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Arranged for the first time in 2018, performing arts showcase Performing HEL will take place on 29th of August – 1st of September 2019 in Helsinki, Finland. Performing HEL happens at the same time with Helsinki Festival – the largest arts festival in Finland.

With 5 full-length performances, 10 demos and 12 production pitches, the event will showcase the finest work from Finland right now. Performing HEL invites both Finnish and international presenters, programmers, directors and other performing arts professionals to discover a full range of Finnish performing arts, including circus, dance and theatre, also delivered in exciting yet difficult-to-define combinations.

‘On behalf of all the organisers and partners involved in the showcase I may say that we are in the midst of a very exciting time for performing arts in Finland, making it a pleasure to showcase them to international professionals in August. Selection processes are never easy, but this time the rewarding discussions we had during the multi-stage process were truly inspiring,’ explains Project Manager Riitta Aittokallio of Dance Info Finland.

The registration to the event is now open for presenters, programmers, directors

The official program of Performing HEL will start on Thursday 29.8. afternoon and end on Sunday 1.9. around 3pm. We suggest that you join us on Thursday and stay until Sunday to get the full experience! Or why not to stay in Helsinki for a little bit longer? Performing HEL is happening at the same time with Helsinki Festival so the city is full of exciting art and culture experiences.

The 2019 programme selections were made by Dance Info Finland, CircusInfo Finland, Helsinki Festival, the Finnish National Theatre, the Swedish Theatre, and Espoo City Theatre.

The programme schedule of the showcase will be published in May.

For further information, please contact:
Riitta Aittokallio, project manager, *protected email* | +358 (0)40 779 8115
Anni Leino, communications officer, *protected email* | +358 (0)40 1823 722

Programme PITCHES

Circus
Agit-Cirk: 2+2+2
Salla Hakanpää: Funis
Recovery Laboratory: 10000000% – Concerto for hoops and drums
Race Horse Company: O’DD

Dance
Johanna Nuutinen +Co: ANON – The Act of Waiting
Liisa Pentti +Co: The Body
Sari Palmgren: Lame Tamer
Dance Theatre Minimi: Life

Theatre
Espoo City Theatre: Flash, Flash
Red Nose Company: Babylon
Oblivia: Verdrängen, Verdrängen, Verdrängen
Other Spaces: Great Barrier Reef

DEMOS

Circus
Circo Aereo: Lion
Sirkum Polaris: Kulovalkea

Dance
Kinetic Orchestra: I’m Liquid
Raekallio Corp.: Recollections
Laura Pietiläinen/Michaela-The Queen of Fucking Everything: Blondes
Tero Saarinen Company: Third Practice

Theatre
Turunen Company: Medusa’s Room
Rossi Holopainen and Riikonen: Johnny Got His Gun
WAUHAUS: Sapiens – A story of the storytelling species
Wusheng Company: Trog

PERFORMANCES

Circus
Ilmatila: Atlas (Helsinki Festival programme)
Kalle Nio: The Green (Helsinki Festival programme)
Sivuhenkilöt: There’s no room for my wings (Helsinki Festival programme)

Dance
Petri Kekoni: Erratic block (Outdoor performance)
Susanna Leinonen Company: Nasty

The post Performing HEL showcase programme appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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i-Portunus is a project, selected and funded by the Creative Europe programme of the European Union. It supports short-term mobility of artists and culture professionals.

Between April and September 2019, i-Portunus will issue three Calls for Applications, providing support for 350-500 short-term (15-85 days), international mobilities of artists active in the fields of the performing or visual arts and residing in a Creative Europe country. These mobilities must have a specific and well-defined objective, such as to develop an international collaboration, to engage in a production-oriented residency or in professional development, to present work in another country or to develop projects with local communities in the destination country.

With projects like i-Portunus, the Commission will be conducting trials on how to best facilitate cross-border mobility for artists. This type of mobility will become a permanent Action under the Creative Europe programme for 2021-2027.

