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I’m happy to announce that we are now accepting entries to have your own solo gallery showing at The Gallery at KelbyOne, in Tampa, Florida.

Our past winners have included an engineer on the long island Railroad, an Anesthesiologist, one worked for the police department. Our next winner could be you. If you’re thinking there’s no way you could win, that’s exactly what the previous winners said. The only way you don’t have a chance is if you don’t enter.

Here’s a quick one-minute video with some details:

Call for Entries: Have Your Own Solo Show at The Gallery at KelbyOne - YouTube

Here’s how to enter: 

  1. Here’s where you submit a link to your portfolio, or Facebook album, or Flickr page, or online gallery – (we’re looking for a body of work – around 20 images) Note: this competition is only open to KelbyOne Pro members.
  2. From the submissions, we will choose a single winner. It could be you. If it is, we’ll fly you and a guest (from anywhere in the world) to the gallery in Tampa, Florida for a solo gallery showcasing your work, where we’ll feature approximately 18 of your images, beautifully printed and displayed by Bay Photo Lab using their amazing Xpozer system.
  3. The evening of the opening, you will welcome the crowd to a wine and cheese reception held in your honor that evening in the gallery where they can see your work, and get a chance to chat with you in person.
  4. Following the reception, we’ll move to our theater for an interview with you about your work, your life, your inspirations, and well…you. It will be streamed live around the world (along with behind-the-scenes images of the opening, and photos of your work).
  5. When it’s all over, you will receive all the prints from the exhibition (courtesy of Bay Photo Lab), and one of your images will be added our permanent collection, so future visitors can get see one of your winning gallery images.
  6. The deadline for submissions is: May 29, 2019, at 11:59 PM EDT.

Have questions?
Here’s the link to an earlier post with a detailed Q&A on how this all works.

Behind-the-scenes: the opening of "The Gallery at KelbyOne" - YouTube

One more thing…
We’ll wrap up with some photos from earlier gallery contest winner’s gallery openings:

Hope we’ll be welcoming you to your own gallery show very soon. Good luck everybody!

Have a great weekend!

-Scott

P.S. Next Thursday the East Coast Photoshop World conference kicks off in Orlando. Want to go? It’s not too late. photoshopworld.com

The post Are You Ready For Your Own Solo Gallery Show? appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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Lightpainting: Macro, Models, & Outdoor Location Portraits with Dave Black

Break out your flashlight and join Dave Black for some lightpainting fun with flowers, models, and more. You may know Dave Black as a sports photographer, but he has taken the art of lightpainting to new levels from years of practice, experimenting, and getting creative.

Dave begins the class with a daytime walk scouting for small world subjects to photograph, and then takes you step-by-step through his process for lightpainting small world scenes in daylight. From there, Dave heads into the studio for a stunning series of lightpainting portraits with a talented ballerina. Dave wraps up the class with a large scale lightpainting scene during twilight with a model on a very cool outdoor set. From daytime to night, indoors and out, Dave teaches you new ways to see the world and photograph it using creative lightpainting techniques.



In Case You Missed It – Under the Milky Way with Dave Black: Lightpainting and Photographing Stars

Join Dave Black as he lightpaints under the stars in Mono Lake and Bodie Ghost Town. Dave starts off with a walk through of all the gear needed for lightpainting before taking us through the importance of a site survey. Over the course of six different shoots in a variety of locations Dave shares all of the steps and settings needed to create stunning lightpainted starscapes. Each lesson is packed with tips, tricks, and lessons learned from Dave’s decades of experience. Dave is a master teacher, and his love for creating these photographs is truly infectious.

The post New KelbyOne Class – Lightpainting: Macro, Models, & Outdoor Location Portraits appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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Have you always wondered how images like the one below are lit?

Have you ever tried to get those beautiful distinct lines from venetian blinds?


Hi guys, and welcome to my guest blog.

Over the years I’ve taught many workshops, and one of the things that always strikes me is that a lot of people are very focused on lighting setups. Even when you look at books and videos, it’s almost always about lighting setups.

Don’t get me wrong, those are pretty awesome. But the problem with this train of thought is that although you can now copy something, you don’t really understand why it gives that look, or the theory behind it so to say. So for this blog post I thought it would be fun to just take one small part of the basis of lighting and give you guys a lot of options to build something for yourself.

