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Are you looking to get away from it all?  Do you require some time away from the office? If so, why not take a look at some of the longest journeys on the planet?  Although there is no doubt that these are all excellent ways to experience all that life has to offer, we should also remember that the presence of modern technology has allowed them to be associated with superior levels of comfort.

Let’s take a quick look at some amazing long-distance journeys that will keep you coming back for more.

Route 6

This famous motorway in the United States has always been associated with a unique sense of Americana.  From blue-ridged mountains to iconic roadside diners, this is arguably the most famous highway within North America.  To put its length into perspective, your journey will begin in California before finally ending in Massachusetts; a total distance of approximately 5,200 kilometres.  You can also visit famous sights such as the mysterious Area 51 as well as cities including Denver and Provincetown, Rhode Island.  The route passes through a total of 14 states and while route 66 might be the more well-known motorway, the fact of the matter is that Route 6 still holds the record in terms of sheer distance.

Source: http://heritagedocumentaries.org

The Golden Quadrilateral Highway

Not only does this route stretch for more than 6,000 kilometres, it is also one of the newest motorways in India.  Originally launched in 2001, the Golden Quadrilateral Highway takes drivers through the largest cities within the country: Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata and Chennai.  It has been billed as the largest public transportation project in India and thanks to its recent completion, you will enjoy a smooth and comfortable journey. Let’s not fail to mention that you can always choose to stop off during any leg of the journey in order to appreciate the natural countryside or to explore smaller villages.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Quadrilateral

The Trans-Siberian Railway

This is currently the longest train route in the world and at nearly 9,500 kilometres, it is almost certainly the most interesting. The Trans-Siberian Railway was originally commissioned by Joseph Stalin utilising mainly slave labour and before its construction, it was nearly impossible to travel from the west to the far eastern portions of Russia.  From majestic pine forests to barren steppes and small Siberian town, this journey certainly has something for everyone, here you can see the Trans-Siberian routeand otherwonderful train routes.

Source: insureandgo.com.au

The Qantas Transcontinental Flight

This is one of the newest journeys to make our list and it is undoubtedly the longest in terms of distance.  Australian air carrier Qantas recently launched a non-stop route between Perth and London. Covering more than 9,000 nautical miles and lasting for just over 17 hours, this flight represents the latest in modern technology.  However, you will also be travelling in style.  Qantas utilises the new Boeing 787 Dreamliner.  It only makes sense that the longest continuous flight in the world is associated with the largest commercial passenger jet.  Its interior is quite spacious and even economy class tickets leave little to the imagination in terms of opulence.  If you have a fear of flying, you will be happy to know that the sheer size of this aeroplane virtually eliminates the chances of experiencing any rough turbulence during the route.  It is expected that more companies will be offering journeys of similar lengths in the future.

Source: https://freight.qantas.com/

The routes mentioned above would have been impossible only 100 years ago and yet, they are now becoming commonplace.  As technology continues to increase, the world could very well become a much smaller place.  It will be very interesting to see what the future has in store.

The post The Longest Trips in the World appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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Having opened in 2001, Royal China in Canary Wharf is somewhat of an institution in the area, having been one of the first influx of local business as the area changed from developer’s impossible dream to thriving London landmark.

We turned up early one Thursday evening to find it heaving with an array of diners, including businessmen, families and couples. Overlooking the Thames, and a minute’s walk from the Thames Clipper’s Canary Wharf Pier, the restaurant gives diners fabulous views of the city. In the summer, seats in the outdoor patio, which sits 80, are in high demand.

The restaurant is part of the Royal China Group, five of London’s most authentic and prestigious Chinese restaurants, including the luxurious and critically-acclaimed Royal China Club on Baker Street.

The menu is traditional Hong Kong Chinese cuisine alongside chef’s specialities and the dim sum is nothing other than famous. Served until 5pm we’re told you can expect to queue at any branch on weekends.

