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LEED certification supports Canada’s sustainability and climate change efforts

OTTAWA, ON – January 22, 2018 – Today, the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) is pleased to announce that Canada has once again ranked second in the annualTop 10 Countries and Regions for LEED list. Curated by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the creators of the LEED green building program, this list recognizes markets outside the U.S. that are using LEED to create healthier, more sustainable spaces where citizens live, learn, work and play. Canada earned the distinction for its current total of 2,970 LEED certified projects totaling more than 40.77 million gross square meters of space.

“Canada’s green building industry has consistently proven that we are among the most innovative in the world, and this result further cements that leadership position,” says Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of the Canada Green Building Council. “LEED has and will continue to be instrumental in bringing green building solutions to scale including energy efficiency and carbon, health and wellness, resiliency and advanced material choices. With LEED we can deliver now to substantially improve performance for buildings across Canada.”

The list ranks countries and regions in terms of cumulative LEED certified gross square meters as of December 31, 2017, and represents 6,657 certified projects totaling more than 158 million gross square meters. LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design is the world’s most widely used green building program with projects in more than 167 countries and territories, with more than 205,800 gross square meters of space certifying every day. It is a global, regional and local solution that provides a framework for buildings, communities and cities to create healthy, highly efficient and cost-saving spaces while working to improve quality of life.

Ranking Country/Region Number of Projects Gross Square Meters*
1 China 1,211 47.16
2 Canada 2,970 40.77
3 India 752 20.28
4 Brazil 461 14.83
5 Germany 276 7.00
6 Republic of Korea 106 6.66
7 Taiwan 124 6.15
8 Turkey 245 6.06
9 Mexico 305 5.16
10 United Arab Emirates 207 4.41
** United States 30,669 385.65

*Gross square meters are reported in millions. Data is reported as of December 2017.

**The United States, where LEED originated, is not included on the list, but remains the world’s largest market for LEED.

“Canada remains an important leader in driving the adoption of LEED and green building. With nearly 3,000 LEED certified projects throughout the country, we are seeing the leaders in this market push the boundaries of what it means to be a high-performing building or space,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, President and CEO, USGBC and Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI), the global certifying body for LEED projects. “Progress happens one project at a time and the work being done across Canada is helping to define where the industry is moving and how we stay focused on finding solutions that will continue to improve our quality of life.”

Canada is part of a growing number of nations dedicated to a greener, more sustainable built environment. According to a Dodge Data & Analytics World Green Building Trends 2016 SmartMarket Report, countries indicated that economic forces were the most important drivers for green building. The SmartMarket report also revealed that increasing consumer demand has pushed the world’s green building market to a trillion-dollar industry that has led to a corresponding increase in the scope and size of the green building materials market, which is expected to reach $234 billion by 2019.

About the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC)
CaGBC is the leading national organization dedicated to advancing green building and sustainable community development practices. As the voice of green building in Canada, we work closely with our national and chapter members in an effort to make every building greener. The CaGBC reduces environmental impacts from the built environment through project certification, advocacy and research, and has helped meet the demand for skilled workers by providing green building education to over 30,000 professionals across the country since 2002. CaGBC established the LEED® green building rating system in Canada and developed the country’s first Zero Carbon Building Standard in 2017. It also oversees the Canada Coalition for Green Schools, and is a member of the World Green Building Council supporting international efforts to reduce environmental impacts from the built environment. For more information, visit cagbc.org and connect on TwitterFacebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

About the U.S. Green Building Council

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is committed to a prosperous and sustainable future through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USGBC works toward its mission of market transformation through its LEED green building program, robust educational offerings, a nationwide network of chapters and affiliates, the annualGreenbuild International Conference & Expo, the Center for Green Schools and advocacy in support of public policy that encourages and enables green buildings and communities. For more information, visit usgbc.org and connect on TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn.

