

Sleep problems are very common in people with traumatic brain injury and not just after severe injuries. Recent research from Monash University has looked in to mechanisms via which sleep problems may occur after head injuries and strategies that can be used to improve symptoms. In this episode Moira and David talk with Dr Natalie Grima, Clinical Neuropsychologist, about her experience working with people with traumatic brain injury and sleep problems.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

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Audio Timeline:

  • 00:00 – 01:03 Introduction
  • 01:03 – 04:19 What’s news in sleep?
    • Sleep Down Under planning
    • Golden Door – Guest speaker program on sleep
  • 04:19 -33:07 Theme – Sleep in Traumatic Brain Injury
    • 04:19 – 06:41 Introduction
    • 06:41 -27:43 Interview – Dr Natalie Grima
    • 27:43 – 28:02 More information in sleep in traumatic brain injury
  • 28:02 – 29:19 Clinical tip: Working with people with traumatic brain injury
  • 29:19 -39:20 Pick of the month:
    • 29:19 – 31:10 David – Evening types, SSRIs and light sensitivity
    • 31:10- 33:20 Moira – Sleep schedules and school performance in indigenous children
    • 33:20 – 36:16 Natalie – Beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain after sleep deprivation
  • 36:16 – 37:42 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: Sleep 2018 meeting

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters: Guest interviews:

Dr. Natalie Grima is a registered Clinical Neuropsychologist, having completed her Doctorate at Monash University.  After completing her doctorate, she completed a two-year world renowned post-doctoral fellowship in Neuropsychology at Harvard Medical School. Since returning from the U.S., Dr. Grima continues to practice as a neuropsychologist within public hospitals in Melbourne. Her research interests span from investigating the impact of diet on cognition to identifying and elucidating the pathophysiological changes in sleep following traumatic brain injury. She is interested in developing evidence-based practices to assist with cognitive and sleep difficulties following acquired brain injuries and in individuals with neurodegenerativeconditions.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

SaveSave

The post Sleep Talk: Episode 30 – Traumatic Brain Injury appeared first on SleepHub.

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