Today we are going to look at shadow control, more so shadow transfers. So take out your popcorn, sit down…. Here we go.

The Bare Basics Are Cool

We all want to start with the cool stuff, I get it, we want shortcuts. The idea behind this goes for everything in life. But in essence, when you look at, let’s say, one year of progress, you will find out very quickly that shortcuts are not working. Let me explain.

When I was young (not that long ago… well okay), I loved playing guitar. In fact, I didn’t do anything else. My whole life was built around playing guitar.

To pay for my hobby, I started teaching local kids. At that point I think I was 18-19 years old. At that time there was a movement emerging called shredding (playing really fast), and although I did like it, I didn’t really play like that. As a huge Queen fan, I was more into the melodic stuff.

But during that period, bands like Dream Theater, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, etc. all became hugely successful, and especially Satriani and Vai caught my attention. Listen to Steve Vai’s album Passion And Warfare and you’ll know why it changed my (and many others’) lives when it came to playing the instrument. Both Vai and Satriani used very melodic solos, but in keys I didn’t recognize. There was a certain “feel” about them, almost singing and summer, or very dark and exotic, what the…?

Soon it became clear these guys were not playing the standard stuff, but were using so called modes. So, my students wanted to learn those modes. A lot of teachers started teaching them scales, intervals etc.

Long story short, there are seven modes that are used most commonly. Imagine having to learn all seven modes over the whole neck of the guitar and remembering them all in any key possible… Feeling dizzy? Yeah, well so did I. But this is what you HAD to learn. Until I started to study what was going on (remember in that time we did not have internet, you really had to figure everything out yourself)…

Seven modes… Seven keys in a scale….mmmm

Very soon it dawned on me that is was actually very simple. Learn the C major scale and just start on different notes to get the modes. Start on D for Dorian, start on E for Phrygian, etc. Now that mess of seven modes all over the neck became actually incredibly simple. Just learn ONE scale and remember on which note to start. I was literally in heaven and very quickly could play any mode almost blindly on the guitar. My progress was like a rocket.

However, my students were very very reluctant to learn the C major scale. They would rather spend 4-5 hours learning one small Dream Theater solo than understanding what he was playing and why. In 4-5 hours you can learn the C major scale over the entire neck and play something similar to your favorite solo and make it your own, but also “play” with it and create totally new stuff.

Ok so what has this to do with photography you might wonder, well everything.

Shadows

When we talk to photographers and teachers, it’s almost always about the light. Not very often do you hear photographers talk about shadows, well, unless it’s something negative like, “How can I get rid of that shadow?” But, in essence, shadows tell you everything about the lighting.

Is the shadow deep and sharp? You can bet that a smaller light source was used and you can just follow the shadow to find out the angle. Is the shadow softer? You can bet that a larger light source was used. And by seeing the speed in which the light falls off (goes into shadow) you can see how far the light source was from the model. The closer it is, the faster the light will fall off into the shadow.

Edge Transfer

Now one thing that’s very important for shadows and determining the light source is the edge transfer. Remember the venetian blinds at the start?

I get a lot of questions from people that tried shots like that but never seem to be able to get the lines they want. In fact, most of the times those lines don’t even show up. So how do I get those lines so sharp?

It’s very simple. It’s all in the distance of a light source to the model and the blinds.

When you place the model right behind the blinds, one would think that those lines will show up, right? Yeah, one would think that indeed. The problem, however, is the light source itself. Often the light source is placed too close to the blinds. Although with an open or gridded reflector, you can see some lines they are far from distinct. Use a softbox and you’ll probably see almost nothing.

By going back to the basics, it all becomes very apparent. The further away you place a light source the harder the light quality. A softbox next to the model is the most beautiful and soft light you can imagine. Now place that same softbox about 30ft away from the model and it’s a lot less wrapping around the model. In other words, it’s a harder light.

So the further away you place a light source, the harder the light quality. But this also goes for shadows, only with shadows it’s the other way around. When you move something that casts a shadow further away the shadow becomes softer and softer.

Going back to the venetian blinds, it’s now clear that we have to place a hard light source, for example, an open or gridded reflector, at a relatively far distance, and have the model stand as close as possible to the venetian The cool thing is that if the shadows are too harsh, you just move the light source closer. If it’s too soft…. Yep, move it back.

