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Having helped a team reach a high-level of performance, it is easy to think that the team will continue to perform for a long time. In this episode, we explore how a team change (a new Product Owner) can reverse a positive trend, and impact the team’s performance. Listen in to learn why that happened, and how you can prevent it from happening to your team.

Are you having trouble helping the team working well with their Product Owner? We’ve put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at: bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO’s collaborate.

http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190624_Long_Suciu_M.mp3

About Long Suciu

Long is driven by a passion to help people unlock their potential and discover their own capacities. He has spent the past 20 years helping teams and organizations find and put in place better ways of working.

You can link with Long Suciu on LinkedIn.

Long Suciu explains how a new Product Owner can derail a great team was first posted on June 24, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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This week, the discussion about the Product Owner role is all about collaboration with the team.

The Product Owner pattern for the week

With two guests this week, we also cover 2 examples of a good Product Owner. Firstly, we talk about the importance of bringing information and data to the team to help them understand and be part of the decision making for the product.

Secondly, we talk about the need for Product Owners to allow the team to give their input, and be heard when it comes to product decisions. Great Product Owners allow their teams to contribute their own ideas and therefore feel invested in the success of the product.

The Product Owner anti-pattern for the week

The two anti-patterns we discuss this week are related to the collaboration (or lack thereof) between the team and Product Owner.

The first anti-pattern is about the Product Owner that was an outside “customer” (from another department) to the team. When that happens, there’s the temptation to let the PO lead, and not challenge them. Collaboration happens when the PO brings their view, listens, and then makes decisions together with the team.

The second anti-pattern is about the Product Owner as an expert. When the PO is an expert, they might feel they have to bring in all the answers, and therefore make it more difficult for the team to feel ownership and contribute to the product. It can also happen that the PO becomes a micro-manager. All signs to look out for.

Are you having trouble helping the team working well with their Product Owner? We’ve put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at: bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO’s collaborate.

About Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras

Katy has over 14 years of software delivery experience, serving in roles ranging from analyst to developer, project manager and for more than 6 years, also Scrum Master. Her Scrum experience has been mostly with distributed teams working across multiple time zones. She hopes to someday have the opportunity to travel to meet her colleagues in China, but for now, Katy enjoys reading about creative methods to keep her team engaged.

You can link with Katy Cabral on LinkedIn.

Joe is an experienced scrum master, who strives each day to help and coach his squad to continuously improve how they work so that they can be awesome.

Joe is also a scrum master chapter lead at Fidelity Investments.

You can link with Joseph Contreras on LinkedIn.

Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras: How to foster collaboration between the Scrum team and Product Owner was first posted on June 21, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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Scrum Master’s success is dependent on the team’s approach to solving their own problems. In this episode, we talk about how teams that take ownership of the process, make decisions on their own and find their own incremental improvements are a sign of a successful Scrum Master. But how do we get there? In the episode, we talk about tools that help Scrum Masters succeed.

Featured Retrospective Format of the Week: Wow, Wandering, Worried. Artifacts, events, roles

Joe and Katy share with us two retrospective formats. First, we discuss “Wow, Wandering, Worried. Artifacts, events, roles”, a format that turns the team’s attention to the items, or things they want to improve.

The second agile retrospective format is the “Picture retrospective” (example: The Sailboat Retrospective exercise). In this segment, we specifically talk about the use of pictures or drawings as check-in as well as data gathering and decision exercises.

http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190620_Cabral_Contreras_Th.mp3

About Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras

Katy has over 14 years of software delivery experience, serving in roles ranging from analyst to developer, project manager and for more than 6 years, also Scrum Master. Her Scrum experience has been mostly with distributed teams working across multiple time zones. She hopes to someday have the opportunity to travel to meet her colleagues in China, but for now, Katy enjoys reading about creative methods to keep her team engaged.

You can link with Katy Cabral on LinkedIn.

Joe is an experienced scrum master, who strives each day to help and coach his squad to continuously improve how they work so that they can be awesome.

Joe is also a scrum master chapter lead at Fidelity Investments.

You can link with Joseph Contreras on LinkedIn.

Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras: 3 signs of a successful Scrum team was first posted on June 20, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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Sometimes, new teams are formed where some team members still have “legacy” tasks in their to-do lists. When that happens, it is the responsibility of the team (with the help of the Scrum Master) to figure out how to handle that work. There are many options to handle that situation. What is not ok is to let it grow, and spiral out of control. Teams own tasks, not individuals, therefore the Scrum Masters should help the team understand that legacy tasks are a team issue, not a personal issue.