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Winner of 2018 Green Building Product of the Year Award to join an exclusive group of leading manufacturers in the green building industry
Ottawa, ON – January 16, 2018 – The Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) is pleased to announce that the 2018 CaGBC Green Building Product of the Year Awardcompetition is now open. CaGBC initiated the Product of the Year award in 2015 to encourage Canadian companies to develop sustainable building products and materials to better support the green building industry. For the third year, the Award is sponsored by UL Environment, an independent product safety testing, certification and inspection organization.
“This is our fourth year recognizing a Green Building Product of the Year, and each year the calibre of submissions increases,” says Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of the Canada Green Building Council. “We encourage Canadian manufacturers and technology providers to submit their innovative products which support the transition to a low carbon economy, promote health and wellness of occupants, or improve overall environmental performance of buildings.”
Product submissions are assessed based on four key areas: sustainability, transparency and verification, innovation, and application. Full criteria can be found by visiting the Award webpage. Entrants to the competition must be a National CaGBC member to apply, and the product must be manufactured or designed in Canada to be eligible (services and software are not eligible). A jury of experts from across Canada will to decide on this year’s winner. Deadline to submit is February 13, 2018.
The top three entrants will be asked to provide a short video about their product that will be shown to delegates at Building Lasting Change 2018, CaGBC’s National Conference and Showcase, taking place this year from June 5 to 7 at Toronto’s Beanfield Centre. The winner will be presented with the award at theLeadership Awards Gala in Toronto on June 6. The winner also gains the right to use the CaGBC Product of the Year crest on its marketing materials and product website. This crest is only available to one winning project each year, making it an exclusive signifier of a truly green product.
Winners will also have a detailed case study on theCaGBC website. Potential applicants can view the submittal process and more about the Award by visiting theProduct of the Year webpage, or bybeginning the application process here.

Media Contact
Renée Rietveld
CaGBC Media Relations
613-288-8075 (desk)
613-894-7772 (cell)

About CaGBC
CaGBC (www.cagbc.org) is the leading national organization dedicated to advancing green building and sustainable community development practices. As the voice of green building in Canada, we work closely with our national and chapter members in an effort to make every building greener. The CaGBC reduces environmental impacts from the built environment through project certification, advocacy and research, and has helped meet the demand for skilled workers by providing green building education to over 30,000 professionals across the country since 2002. CaGBC established the LEED® green building rating system in Canada and developed the country’s first Zero Carbon Building Standard in 2017. It also oversees the Canada Coalition for Green Schools, and is a member of the World Green Building Council supporting international efforts to reduce environmental impacts from the built environment.

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CaGBC members selected to present will have an exciting opportunity to reach a wider audience of green building industry professionals than ever before, with WorldGBC delegates coming from around the world to attend this event.

Apply today – the Call for Presentations for all five education streams and the EGP Innovation Challenge now closes on January 8, 2017.

The details and criteria for presentation submissions can be found in our online application platform and our website.

Click to begin your application now

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Time is running out to apply to present at Canada’s premier green building industry event – CaGBC’s Building Lasting Change 2018 with WorldGBC Congress Canada. Building Lasting Change returns to Toronto from June 5 to 7, 2018 – and we’re inviting all CaGBC members to share their expertise with industry professionals from across the country and the globe as part of the Conference.

Click here to learn more

In partnership with REALPAC, we are proud to host WorldGBC Congress as part of this year’s Conference, which will examine what is happening in Canada and around the world to meet aggressive international carbon reduction targets.
CaGBC members selected to present will have an exciting opportunity to reach a wider audience of green building industry professionals than ever before, with WorldGBC delegates coming from around the world to attend this event.

Apply today – the Call for Presentations for all five education streams and the EGP Innovation Challenge closes December 22, 2017.

The details and criteria for presentation submissions can be found in our online application platform and our website.

Click to begin your application now

Also accepting nominations now:
CaGBD Leadership and Green Building Excellence Awards
The CaGBC is pleased to celebrate the calibre, quality and impact of outstanding green building projects and our committed volunteers across the country.

