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SleepHub by Dr David Cunnington - 3d ago
Episode 27: Hyperarousal

Having trouble with sleep is not just about what you do at night. How you think and behave during the day impacts on sleep and can result in the brain being over stimulated or hyperaroused at night. In this episode Moira and David discuss how the brain works in insomnia, and talk with Professor Dieter Riemann from University of Freiburg about hyperarousal. What is it? How does it impact on sleep, and what can be done about it?

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 –  00:49 Introduction
  • 00:49 – 02:18 What’s news in sleep?
    • Getting back up to ‘work speed’
  • 02:18 – 41:23 Theme – Hyperarousal
    • 02:18 – 03:40 What is hyperarousal?
    • 03:40 – 13:01 Prof Dieter Riemann – Recognising and treating hyperarousal
    • 13:01 – 19:09 Hyperarousal, regional sleep and the Ebb Sleep device
    • 19:09 – 22:40 Ebb Sleep device for insomnia
    • 22:40 – 23:30 Take home messages around hyperarousal
  • 23:30 – 25:40 Clinical tip: Pay attention to arousal levels across the day
  • 25:40 – 41:29 Pick of the month:
    • 25:40 – 27:00 David – Thrive
    • 27:00 – 28:02 Moira – Smiling Mind app
  • 28:02 – 29:26 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: March – Sleep and Cancer (Part 1) 

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Professor Dieter Riemann is the Head of Department for Clinical Psychology and Psychophysiology at University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany. Dieter is the Editor in Chief of the Journal of Sleep Research and very widely published with over 400 peer-reviewed articles. Prof Reimann’s research group aims to better understand the relationships between sleep, insomnia and mental disorders, especially depression. They combine expertise from psychology, psychiatry and physics to experimentally study sleep with a variety of methods in good sleepers and people suffering from mental disorders and insomnia. Besides striving to understand the pathopyhsiology/ etiology of disturbed sleep in psychiatry they hope to to improve current therapeutic avenues.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

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The post Sleep Talk: Episode 27 – Hyperarousal appeared first on SleepHub.

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How much can sleep impact on performance in sport?

In elite sport the difference between first and second is often tiny differences in physiology and performance. Major sports teams and individual athletes are waking up to the importance of sleep in optimising recovery and performance. However, as coaches and athletes place more emphasis on sleep, it can increase the pressure on sleep and make athletes anxious about getting enough sleep, creating sleep problems. Getting the balance right between recognising the importance of sleep, but not getting to anxious about sleep can be tricky.

How does sleep impact on performance in sport?

There are 2 main ways that sleep can impact on performance, both of which athletes are susceptible to:

  1. Not getting enough sleep
  2. Jet-lag, or sleeping and performing in different time zones without adequate adjustment

Each of these have been shown to both reduce peak performance, impact on the effectiveness of training and have an effect on recovery from training and injury. However, the effect of lack of sleep on performance is not as great as athletes sometimes imagine. This can lead to athletes being more affected by being worried about not sleeping than from lack of sleep itself.

I see quite a lot of athletes, both in individual and team sports who have trouble getting enough sleep. It’s not uncommon for games or events to be held in the evening to optimise the viewing audience, such as evening football games, swimming finals and many other sports. Performing at an elite level is very stimulating, and it takes hours to wind down after that degree of stimulation. Games may not finish until 11pm, so it’s not realistic to expect to be able to sleep much before 2am without taking some form of sedative. However, often recovery training sessions are set early the next morning allowing only a short window for sleep.

Research done on elite Australian swimmers showed that when swimming training was scheduled early in the morning, as is common most mornings for elite swimmers, the swimmers averaged 5.4 hours of sleep per night, compared to 7.1 hours of sleep when rest days. Exacerbating this limited opportunity for sleep is the pressure that can be placed on sleep and it’s role in recovery, which can fuel the development of sleep-related anxiety.