The deadline for the first application round is May 15th.

More information and how to apply

The post European Commission’s new i-Portunus mobility grant for artists appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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Arranged for the first time in 2018, performing arts showcase Performing HEL will take place on 29th of August – 1st of September 2019 in Helsinki, Finland. Performing HEL happens at the same time with Helsinki Festival – the largest arts festival in Finland.

With performances, demos and production pitches, the event will showcase the finest work from Finland right now. Performing HEL invites both Finnish and international presenters, programmers, directors and other performing arts professionals to discover a full range of Finnish performing arts, including circus, dance and theatre, also delivered in exciting yet difficult-to-define combinations.

The registration of the event is now open for presenters, programmers, directors

The program of the showcase will be published on this website by the end of April 2019.

The official program of Performing HEL will start on Thursday 29.8. afternoon and end on Sunday 1.9. around 3pm. We suggest that you join us on Thursday and stay until Sunday to get the full experience! Or why not to stay in Helsinki for a little bit longer? Performing HEL is happening at the same time with Helsinki Festival so the city is full of exciting art and culture experiences.

In 2019 the showcase is organised by CircusInfo Finland and Dance Info Finland in cooperation with Helsinki Festival, the Finnish National Theatre, Svenska Teatern (the main Swedish-language theatre in Helsinki), Espoo City Theatre and Theatre Info Finland TINFO.

For further information, please contact Project Manager Riitta Aittokallio, *protected email*, +358 40 779 8115

The post Performing HEL Showcase 29th August – 1st September 2019 appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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The “salon” room at Circusinfo Finland’s office can be rented for meetings, seminars, lectures and other similar events. Seating is available for 12-20 persons, depending on the arrangement of the chairs and tables, which can be arranged e.g. in a U-shape, a classroom formation or moved away altogether.

The space is available on weekdays between 9 am – 6 pm. A video projector is available for use on request and the image can be projected either on the wall or on a projection screen. The office’s kitchen can also be used to make coffee and tea.

The price for Circusinfo’s member societies is 100 € per day and 50 € for half a day (under 4 hours), for non-members 200 € per day.

Inquiries and reservations: managing director Lotta Vaulo, *protected email* or by phone 050 386 6971.

The post Space for rent at Circusinfo Finland appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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Report starting point

CircusInfo Finland and The Finnish Youth Circus Association surveyed the number and job titles of professionals working in the field of circus. The survey spanned the year 2017. Data was collected from the largest employers in the field, from vocational institutions and youth circuses, and by inviting individuals working in the field to answer a questionnaire.

CircusInfo Finland conducted the survey in 2018. The Finnish Youth Circus Association conducted an employee survey among its member organizations. Arts Promotion Centre Finland provided help and expertise at different stages.

There are no compiled statistics of professionals working in the circus sector in Finland. Statistics produced by Statistics Finland do not differentiate between circus professionals and professionals in other cultural fields. Arts Promotion Centre Finland does compile statistics of grant applicants by cultural field. Since only part of professionals working in the circus sector apply for grants, the grant applications received by Arts Promotion Centre Finland do not give a truthful and comprehensive view of the employment status or jobs titles of circus professionals.

The circus sector has grown, changed and become more versatile over the past ten years. Circus has grown both in relevance and numbers, be it as part of performing arts, basic arts education or the physical and artistic leisure time activities of Finns. The survey aimed to update data on the number of professionals working in the field and to form a picture of the circus sector as employer in Finland in 2017.

Circus sector employers in Finland

The survey gathered data on circus as job creator from the largest employers in the field: youth circuses, educational institutions that offer a degree in circus arts, circus companies that receive government subsidies and the Cirko – Center for New Circus, Dance Theatre Hurjaruuth, traditional circuses, CircusInfo Finland and The Finnish Youth Circus Association.