Click here to learn more about the awards and to submit a nomination today.

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TallWood House at Brock Commons, Vancouver, Canada
Engineer: Fast + Epp
Winner: The Award for Construction Innovation

Last night, The Institution of Structural Engineers announced the winners of The Structural Awards 2017, at a glittering awards ceremony at The Brewery, London. TallWood House at Brock Commons, Vancouver, Canada was amongst the winning projects, scooping-up the prestigious Award for Construction Innovation .

The winners were chosen from a shortlist of 45 pioneering global projects which showcased the ingenuity and expertise of the engineers behind them.

A diverse range of structures, from temples to tourist attractions, were recognised across 14 categories which singled-out engineering excellence and highlighted the important role played by structural engineers in the building journey.

The judging panel, made up of a distinguished group of industry experts, were unanimous in their admiration for the fresh approach that was taken across design and detailing, which has developed an economic new hybrid system for high rise structures and set a new precedent for what can be economically achieved in predominantly timber structures. The judges praised the engineers, Fast + Epp, on the development of this innovative solution to deliver a highly economic and sustainable alternative to more traditional construction methodology.

British Airways i360, Brighton, United Kingdom
Engineer: Jacobs
Winner: The Supreme Award for Structural Excellence & Award for Tall or Slender Structure

The overall winner on the evening was the British Airways i360 in Brighton, received the hotly contested Supreme Award for Structural Engineering Excellence. This particular award celebrates the year’s finest example of structural engineering design.

Baha’i Temple, Santiago, Chile
Engineer: Simpson Gumpertz & Heger ¦ Patricio Bertholet M. ¦ Halcrow ¦ Joseph Gatner GmbH
Winner: The Award for Structural Artistry

Institution Chief Executive, Martin Powell, comments: “When you think you’ve seen it all, another year of exemplary entries are received elevating structural engineering, yet again, to another level. We have witnessed some breath-taking projects at this year’s awards, featuring ingenious use of materials and new construction methods to create buildings, bridges and landmarks that inspire.

“Congratulations to our award winners and thank you to all those that entered – you’ve made this an outstanding year for the industry. Each project celebrates the very essence of structural engineering, recognising structural engineers as the guardians of public safety and innovative, problem-solving design professionals. ”

Jet D’Eau, Geneva, Switzerland
Engineer: INGENI SA
Winner: The Award for Pedestrian Bridges

Now in its 50th year, these prestigious annual awards celebrate the world’s most outstanding achievements and demonstrate the diversity of structural engineering, recognising e xcellence, creativity and innovation, as well as sustainability, economic viability and value for money.

The Pump House, London
Engineer: Webb Yates Engineers
Winner: The Award for Small Projects (of under £1 Million)

The full list of winners and projects can be viewed at www.structuralawards.org.
Downloadable images of the winning projects are available on the following link: https://we.tl/VbDscHH5zH

To receive further information, please contact Henry Rubinstein, henryr@thinktank.org.uk at The Think Tank, T: +44 (0) 20 7831 2225.

The Structural Awards 2017

Category winners :

– The Supreme Award for Structural Engineering Excellence

  • British Airways i360 at Brighton
  • Structural Engineer: Jacobs

– The Award for Tall or Slender Structures

  • British Airways i360 at Brighton
  • Structural Engineer: Jacobs

– The Award for Long Span Structures

  • San Mames Football Stadium Cable Roof Extension
  • Structural Engineer: IDOM

– The Award for Vehicle Bridges

  • Destructor Bridge
  • Structural Engineer: COWI (formerly Flint & Neill)

– The Award for Pedestrian Bridges

  • The new mobile walkway of Geneva’s Jet d’Eau
  • Structural Engineer: INGENI SA

– The Award for Small Projects (of under £1 million)