Travel itself can be tiring, with long days and a lot of downtime with travel and transfers, and having to sleep in a range of environments, sometimes not optimal, with a range of room-mates who may disturb each other’s sleep. In addition to this though are the effects of jet-lag or changes in time zone. This doesn’t just apply to long-haul international travel. Often travel across 2 time zones such as from East coast Australia to New Zealand or Perth can be harder to deal with. The trips aren’t long enough to allow a whole day for travel, and time for acclimatisation is often not built in as they are seen as ‘domestic’ trips. This type of travel is undertaken each week throughout the season by many Australian, US and European sports teams.

These articles from Sports Illustrated and the BBC describe some of the steps athletes and teams that have woken up to the importance of sleep now go to in the name of sleep both in the US and amongst soccer teams in Europe.

What can be done?

There are a number of steps that athletes, clubs and coaches can take to give the best chance of good sleep and ensure sufficient sleep for recovery and optimal performance.

Clubs / coaches: 

  • Ensure adequate opportunity to wind down and sleep between games or events and recovery and training sessions
  • Ensure travel routines including flights, layovers, transfers and training sessions are sleep-friendly and allow adequate time for sleep at times that are optimal for athletes body clocks
    • There are tips on managing jet lag in this post.
    • For long haul travel across many time zones consider using an app such as the Entrain app developed by the mathematics department at University of Michigan and getting some more tips from this podcast episode on jet-lag.
  • Whilst emphasising the importance of sleep, don’t put too much pressure on sleep. I’ve seen an elite cyclist whose coach told them they must sleep for at least 9 hours each night or they wouldn’t perform at their best. Very few people can sleep for that long, even if they try, so this just resulted in the cyclist getting anxious about sleep and sleeping worse.
  • Encourage napping as way of catching up on sleep
  • Arrange education on good sleep habits for athletes and team staff and encourage good sleep behaviours

Individual athletes:

  • Recognise your sleep type: good sleeper vs poor sleeper, early-bird vs night-owl.
    • If you recognise they’re you’re not a good sleeper, developing your ‘sleep skills’ by learning more about sleep through online resources such as SleepHub, seeing a sleep physician or psychologist who specialises in managing sleep problems can go a long way towards helping to better manage sleep
    • Early-birds will naturally tend to sleep better going to bed early and waking early, whereas night-owls do better sleeping later. It makes sense for early-birds to share rooms for example, rather than having an early-bird share a room with a night-owl.
  • Measure your sleep for a few weeks using a sleep diary or a device such as an activity tracker. This allows you to calculate your average sleep per night over a couple of weeks which takes in to account the variation in sleep that occurs on a night to night basis. Once you have an understanding of your average amount of sleep on a week where you feel and are performing well, that can be your individual goal which will most likely be different from the average amount of sleep for someone of your age.
  • Manage the fine balance between recognising the importance of sleep, but not getting overly anxious about sleep, or trying too hard to control sleep. I like to use the terms ‘respect’ for sleep, whilst maintaining ‘ambivalence’ about sleep. That can be a hard balance to strike.
  • Develop skills for ‘switching off’. It’s not something that comes naturally and takes practice to develop those skills. Some people like meditation, others more movement focussed activities such as yoga, pilates, walking or stretching, whereas others prefer breathing focussed relaxation strategies or even reading. Mindfulness can be a great tool for not just switching off, but also helping with sleep troubles. To hear a discussion of how mindfulness can be used around sleep, listen to this podcast episode.

We all have different sleep needs and getting a better understanding of your individual needs, then developing your sleep skills to get sleep working for you can work in your favour if your are trying to optimise your sporting performance.

Related links and posts: Need more information on how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

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The post Performance in sport. What’s the best way to manage sleep? appeared first on SleepHub.

