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While the widely publicized deportation raids reportedly planned for Sunday may still be happening in multiple cities this week, legal pushback and the removal of the element of surprise may have caused them to be canceled or delayed once more.

Immigrant communities in San Francisco, Chicago, New York, Miami and elsewhere were lying low Sunday, due to the story floated last week via government sources that ICE was planning early morning raids on some 2,000 undocumented immigrant families in 10 cities. By late in the day Sunday, those large-scale raids had failed to materialize in any city, as NPR reports, with Mayor Bill de Blasio saying that ICE had attempted a few arrests, but all of them were "unsuccessful."

Receiving reports of attempted but reportedly unsuccessful ICE enforcement actions in Sunset Park and Harlem.@NYCImmigrants and advocates are connecting with residents and distributing resources door to door.

Remember: you have rights. Call 311 and say ActionNYC for help. pic.twitter.com/OZwpxlm30d

— Mayor Bill de Blasio (@NYCMayor) July 13, 2019

The New York Times reports that there were a few isolated arrests on Friday and Saturday in certain cities, with one report of a mother and several daughters being detained in Chicago — though all of them were released "under supervision." A teenager in New Jersey named Liza told the paper about having ICE visit her family's home at 1 a.m. Sunday, and again at 5 a.m., shining flashlights through windows and asking the family to come outside. Having learned their rights from various aid organizations, the teen and her parents refused to open the door and hid upstairs. Eventually the agents left after each visit.

Volunteer "ICE chasers" were out in force in Atlanta Sunday, but they found no raid activity. The Times reports that ICE is still planning isolated raids throughout this week, relying on the element of surprise in order to apprehend those they're targeting. (Because ICE isn't legally allowed to enter homes, all the news coverage last week has impacted the likely effectiveness of the raids — and the Times notes that ICE typically nabs only 20 to 30 percent of its deportation targets.)

KPIX/CBS SF reports that there were no such reports of any ICE visits in the Bay Area over the weekend, and local advocates attribute this in part to the ACLU's pre-emptive lawsuit agains the government. The suit, filed in Northern California on Saturday, was an emergency temporary restraining order against ICE, halting any deportations without giving immigrants a proper hearing before an immigration judge.

The ACLU has found that in many cases, the immigrants being targeted in these raids did not receive the self-deportation orders the government claims they sent, because they went to invalid addresses. And of those who did receive the government's letters requesting appearances in court, the letters didn't contain specific times or dates to appear.

As a result of the raid threat, the Mission was notably quieter on Sunday, and some local business owners claimed they had to come staff their businesses themselves because their workers had called out sick.

President Trump himself had confirmed that the raids were on late last week, and this came after he previously postponed them a month before facing pushback from House Democrats. There is also the looming PR threat of causing a new national outcry if families are forcibly separated in the raids.

Hamid Yazdan Panah with the California Collaborative for Immigrant Justice tells KPIX that "The solidarity expressed within our communities and the work being done by organizers, activists and attorneys, serves as a major deterrent to [these] types of operations" by ICE. However it remains to be seen if the raids may simply be staggered and scattered, and early-morning door-knocks will be coming to local immigrants' homes in the coming days.