  • The Pump House
  • Structural Engineer: Webb Yates Engineers

– The Award for Small Projects (of between £1-3 million)

  • Adele 25 Stage
  • Structural Engineer: OPS Structures Ltd

– The Award for Structures in Extreme Conditions

  • MeyGen Phase 1A
  • Structural Engineer: Robert Bird Group

– The Award for Structural Heritage

  • Rejuvenation of the heritage Makatote rail viaduct
  • Structural Engineer: Opus International Consultants

– The Award for Structural Transformation

  • The Design Museum
  • Structural Engineer: ARUP

– The Award for Construction Innovation

  • TallWood House at Brock Commons
  • Structural Engineer: Fast + Epp

– The Award for Construction Integration

  • National Taichung Theater
  • Structural Engineer: ARUP

– The Award for Structural Artistry

  • Bahá’í Temple of South America
  • Structural Engineer: Simpson Gumpertz & Heger|Patricio Bertholet M.|Halcrow|Josef Gartner GmbH

– The Award for Outstanding Value

  • ElevArch
  • Structural Engineer: Freyssinet/BHA

– The Award for Sustainability

  • The Enterprise Centre
  • Structural Engineer: BDP
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OTTAWA, ON – October 31, 2017 – Today, the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) is opening public registration for Canada’s first Zero Carbon Building (ZCB) Program, which provides third-party verification of compliance for zero carbon design and performance. This world-class Standard positions Canada as a global leader, offering designers and operators the opportunity to make carbon reduction the key indicator for building performance. In order to achieve large-scale market transformation, the Standard is designed to be broadly applicable across many types of new and existing buildings, and aligns with recent and upcoming federal and provincial policies that target net zero performance. The ZCB Program joins CaGBC’s other successful programs in providing solutions for the industry as it prepares for a carbon constrained future and a rapidly evolving economy.

“I am confident that the Canadian building industry is ready to lead the global shift to zero carbon by building on the extensive experience and capacity delivering LEED across the country,” says Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of the CaGBC. “The CaGBC Zero Carbon Building Standard provides the framework to guide the industry toward achieving zero carbon performance, and to making real progress in moving to a low-carbon economy.”

A part of CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Buildings Initiative, CaGBC has been working with 16 Zero Carbon Pilot Projects across the country. This elite group represents the broad applicability of the Standard, with both new and existing projects ranging in size from 20,000 to 1.3 million sq. ft. found across the country. Many of the Pilots are now completing the design stage and report that they have found the ZCB Standard key to shaping their design strategies.

“The CaGBC’s new Zero Carbon Building Standard charts an innovative, bold new course for the future of buildings. Oxford is piloting the standard because it will help us meet the changing expectations of our customers and future proof our buildings, all while doing the right thing for our community,” says Andrew McAllan, Head of Real Estate Management, Oxford Properties Group who has two projects in the ZCB Pilot.

For the West 8th and Pine Mixed-Use Pilot Project proposed in Vancouver, CaGBC’s ZCB Standard is a way to achieve a deeply sustainable development while also helping them comply with the City of Vancouver’s new Zero Emissions Building Plan.

“Although we’ve been proponents and early adopters of high performance and sustainable building features, we recognize that incremental improvement is not moving the dial far enough and that we need a fundamental and transformative shift in how we design, specify, and build-out our projects,” says Kirk Robinson of Delta Land Development who owns this project. “With this in mind, the principles that the project team have started to identify for our 8th and Pine mixed-use development align perfectly with the CaGBC Zero Carbon Building Pilot Project Program, in particular as we want this project to ultimately serve as a demonstration to the private sector development industry that these measures are viable, on-market, and the way forward.”

The MacKimmie Complex Redevelopment at the University of Calgary is a Pilot Project aiming to be the first zero carbon building on campus. It will include the retrofit of a 14-storey tower and the construction of a new building that will include a double-skin façade – one of the first projects in Canada to use this technology.