The circus sector employers surveyed offered a total of 1243 employment contracts in 2017. A total of 99 employees (8% of contracts) were full-time. Of the full-time employees, 69 worked in one of 17 youth circuses 3 worked in one of the two educational institutions that offer a degree in circus arts, 6 in either Cirko – Center for New Circus or one of three circus companies, 8 in Dance Theatre Hurjaruuth, 9 in one of two traditional circuses, and 4 in two different circus organizations.

Part-time, fixed-term or atypical employment contracts accounted for 92% of all contracts (1144 employment contracts in all). Of the part-time, fixed-term, or short-term employees, 566 worked in one of the 43 youth circuses surveyed, 326 in Cirko – Center for New Circus or in one of the ten circus companies surveyed, 103 with Dance Theatre Hurjaruuth, 85 in one of the two traditional circuses, 29 in one of the two educational institutions and 35 in one of the two circus organizations.


The number of contracts does not reflect the number of professionals employed in the field of circus, since the data does not account for overlaps. Individuals surveyed may have worked in multiple organizations over the course of twelve months while both performing and teaching. The data does, however, help form an indicative picture of the volume of circus as employer in Finland.  A closer look at the number of individuals with a degree in circus and data gathered from professionals surveyed complements the picture.

Professionals with vocational education and training

The survey on individuals with vocational education and training in circus arts identified 318 Finns or foreign nationals working in Finland in 2017 who had received vocational education in the field. A total of 264 individuals had graduated from either Salpaus Further Education or the Arts Academy of Turku University of Applied Sciences (and their predecessors) between 1994 and 2017. In addition, four professionals had studied in Finland without earning a degree, and 93 had received vocational training abroad, 43 of whom had also studied in Finland.

Two Arts Council of Finland reports, by Merja Heikkinen in 1999 and Riikka Åstrand in 2010, have touched upon the number of professionals working in the field of circus in Finland. Heikkinen surveyed the 134 members of artist organizations in 1998. Åstrand’s survey, conducted in 2008, covered 205 individuals who had either gained a degree in or were currently studying circus arts. Our 2017 survey identified 318 individuals with vocational education and training in circus arts and/or pedagogy, a gain of 100 in ten years. Self-education is one way to enter the field. Furthermore, individuals with an education outside the circus sector may work in administrative and production jobs or in pedagogy. A survey targeted at professionals aimed to expand the overall picture.

Survey on jobs in the circus sector

CircusInfo Finland and The Finnish Youth Circus Association conducted a survey targeting professionals working in the circus sector in Finland and Finns working in the field abroad in 2017. The survey included all job titles in the field and could be taken anonymously either in Finnish or English. A total of 663 individuals were surveyed, and 244 responded (37% response rate). Only 220 respondents were trained professionals or people employed in the circus sector. A breakdown of the respondents’ answers:

The average age of respondents was 37 years. The largest age bracket was 30-39 years (45% of respondents), followed by 20-29 years (25%).

A majority of respondents lived in the Helsinki metropolitan area; 9.5% of respondents lived abroad.

A majority (65%) had worked in the field for less than ten years, and 35% more than ten years. There was a significant overrepresentation of women in the less than ten years in the field cohort compared to the 10+ years cohort.

192 out of the 220 professionals worked in artistic or pedagogic jobs. 133 had vocational education and training, and 31% (59 individuals) worked in the field without having earned a degree in circus arts. Three out of four professionals without a degree in circus had a vocational degree from another field of study. 45% of respondents had self-learned and 39% had received on-the-job training. 35% of respondents had a background in youth circus.