Previously: Postponed ICE Raids Happening In SF On Sunday

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  • A brush fire in SF's McLaren Park burned four acres Sunday afternoon before being contained. The fire broke out around 5:30 p.m. near the Gleneagles golf course. [Bay City News]
  • A deadly crash on eastbound I-80 closed two lanes early this morning, snarling early morning traffic. The crash, in which at least one person died, happened near San Pablo around 5 a.m. [ABC 7 / Chronicle]
  • Bay Area Congresswoman Jackie Speier made a trip to the border. Speier visited the McAllen Border Patrol station and found that some migrants had been held for 60 days with no information, or toothbrushes. [ABC 7]
  • A draft bill is circulating in the U.S. House of Representatives that would fine Facebook $1 million per day if it creates the Libra cryptocurrency that it has planned. The bill, although it's unlikely to gain traction, is the biggest sign yet of potential opposition to tech dipping into the world of finance. [Reuters]
  • Thousands participated in Sunday's annual AIDS Walk in Golden Gate Park. [ABC 7]
  • East Bay Congressman Eric Swalwell was the subject of a Conan O'Brien Twitter joke over the weekend. [SFGate]
  • A golden retriever stolen from outside a store in Japantown caused some serious drama on local news stations Sunday, but was found safe. [NBC Bay Area]
  • Character actor Charles Levin went missing in remote Oregon, and his remains, along with those of his pug, were just found. [Associated Press]
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It looks like the recent great white shark migration into the Bay Area is very real, and at least one came into San Francisco Bay on Saturday where it got hooked on a fisherman's line and proceeded to tow the fishing boat around for about two miles before the shark could be freed.

Captain Joey Gamez of Golden Gate Sport Fishing tells his tale to KPIX/CBS SF, and he says he's never experienced anything like this in the twenty years that he's been fishing in the Bay four to five days a week. Gamez was in his boat with six other fishermen about a half mile out from Alcatraz when he hooked the great white, and he describes the force as "like hooking into a Volkswagen that was a hundred feet deep and just trying to hold on to the rod and reel."

Gamez fought the animal for over an hour as it dragged the fishing vessel around the Bay, still with the hook in its mouth. Gamez, who drives in from Tracy to take sport fishermen out on these excursions, estimates that the shark was six to eight feet long. He says that while he's hooked sharks large and small before — between three and 400 pounds — he's never caught a great white before, and it put up quite a fight.

Ultimately Gamez was able to free the fish, and took some dramatic footage of the ordeal that you can see below.

Great white shark sightings were made by multiple pilots in recent weeks over the San Mateo County coast, with one sighting claiming to have spotted four sharks together near the beach in Half Moon Bay.

Experts say the sharks tend to return to the Bay Area, and particularly to the area around the Farallon Islands, to feed in the late summer and early fall after migrating out to the deep ocean.

Sightings of great whites in the Bay are rare but not unheard of. A family of tourists shot the video below in October 2015 after spotting a great white feeding on a seal near Alcatraz.

Great White Shark attack in Alcatraz waters - YouTube
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  • In Heather Knight's latest column in the Chronicle, she speaks to residents who have traveled abroad and been newly horrified by SF when they've returned. It's a new twist on the "everything is terrible" genre. [Chronicle]
  • A 36-year-old man was shot and killed after allegedly breaking into a couple's tent at a campground in Stanislaus National Forest. It is called — no kidding — Deadman's Campground. [KSBW]
  • A man is missing after helping to save a child in the Yuba River in Nevada County. Crews were able to rescue the child, who was uninjured, but witnesses saw the man then get swept away down the river. [KCRA]
  • A man was hospitalized in critical condition Saturday after being pulled from the water at Ocean Beach. [CBS SF]
  • The Mission was on edge Saturday anticipating pending ICE raids. [ABC 7]
  • Sonoma County officials shut down a large illegal cannabis grow operation with 9,000 plants. [Chronicle]
  • The management company at Valencia Gardens, the large affordable housing complex near 15th Street in the Mission, says they've been trying to evict a single mother for seven years for various offenses, but she says they've been unfairly targeting her. [Mission Local]
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Lake Tahoe is getting very high after spring and summer snowmelt continues to fill it, and soon officials will begin releasing water into the Truckee River.

Beaches around Tahoe this summer are especially tight as the lake level is nearing its legal limit of 6,229.1 feet above sea level. As the East Bay Times reports, that water release is likely to begin this weekend at Tahoe Dam, which is in Tahoe City.

Dave Wathen, deputy water master for Lake Tahoe, tells the paper, "There were big beaches at lower water levels. Sand Harbor Beach near Incline Village is a very big beach. A lot of people could fit on it. Now, it’s tighter. It’s drastically different.”