“Our participation in the CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Building Standard pilot program offers University of Calgary the opportunity to learn from our peers and contextualize it to the Alberta energy environment with an eye to fiscal responsibility, while still delivering the space and program that supports the needs of our campus,” says Boris Dragicevic, Associate Vice President of Facilities Development at U of C.

A full list of pilot projects can be found here.

Along with registration and detailed pricing information, a new Zero Carbon Building (ZCB) Workbook is now available. The Workbook helps calculate the net carbon balance of a building, provides enhanced support for advanced calculations, and includes guidance to ensure that all required documentation is provided. Energy Modelling Guidelines have also been released, which provide clarity on the key metrics of the standard for energy professionals. The CaGBC will be providing additional guidance, education and support for the Standard over the coming months.

Those interested in registering for the CaGBC ZCB Program or in learning more about the Standard and its requirements can visit the website at cagbc.org/zerocarbon.


Media Contact
Renée Rietveld
CaGBC Media Relations
613-288-8075 (desk)
613-894-7772 (cell)


About CaGBC

The CaGBC (www.cagbc.org) is the leading national organization dedicated to advancing green building and sustainable community development practices. As the voice of green building in Canada, we work closely with our national and chapter members in an effort to make every building greener. The CaGBC reduces environmental impacts from the built environment through project certification, advocacy and research, and has helped meet the demand for skilled workers by providing green building education to over 30,000 professionals across the country since 2002. CaGBC is the license holder of the LEED® green building rating system in Canada and developed the country’s first Zero Carbon Building Standard this year, supports the WELL™ Building Standard and GRESB in Canada, and oversees the Canada Coalition for Green Schools. We are also a member of the World Green Building Council supporting international efforts to reduce environmental impacts from the built environment.

Le CBDCa donne le coup d’envoi à une économie sobre en carbone au Canada et ouvre l’inscription au Programme des bâtiments à carbone zéro

OTTAWA (Ontario), le 31 octobre 2017 – Aujourd’hui, le Conseil du bâtiment durable du Canada (CBDCa) ouvre l’inscription publique au premier Programme des bâtiments à carbone zéro du Canada (BCZ), qui offre une vérification par une tierce partie de la conformité de la conception et de la performance des bâtiments à carbone zéro. La Norme du bâtiment à carbone zéro utilisée à cette fin est une norme de classe internationale qui positionne le Canada comme un chef de file mondial et offre aux concepteurs et aux exploitants des bâtiments la possibilité de faire de la réduction du carbone l’indicateur clé de la performance des bâtiments. Pour que s’opère la transformation du marché à grande échelle, cette Norme est conçue pour s’appliquer à une vaste gamme de bâtiments neufs et existants et elle est alignée avec les politiques fédérales et provinciales récentes et à venir qui ciblent une performance nette zéro. Le Programme des BCZ s’ajoute aux autres programmes à succès du CBDCa et il offre des solutions à l’industrie alors qu’elle se prépare à un avenir sous contrainte carbone et qu’elle exerce dans une économie qui évolue rapidement.

« Je suis convaincu que l’industrie canadienne du bâtiment est prête à prendre la tête du virage mondial vers le carbone zéro en s’appuyant sur sa vaste expérience et sa grande capacité à réaliser des projets LEED à la grandeur du pays », a déclaré Thomas Mueller, président et chef de la direction du CBDCa. « La Norme du bâtiment à carbone zéro offre le cadre qui aidera l’industrie à réaliser des bâtiments à carbone zéro et à faire de réels progrès dans le passage à une économie sobre en carbone. »

Dans le cadre de son Initiative sur les bâtiments à carbone zéro, le CBDCa mène un Programme pilote sur le carbone zéro auquel participent 16 projets à la grandeur du pays. Ces projets triés sur le volet illustrent la vaste portée d’application de la Norme; ils comprennent des projets de construction neuve et des projets de rénovation de bâtiments existants dont les superficies varient de 20 000 à 1,3 million de pieds carrés. Plusieurs de ces projets pilotes en sont aux dernières étapes de la conception et leurs concepteurs ont déclaré que la Norme du BCZ avait joué un rôle déterminant dans l’élaboration de leurs stratégies conceptuelles.