Circus is a polymorphous field and jobs within the field reflect this versatility and diversity. Respondents named a total of 85 different job titles. The most cited were circus artist, teacher, performer, air acrobat, producer, magician, director, circus teacher and circus director. Circa half of job titles cited in the responses were performance-related. In addition to the aforementioned, titles included base, hair hanger, interprète, foot juggler, juggler, clown, flier, tightwire dancer, magician, and hoop dancer. Titles related to teaching and applied use of circus were cited 69 times (23%) and five times, respectively. The titles of artistic or circus director were cited eight times. Administrative and production work related titles were cited 32 times, and titles related to other arts were mentioned 16 times (i.a. choreographer, set designer, music and sound editor, actor, costume designer, composer, dance artist and teacher, light designer).

Employment and income

A third of respondents cited artistic work in circus as their primary source of income, and 28% cited teaching circus. Administrative and production work provided an income for 11% of respondents. A total of 161 respondents (73%) named work in the circus sector as their primary source of income. Social benefits and work outside the field provided the primary income for 58 respondents. In other words, the circus sector was not the primary source of income for a quarter of respondents. (Figure 5)

Grouping responses by jobs and years worked in the field shows how jobs in the sector are divided between individuals at different stages. (Figure 6)

Artistic work, teaching and administrative and production work, social benefits and work outside the field as the primary source of income were divided quite equally and proportionally between different brackets. In the top two brackets (i.e. more than 16 years in the field), artistic work was the primary source of income for more than half of respondents. Of all respondents, 28% cited teaching as their primary source of income, but a closer look between brackets reveals that teaching diminishes in importance as the years progress. Social benefits are more prominent as the primary source of income for those with less than ten years of experience than those with more than ten years in the field. 30 % of the recently graduated (with 0 -2 years of experience) cited social benefits as their primary source of income, a figure that diminishes as work experience accumulates. (Figure 6)

As employment and the nature of jobs available in the field may vary greatly from month to month, the survey asked respondents about their employment situation with a multiple-choice question. A majority of respondents (62%) said they had worked freelance. A majority of employment contracts (57%) were fixed-term. A quarter of respondents were permanent employees, most often working as teachers or in administrative and production jobs in youth circuses or circus organizations. (Figure 7)

The responses are in line with data provided by employers. Permanent employment in the field is associated with jobs in teaching and administration. Artistic work is almost exclusively fixed-term. Both the responses to the survey and data provided by employers highlighted the prominence of atypical employment contracts in the field. Close to half of respondents said they also worked jobs outside the field. A third had been unemployed.

Close to 50% of respondents reported having worked without pay. Unpaid work included technique rehearsals, rehearsing for a new project or production, and creative and artistic work. Administrative and production jobs could include doing unpaid work. Some of hauling, rigging, and service and maintenance related work was done without pay. Some of the unpaid work was voluntary or communal work, or work done in a position of responsibility.

The survey also highlighted how grants do not cover all work. Funds available often cover no more than performers’ salaries, and all other production related work is done without pay.

”Most (70-80%) of artistic work is unpaid work, and that is what it is for the most part. The salary is in the performance, grants cover but a small portion of work done. Also, much (30-50%) of administrative and production work is done without pay.”

”In theory, all circus artists do a certain amount of unpaid work, since you seldom get paid for rehearsing or upkeep even though it is part of the job. Office work is almost always done without pay. I do consider it work. It is certainly not leisure time…”

Job opportunities and working abroad

Organizations and associations along with circus companies and youth circuses were the most often cited job opportunity providers. They accounted for 50% of the responses to the multiple-choice question. Private sector gigs and odd jobs accounted for 17% of responses to the question.

Typically, circus organizations are independent arts sector organizations, companies and youth circuses. Their impact as job creators became evident in the question about job opportunity providers. Of the 453 responses to the multiple-choice question, 50% cited organizations and associations, circus companies or youth circuses. Performing at company parties and corporate events is an important source of income. Private sector gigs and odd jobs were cited as the most important job opportunity in 80 responses (17%).