In this episode, we refer to the concept of T-Shaped skillsets for individuals, and the Agile Retrospective format called “pre-mortem”.

http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190619_Cabral_Contreras_W.mp3

About Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras

Katy has over 14 years of software delivery experience, serving in roles ranging from analyst to developer, project manager and for more than 6 years, also Scrum Master. Her Scrum experience has been mostly with distributed teams working across multiple time zones. She hopes to someday have the opportunity to travel to meet her colleagues in China, but for now, Katy enjoys reading about creative methods to keep her team engaged.

You can link with Katy Cabral on LinkedIn.

Joe is an experienced scrum master, who strives each day to help and coach his squad to continuously improve how they work so that they can be awesome.

Joe is also a scrum master chapter lead at Fidelity Investments.

You can link with Joseph Contreras on LinkedIn.

Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras: How to handle “legacy” tasks for new Scrum team members was first posted on June 19, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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A common anti-pattern Scrum Masters encounter in their teams is the inability to say “No!” This becomes an especially impactful anti-pattern when the team is unable to say “No!” to the Product Owner. When that happens we run the risk of allowing the team to ver overwhelmed, and eventually decrease the quality of their work.

In this episode, we discuss that anti-pattern and how Scrum Masters can help Product Owners and teams to avoid that from becoming destructive for the team.

Are you having trouble helping the team working well with their Product Owner? We’ve put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at: bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO’s collaborate.

Featured Book for the Week: Scrum: the art of doing twice the work, in half the time by Sutherland & Unmarketing, Scott Stratten

This week we have a tag team for guests and therefore we have two books to discuss. Katy recommends Scrum: the art of doing twice the work, in half the time by Jeff Sutherland.

That book helped Katy understand better her role as a Scrum Master.

Joe takes a different approach and recommends a book that is not about Scrum or Agile: Unmarketing – stop marketing, start engaging by Scott Stratten. This book helped Joe understand better the team he is working with, which is a marketing team.

In this episode, we also refer to Who the Hell Wants to Work for You?: Mastering Employee Engagement by Tim Eisenhauer and Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators by Patrick Lencioni, a follow-up to a regular recommendation on the podcast: The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni.

http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190618_Cabral_Contreras_T.mp3

About Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras

Katy has over 14 years of software delivery experience, serving in roles ranging from analyst to developer, project manager and for more than 6 years, also Scrum Master. Her Scrum experience has been mostly with distributed teams working across multiple time zones. She hopes to someday have the opportunity to travel to meet her colleagues in China, but for now, Katy enjoys reading about creative methods to keep her team engaged.

You can link with Katy Cabral on LinkedIn.

Joe is an experienced scrum master, who strives each day to help and coach his squad to continuously improve how they work so that they can be awesome.

Joe is also a scrum master chapter lead at Fidelity Investments.

You can link with Joseph Contreras on LinkedIn.

Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras: Helping teams work well with a demanding Product Owner was first posted on June 18, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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When we want to help the teams we work with, sometimes we go too far. In this episode, we share a story of a Scrum Master that did just that, only to find out that it is critical that the teams take ownership over the solutions they choose to implement. No matter how much experience we have, as Scrum Masters, it is ultimately the team that needs to improve and live with their choices.

http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190617_Cabral_Contreras.mp3

About Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras

Katy has over 14 years of software delivery experience, serving in roles ranging from analyst to developer, project manager and for more than 6 years, also Scrum Master. Her Scrum experience has been mostly with distributed teams working across multiple time zones. She hopes to someday have the opportunity to travel to meet her colleagues in China, but for now, Katy enjoys reading about creative methods to keep her team engaged.

You can link with Katy Cabral on LinkedIn.

Joe is an experienced scrum master, who strives each day to help and coach his squad to continuously improve how they work so that they can be awesome.

Joe is also a scrum master chapter lead at Fidelity Investments.

You can link with Joseph Contreras on LinkedIn.

Katy Cabral & Joseph Contreras: On the Scrum Master’s difficulty to step back, and let the team lead was first posted on June 17, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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There’s many insights to be had from looking at how Startups and Lean Product businesses develop software and bring products to the market. In this BONUS episode with Ash Maurya, we learn about Lean Product Development from the author of Running Lean, one of the first published books around Lead Product Development.

Developing a book, the Lean way http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190616_Ash_Maurya_BONUS.mp3

When Ash got started he was not a famous author. He started a blog. By publishing his ideas on that blog and collecting feedback he understood the importance of the ideas that he was sharing and ultimately wrote his book: Running Lean: ITERATE FROM PLAN A TO A PLAN THAT WORKS.

In the blog, he shared his learnings from trying and failing at product development. From those blog posts came a book, but also a new tool, the Lean Canvas.