« La nouvelle Norme du bâtiment à carbone zéro du CBDCa trace une voie innovatrice et audacieuse pour l’avenir des bâtiments. Oxford participe au programme pilote parce que nous croyons que cette norme nous aidera à modifier les attentes de nos clients et à assurer la durabilité de nos bâtiments tout en agissant dans l’intérêt de notre communauté », a pour sa part déclaré Andrew McAllan, directeur de la gestion immobilière chez Oxford Properties Group, qui compte deux projets inscrits au Programme pilote des BCZ.

Pour le projet de complexe à usage mixte à l’intersection de West 8th et Pine, à Vancouver, la Norme du BCZ du CBDCa est une façon de réaliser un projet profondément durable et de se conformer au nouveau Plan sur les bâtiments à zéro émission de la Ville de Vancouver.

« Bien que nous soyons de fervents défenseurs et des pionniers des bâtiments durables et à haute performance, nous sommes conscients que l’amélioration graduelle ne suffit pas et que nous devons effectuer un virage fondamental et transformateur dans nos façons de concevoir, d’établir les cahiers des charges et de construire nos projets », a souligné Kirk Robinson de Delta Land Development, le propriétaire de ce projet. « Gardant cela à l’esprit, les principes que l’équipe de projet a commencé à définir pour notre complexe à usage mixte de l’intersection 8th et Pine concordent parfaitement avec le Programme pilote des bâtiments à carbone zéro du CBDCa, d’autant plus que nous voulons démontrer aux intervenants du secteur privé que ces mesures sont viables, qu’elles sont disponibles sur le marché et qu’elles représentent la voie à suivre. »

Le projet pilote du réaménagement du complexe MacKimmie à l’Université de Calgary vise quant à lui à devenir le premier bâtiment à carbone zéro sur le campus. Il porte sur la rénovation d’une tour de 14 étages et la construction d’un nouveau bâtiment doté d’une façade à double peau – l’un des premiers projets à utiliser cette technologie au Canada.

« Notre participation au Programme pilote des bâtiments à carbone zéro du CBDCa offre à l’Université de Calgary l’occasion d’apprendre de ses pairs et de contextualiser ces apprentissages dans l’environnement énergétique de l’Alberta sans perdre de vue la responsabilité fiscale et tout en offrant les espaces et les programmes qui répondent aux besoins de notre campus », a dit Boris Dragicevic, vice-président adjoint du développement des installations à l’Université de Calgary.

La liste complète des projets pilotes est affichée ici.

En plus de l’information sur l’inscription et la tarification détaillée, un nouvel outil, le Zero Carbon Building (ZCB) Workbook est maintenant offert. Cet outil aide à calculer le bilan carbone net d’un bâtiment, en plus d’apporter une aide pour les calculs avancés. Il comprend également des directives pour s’assurer de fournir toute la documentation requise. Le CBDCa a aussi publié des Directives de modélisation énergétique qui apportent des éclaircissements sur les principaux indicateurs de la norme à l’intention des professionnels de l’énergie. Le CBDCa fournira des directives additionnelles, de la formation et du soutien à l’utilisation de la Norme au cours des prochains mois.

Pour s’inscrire au Programme des BCZ du CBDCa ou pour en apprendre davantage sur la Norme et ses exigences, veuillez visiter le cagbc.org/carbonzero.
Personne-ressource pour les médias
Renée Rietveld
Relations avec les médias du CBDCa
613 288-8075 (bureau)
613 894-7772 (cell.)