But this is just the start. This is learning the C-major scale. Now let’s play with this concept.

Flags

If we move an object between the model and the light source, we block part of the light. By moving this object closer to the light source, we make the area between light and dark larger. By moving the object closer to the model, we make that area between light and dark smaller, hence creating a more distinct “barrier.”

Remember that first shot? Those kinds of shots you saw a lot in the “old” days of photography. Just look up people like George Hurrell or Studio Harcourt. At that time they had a lot less light shaping tools than we have now. Often it ended/started with some Fresnels, and in most cases continuous lighting. Strobes came into fashion much later.

Now if you look up George Hurrell, you will find a lot of diagrams for his lighting, but often a key element is missing. The flags.

So What Is A Flag?

In essence, it’s just something to block the light, nothing more, nothing less. You can use cardboard, a piece of wood, or get a real flag. I use the Manfrotto flags, which I love. They are not cheap, but trust me, once you master using them you won’t ever want to be without. Make sure you don’t save money on the mounting piece. Positioning a flag is VERY precise work.

Now that we have something we can place between the model and the light source, you literally have 100% control over your lighting. You can use grids or snoots to narrow the light beam, but what if you want a diagonal shadow line? Or what if you want a certain area of the face lit, but you don’t want the chest area to be lit, and want it to slowly fall into shadow from the neck down… but when you have the face properly lit, you end up with way too much light on the neck and chest? Just put that flag there and start moving it around to create the perfect light fall off that you want.

As you can see here, I moved the flag close to the light to block off light, but I wanted a very gradual light fall off. Not too fast and certainly not dark on his hands.

By moving the flag closer to the model, you get way more direction in your light and you get results like this.

Or in color and with the flag a lot closer to the light source but away from the model.

As you can see you literally have total control over your lighting by just using one flag.

And let’s be honest, you can create a Photoshop vignette, but it’s way cooler to just do it on the spot. Plus it always looks better when you do it in camera for this simple reason… Just look at the background. You can see that this is real due to the lighting on the background. If I use a vignette in Photoshop, the background will look fake, and it’s a dead giveaway that it’s a vignette and not real light.

In Closing

A lot of photographers are controlled by their lighting, while you, as the photographer, should be in control of your lighting.

There are NO shortcuts.

Of course you can learn some lighting setups, but let’s be honest. Which guitar player wants to play the same solo over every song?

As a closing tip. We all know lens flare right? It’s something we often don’t want in an image, and most modern lenses are coated so we have as little lens flare as possible, however… get a really old lens and put some lighting behind your model that’s pretty strong. When you take the image it will look horrible. In most cases totally washed out or even pure white.

Normally we use lens hoods to protect our lenses from too much light hitting the lens. So now cup your lens with your hand on the side of that light and you’ll see that the lens flare will be gone or a lot less visible. Now… and trust me, it takes sometime to get it right… do a Mr. Spock (live long and prosper) and voila!

As you can see, you now have total control over your lens flare and can create some stunning spotlight effects without using Photoshop. Again this does take some/a lot of practice.

The cool thing about learning the basics of photography is that there are absolutely no boundaries to your creativity. Remember, this is just one of the fundamentals. Get my book Mastering the Model Shoot or my watch my videos on KelbyOne to get a lot more information on lighting and styling.

Join my YouTube channel for a weekly update with videos, tips, livestreams and a lot more.

Thanks to Scott for inviting me over and getting me back into playing guitar after a 17 year break

Any questions? Feel free to ask, I’ll be monitoring the comments for you guys. Or do it in the amazing KelbyOne Community.

If you want the opportunity to learn from Frank Doorhof in person, sign up for his New York City workshop! It’s happening on September 1, and will include topics like coaching models, shooting tethered, using a light meter, retouching, styling, and much more. You can find out all about it and register right here.

You can see more of Frank’s work at FrankDoorhof.com, check out his classes on KelbyOne.com, and keep up with him on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

The post Guest Blog: Portrait Photographer Frank Doorhof appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider by David Williams - 5d ago

Happy #TravelTuesday everybody! It’s me, Dave Williams, taking over for the day as I do every Tuesday here at Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider. Let’s be honest, Scoot deserves a break with Photoshop World East coming up soon, and I’m pretty excited to get over there and hopefully to see some of you!