But back to our evening in the east end. I took along my friend from Macau to get a real insight into just how authentic Royal China would be. Though Chinese, she had never been to one of the restaurants but had heard good things through the grapevine and was also quick to point out that it had been named-checked in the book Crazy Rich Asians. So far so good.

We were instantly impressed with how busy the restaurant was and were really keen to get stuck in to the food.

We decided the best approach was to order a number of dishes from various regions across China and share them. My friend talked me through what was a staple in Beijing, what dishes were Cantonese and Szechuan and even how her grandmother put her own twists on certain classics that were on the menu here.

In the absence of dim sum availability, we ordered a portion of Steamed Chilli Pork Dumplings to begin – the spicy sauce they arrived in so delicious we asked to keep it back to use as a potential dip after we’d polished off the delicious dumplings.

We decided not to drink with our meal but were very impressed with the scope of the wine menu, offering a range of reds and whites clocking it at the usual £30-mark up to a couple of hundred pounds as well as champagnes.

We continued with half a Crispy Aromatic Duck served with thin pancakes and garnishes. The duck is first marinated with spices, then steamed until tender and finally deep fried until crispy. The display was impressive, the duck arrived glistening and the pancakes are served in a lovely basket with lid to keep them warm.

Tucking in is somewhat ceremonial – place a thin pancake from the steaming stack, take a slice of meat and place it on the edge of the pancake with some garnishes and sauce on top then roll and enjoy.

As we waited for the chefs to rustle up our final dishes we admired the interiors; golds and red abound in the elegant décor, a large lacquered mural depicting birds and the ocean encased in a large gold frame is a focal point and round tables are swathed in white tablecloths to seat 130 people.

I was eager to try the Diced Veal with Teriyaki Sauce when it arrived. I’d never actually tried veal before, a popular meat in China and this looked thoroughly delicious. The generous portion was decorated with sizeable piece of vegetables alongside tender chunks of meat coated in a fantastic tangy honey-like sauce. I can only say this was cooked to perfection and I’ll definitely be on the look-out for veal on future menus.

To get a taste of the seafood here we ordered the Seafood Fried Rice to accompany the veal. It came out of the kitchen in a gorgeous black cast iron pot to keep it hot and was nothing other than a meal in itself. An excellent example of a fried rice it has to be said, with spring onions, egg and prawns.

The final dish to join these two was the Braised Bean Curd Studded with Minced Seafood. I had been particularly keen to try this as I enjoy tofu and find professional chefs are best placed to turn it into a tasty dish (I myself have never found success in doing so in my own kitchen).

Though my friend thoroughly enjoyed it (and even took the leftovers home with her) I found the minced seafood undetectable and was not a fan of the spongy texture given from braising. Visually it looked very appealing and full of flavour but this dish sadly missed the mark with me.

Our meal concluded with the mango pudding – possibly the highlight for my friend who recounted being bribed with this as a treat as a young child at family gatherings.

With no complaints from her throughout the evening, I can confidently say this is the most authentic Chinese restaurants I’ve ever been to and I’m keen try other branches. The Baker Street site is considered the crème-de-la-crème and a bit of a celebrity hotspot.

What’s most notable was actually the prices here, for a high-end Chinese restaurant with quality ingredients – and bearing in mind our order included veal, duck and seafood our dinner came in at under £90. Not bad at all for a traditional and delicious taste of China.

Words by Clarissa Waldron.

30 Westferry Circus, Canary Wharf, London E14 8RR
http://www.rcguk.co.uk/rcrs.html

The post Royal China Canary Wharf Review appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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I have to admit, going out for dinner to a hotel restaurant doesn’t usually appeal to me. Seldom anyone has ever thrilled about the coolest place in town to grab a bite and it’s been in a hotel. When has the ‘restaurant of the moment’, bequest with a three-month waiting list, ever been in a place of lodging?

Hotel restaurants are reserved as a den of convenience for hostees, those who need some quick sustenance after a long-haul flight, those too tired to leave the confines of the building or those too new to a city to know where to begin.