A mere 39 responses cited arts institutions as important job opportunity providers. Currently, no facility in the circus sector is entitled to a statutory government transfer. Circus artists make guest appearances in theatrical productions, but theatres and other art facilities were marginal employers of circus professionals in 2017. Traditional circus was the number one employer in eight cases (4% of respondents). (Figure 8)

The survey revealed how a substantial part of job opportunities are jobs outside Finland. Half of respondents said they had worked abroad in 2017. Half of those who had worked abroad had worked for a foreign employer and the other half for a Finnish employer. For 11% of respondents, almost all jobs in 2017 had been outside Finland. (Figure 9.) 11% of respondents reported living abroad.

> Download this report (pdf)
> Read the full-lenght report in Finnish.

For inquiries, please contact:
CircusInfo Finland, Johanna Mäkelä, *protected email*

The post Report on circus professionals and employment in Finland 2017 appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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Circusinfo Finland has awarded its annual Sirkuksen Lumo Prize to Mira Ravald and Luis Sartori Do Vale’s show Portmanteau. The award was announced 11th March 2019 at the Thalia Gala, which is an annual event held by the circus, dance and theatre organizations of Finland.

Portmanteau is a multidisciplinary show which includes tightrope dancing, juggling, dance, live music and visual & light art. In their statement the jury considers Portmanteau to be artistically ambitious, stylish and well-polished piece of work that successfully combines different forms of art. Highly talented artists have created a piece that is appealing, warmhearted, innovative, charming and honest, and in which the stage work is skillful and even hypnotic at best. All the different elements, including music and light design, come together in a balanced performance that requires input from every member of the working group.

Portmanteau premiered at Flow Circus in Oulu, Finland 2-4 February 2018. After that it has been performed several times, including at Festival UP! in Belgium, March 2018, at Cirko – Center for New Circus in Helsinki, September 2018 and at Circus Ruska Festival in Tampere, Finland in February 2019. Next the show tours to Annemasse, France, where it can be seen at the Château Rouge, 22-23 March.

The Sirkuksen Lumo Prize is awarded by Circusinfo Finland as an acknowledgement for work done to promote Finnish circus art. It can be granted to a person, group, performance, event or other deed or action that has contributed to the development and prosperity of circus art. The prize was awarded for the first time in 2010.

The Sirkuksen Lumo jury consisted of journalists Annikki Alku, Nina Jääskeläinen and Maria Säkö and artist professor Pirjo Yli-Maunula. Circusinfo Finland’s managing director Lotta Vaulo acted as the jury’s chairperson.

The post Sirkuksen Lumo 2018 Prize Awarded to Portmanteau appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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The first Salo Circus Festival takes over the city of Salo 2.-3.8.2019. The call for performances is open until March 31st 2019 at 23:59. The applications should be sent to *protected email*. The program choices will be made during April.

We are looking for full-lenght performances and short acts. The festival will include a variety of disciplines and genres such as: circus, puppetry, theatre, dance, music, etc. Street and other outdoor shows are very welcome too. You can propose work-in-progress acts as a part of our open stage club.

We can offer small support for travel costs and the income of the festival will be shared among the performers. Buskers, we will take care of the licenses and book the performing spots, come and test the generosity of the habitants of Salo!

Please include these in your application:

  • The name of the performance
  • Description text
  • Duration and age limit
  • Technical needs, how much time do you need for setup/strike down
  • Number of persons in your crew
  • 1-3 photos (for music acts: sample recordings)
  • A video of the performance (not necessary for work-in-progress shows)
  • Your possible upcoming shows (so that we can come and see you!)

Don’t hesitate to ask if you have any questions: *protected email*

Festival organizers: Erika Malkki & Eikka Alatalo

The post Open Call: Salo Circus Festival 2.-3.8.2019 appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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Being held this year for the second time, the Performing HEL showcase – encompassing circus, dance and theatre – is on the lookout for full-length performances, demos and pitches. Taking place in Helsinki on 29 August–1 September 2019, the showcase will present some of the most interesting elements of Finnish performing arts that are suitable for international audiences and touring to Finnish and international festival and theatre programme presenters.