Lean Canvas, a better business modeling tool

The Lean Canvas came from Ash’s own experience and learning when trying to define, design and launch products and new businesses.

Lean Canvas is a 1-page business plan template that helps product developers come up with the key ideas or assumptions on which their business and product depend on. Ash adapted the Lean Canvas to improve the Business Model Canvas, developed by Alex Osterwalder. The Lean Canvas replaces elaborate business plans with a single page business model.

Lean Product Development: Agile made real

Lean Product Development is about iterating your product and business idea over time. From plan A to a plan that works, as Ash puts it. In that aspect, Lean Product Development became the embodiment of the original Agile idea of iterative development. We can argue that Lean Product Development continued what Agile started, but failed to realize: applying Agile as a philosophy of business and to all aspects of business, not just the software development process.

How Ash followed his own advice: Lean Stack, a Lean Product company

It is particularly fitting that Ash followed his own advice and applied his ideas to developing his own business. Lean Stack is a company that Ash created to market a Lean Canvas tool as well as to serve as the “home” to develop many more Lean Product Development tools. In this episode, we discuss some of those tools, but you can find many more at Lean Stack, which has a free trial for you to get familiar and learn about Lean Canvas.

Going beyond Running Lean, the book: Scaling Lean

Later on, a few years after publishing Running Lean, Ash wrote and published Scaling Lean, where he collects new tools and solutions to the most common problems he’s seen in the field when applying Lean Product Development. In that book he specifically discusses Lean metrics, and how to communicate ideas using leading metrics, not trailing metrics.

We discuss why “revenue” is not a good metric for Product Development (even if it is a critical metric, albeit “lagging”).

In this segment, we also learn about Ash’s new book the upcoming book on Product Discovery where he introduces new tools such as the Customer Forces, a new canvas for Lean Product companies to use when developing their products.

Resources for further study

For those interested in learning more about Lean Product Development, Ash recommends the Lean Analytics and Lean Customer Development books, which explore specific aspects of Lean Product Development not discussed in the Running Lean or Scaling Lean books.

http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190616_Ash_Maurya_BONUS.mp3

About Ash Maurya

Ash Maurya, is a serial entrepreneur and author of the startup cult classic Running Lean, pairs real-world examples of startups like Airbnb and Hubspot with techniques from the manufacturing world in this tactical handbook for scaling with maximum efficiency and efficacy. This is vital reading for any startup founder graduating from the incubator stage and product developers working for growth businesses.

You can find more about Ash Maurya at LeanStack.com where you can also find a free trial for the Lean Stack product.

BONUS: Ash Maurya: Running Lean, Lean Product Development in practice was first posted on June 16, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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We explore the technical-dictator Product Owner anti-pattern and also talk about how great Product Owners get ready and come prepared for the meetings with the teams.

The Product Owner pattern for the week

When Product Owners come prepared to the meeting, you know they are doing their job well. They bring numbers, the rationale behind certain decisions, maybe even different options for priority to be chosen based on the feedback from the team. In this episode, we refer to the work by Jeff Patton and Jeff Gothelf, who’ve both been on the podcast before. You can find Jeff Patton’s Podcast episode here. You can find Jeff Gothelf’s podcast episode here.

The Product Owner anti-pattern for the week

Many Product Owners come from a technical background. This means that they know a lot about the technical aspects the team needs to consider. However, when the PO starts to question the team’s estimates or decisions, that’s a recipe for failure. Listen to how Nick handles that situation, and get some tools and practices you can apply right away!

Are you having trouble helping the team working well with their Product Owner? We’ve put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at: bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO’s collaborate.

http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190614_Nick_Vitsinsky_F.mp3

About Nick Vitsinsky

Nick as more than 10 years in IT started from QA Engineer/Waterfall after two years realized that there should be a different approach to how to develop and ship the software. His philosophy and mindset is: “find out Agile and make it own moto”. He focuses on that on a daily basis.

You can link with Nick Vitsinsky on LinkedIn and connect with Nick Vitsinsky on Twitter.

Nick Vitsinsky on how PO’s can prepare for meetings with the team was first posted on June 14, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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Is the team providing feedback openly to each other and stakeholders? That’s one of the key success questions that Nick asks when evaluating his own success as a Scrum Master.

That leads him to find approaches to help teams open up and share their perspective on the work.

In this episode, we also refer to a paper on how to help teams improve their performance. It is based on the same principle that top athletes apply every day: pushing, then resting. A cycle that is guaranteed to improve performance over time.

Featured Retrospective Format for the Week: The Island Expedition metaphor format

Nick likes to focus on creativity for the retrospectives he facilitates. He’s found several metaphor-focused formats that work, but one he especially likes is The Island Expedition.