Let’s start by addressing a little myth that’s circulating social media right now, and that’s the myth that Adobe have scrapped their £/$/9.99 Photography Plan. The answer is: – they haven’t! Go take a look at Adobe’s subscription plans if you don’t believe me, and if you’re quick you’ll catch a flash sale they have, too.

Ok, onto the main event! Today I want to address something rather important in photography. Can a photographer be ‘good’ because they have good gear? Well, my immediate answer to that question on absolute face value is no. I think it’s much more important to work on your eye first, and here’s why: –

The most important thing a photographer can do is understand why. Whatever gear you’re using, if you’re just starting out or an old hand to the game, the most important thing really is to understand why. Why does a certain lens perform in a certain way? Why does a certain camera’s sensor give a particular look to the colour? Why does composition lend itself to conveying a particular message? Why does f/16 generally work in bright sunlight? Why does the exposure triangle make sense? Why does light soften as the source and subject get closer? 

If you want to be a better photographer, you must understand why. The belief that a new camera makes you better for example, is not true unless you understand why. Understanding why you want that new camera is crucial because if you don’t, you don’t know if it’s the right one. There’s the old adage, if you’re new to photography, that a pro photographer can do better with any camera than a rookie can do with a top of the range prosumer camera, and it’s true. You know why? It’s because the pro knows why. Having spent the time to understand not only what happens when they press the shutter, adjust the light, set the aperture etc, the pro knows why these things happen. We all want to improve ourselves and our photography, it’s our human nature, but often the problem is that we can be mistaken that better gear makes us better photographers. It’s certainly true that the bokeh on a shiny new f/1.4 lens can be phenomenal, but without a good understanding of light and composition that can all be wasted. Perhaps if you’re looking to spend money to improve your photography, consider spending it on training or on gaining experience and you’re on the fast-track to understanding the answer to that all important question – why?

When I started out in photography I thought I needed shiny new toys, loads of different lenses, tons of megapixels, and I quickly learned that what I in fact needed was answers and no amount of money spent on gear would substitute training and experience. The most important thing a photographer can do is understand why. Know why a camera or a piece of kit does what it does, and you’ll know which one best suits your purpose.

I hope that means something and makes a difference to your progression, no matter what stage you’re at. There is one exception, however: – buy a Platypod ;)

I’m off to Paris today, so I wish you all a great #TravelTuesday and you can follow along at @capturewithdave if you like, I’d love to meet you in the comments!

Much love

Dave

The post Understand Why appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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When I was in Minneapolis for my new seminar and I had the day off before my seminar, so I went shooting with my buddy Jay Grammond who lives up there. I’m always on the lookout for classic old interiors and he came up with some really great ones.

We got to four locations in all (including some real gems), and I put together an Adobe Spark page with the story, behind the scenes shots, camera settings, and my favorite shots from the day of shooting in the Twin Cities.

>> Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec. Hope you’ll check ’em out.

Just 10-days to the East Coast Photoshop World Conference

It’s not too late to come and join us in Orlando. If you can’t make Orlando this month, we’re doing a West Coast Photoshop World Conference in Las Vegas at the Mirage Resort & Casino on August 21-23, 2019 and it’s going to be epic. Tickets and info on both conferences at photoshopworld.com

Here’s to a super awesome week. :)

-Scott

The post My Favorite Shots From A Day Shooting in The Twin Cities appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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The Secret to Restoring Old Photos with Dave Cross | Official Class Trailer - YouTube
The Secrets To Restoring Old Photos with Dave Cross

Learn how to bring new life to old photos! Join Dave Cross for an in-depth look at various tools, techniques, and strategies for restoring old photographs. Dave starts with a look at options and considerations for capturing digital versions of your photos, then lays out his fundamental strategies for his restoration workflow. Dave builds on that foundation with a series of lessons that tackle the common scenarios you will encounter when working with old photos. From dealing with faded color to removing various types of spots to putting torn photos back together again, you’ll leave this class well prepared to tackle your next restoration project.