A total of 4–6 full-length performances, 6 demo performances, and 10 pitches will be selected for Performing HEL. Some of the evening performances will be selected from the domestic programme of Helsinki Festival 2019.

The organisers are seeking applications from professional groups or artists working in or receiving funding from sources in Finland. The pieces selected must be suitable for touring and may be intended for different audiences. There are a total of three application options:
– full-length performances
– demo performances of pieces that have already premiered or future pieces/ideas (20–30 mins)
– 15-minute pitches of existing or future pieces.

Applicants may indicate which category they wish their application to be considered for, but the final decision on categories lies with the selection jury. Please note! Only one application from each applicant (artist/company) will be accepted.

The application period ends on 15 March 2019, with the jury aiming to have made its selections for the programme in April 2019. Artists and groups selected for the showcase programme will be paid a small fee.

Link to the application form

The groups and artists selected commit to partaking in workshops to be held in spring and early summer on touring practicalities (technical riders, etc.) and how to sell performances (incl. promotional material and pitching).

For further information, please contact
Producer Anni Leino, *protected email*, tel. +358 (0)40 1823 722
Head of International Development Lotta Nevalainen, *protected email*, tel. +358 (0)50 303 8339

The main organisers of the Performing HEL showcase are CircusInfo Finland and Dance Info Finland. The event partners are Helsinki Festival, Svenska Teatern (the main Swedish-language theatre in Helsinki), the Finnish National Theatre, Espoo City Theatre, and Theatre Info Finland (TINFO). The event is supported by the Ministry of Education and Culture of Finland.

The post Open call for Finnish performing arts showcase Performing HEL appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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Arranged for the first time in 2018, performing arts showcase Performing HEL will take place on 29th of August – 1st of September 2019 in Helsinki, Finland.

With performances, demos and production pitches, the event will showcase the finest work from Finland right now. Performing HEL will encompass the full range of performing arts, including circus, dance and theatre, also delivered in exciting yet difficult-to-define combinations. The showcase happens at the same time with Helsinki Festival – the largest arts festival in Finland.

In 2019 the showcase is organised by Dance Info Finland and CirkusInfo Finland in cooperation with Helsinki Festival, the Finnish National Theatre, Svenska Teatern (the main Swedish-language theatre in Helsinki), Espoo City Theatre and Theatre Info Finland TINFO.

Save the date 29.8.-1.9.2019 – more news coming soon!

For further information, please contact Anni Leino, Producer, *protected email* | +358 (0)40 1823 722

The post Save the date: Performing HEL showcase is coming again! appeared first on Sirkuksen Tiedotuskeskus.

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Subcase, a showcase and marketplace for contemporary circus, takes place for the 10th time on February  11–15, 2019 near Stockholm, Sweden. Subcase is a meeting place for Nordic artists and international venues and festivals. As in previous years there will be strong Finnish presence. Lotta Vaulo and Lotta Nevalainen from CircusInfo Finland will be attending the showcase together with various Finnish circus artists, producers and programmers.  CircusInfo Finland is also happy to bring two Finnish producers Selene Abonce Muhonen and Anni Leino to attend Subcase and network with their Swedish and Canadian colleagues through the project Crossing Missions for Young Presenters in Circus Arts. The project is funded by Nordic Council of Ministers.

Finnish shows in the programme

Full lenght performance

Race Horse Company: Urbotek

Work-in-progress performance

WHS/Kalle Nio: The Green

Pitches Premiered projects

Ilona Jäntti & Aino Venna: Yablochov Candle

Pitches Upcoming Projects

Salla Hakanpää: Funis

Recover Laboratory: One Night Only Multi Art Labyrinth

Sisus: Plusplus

One can find Finnish circus artists also in the following performances/pitches:
Duo Homeles Moreles: Liquorice and Lemons
The Nordic Council: Three Men from the North

See you at Subcase 2019!

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