Metaphor-focused formats help the teams be more creative by taking them out of their regular context and pushing them to imagine themselves in a different context.

http://traffic.libsyn.com/scrummastertoolbox/20190613_Nick_Vitsinsky_Th.mp3

About Nick Vitsinsky

Nick as more than 10 years in IT started from QA Engineer/Waterfall after two years realized that there should be a different approach to how to develop and ship the software. His philosophy and mindset is: “find out Agile and make it own moto”. He focuses on that on a daily basis.

You can link with Nick Vitsinsky on LinkedIn and connect with Nick Vitsinsky on Twitter.

Nick Vitsinsky on The Island Expedition Agile Retrospective format was first posted on June 13, 2019 at 10:05 am.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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This is a guest blog post by Jacopo Romei. Author of the Italian version of the book Extreme Contracts, and author of an upcoming book on the same topic in English.

Contracts are usually designed around a unique way to deliver some effort, assuming there will only be one solution to the problem at issue.

This is wrong.

Not only conceiving more than one solution will enhance the chances to create a better one, but if we take into account some basic risk management principles, we may even help to shape a prosperous collaboration between us and our customers. In Extreme Contracts, we call this principle Optionality, and this is a story about how to see options where none seem to exist.

One problem, many solutions

A few years ago, I shared a big apartment in Milan with two flatmates. In 2017 our rental contract was about to expire, the deadline set to August. In February, Fabio—one of the flatmates—told us he had found a new apartment available starting already in June.

I and Silvia, the third flatmate, were conflicted: on one hand, replacing Fabio and his share of the rent seemed a bit difficult considering the 2-month availability of his room from June to August. On the other hand, Fabio was giving us notice way ahead of the formal requirement to get all his deposit back: a notice three months ahead was enough and he was giving us notice four months ahead of his exit.

We were in a corner case. From a contract point of view — or rules, as we discussed in the last post—, it looked like Silvia and I had to pay 50% each of the full rental fees for two months when Fabio would already be in another apartment, during July and August. From an ethical point of view, it was clear to everybody that the three-months-notice rule had an intrinsic limit and it was not designed to properly manage scenarios featuring a perfectly compliant notice given too close to the rental contract’s expiry date when 3 people shared the same apartment.

Silvia and I had both a keen interest in staying in the apartment as long as possible, due to a few business events requiring our full commitment during the summer, hard to reconcile with a relocation. The conversation soon acquired positional traits, with a lose-lose outcome: “we could all go in July: Fabio will pay one month for nothing, and Jacopo and Silvia will accept to move by July.”

I was not satisfied. There had to be a better solution to make everybody happy in a win-win fashion. The a-ha moment came as soon as I started considering a fourth stakeholder ignored up to that point: the landlord.

I realized that the landlord might want to avoid seeing their regular income disappear in the middle of the summer if we all left in July. Realizing that, I concluded this could give us the chance to come up with a new proposal. First, we would have given the notice to exit all together by June, then Silvia and I would have signed another very short-term rental agreement for July and August only, for ⅔ of the original monthly fee. This way, I thought, Fabio could be free to move, Silvia and I would pay a fair rental fee, and the landlord would find a replacement tenant easily by September.

Look for several better alternatives, until you find your best alternative

In negotiation theory, we use a concept called BATNA (Best Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement) which is defined by the best options all parties have if they can’t get to a negotiated agreement with their counterparts. Long story short it means that we may severely affect the outcome of our next negotiation by scrupulously hiding—or revealing—how many viable options are available to us if we don’t get to a negotiated agreement. Do you want a bracelet? Do you need it for a birthday today and all other shops are closed? Do you want the seller to know it just before you ask for a discount? Or not? Do you like an open position in your favorite company? Do you want them to know you just received other four well-paid offers from their main competitors?

The offer I shaped for our landlord was my way to develop a negotiation based on revealing our BATNA—”if they don’t accept, we’ll have to move sooner anyway”—while placing a little unharmful bet on the landlord’s BATNA— “if I don’t rent two months for ⅔ of the fee, there is a concrete risk not to rent at all”. After this proposal was ready, we needed to validate our assumptions.

I scheduled an appointment with the landlord and told the landlord that we were prepared to move in June rather than paying the full rental fee for July and August, and I closed my plea explaining that it would probably be difficult find new tenants in the middle of summer.