After sampling dinner at Hunter 486, a restaurant housed within the Arch London, comprised itself of seven Georgian houses, just north of Marble Arch, I have to say my mind has been swayed.

The Arch is a five-star, boutique hotel and one that is ever so discreet we walked right by it on the night of our reservation. The foyer is modest and small, the entry to Hunter 486 directly opposite the reception team – you can’t miss it.

The bar got our attention right away and we decided on a drink before dinner. Perching on the plush steel high chairs we were bowled over by bartender Dimo’s attention to detail, his knowledge of the craft and his mixing skills.

Drinks in hand (the fresh and flavoursome Bramble Arch and Elderflower and Strawberry Bellini) we sippedand took in the clean surroundings. There’s an unusual merging of styles here and I’m not quite sure it works – classic leather booths, dark wooden tables with red velvet chairs and grey leather seats all a contrast to the glitzier bar. The contemporary handblown bulb cluster chandeliers I’m a big fan of however.

Towards the other end there’s a more secluded area where drinkers can cosy up by a fireplace or hideaway in one of the curtained-off booths.

At the very back, the kitchen is open plan and airy and we spy a gleaming selection of copper pots  and pans suspended from the ceiling. The menu here is mostly British, something alluded to in its moniker – the 1950s dialling code for Marylebone – and it’s all about the flavour combinations. The menu is expansive and is sure to please everyone with dishes such as grilled fillet of stone bass, pan fried sweet potato gnocchi, roast Barbary duck breast and slow roasted Gloucester Old Spot pork belly. Despite its five-star location, you won’t be greeted with fussy, haute cousin – but plates full of quality produce.

First out was salt baked heritage beets with whipped goat’s curd, red chard and candied pecan. With good potential for creativity, it admittedly wasn’t quite the culinary extraordinaire that I was expecting. The inclusion of golden beetroot was a saving grace but the star attraction didn’t reign supreme in what was a rather scattered presentation. You won’t be disappointed but there are other big players worthy of your attention; such as the pan-fried Cornish mackerel fillet. Beetroot, orange and horseradish cream are paired with a perfectly crisped fillet. Presentation was fulfilling as was its flavour – what a treat.

Service is absolutely impeccable and we felt very well looked after by our diligent waiter and what we gladly noticed, and really valued, was the restaurant’s commitment to being flexible for diners.

My guest went for the 28-day aged rib eye for mains and asked if the French fries be swapped for chunky chips. No problem, our waiter assured us. It was also asked if the kitchen could make some peppercorn sauce for the steak in replacement of the bearnaise sauce listed on the menu. He quietly confidently told us it was likely the kitchen would be able to make some up.

We were thrilled when the steak, aperfect version of the classic dish, arrived completely as ordered and very much respected the kitchen’s determination to make small but significant changes to help diners fully enjoy their experience here, which is not always the case in busy restaurants.

My monkfish main was very well put together, wrapped in air dried ham, and sat atop braised lentils, and caramelised baby onions. The mild taste of the fish was very well complimented by the succulent, sweetly flavoured ham and salty lentils. This dish is alovely showcase of ingredients and a little bit of thought.

A luscious offering of rhubarb and lemon sorbets and pistachio and chocolate ice creams acted as dessert to cleanse our palette and send us on our merry way.

With the ubiquitous food coma looming, we wished we had a room booked in upstairs as we came to the end of our evening. And on the reverse, if we were a guest here, we think we’d be delighted to find this treasure downstairs.

Hunter 486 has definitely been a game changer and made me reconsider what I thought as a suitable destination for an evening of dinner. The scope of the menu is impressive and we appreciated its approach to inventiveness. We certainly will be back, whether we’re booked in for the night, or not.

Words by Clarissa Waldron

The post Hunter 486 Review appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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Potted plants, books and souvenirs sit atop wooden shelves above little wooden tables and chairs adorned with plump cushions in shades of blue and beige in the newly opened The Belrose pub in Belsize Park.

A large, dark wooden bar adorned with trailing leaves, displays an impression collection of wines, and is offset by dark blue on the walls and ceiling.