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Episode 26: Sleep Around the World

Understanding sleep beliefs and behaviours in different cultures can help better understand your own beliefs about sleep, and in turn change your expectations around sleep. In this episode we talk to Dr Andrew Beale on sleep in two communities in Mozambique, and Dr Himanshu Garg on sleep in India including common sleep problems, sleep behaviours and traditional beliefs around sleep.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 –  00:32 Introduction
  • 00:32 – 05:00 What’s news in sleep?
    • Catch up on sleep over the holiday period
    • Qantas’ Dreamliner – designed to reduce jet-lag
    • Socio-economic aspects of sleep
  • 03:22 – 41:23 Theme – Sleep in other cultures
    • 03:22 – 05:00 Why do cultural aspects of sleep matter?
    • 05:00 – 19:50 Dr Andrew Beale – Sleep in 2 communities in Mozambique
    • 19:50 – 22:23 How do people in Australia think about sleep?
    • 22:23 – 35:30 Dr Himanshu Garg – Sleep in India
    • 35:30 – 37:46 The cultural context of sleep
  • 37:46 – 39:00 Clinical tip: What’s your perspective?
  • 39:00 – 41:29 Pick of the month:
    • 39:00 – 40:04 Moira – Sleep in Jellyfish
    • 40:04 – 41:29 David – Dreaming in the World’s Religions – Kelly Bulkeley
  • 41:29 – 42:50 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: February – Hyperarousal 

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Dr Andrew Beale is a research fellow at the University of Surrey. Andrew has a keen interest in taking basic research to improve everyday lives. As a research scientist, he has experience of both mechanistic molecular biology and broader epidemiological studies, specifically within the area of circadian rhythms and sleep. He is interested in how and why circadian rhythms are a feature of almost all organisms and how they impact our daily lives. Andrew has worked in a number of international, multi-disciplinary collaborations and have significant cross-cultural experience from research and personal perspectives. Andrew loves to share what he discovers through science communication, teaching and training.

Dr Himanshu Garg is an experienced Respiratory, Critical care & Sleep disorders Physician. He has been trained extensively in India and Australia and was entrusted with the responsibility of setting up Respiratory & Sleep Medicine service at Medanta-The Medicity one of the largest facilities in India. He is playing a pioneering role in the emergence of sleep medicine in India and the region and working towards developing training pathways and curriculum pathways in sleep medicine. He was instrumental in setting up of first sleep lab in Nepal. He is the founder of South East Asian Academy of Sleep Medicine. He is currently heading the Respiratory Critical care and Sleep Medicine service at Artemis Hospitals.He is also the Director at Respiratory and Sleep Cure Solutions, Gurgaon.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

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The post Sleep Talk: Episode 26 – Sleep Around the World appeared first on SleepHub.

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SleepHub by Dr David Cunnington - 6M ago
Episode 25: Jet Lag

Why do people get jet lag, and what can be done to reduce the effects of jet lag? In this episode, hear what Qantas is doing to help their passengers arrive fresh at their destination. With the introduction of new 787-9 Dreamliner planes and their ultra-long-haul route non-stop from Perth to London starting in March 2018, Qantas has invested heavily in strategies to reduce the effects of jet lag. You’ll also hear from the developer of the Entrain app on using the app to manage light exposure before, during and after travel to help your body acclimatise to your destination time zone.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 –  00:43 Introduction
  • 00:43 – 05:00 What’s news in sleep?
    • Don’t drink and drive when sleep deprived
    • A New Start – Making New Year’s resolutions that stick
  • 05:00 – 41:23 Theme – Jet Lag
    • 05:00 – 08:35 Why does jet lag happen?
    • 08:35 – 21:33 Dr Olivia Walch – Entrain app: managing light to adjust to new time zones
    • 21:33 – 35:29 Phil Capps – What is Qantas doing to reduce jet lag for passengers?
    • 35:29 – 41:23 Managing jet lag
  • 41:23 – 42:36 Clinical tip: Have a plan
  • 42:36 – 45:41 Pick of the month:
    • 42:36 – 43:40 Moira – Prof Steve Kay
    • 43:40 – 45:41 David – Treating Sleep Problems: A Transdiagnostic Approach – Allison Harvey and Daniel Buysse
  • 45:41 – 47:12 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: January – Sleep in other cultures 

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Dr Olivia Walch is a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Michigan. Olivia’s current work is on the mathematics of sleep and circadian rhythms, and she recently achieved her PhD in applied mathematics. Olivia develops apps and developed the mobile application Entrain, which provides mathematically optimal schedules of light and dark to travellers crossing time zones.  Olivia also draws and produces the webcomic Imogen Quest. You can find out more about Olivia’s work at her website OliviaWalch.com, or follow her on social media via Twitter or Instagram.