In Case You Missed It

Ideally, every photo we take would be perfect: perfect exposure, perfect white balance, no backlighting, no harsh shadows. Of course the reality is that some images need to be fixed, and in this course Dave Cross will look at ways to deal with common photographic problems. In each lesson Dave will fix a problem image, real-time, step-by-step.

The post New KelbyOne Class: The Secrets To Restoring Old Photos appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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I did it — I went mirrorless this week when I bought the new Canon EOS R Mirrorless body and I’m super-psyched. I mentioned this on “The Grid” this week and I had a flood of questions, so I thought today I answer some of the most common questions I’ve been getting about the switch. Here goes:

Q. Why did you wait so long?

A. Mostly because of all the rumors about Canon coming out with a pro-level mirrorless camera later this year, but my fear is the pro-level one when it comes out, will be more than I need (more megapixels, a lot more money, heavier, etc.). Plus, I have my Paris Workshop coming up next month, and while I could rent one from LensProToGo.com, I already know I really like the EOS R, and when I saw a great deal on it on B&H Photo, I finally pulled the plug and bought it.

Q. I thought you already had a EOS R?

A. That was just a loaner from Canon. They let me try one for 60-days when it first came out. I’ll say this. It worked — I wound up buying one. I also borrowed one from CPS (Canon Professional Services) for my Aircraft Carrier Trip last month. On that trip, I fell in love with it all over again.

Q. What does it do that your Canon 5D Mark IV doesn’t do?

A. It actually takes almost an identical image, since I believe it uses an updated version of the 5D Mark IV sensor, but it has so many things that my 5D Mark IV doesn’t, like a fully articulating pop-out rear LCD touch screen. I shoot a lot down low for my style of shooting (often on a Platypod), so being able to move that screen anywhere I want was a very big thing for me (that LCD screen is a higher resolution than my 5D Mark IV’s screen, too). There are a half-dozen other things that the EOS R does, that my 5D Mark IV doesn’t (stuff like the new Eye-AF feature, 4K screen grab, an assignable touchbar, fully silent shooting modes, built-in Bluetooth, way more autofocus points, double the RAW buffer, better auto-focus in low light), and those are all more icing on the cake for me. So, my images will look about the same, but it will be a better shooting experience for me and that’s really important to me.

Q. OK, give me one more thing.

A. That’s not a question (it’s more of a bossy order), but I do a lot of long exposures, and it has a really feature using its touch screen for shooting long exposures. Well, there’s that and it’s just easier to do long exposures on a mirrorless camera. Of course, that applies to any mirrorless, but together it’s another plus. I know you only asked for one, but one thing I love is when you turn off the camera to change lenses; a little door comes down over the sensor opening, so junk doesn’t get on your sensor. I super dig that.

Q . So, does your 5D Mark IV now become your backup camera?

A. Yup, pretty much. I sold my old 5D Mark III (which was my backup camera) and my old 16-35mm f/2.8 lens on eBay and those pretty much paid for my upgrade. Now my 5D Mark IV will be my backup camera in most cases, but I could still see me using it for studio work. I’m not sure how I feel about an Electronic Viewfinder in the studio — I’ve done it, but not enough to make a final call.

Q. Does it tether to Lightroom Classic yet?

A. It does, but only for the past few days. Tuesday’s Lightroom Classic update included the ability to tether the EOS R into Lightroom. Whew! Just in the nick of time.

Q. I always thought Canon sent you all your cameras for free?

A. I hear that a lot (saw some comments that said that same thing on The Grid this). Sadly, they do not. I have to buy them, but again, B&H Photo had it for $300 off, so I bit (thanks B&H). Really glad I did.

Q. I see from the picture up top that you bought the Control Ring Mount Adapter. What does it do, and why did you get it?

A. The Adapter part lets me use my existing Canon lenses on this new mirrorless body. The Control Ring part lets me assign a camera function to a ring that goes around the adapter. For example, I like to assign Exposure Compensation to that ring. My hand is already right there, so it’s incredibly convenient. I fell in love with that feature when I had the loaner. It’s so brilliant, I’m surprised someone else didn’t think of it first.

Q. How do you feel about the Electronic Viewfinder?

A. I’m getting used to it. It’s definitely different and it has a few nice features to it, but if given a choice I still like my regular ol‘ viewfinder. I’ll probably get used it. Well, I’m pretty sure I will, because it’s now my main camera.