Past this, a kitchen, decorated with striking diamond tiles, makes delectable pizzas in its clay pizza oven whilst a downstairs microbrewery helps to keep the bar fully stocked.

An intimate separate dining room and a suntrap beer garden add to the amenities on offer here.

With a slight rustic hint to its clean interiors, the space is an unusual merging of the classic British pub and the laid back charm of the Mediterranean.

Bright and spacious, this is no boozer but rather a refined, inviting and cosy eatery that offers an impressive range of beer alongside Roman-style pizzas and other menu classics.

Torn between the six pages of bottled beer and the wine list which offers more than just The Boot’s choices, our helpful waiter helped us decided on a bottle of Italian Sogno di Ulisse Montepulciano d’Abruzzo.

It was a good choice with well-balanced and very soft tannins. Despite a flavour combination of dark cherries and chocolate it has a light finish; a very good wine for tomato dishes and lighter meats like chicken or fish.

The food menu lists a good variety of pizzas including Margherita, Napoli and Quattro Formaggi alongside new twists such as Tartufo (fresh black truffle and mozzarella) and Biancaneve (mozzarella, wild boar mortadella, pistachio) but is otherwise concise.

If you’re not here for the dough you can choose between burger, rib-eye steak, chicken Milanese or chargrilled cauliflower. Short but surely done well, we thought, after tucking in to our thrilling starters.

Bruschetta, on the most delectable bread I’ve ever tried, was drizzled with olive oil and perforated with a lively amount of garlic. Topped with room temperature tomato and basil, it was seasoned to utter perfection. Upon finishing I internally questioned the possibility of ordering another to replace my main…

The Grilled Calabrian Sausage came highly recommend by our waiter and was paired with a caponata that matched the flavour profile of the main attraction, leaving the plate clean.

After, our Napoli and Vegetariana pizzas arrived – full of fresh, sizeable ingredients on probably the thinnest crusts I’ve ever seen.

Our waiter informed us of the difference between the Roma and the, more ubiquitous, Neopolitana styles of pizza. A key difference being that Roma pizzas include olive oil in the dough, giving it more weight, flavour and a crispier dough than the Neopolitana, a softer dough which puffs around its edges.

With that in mind I’ll definitely be keeping my eye out for Roma-style pizzas from now on, as I found the thinner crust allowed the flavour of the toppings to come through.

My only qualm at this point is that the Vegetariana is actually a white pizza (with a cheese or cream base) and doesn’t say this on the menu. As I’m very much a fan of the classic tomato base I probably would have ordered differently had that been noted on the menu. There’s just nothing like fresh, quality roasted veggies being offset by a fruity, tomato pizza base.

Although The Belrose was a little quiet on a Saturday evening, we’re can’t attribute this to the food, ambience or friendly service. We thoroughly enjoyed our evening here and upon leaving were recommended the Sunday brunch, a suggestion we’ll definitely be keeping in mind for our return.

Words by Clarissa Waldron

The Belrose
94 Haverstock Hill, NW3
0207 2670 033
www.thebelrose.co.uk
@thebelrose_pub

The post The Melrose Pub Review appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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If you’re like us, there are at least a few jars and bottles in your cupboard that are full of ingredients you used for one recipe, then forgot about — none so old as that dusty bottle of sherry. But sherry has a complex, heady flavor that can add tons of dimension to soups, sauces, and slow-cooked beef recipes; and it’s not that hard to use it. Add a splash to your favourite wine sauces to enhance the flavor, or use it to deglaze the pan before you reserve drippings for homemade gravy. You can even just sip it from a glass (as long as you didn’t buy the cooking kind that has salt added). Or use up that lingering bottle with this suggestion below….

Check out our delicious recipe for chicken livers and Jerez sherry.

Ingredients
  • 800 gram spelt rigatoni
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 2 leeks, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced
  • 1 large shallot, thinly sliced
  • Fine sea salt
  • Pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped sage
  • 1 pound chicken livers—trimmed, patted dry and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  • Lemon wedges, for serving
METHOD
Step 1

In a large pot of salted boiling water, cook the rigatoni until al dente, about 8 minutes. Drain, reserving 1/2 cup of the pasta water.