Phil Capps is Head of Customer Product & Service Development, Qantas. With a career spanning almost 20 years at Qantas Airways, Phil oversees a portfolio that encompasses every part of the customer journey.  In his role, Phil and his team drive customer strategy, product development as well as hold responsibility for service standards in the air and on the ground. With almost two decades of experience Phil has held  a  number of operational and strategic roles with a speciality in fleet configuration, airport and lounge design as well  rolling out new products such as the airline’s Auto Check-in and Q Streaming inflight entertainment. Qantas carries more than 50 million passengers every year and Phil and the rest of him are passionate to ensure every customer receives the best of Australian service while benefiting from the latest technology and cabin design.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

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The post Sleep Talk: Episode 25 – Jet Lag appeared first on SleepHub.

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SleepHub by Dr David Cunnington - 7M ago
Episode 24: Sleep Economics

What does economics have to do with sleep? A lot it turns out. Inadequate sleep is a major cause of ill health and loss of productivity in modern economies. A recent Australian report put that cost at 4% of gross domestic product. Economic principles can also be used to help with getting people to take up effective sleep treatments. The relatively new discipline of behavioural economics can teach us a lot about designing systems to promote healthy choices including around sleep.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 –  01:15 Introduction
  • 01:15 – 05:53 What’s news in sleep?
    • Sleep Down Under 2017 – Auckland
    • SEAASM – 3rd International Conference on Sleep Disorders
  • 05:53 – 38:55 Theme – Sleep Economics
    • 05:53 – 06:45 Background – Sleep Economics
    • 06:45 – 21:07 Prof David Hillman – Asleep on the Job –  The Cost of Inadequate Sleep in Australia
    • 16:07 – 32:40 Assoc Prof Jack Stevens – Behavioural Economics
    • 32:40 – 32:55 More information on Sleep Economics
  • 32:55 – 34:12 Clinical tip: Consult outside your own field
  • 34:12 – 43:10 Pick of the month:
    • 34:12 – 34:44 David – Nudge – Book on behavioural economics
    • 34:44 – 35:55 Moira – The Conversation Hour – Discussion on sleep
  • 35:55 – 37:11 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: December – Jet Lag 

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Prof David Hillman is head of the Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, Western Australia and director of the West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute. He is an anesthesiologist and sleep physician. His clinical and research interests are centred on respiratory and upper airway physiology and their relationship to sleep disorders and anesthesia. He has published extensively in related areas. Prof Hillman is a past president of the Australasian Sleep Association and founding chair of Australia’s Sleep Health Foundation.

Assoc Prof Jack Stevens, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University and a Clinical Psychologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. He is also an Investigator in the Center for Biobehavioral Health, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Dr. Stevens’ primary research is in the area of treatment approaches for a diverse number of pediatric conditions.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

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The post Sleep Talk: Episode 24 – Sleep Economics appeared first on SleepHub.

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Episode 23: Sleep in special needs children