Q. How much lighter is it than your old body?

A. Not enough to matter. Around 1/2 pound. It is physically a smaller camera, but for the most part, the whole “Mirrorless is lighter” thing on any platform (Sony, Nikon, Canon, etc.) is pretty much negated by the fact that as soon as you put a nice f/2.8 lens on it, it’s about as heavy as your old DSLR rig. I didn’t go mirrorless for lower weight anyway (especially since it really doesn’t exist in any meaningful amount); I did it for all the other reasons (well, that and the fact that it’s pretty much the future).

Q. Will you be buying any new lenses for it?

A. I will. When they release a 70-200mm (which apparently they have already officially announced is coming this year), hopefully, I’ll be getting that one, because it actually is smaller and lighter. Also, the lenses I’ve tried that Canon has made for their Mirrorless line so far have been absolutely stellar. Crazy, ludicrously sharp. So, in short “I’m in.”

Q. Have you talked with other EOS R users about their experience with the camera?

A. I have, and I haven’t talked to a single one that doesn’t absolutely love it. Plus, when I did a this on Facebook

Q. But it only has one card slot. How will you possibly manage to shoot with a card with only one-card slot?

A. Somehow, I’ll manage. I have a number of bodies with two slots and rarely do I ever actually put two cards in them. Over the years I have had a memory card go bad. Thankfully not many, but it happens. Maybe once every three years or so. In every case, I’ve been able to retrieve all the images off the damaged cards, so it’s never been an issue. So, for me, the two card slots mania isn’t a big issue, but in the big picture — it should have two card slots. At least two SD-slots — heck, they’re so thin, how much could it have added to the size or weight? Anyway, I imagine when Canon releases their Pro Mirrorless, it will certainly have two card slots (or spontanious Twitter death will rain down on it from above).

Q. Anything you don’t like so far?

A. Its battery life. It’s not awful, but it ain’t great. Not nearly as good as my 5D Mark IV’s battery. I generally carry 4 extra batteries (in my awesome little Think Tank Battery Holder), so it’s not a big issue, but I do wish the batteries lasted longer. Also, although you can just tap the rear screen to set focus and move your focus point, I miss the little rocker switch dial thingy from my 5D Mark IV. The EOS could use a few extra buttons for stuff like that.

Q. When are you going to share some images from the EOS R?

A. I already have. Check out my photos from Rome all shot with the EOS R, and I shot last month with a loaner EOS R on a US Navy Aircraft Carrier. :)

There ya go. Hope you all have an awesome weekend. I’ll be playing with my EOS R and getting it ready for my trips to Paris, then Provence, then London. I cannot wait! :)

-Scott

P.S. If you’re wishing you had signed up to go to the Photoshop World Conference in Orlando (it’s in two weeks), it’s not too late. photoshopworld.com

The post That’s it. I’ve Gone Mirrorless! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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Are you a Photographer, Retoucher or Graphic Artist?

This article was inspired by an interaction I had with a member of a Facebook photography group I belong to. A member posted an image of a bride standing in front of a jungle gym on a playground. He removed the jungle gym and was looking for praise in the form of asking for critiques. When he didn’t get the positive feedback he was hoping for, he proceeded to argue why he felt the image was his best work. I simply asked him if he is a photographer, retoucher, or graphic artist. His reply set the tone for my advice.

Proper Advice For The Proper Level

As an educator, my job is to inspire and help others, not tear them down. Before I give advice I ask what level the person wants me to critique their work — beginner, intermediate, advanced, or professional making a living — then I give proper advice for the proper level. So when I asked him, “Are you a photographer, retoucher, or graphic artist and at what level?” he proclaimed he is proficient in all three. Here is a sample of the interaction.

Guy on Facebook: Art, art, art. You know what I’m saying. That’s why you see Rihanna in the movies while she’s a singer.

Vanelli: You can be all three. BUT, for each discipline, you need to do it right. Unless there was no other way to get the shot of the bride, and I mean zero chance of moving her to a different location, then you move to plan B and use Photoshop to FIX and REPAIR. Think how long it took you to take the shot and then to edit it. Sometimes it’s quicker to fix it in post or for the sake of “ART,” you get the quick shot then manipulate it after. Again, decide which one you are IN THAT MOMENT. I hope this helps.