Step 2

Meanwhile, in a large, deep skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in the olive oil. Add the scallions, leeks and shallot and season with salt and pepper. Cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 8 minutes. Stir in the sage.

Step 3

Increase the heat to high. Season the 
livers with salt and pepper and add them to the skillet. Cook, stirring occasionally, until golden all over, about 2 minutes. Add the wine and cook until evaporated, 1 minute.

Step 4

Add the pasta, 1/4 cup of the reserved pasta water, 1/2 cup of the cheese and the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter to the livers and season with salt and pepper. Remove the skillet from the heat and toss the pasta. Add the remaining pasta water if necessary. Transfer the pasta to plates, top with the remaining 1/2 cup of cheese and serve with lemon wedges.

The post Spelt Rigatoni with Chicken Livers, Leeks, Sage and Sherry appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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The city’s latest gin bar, 1821, has opened on Benthal Green Road.

Organised by Luxardo and running until September 9th, the pop-up celebrates the launch of the brand’s new sour cherry gin and will be the only place in the city you can enjoy it ahead of its debut in other bars.

As well as this preview, the menu features an array of stalwart and new gin cocktails including Luxardo’s take on the classic London Dry, a Cherry Negroni, Lost in Thyme (a sweet and savoury option with hints of lemon and celery) and Sushi Sour – an adventurous mix of amaretto, ginger, lemon and wasabi.

On our visit, we tried the faultless Luxardo London Dry which was garnished with basil and lemon zest.

The Cherry Springer, joining the sour cherry gin with lemon, mint liqueur, cherry syrup and chocolate bitters, bursts with fruity deliciousness but is a strong and punchy concoction which we drank rather slowly.

The star of the show was aptly credited, so much so that we re-ordered this Marasca cherry gin based option another two times.

Garnished with orange zest and cinnamon (a combination I’m keen to try out again) the Luxardo Sour Cherry gin is mixed with Fevertree’s Indian tonic water to make a superbly fruity and delicate drink. In fact, the only tonic mixer on offer here is Fevertown’s Indian variety.

Spread over two floors and decorated in luscious green canopies and hanging baskets, 1821 serves cicchetti, or Italian bar snacks.

In the pop-up’s kitchen you’ll find Kensington’s Enoteca Rosso preparing charcuterie, cheeses and other artisanal snacks.

Bar 1821 is open every Wednesday to Sunday until 9 September 2018
147 Bethnal Green Road, E2 7DG.
Find out more about Luxardo at luxardo.it.

The post 1821 Gin Bar Review appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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We arrived on a hot evening in July to Delicatessen in Hampstead and were told all the outdoor seating was fully reserved for the evening but our kind waiter placed us at a table for two by the open door and we lived in hope of a gentle breeze.

With roughly 40 covers, this kosher eatery is a bit of a head-scratcher thanks to its name (of German origin), its menu (Middle-Eastern) and its rather trendy East London aesthetic – exposed brick, whitewashed walls, unassuming wooden tables and chairs and lighting reminiscent of filament bulbs.

The juxtaposition is none such a bag thing at all, but rather one to make you think as you peruse the menu orchestrated by Tel-Aviv native Or Golan, protégée of lauded Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi.

While the setting is informal, the staff are quick, attentive and ready to assist and recommend. The menu is extremely varied and colourful and we deliberated quite some time, and questioned our waitress, before deciding on the Tanned aubergine with tahini, figs and mixed nuts to start accompanied by the Green falafel.

The classic falafel was dwarfed by the aubergine not just in size but presentation, detail and flavour. Pretty, the aubergines are roasted and spread across the plates, topped with its accompaniments as well as tomato and sumac. There’s a lot going on in the dish but it pairs together well enough to have us polishing it all off.