Children with severe developmental disabilities or autism often have difficulty with sleep which can not only impact on their sleep, but affect the whole family. These disorders are common, with autism affecting around 2% of the population. To understand why this occurs and what can be done we talk to Assoc Prof Margot Davey from Monash Childrens’ sleep Centre and Assoc Prof Amanda Richdale from La Trobe University.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 –  01:35 Introduction
  • 01:35 – 05:35 What’s news in sleep?
    • Dr Michel Jouvet
    • Daylight Saving Time
    • World Sleep Congress 2017
    • Upcoming conferences
  • 05:35 – 38:55 Theme – Sleep in Special Needs Children
    • 05:35 – 07:41 Background – Sleep in Special Needs Children
    • 07:41 – 21:07 Assoc Prof Margot Davey – Sleep in Children With Severe Developmental Disabilities
    • 21:07 – 33:45 Assoc Prof Amanda Richdale – Sleep in Autism
    • 33:45 – 37:52 Strategies for parents of special needs children to manage their sleep
    • 37:52 – 38:55 More information on Sleep in Special Needs Children
  • 38:55 – 40:00 Clinical tip: The key to children sleeping well is parents sleeping well
  • 40:00 – 43:10 Pick of the month:
    • 40:00 – 41:37 Moira – Nobel Prize for circadian rhythm research
    • 41:37 – 43:10 David – The Paradox of Sleep – Book by Dr Michel Jouvet
  • 43:10 – 45:37 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: November – Sleep Economics 

Links mentioned in the podcast:  Presenters: Guest interviews:

Assoc Prof Margot Davey is Director of the Melbourne Children’s Sleep Centre, Monash Medical Centre. This is the only dedicated paediatric sleep unit in Victoria and Tasmania. It sees over 1000 children each year. Margot is also an adjunct senior lecturer in the Ritchie Centre, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University.  Her clinical practice is paediatric sleep medicine, and she works in public and private settings (Epworth Sleep Centre). Since 2006, Margot has been a chief investigator on four successful National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grants and an associate investigator on a fifth. She has numerous peer-reviewed publications.

Assoc Professor Amanda Richdale is a founding staff member at the Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre (OTARC). Amanda’s research interests include autism spectrum disorder, specific learning difficulties and developmental disorders, and paediatric sleep. Amanda was Chair of the former Autism Victoria Professional Panel and was co-founder of the Autism Victoria (now AMAZE) Autism Spectrum Disorder Reseach Group (2003) and the Australasian Autism Research Alliance (2005). Amanda is currently Deputy Chair of the EPIC Early Intervention Centre‘s Committee of Management and a committe member of the APS Interest Group Psychology of Intellectual Disability and Autism. Amanda is a project leader in the Autism Cooperative Research Centre.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

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The post Sleep Talk: Episode 23 – Sleep in special needs children appeared first on SleepHub.

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Episode 22: How to treat sleep apnea

Sleep apnea is common and can cause significant symptoms. But how can it be treated and how do you decide what treatment to use?  Historically treatment choices have been made based on the severity of sleep apnea. However, treatment can be more personalised by assessing airway anatomy and physiology. With the help of Prof Stuart Mackay and Dr Brad Edwards, we discuss the latest research and talk through how to treat sleep apnea.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 – 00:56  Introduction
  • 00:56 – 08:48 What’s news in sleep?
    • 00:56 – 07:15 Asleep on the Job report
    • 07:15 – 08:48 Sleep and Golden Door Health Retreat
  • 08:48 – 43:50 Theme – How to treat sleep apnea?
    • 08:48 – 09:52 Background – Why treat obstructive sleep apnea?
    • 09:52 – 13:11 Background – What are the options?
      • 09:52 – 10:40 What doesn’t work?
      • 10:40 – 14:22 Lifestyle factors
      • 14:22 – 17:15 Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)
      • 17:15 – 19:30 Oral appliances
      • 19:30 – 22:53 Surgery – Prof Stuart Mackay
    • 22:53 – 24:07 Choosing sleep apnea treatment based on severity
    • 24:07 – 28:40 Assessing the anatomy to determine treatment – Prof Stuart Mackay
    • 28:40 – 41:03 – Using physiology to determine treatment – Dr Brad Edwards
    • 41:03 – 43:15 Incorporating personal preference in to treatment choices
    • 43:15 –  43:50 More information on how to treat sleep apnea
  • 43:50 – 34:00 Pick of the month:
    • 43:50 – 45:56 David – Using architecture, design and materials to make a bedroom sanctuary
    • 45:56 – 47:48 Moira – Blue light and effect on sleep in athletes
  • 47:48 – 49:49 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: Oct 2nd – Sleep in special needs children 

Links mentioned in the podcast: Presenters: Guest interviews:

Prof Stuart Mackay completed his medical degree at the University of NSW in 1998, graduating with honours. His Fellowship in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery was completed in 2006. In 2007 he completed a Fellowship in Airway Reconstruction Surgery for Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea. In 2008 Prof MacKay started the Illawarra Multidisciplinary Sleep Apnoea Team Meeting and acts as the Chair, holding monthly patient reviews with various other specialists and allied health staff. He also has been an invited speaker and chair of Snoring and Sleep Apnoea Panels nationally and internationally. Stuart is actively involved in teaching as both Professor and Examiner at the University of Wollongong Medical School and is a member of the Australasian Sleep Association and its clinical committee. Stuart practices in Wollongong at Illawarra ENT.

Dr Brad Edwards completed his PhD in respiratory physiology at Monash University in 2009. Following his PhD, Dr. Edwards pursued post-doctoral studies at Harvard Medical School (Boston, USA) focused on understanding the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). During his postdoctoral studies at Harvard, he assisted in the development of the technique to ‘phenotype’ the underlying causes of OSA and has also been the project leader on several studies that have tested novel therapies targeting these individual phenotypic traits as a potential treatment alternatives. Dr. Edwards has now returned to Monash University as a Senior Research Fellow where he aims to expand his team and respiratory physiology/sleep medicine research program.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

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The post Sleep Talk: Episode 22 – How to treat sleep apnea appeared first on SleepHub.

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Worried about adjusting for the start of daylight saving time?

On Sunday 1st October, in the early hours of the morning, daylight saving time begins (unless you live in QLD, WA or NT). At 2am, clocks shift forward an hour to 3am. If you are a good sleeper, you’re probably not reading this anyway, as you will generally be able to go to bed at your usual time (according to the clock), and get to sleep without a problem. However, if you have trouble sleeping, it’s important to have a plan to minimise the impact of this change on your sleep.

What problems might I run in to?

With the clock shifting forward an hour, the most common problems people run in to are:

  1. Not feeling tired at their normal bed time
  2. Trouble getting up in the morning
  3. Being anxious about what will happen with sleep

Shifting the clock forward 1 hour, is the same as shifting your entire schedule 1 hour earlier, or travelling 1 time zone to the east.

Going to bed

With the new time being 1 hour later, it’s likely that you won’t feel sleepy or fall asleep readily if you go to bed at the new time.  As such, don’t just go to bed at the same clock time out of habit, instead on Sunday night, aim to stay up an hour later. This has 2 effects:

  1. Helping you build up a little more sleep debt, making it easier to get to sleep and stay asleep
  2. Delaying your body clock, so that your internal clock also shifts 1 hour later

Over the next few days, as you begin to feel sleepy earlier, you can shift the time you go to bed earlier. This could be in half hour steps, or if you are more cautious go to bed 15 minutes earlier each day, and in 4 days you will have adjusted to the new time.

Most people can shift their body clock up to 2 hours later each 24 hours without much effort. We see this when we travel across time zones. Going from Melbourne to Perth, a 2 hour later shift, generally takes a only a day or two to adjust to. Interestingly people find travelling to the east or shifting their clocks earlier harder, and can generally only shift 1 hour earlier each 24 hours. So travelling from Perth back to Melbourne takes longer to adjust.

Getting up in the morning

It’s likely that you’ll want to wake later than your usual waking time, as with the time change, this will be an hour later. However, over a few days, this will shift and you’ll find yourself gradually waking earlier and earlier until your body clock adjusts to the new time.

It’s important to:

  1. Not sleep past your usual waking time. Have an alarm set for your usual waking time, so you don’t sleep past your usual time even if you have trouble getting to sleep or have a bad night
  2. Recognise that your alarm will be going off earlier than your internal clock is expecting for a few days, so you will feel more sluggish in the morning and take a bit longer to get going. You can counter-act that by getting out for a walk first thing in the morning, which will also help to push your body clock back to help adjust to daylight savings time.
Getting anxious about changes to sleep

People who have trouble with sleep can get anxious about changes to their sleep routine. They sometimes have very careful routines around sleep that they put in place to minimise the impact of day to day variations on sleep. When changes to these routines are forced upon them it can result in sleep-related anxiety.