Au sujet du CBDCa

Le CBDCa (www.cagbc.org) est le principal organisme national de l’industrie voué à la promotion des pratiques liées aux bâtiments durables et à l’aménagement de collectivités durables. En tant que porte-parole du bâtiment durable au Canada, il travaille étroitement avec ses membres nationaux et les membres de ses sections régionales dans une volonté de verdir tous les bâtiments. Le CBDCa réduit les impacts environnementaux du cadre bâti par ses activités de certification de projets, de sensibilisation et de recherche. Il aide aussi à combler les besoins en main-d’œuvre qualifiée et il a offert de la formation sur le bâtiment durable à plus de 30 000 professionnels du pays depuis 2002. Le CBDCa détient la licence d’utilisation du système d’évaluation des bâtiments durables LEED® au Canada et il a lancé la première Norme du bâtiment à carbone zéro au pays cette année. Il appuie les normes WELLTM Building Standardet GRESB au Canada, et il supervise les activités de la Coalition canadienne pour des écoles vertes. Enfin, le CBDCa est membre du World Green Building Council (Conseil mondial du bâtiment durable) qui appuie les efforts internationaux visant à réduire les impacts environnementaux du cadre bâti.

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Vancouver, BC – October 10, 2017 – The Canada Green Building Council® (CaGBC) commends the Vancouver Convention Centre (VCC) for demonstrating sustainability excellence with the announcement that it has earned LEED® v4 Existing Building Platinum, becoming the first double LEED Platinum convention centre in the world, and the first v4 Platinum Existing Building project to certify in Canada. The announcement was made at a press conference in Vancouver today, which included BC Minister for Tourism Lisa Beare, Vancouver Acting Mayor Raymond Louie, and CaGBC’s President and CEO, Thomas Mueller.

“Congratulations to the whole team at the Vancouver Convention Centre for once again proving their leadership in sustainability by earning Canada’s first LEED v4 Platinum Existing Building certification,” says Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of CaGBC. “Through the LEED v4 Platinum certification, the VCC team is ensuring that this world-class venue continues to be operated and maintained at the highest level delivering environmental and health benefits for years to come. At the same time the VCC is setting an example for convention facilities around the world while showcasing Vancouver’s commitment to environmental excellence.”

Consisting of two uniquely designed buildings totaling 466,500 sq. ft., the VCC is British Columbia’s flagship convention centre, hosting more than 500 events and welcoming hundreds of thousands of attendees each year, while generating significant economic activity for the province. Following its initial LEED for New Construction Platinum certification in 2010, the VCC sustainability team has been dedicated to continuing to improve operations.

“While the Vancouver Convention Centre was built to the highest environmental standard with features like our six-acre living roof, marine habitat and impressive green technologies, our commitment to the environment is more than the building, significant as it is,” says Ken Cretney, President and CEO, BC Pavilion Corporation. “When we opened our West building, we set out to be a global leader in sustainability to make a difference in our community and global industry. I am extremely proud of our team for its dedication and hard work to further our sustainability program, resulting in this prestigious second Platinum designation.”

To meet the certification requirements for the rigorous LEED v4, the VCC team introduced new sustainability initiatives and enhanced existing programs including:

  • Increasing the capacity of the blackwater treatment plant by 30 per cent which, when combined with water efficient fixtures, has reduced potable water use by 38 per cent annually – the equivalent to approximately three quarters of an Olympic-size swimming pool or 1,815,962 liters.
  • Aiming to continually maintain and improve energy performance through an ongoing program of building system and energy use analysis, and implementation of upgrades. Recent upgrades include switching to more efficient LED lighting in the facility to improve overall efficiency.
  • Enhancing the organization-wide recycling program to increase the waste diversion rate from 50 to 75 per cent.
  • Developing a Post-Event Sustainability Report for interested clients, which carefully monitors and measures several sustainability-related indicators. The final Report highlights areas of achievement and opportunities for future growth.
  • Creating a Reclaim Room at the Convention Centre where material and goods left behind from events are housed until the Sustainability Coordinator sources local charity or community group where the items could be donated or meaningfully re-purposed.