This is a menu made for being paired with wine but given our mid-week obligations we stuck to a couple of beers for the evening and were just as satisfied – there’s a choice of Brewdog and Camden Town, as well as a neat list of cocktails.

While you could easily dine out on a few of the starters alone (the menu is also very much geared for a mezze approach) we were taken with the scope of the mains (entitled Land and Sea) and wanted to cover all bases. Bear in mind that portions are very generous and some dishes come with a bit extra even though it’s not listed on the menu – so it’s worth checking before ordering any sides.

My Seabass with burnt tomato and tahini siniya looked like it came solo but in fact a crunchy salad appeared by its side as I started on my second bottle of beer. The fish was huge and plenty to get through on its own as well as delicious enough to not need any supporting acts.

Baked and then fried so it is expertly crisped all the way round, the seabass lies atop a mix of its thick, rich sauce and is adorned with a watercress and pomegranate salad. While I became too full to finish it all I did my very best!

At the same time we had a Chicken thigh shawarma hit the table with seared laffa & sumac onions.

Although well-cooked and flavoursome, topped with radish and watercress, I couldn’t help feel it was rather overpriced at £26, for what was essentially an open kebab, in comparison to the splendour of the seabass (£25) and other dishes in the Land and Sea section.

Nonetheless we were very happy and satisfied with our outing to Delicatessen in leafy Hampstead. The array of food choice here is wonderful; whatever you’re hankering for you are sure to be satisfied due to the merging of so many spices and recipes from Golan’s roots, which stem from Morocco and Lebanon, and well as his Jewish heritage.

Having moved base from Swiss Cottage and propping up in an area notorious for short lived restaurants, eight months into its Hampstead home and heaving on a Wednesday evening during the heatwave, Delicatessen is doing much right.

https://delicatessen.company/

46 Rosslyn Hill, Hampstead London NW3 1NH

The post A new Middle Eastern Delicatessen, in Hampstead appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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On first impression Pizza Pilgrims appears to be a kitsch Italian chain with little defining characteristics, touting Italy’s conventional appeal and stereotypes.

The country’s green, white and red are used throughout the restaurant’s interior alongside classic chequered plastic tablecloths, 70’s style wooden seating, ubiquitous neon lighting and vintage signs for Birra Morretti.

The approach is more tongue in cheek than lackadaisical however as I discovered on my first trip to what is now my favourite pizza chain. And I say my favourite ‘pizza chain’ because the best pizza I’ve ever had is from a little pizza oven in the corner of an independent dive bar in Tufnell Park.

In terms of pizza chains, I’ve never been swayed until I visited Pizza Pilgrim’s West Quay Side branch. Cheap and cheerful meets retro edge with fun, vibrant and playful interiors and on first entry, you’re instantly compelled to dine.

On our visit, staff were friendly and attentive, our bottle of house red wine to a higher standard than we expected and the pizza was magnificent.

Here Italian chefs make it bready, chewy, flavoursome and with a hint of char.

We tried the Salami – its standout take on the classic pepperoni pizza and the strongly flavoured smoked Napoli which comes with olives and smoked anchovies.

Even the accompanying small plate choices made a lasting impression on us – the salami balls being a key reason why we have returned with guests!

There’s an outdoor seating area but sitting inside the West India Quay location was a real joy. We marvelled throughout the evening at the eclectic and thematic furnishings which consisted of hollowed mozzarella rind lampshades, exposed brick walls, comfy red leather booths, movie posters, many pop culture references and a foosball table downstairs.

The story goes that those behind the restaurant pilgrimaged across Italy tasting pizzas at every opportunity, before agreeing that Neapolitan pizza is impossible to beat. They brought their take on it back to the streets of London so you don’t have to venture too far to get an excellent pizza.

12 Hertsmere Rd, Canary Wharf, London E14 4AE

https://www.pizzapilgrims.co.uk/

The post Pizza Pilgrims Review – Canary Wharf appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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Taking a seat for brunch in the outdoor section of atmospheric Korean restaurant Jinjuu we were so enthralled by getting to try their famous fried chicken that we initially missed the fact that brunch here is served as a three-course meal (£27). And every bit of it was delectable.