The best way to address sleep-related anxiety, anticipating threats to sleep, is to have a plan and understand how sleep works, so that you can feel confident that although there will be some changes to sleep for a few days, it will quickly settle down and get back to normal.

What about my kids?

Children can take a few days to adjust to the changed time as well. This may mean they will be up later than usual, or have trouble settling at night for a few days. They will respond to the same measures as adults, so use the strategies above to help them shift to the new time with minimal fuss and impact on their or the family’s sleep.

Related links: Need more information on how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

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The post How do I adjust for the start of daylight savings time? appeared first on SleepHub.

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  • Show original
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Episode 22: How to treat sleep apnea

Sleep apnea is common and can cause significant symptoms. But how can it be treated and how do you decide what treatment to use?  Historically treatment choices have been made based on the severity of sleep apnea. However, treatment can be more personalised by assessing airway anatomy and physiology. With the help of Prof Stuart Mackay and Dr Brad Edwards, we discuss the latest research and talk through how to treat sleep apnea.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline:
  • 00:00 – 00:56  Introduction
  • 00:56 – 08:48 What’s news in sleep?
    • 00:56 – 07:15 Asleep on the Job report
    • 07:15 – 08:48 Sleep and Golden Door Health Retreat
  • 08:48 – 43:50 Theme – How to treat sleep apnea?
    • 08:48 – 09:52 Background – Why treat obstructive sleep apnea?
    • 09:52 – 13:11 Background – What are the options?
      • 09:52 – 10:40 What doesn’t work?
      • 10:40 – 14:22 Lifestyle factors
      • 14:22 – 17:15 Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)
      • 17:15 – 19:30 Oral appliances
      • 19:30 – 22:53 Surgery – Prof Stuart Mackay
    • 22:53 – 24:07 Choosing sleep apnea treatment based on severity
    • 24:07 – 28:40 Assessing the anatomy to determine treatment – Prof Stuart Mackay
    • 28:40 – 41:03 – Using physiology to determine treatment – Dr Brad Edwards
    • 41:03 – 43:15 Incorporating personal preference in to treatment choices
    • 43:15 –  43:50 More information on how to treat sleep apnea
  • 43:50 – 34:00 Pick of the month:
    • 43:50 – 45:56 David – Using architecture, design and materials to make a bedroom sanctuary
    • 45:56 – 47:48 Moira – Blue light and effect on sleep in athletes
  • 47:48 – 49:49 What’s coming up in sleep?

Next episode: Oct 2nd – Sleep in special needs children 

Links mentioned in the podcast: Presenters: Guest interviews:

Prof Stuart Mackay completed his medical degree at the University of NSW in 1998, graduating with honours. His Fellowship in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery was completed in 2006. In 2007 he completed a Fellowship in Airway Reconstruction Surgery for Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea. In 2008 Prof MacKay started the Illawarra Multidisciplinary Sleep Apnoea Team Meeting and acts as the Chair, holding monthly patient reviews with various other specialists and allied health staff. He also has been an invited speaker and chair of Snoring and Sleep Apnoea Panels nationally and internationally. Stuart is actively involved in teaching as both Professor and Examiner at the University of Wollongong Medical School and is a member of the Australasian Sleep Association and its clinical committee. Stuart practices in Wollongong at Illawarra ENT.

Dr Brad Edwards completed his PhD in respiratory physiology at Monash University in 2009. Following his PhD, Dr. Edwards pursued post-doctoral studies at Harvard Medical School (Boston, USA) focused on understanding the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). During his postdoctoral studies at Harvard, he assisted in the development of the technique to ‘phenotype’ the underlying causes of OSA and has also been the project leader on several studies that have tested novel therapies targeting these individual phenotypic traits as a potential treatment alternatives. Dr. Edwards has now returned to Monash University as a Senior Research Fellow where he aims to expand his team and respiratory physiology/sleep medicine research program.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira has consulted at Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre since 2008, and is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA). She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists wanting to learn more about sleep disorders, and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments, as well as clinical involvement with the Monash University Healthy Sleep Clinic. She is one of the clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

Dr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media, and blogs for the Huffington Post on sleep. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.

Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

The post Sleep Talk: Episode 22 – How to treat sleep apnea appeared first on SleepHub.

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SleepHub by Dr David Cunnington - 11M ago
What are the common symptoms? Who gets it?

Snoring and sleep apnea are similar in that they both occur when muscles in the tongue and upper airway relax during sleep and cause either a partial or complete blockage of the airway. When the airway slightly narrows, that’s snoring. Enough to cause vibration in the back of the airway that generates a snoring noise. Sleep apnea is when the airway gets even narrower, and either blocks completely or is narrow enough, that breathing is difficult. The brain senses this during sleep and reacts by trying to breathe harder causing brief awakenings, called arousals, from sleep.

The illustration below shows what is happening in the upper airway with sleep apnea. With the onset of sleep, the tongue falls back towards the back of the airway causing either a partial or complete obstruction.

What are common symptoms of sleep apnea?
  • Regular snoring or noisy breathing during sleep
  • Variation in breathing during sleep such as pauses or gasping
  • A sense of waking choking or gasping
  • Feeling more tired during the day than expected
  • Having trouble with concentration and memory
  • Feeling irritable or down when we wouldn’t usually expect to be
  • Needing to pass urine often during the night
  • Morning headaches on waking up
Who gets sleep apnea?

Snoring is very common, around 25%, or 1 in 4 men snore. Sleep apnea is less common than snoring, but still common overall. Around 5% of men (1 in 20) and 3% of women (1 in 33), have bad enough sleep apnea that it is causing tiredness that is having an impact on them throughout the day.

Whilst it’s true that men are more likely to have sleep apnea, and being overweight is also a risk for sleep apnea, women and people who are not overweight can also get sleep apnea. Sleep apnea can also look different in women, particularly before the menopause, when it is not always associated with loud snoring or a bed partner noticing changes in breathing. In people who are not overweight sleep apnea can occur if they have a narrow upper airway because of large tonsils or a blocked nose. People with small jaws or an overbite are also at risk of obstructive sleep apnea.

For more details on sleep apnea in women see this post.

Sleep apnea also occurs commonly together with a range of medical conditions such as:

  • Type 2 diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart failure
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Stroke
  • Depression that isn’t responding to anti-depressants
  • Kidney failure
What are the consequences of sleep apnea?

If left untreated, sleep apnea can have significant short and long term effects:

  • Increased risk of accidents at work or driving (2-7 times greater risk)
  • Feeling tired and having trouble with concentration and memory
  • Increased risk of depression (up to 5 times the risk)
  • Increased risk of stroke (3 times greater risk)
  • Increased risk of high blood pressure (double the risk)
  • Increased risk of heart attack or heart failure (double the risk)

Sleep apnea also exacerbates a range of chronic medical conditions that are associated with sleep apnea including diabetes, high blood pressure, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and depression.

If I think I have sleep apnea, what should I do?

If you have symptoms of sleep apnea or any of the medical conditions that are associated with sleep apnea, you should discuss them with your doctor. They may arrange for you to have a sleep study to determine if sleep apnea is present, and if so, how bad it is, or they may refer you to a sleep specialist.

That is one of the things I do in my day to day practice. Working with people who have symptoms and wonder if they have sleep apnea and whether it is impacting on how they feel and their health.

Related posts and links: Need more information about how you can sleep better?

At Sleephub we understand the struggle people endure with sleeping problems which is why we have created a comprehensive FAQs page with information for those seeking information about sleep disorders and potential solutions.

Check our resources or take our Sleep Wellness Quiz for a free assessment of elements that may be keeping you from a good night’s sleep.

SaveSave

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The post What is sleep apnea? appeared first on SleepHub.

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