This statement didn’t help him and he continued to comment why everyone is wrong and he is right. I ended my participation in the conversation. I want to show his image, but out of respect I can’t. Instead, I’ll continue by using a bad image I took early on in my career when I thought I knew lighting.

Photographers Strive To Get It Right Before They Take The Shot

I was excited after I took this image. I had just learned how to use a light meter and didn’t have to guess at achieving proper exposure. I was even excited that I got the model to strike an interesting pose. I received praise from friends, local photographers, and even the model — who proclaimed I was the best photographer she had ever worked with. I was feeling pretty full of myself, until I asked the late great Jim DiVitale to review my portfolio at Photoshop World. Looking back, I realized how kind he was in choosing the right words to teach me about feathering the light, using grids, and how sometimes, to light a scene, you need to remove or redirect light. That was one of the best Photoshop Worlds I attended.

Retouching Should Enhance The Image, Not Repair It

Over the years I’ve developed my editing and retouching skills. I rose through the ranks while creating presets, looks, and creating educational content for a variety of photography-related companies. This skill set landed me a position with Skylum Software as a member of their Education Development Team. I still consider myself a photographer first. If I want to remove a blemish on a subject or ensure they have perfect skin, I hire a makeup artist. If there isn’t room in the budget for a makeup artist, THEN I fix it in post.

Recently I was asked to create a tutorial on how to develop a dramatic portrait using Luminar. This was a perfect opportunity to once again share the knowledge Jimmy D gave me many years ago. In this short 3-minute video, I show how to use Luminar to develop a dramatic portrait, and what photographers can do to achieve the same look as they take the photo.

DRAMATIC PORTRAITS | How To Remove Light With Luminar 3 - YouTube
A Graphic Artist Has The Ability To Transport Us To A Different Reality

Software such as Luminar was designed with photographers in mind and has some graphic tools — layers, masking, blending modes — to help their artistic efforts. Photoshop, on the other hand, was designed with graphic artists in mind and has tools photographers can use, making it a perfect choice to augment or change reality. I am by no means a Bert Monroy, Corey Barker, or Brooke Shaden. The graphic skills I’ve achieved came from the many years of attending Photoshop World and learning from some of the greats. When something inspires me, I do my best to be able to achieve it in camera. When that’s not possible, I enhance it in Luminar and then take it Photoshop to complete the vision.

For the image below, from my Assassin series, I didn’t have access to a rooftop with the New York skyline. So, instead, I found a rooftop image on Adobe Stock and photographed my assassin on a dark background to match the scene.

For this next image, “Shipwreck,”  I used my photography skills to achieve a beautiful blue sky by cross filtering. I set the white balance in the camera to Tungsten to make everything blue, then applied a CTO (color temperature orange) gel to color correct the light illuminating the model. Once again, I searched Adobe Stock for images of stars and the moon.

For the image below, from my Aviator series, I took images of vintage planes at an air show, then photographed the aviator on a white background to make it easier to extract her and to match the scene.

So ask yourself, are you a Photographer, Retoucher, or Graphic Artist? With discipline, you can achieve all three! But decide which one you are IN THAT MOMENT and use that skill to the best of your ability.

You can see Vanelli in person at Photoshop World Orlando from May 30 – June 1! You can also find more of his work at VanelliAndFriends.com, and keep up with him over at PhotoFocus and on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

The post Guest Blog: Photographer, Educator, and Author Robert Vanelli appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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Photoshop World is coming up soon, and with two events this year it’s set to be amazing! I’ve said of Photoshop World before: –

You should never underestimate the power of networking provided by Photoshop World, as well as the learning, inspiration, motivation, and everything else on offer! You never know who you might be talking to and everyone there is your friend.

Dave, last year

It’s because of the people at KelbyOne and Photoshop World that I have gotten where I am today. I started my journey as a travel photographer a few years ago and developed my skills as a writer and instructor as well, partly due to what I’ve learned and experienced at Photoshop world.  I’m proud to be a KelbyOne instructor, a writer for Photoshop User Magazine, the editor of Layers Magazine, and the dude who writes for you every Tuesday for #TravelTuesday on ScottKelby.com. 