As ABC 7 notes, Lake Tahoe is now eight feet higher than it was in 2016, at the end of the drought.

Higher water levels mean higher boat docks as well, and some soil erosion in certain parts of the shoreline.

The legal height limit for the lake was set in 1935 following years of court battles that were spawned by an especially snowy winter in 1907 that also caused a dramatic rise in the lake's level — flooding many homes and businesses.

Tahoe's famous clarity also improved dramatically in the last two years, going up by ten feet in the last clarity test.

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  • Police in the East Bay town of Pittsburg had a lengthy standoff with a man Friday after he fired shots at someone. No one was injured, but the man remained holed up in his house with two handguns for hours after police told him to come out. [East Bay Times]
  • After the CPMC hospital on California Street closed in March, business has been down at the Laurel Village Shopping Center. Laurel Heights has already lost two restaurant, Noah's Bagels and Beautifull. [Chronicle]
  • Activists are fighting the deportation of Jose Armando Escobar Lopez, an artist and refugee from El Salvador who goes by the name Armando. Lopez was detained in Daly City earlier this year during a traffic stop, and is currently at an ICE detention facility in Bakersfield, awaiting deportation. [ABC 7]
  • Hundreds gathered in Oakland's Frank Ogawa Plaza Friday evening to protest the pending ICE raids. [CBS SF]
  • An Oakland nurse shares her story of being deported back to Mexico and having to leave her kids behind here. [KTVU]
  • A three-judge panel on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the Trump administration, saying it could legally withhold federal policing grants from Sanctuary Cities. [New York Times]
  • BART issued a warning against trying to retrieve dropped Airpods from the train tracks — station agents have grabber tools for that. [ABC 7]
  • A new arts space called Ruth's Table has just opened at 21st and Capp. [Mission Local]
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  • The FTC voted 3-2 today to fine Facebook around $5 billion in a landmark settlement over privacy violations. The fine, rumored months ago to be around $5 billion, is the largest ever levied on a tech company by the FTC. [Associated Press]
  • Ahead of Sunday's planned ICE raids, Mayor London Breed reminded immigrants that SF is a Sanctuary City. Breed said she would be "monitoring the situation" and the city would be offering immigration legal services in the city through the Office of Civic Engagement and Immigrant Affairs. [Chronicle]
  • A Muni T-train collided with a vehicle in the Bayview District Friday. The incident happened around 2 p.m. and an adult and two children who were in the car are said to be in stable condition. [Examiner]
  • Lyft is rolling out e-bikes and scooters in Oakland. [SF Business Times]
  • Police in East San Jose have shut down a neighborhood to investigate a homicide near a middle school. [CBS SF]
  • Chevron is about to begun cleanup of seepage of 800,000 gallons of oil and water into a Kern County canyon. [Associated Press]
  • Drag queens Peaches Christ and Bob the Drag Queen are starring in the Bring It On spoof Bring It On, Queen at the Castro Theatre on Saturday. [ABC 7]
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A five-story complex that’s been in the works since 2014 just broke ground at the site of the former Sullivan’s Funeral Home in the Castro.  

There has been a vacant lot and not much else going next to Beck’s Motor Lodge in the Castro for the last few years. But there has been plenty going on between the Planning department and developer Prado Group with regards to that particular parcel, and the years-long attempt to build an apartment complex there has hit a milestone today. Socketsite reports that a five-story apartment complex project broke ground there today, and we’ve got a few renderings of what’s going up at the former site of Sullivan’s Funeral Home and it’s adjacent, usually-fenced-off parking lot.

Market Street mortuary redevelopment on the border of #DuboceTriange and #TheCastro formally breaks ground today #RealestateSF https://t.co/Bk3Un6Utnu pic.twitter.com/ZUDO6MgdfI

— SocketSite (@SocketSite) July 12, 2019

If you want to get to know this project in fancy real estate developerspeak, check out the 2240 Market SF website. The developers describe the area as “a quaint, walkable and eclectic part of town nestled away amongst tree-lined Victorian dotted streets, local shops with vibrant nightlife options in the Mission and Castro right around the corner.” Some Socketsite commenters have scoffed at the notion that this location is “right around the corner” from the Mission, though it is about five blocks from Mission Dolores church.