I suppose you’d expect nothing less from the woman who served as executive chef at Hugh Hefner’s London Playboy club before she ventured over to Kingly Court to do her own thing.

For brunch drink options, you’ll begin with either a Soju Mojito or a Spiced Kimchi Mary before moving on to your choice of Red, White, Prosecco & Beer (£39) or Veuve Clicquot Champagne, Red, White, Prosecco & Beer (£55).

We had party plans for the evening so decided to stick with soft drinks for now, although the trolley of chilled champagne sure looked tempting! The Hai Tai Crushed Pear was a sweet and still soft drink in a can. Go forthe manuka honey and matcha iced tea if you’re partial to bold flavours.

We were mesmerised by the sharing platter when it arrived and eager to begin. Impressive in size and variety it contained vegetable chips and dips, steamed edamame, cured salmon and avocado, amazing crispy fried round prawn cakes served on sticks and moreish dumplings stuff­ed with beef short ribs and cheddar cheese. All of it was absolutely faultless.

And the classic edamame bean was given a new lease of life adorned with not just salt rocks but a chili panko mix.

The sheer quality of the ingredients meant we were very happy to work our way through its entirety, and as such it’s a plentiful portion on its own for two people to finish and be satisfied.

We were keen for more however and were not disappointed in our choices for mains but we noticed at this stage that service was rather slow (requests for drinks and condiments were fulfilled rather tardily) and it was disappointing that the Korean fried chicken on spring onion waffle came to the table a good five minutes before the Bulgogi beef fillet.

Presentation scores well and portion sizes are very generous here – the waffle was twice the size I was expecting, drenched in honey soy and topped with large, crunchy pieces of chicken that were cooked to perfection. Sprinkles of chilli added a kick as well the finishing touches.

The beef came with a sidekick – a sizzling hot stone which allows diners to cook the meat to their choice in their time. Dips and a side of chargrilled veg make this a light but fun choice when visiting Jinjuu, one I would very much recommend.

We stuck around for dessert on the advice of our waiter despite the onset of a food coma. Good job we did as the flavours were delicious! You get to choose one of three types of shaved ice and as get to apply toppings at leisure including berries, rum pineapple, nuts, honey and granola. Presentation and attention to detail resound here, this is no ordinary approach to serving ice cream.

No doubt the food was faultless, and seriously impressively good value for money. But Jinjuu would improve with a few more staff on the ground, especially at such a prime time. This would lend itself to a quicker turnover on tables and more turnover generally thanks to the outstanding work done in the kitchen, it’s pleasing, trendy interiors and its resident DJ.

Jinjuu 15 Kingly St, London W1B 5PS

https://jinjuu.com/london-soho/

The post Jinjuu Brunch Review appeared first on Sharking for Chips and Drinks.

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Named after Lakis Travolta, who was famous for his dancing skills and maintained the Pigadi taverna in Peristeri, it is located almost behind Agios Antonios metro station, Travolta fish tavern (the owners are the Liakos brothers from the successful Base Grill and Cookoovaya, as well as Lakis’ son), serves inspired fresh fish and seafood dishes.

At Travolta you will also find classic fish for grilling or frying, but their aim is to demonstrate that “second-class” fish too, when fresh and grilled, fried or baked properly, are quite capable of offering a wonderful gustatory experience. Give them enough of a heads up on your arrival and you’ll hopefully be able to score yourself the catch of the day!

We ate a whole hell of a lot of food so here’s the highest reel which will give you an idea of what you can expect. And for an average of £35pp you really can’t go too wrong can you?!

The most fancy dip you’ll ever have in your life kicked the evening off.

Greek Salad with P.D.O. Feta – with tomatoes that actually taste like tomatoes!

Sea bream carpaccio

Fish of the day tartare

Fish of the day sashimi

Mussels + Smoked eel with Schinoussa fava beans

Fresh cuttlefish with orzo & Graviera from Ios

Prawns

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