Photoshop World is the best place in the industry to make and maintain connections, bar none. It’s funny because when you learn to write for editorial there are a whole bunch of rules, one of which is that when you want to emphasise something you put it in italics—you don’t make it bold and underline it, but I just can’t make this point strongly enough! 

Photoshop World is much, much more than a conference! Aside from the fact that you can attend a ton of classes on a range of tracks led by the cream of the crop from the creative industry. Here’s the real deal, let’s go!

First off, you know all those names you see on the KelbyOne Facebook Page? The members’ images shared on the KelbyOne Instagram Feed? The names you hear mentioned when the comments are read out during The Grid? The names you see commenting on your Instagram posts because you’re both members of the KelbyOne community? You get to put faces to those names! 

So, what else?! I mean, surely life-long friendships alone is a pretty good reason to look forward to the other side of Photoshop World, but what else?

The Partner Pavilion’s pretty sweet. You know that there’s a huge gathering of awesome creatives showing their wares there too, right? So, the likes of B&H Photo Video and Platypod Tripods are joined by so many other awesome companies that we all love right in one place, waiting to meet you too! That’s a pretty “mainstream” thing about Photoshop World though, and that’s not the point of this post. It’s meant to be the other things!

And then there are all the extra-curricular activities! There is a whole load of things going on in the evenings. When you hear about a party being announced or “tickets being released tomorrow morning” or anything like that, jump on it!

So, there’s all that, there’s the T-shirt toss, there’s the shipment of the biggest pile of Krispy Kreme donuts you’ve ever seen at Midnight Madness, and I feel like I’m laying down a sales pitch now but there’s good reason for that – Photoshop World is the creative event of all creative events!

Live events in general provide unique learning and career building opportunities that aren’t matched anywhere else. Taking a break from your day job, particularly when in our creative and ever-evolving industry, to sharpen your skills and pick up new tips and techniques will always make us more effective and efficient. Not only is it an opportunity to meet your business idols, making connections can lead to finding your next mentor and your chances of learning are greatly improved among an actively engaged and like-minded crowd. Hands-on demos and workshops afford an opportunity to ask the questions you want to ask. Breaking out of your comfort zone, albeit in comfortable surrounds, engages different parts of our minds and that exactly what we sometimes need to break out of old ways of thinking and stepping into new ones. There are just so many reasons to attend Photoshop World which I have personally experienced and benefited from that I could make this list last forever, but the ultimately if you want to improve yourself, invest in yourself at Photoshop World!

The post PSW East is near! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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Alright, which do you want first?  The bad news? OK.

I had just boarded my flight to Minneapolis last week when I got a call from my editor at Rocky Nook to let me know that they received the first copies of The Landscape Photography Book and about 30% of the book had a serious printing issue. The company that printed the book admitted the mistake and agreed it was unacceptable, so this past weekend they were back on press reprinting the entire print over from scratch.

Unfortunately, (for my readers who pre-ordered the book, and my editors, and my publisher, and me) that means instead of the book being delivered to readers and bookstores this past week as expected, it will now be delayed a few more weeks as the books have to be bound, finished and shipped. Ugh. :(

Wow, that is bad news. What’s the good news?

Well, if there is a bright spot here, it’s that my publisher made the right call to have the book reprinted. Not every publisher would have done that because this is a decision that adversely affects their business, their author, and their relationships with the booksellers as well (especially seeing as this book had my biggest pre-sales numbers in years).

The folks at Rocky Nook felt that the printing for a photography book like this had to be “on the money” and I totally agree. They have always been absolutely committed to the reader, so I’m not surprised they made the call to pull all the copies already in print and go back to press. It’s one of the things that makes me proud to be one of their authors. My hats off to them.

So, to sum it all up:

The good news is — when you see The Landscape Photography Book, the printing will look great. The bad news is, we have to wait a bit longer to see it look great.  

Needless to say, I was (a) upset (b) heartbroken (c) upset and heartbroken, and just generally bummed out, but I would have been embarrassed to have delivered a book that didn’t live up our standards, so I understand and agree it’s the right call, even if it’s a painful one. 

Thanks everybody for your patience a few weeks more. Thanks to Rocky Nook for caring so much about our readers, and to the printer for owning up to the error.

Here’s to a week of better printing! :-)

-Scott


The post I have good news and I have bad news about my new landscape photography book appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

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