Image: 2240 Market SF

While the above rendering gives you a sense of the now-approved front facade, these aerial, overhard images from the developer and from Socketsite do a better job of depicting the massive size of this development. The project is billed as “2240 Market,” it actually covers several parcels on both Castro and 15th Streets.

Per Socketsite, the whole shebang will eventually consist of “44 new residential units – a mix of 11 studios, 9 one-bedrooms, 20 two-bedrooms, 3 three-bedrooms, and one four, with five of the units to be offered at below market rates – over 5,200 square feet of new ground floor retail space and a basement garage for 24 cars with its entrance off 15th Street.”

There is certainly historical significance to the site, as Sullivan’s Funeral Home is an unofficial landmark from the AIDS crisis in the 1980s. It was one of the only funeral homes in town that would handle the bodies of deceased HIV victims when confusion still reigned over how this virus was transmitted (then-owner Jim Sullivan lost his own brother to AIDS) and its location made it an obvious draw for many memorial services. More recent San Francisco arrivals might recall Sullivan’s Funeral Home more for that one time in 2014 when a frozen yogurt truck rammed into the place and burst into flames.

Related: Massive 5M Office and Condo Project Set To Begin Construction In SoMa [SFist]


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It turns out that one of the writers for Mission Local is a resident at 959 South Van Ness Avenue, the house that was used for exterior shots and a few interiors in the film The Last Black Man in San Francisco.

The acclaimed film has brought some gawkers around to the Mission neighborhood to take Insta shots of the house — which in the movie is supposed to be in the historically black Fillmore District. And Julian Mark from Mission Local has the real inside history of the house via his 83-year-old landlord, John Tyler, a retired water chemist. Tyler, who is gay, first came to the 1889-built house when it belonged to (as he says) "a bunch of queens" in the 1950s who shared it and threw "wild parties." He first saw and fell in love with the place in late 1960, and within a couple of years had bought it with a friend. Forced to sell in 1964 by that same friend, Tyler circled back to San Francisco after some time overseas only to find it for sale again in 1970, at which point he bought it back for $47,500 and began the long, slow project of restoring it.

Marks has some other great details about the house's inhabitants, via Tyler, and some pretty photos of the very Victorian interior. Check out the whole piece here.

And below, ICYMI, the trailer for the film.

The Last Black Man in San Francisco | Official Trailer HD | A24 - YouTube
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The Bixby Bridge and a particular restaurant on Monterey's Fisherman's Wharf have been magnets for international tourists who want to see locations from HBO's Big Little Lies up close.

This tourism started after the show's first season two years ago, but now the uptick has arrived again with summer and the second season of the popular drama series.

As ABC 7 reports, one major draw is Paluca Trattoria, a restaurant with outdoor seating that doubles as the cafe frequented by Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, and Shailene Woodley.

The show, as SFist pointed out back in 2017, fudges the local geography of Monterey a bit. The iconic Bixby Bridge gets shown often, despite the fact that it's 20 miles south of Monterey — the ladies of the show are often shown driving over it even though they never really go to Big Sur, which is where they would be heading if they were on the bridge.

Bixby Bridge

Also, as many have pointed out, the only house shown on the show that's in the immediate area is Kidman's character's — the houses used for Witherspoon and Laura Dern's homes are both in Malibu, and as we all know, there isn't a ton of beachside property in Monterey anyway.

A tourist from Scotland tells ABC 7 that she came to Paluca Trattoria just to feel like she was one of the stars of the show. A man from Brazil reiterates this, telling the station that he was such a fan of the show that he needed to see where it was filmed.

Related: Reese Witherspoon Surprised The Current Residents In Her Old Stanford Dorm Room

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