The landlord didn’t blink an eye, thanked us for the candor and for preparing and presenting a concrete proposal. After a few days, the landlord called me to say they accepted our proposal. Fabio was free to exit by June without paying a cent—a win for him!—Silvia and I stayed in that apartment until September, one month longer than previously planned—win-win!—and the landlord had the time to look for a replacement with no need to rush while earning almost 70% of the whole fee instead of leaving the apartment empty—triple win!

Any problem may have more than one positive and acceptable solution. If we consider an ongoing negotiation a problem to be solved with our counterparts and not an adversarial competition to win, hindering the chances for a good relationship with them, we better incorporate options thinking into our practice. This is an old engineering principle that lately seems to have been forgotten in knowledge work.

Developing multiple options may seem more expensive than developing a single approach, but for critical decisions, it is almost always cheaper and gives better results.

— from “Leading Lean Software Development”, Mary & Tom Poppendieck

The importance of being right (skewed)

However, optionality is more than this. Creating an abundance of options for your collaborations to find their way is mandatory if you want success, but the concept of ‘options’ can hide a deeper meaning on a higher level.

We all know how insurance works. We pay a fixed, supposedly small amount of money to get refunded in case of severe loss: an incident, a theft, a canceled flight, and other accidents. When we buy insurance coverage, we buy an option to get refunded in case something bad happens. We also know how venture capital works, especially in these roaring digital times. Investors put a relatively small amount of money on as many promising start-up businesses as possible, hoping at least one or a few of them explodes paying back for the entire aggregate investment (investment fund). In practice, this means that venture funds buy many options to get an open-ended benefit against the investment of a capped/limited amount of money.

These two examples, one of which is a daily life example, and the other more in the realm of investment newspapers, are based on the same mindset: we should create and seek to develop options, first, and whenever possible, we should develop options with an open-ended/unlimited upside.

AirBnB, Facebook, or WhatsApp are examples of how open-ended these options can be. In the case of WhatsApp, the company was sold to Facebook for USD 19 Billion, and at the time they only had 55 employees. From this asymmetry of investment/pay-off, we can extract some practical tip about negotiations.

In life, scenarios in which you have the same chance for things to go bad and good are rare. More often than not, in real life probabilities are skewed. In some cases, the worst possible outcome may have a much more significant negative impact than the best possible positive one. Whenever you sell software on a fixed price contract, the project either ends up as per planned or ends up being delivered later. The best case scenario is limited—we end on time—while the worst case scenario is not—we know that on average projects are delivered 60% later than planned (CHAOS report and others have confirmed this, year after year). This is a left-skewed scenario. In other words: you have a lot more to lose than to gain in fixed-price contracts.

In other cases, the best possible outcome may have a much bigger positive impact than the worst possible negative one. Developing software for a start-up, you may grant a discount on your fees and propose that instead, you will get a share of future revenue or equity. This way, you are preparing to face a limited and known downside—the discount you apply—along with unknown possible benefits long term, no matter how unlikely they will turn into reality. We call this a right-skewed scenario.

If limiting the loss is the key to being right-skewed, we can also bring this a bit further and closer to my rental contract story with the last hint.

In my experience, knowledge workers often become allergic to their relationship with their customers. Struggling with agreements that are not suitable to match the complexity and volatility of their work, they desperately try to avoid problems by planning, or by trying to describe fine-grained and immutable project requirements, or by overpricing (aka buffering) and a full plethora of dysfunctional remedies for the mother of all fears: getting stuck in a lousy project forever. The risk is so relevant that I see companies worried about getting new customers instead of happily welcoming a further opportunity for higher income and business development. They fear the growth of their business! Crazy!

It doesn’t have to be like this. Among all the options you may give to your customers and yourself, the simplest one is the option to get out of the agreement.

Our agreements should describe how we can get rid of the agreement itself.

Our agreements should describe how we can get rid of the agreement itself. Our contracts should be devices to describe the constraints of our collaboration—capping its costs—and let good collaboration thrive.

About Jacopo Romei

Jacopo is an independent strategy consultant, with a strong background in Agile product development.

Jacopo is also an entrepreneur & writer. After having founded a couple of IT companies and practiced agile software development, he started as a full-time freelance agile coach, coaching teams in Italy, Germany and UK.

He has worked with eBay Italia team to set their agile process up. Product ownership and agile UX are added skills acquired in the field.

As a writer, Jacopo published a couple of books on agile coding practices and the Italian version of “Extreme Contracts: knowledge work from negotiation to collaboration“.

Jacopo is a frequent public speaker in international conferences and events about how the way of working is changing in the software industry and organizations management.

Generating options to change lose-lose contracts to win-win contracts and relationships, an #ExtremeContracts blog post was first posted on June 12, 2019 at 12:05 pm.
©2019 "Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at communications@oikosofy.com
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