To view photos and a project description, click here.

For more information on LEED v4 and the project’s who are leading the way, visit cagbc.org/LEEDv4. A searchable LEED project database with further detail on all LEED certified projects in Canada, including project scorecards and photos, can be viewed on the CaGBC LEED® Project Profiles webpage.


Media Contact
Renée Rietveld
CaGBC Media Relations
Desk: 613-288-8075
Cell: 613-852-3125

About the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC)
The CaGBC (www.cagbc.org) is the leading national organization dedicated to advancing green building and sustainable community development practices. As the voice of green building in Canada, we work closely with our national and chapter members in an effort to make every building greener. The CaGBC reduces environmental impacts from the built environment through project certification, advocacy and research, and has helped meet the demand for skilled workers by providing green building education to over 30,000 professionals across the country since 2002. CaGBC is the license holder of the LEED® green building rating system in Canada and developed the country’s first Zero Carbon Building Standard this year, supports the WELL™ Building Standard and GRESB in Canada, and oversees the Canada Coalition for Green Schools. We are also a member of the World Green Building Council supporting international efforts to reduce environmental impacts from the built environment.

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In addition to exemplary environmental curriculum, school has achieved a 68 per cent energy savings, and a 50 per cent reduction in water use

Ottawa, ON – September 27, 2017 –
The Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) and the Canada Coalition for Green Schools announced today that Amber Trails Community School in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is the winner of the annual CaGBC Greenest School in Canada competition. Located in the heart of a new neighbourhood in North Winnipeg, Amber Trails is a 78,000 sq.ft., newly constructed building that acts not just as a school, but as an open and accessible hub within the community. The school received LEED® Platinum certification in 2016, and won the CaGBC’s Excellence in Green Building for New Construction award in May 2017.

The CaGBC Greenest School jury, comprised of green building industry experts from across the country, chose Amber Trails for both its excellent environmental curriculum and its dedication to maintaining a truly green building, including an ENERGY STAR score of 92 and overall energy savings of 68 per cent. They appreciated the school’s eco-positive vision that highlights community engagement, as well as the Outdoor Learning Environment, which integrates this space with the surrounding public trails and encourages teachers to take their instruction outside. Additionally, they like that the school has adopted a “balanced” school day which allows students more time to play outside.

As the 2017 Greenest School in Canada winner, Amber Trails will receive a $2,000 cash award to put toward a new or ongoing sustainability project.

“This award is such a tremendous honour and we’d like to thank the Canada Green Building Council for providing this wonderful opportunity,” says Shivram Raveendrabose, a teacher at Amber Trails. “These funds will significantly help our school’s ongoing commitments to sustainability and green innovation. We would like to recognize how this achievement was made possible through the dedication of our entire community. Through our various green projects, students, staff members, and families of all backgrounds have made sustainable living an essential part of community life.”

Among the many highlights of the Amber Trails Community School:

  • A student-run organic vegetable farm was developed last summer, enabling students in the farming club to work together with a farm coordinator to cultivate a mixture of over 20 varieties of vegetables which are sold to staff and community members.
  • The school is working on a timeline-based teaching guideline that connects the climatic seasons with the school’s vegetable farm, in order to support land-based education and promote a deeper sense of place, and an awareness of human impacts and how they acknowledge and connect with natural cycles.
  • The project owner, Seven Oaks School Division and PSFB, made the decision to eliminate natural gas from the project to reduce GHG emissions and future mechanical maintenance costs. With a combination of geothermal heating and cooling, radiant floor heating, low-flow fixtures and other initiatives, the school achieved over 68 per cent energy savings and a lower carbon footprint.
  • Each classroom has three large windows and a partially glazed wall separating the classroom from the hallway, allowing for fresh air, outdoor views and natural light to come into the classroom. They say this has many positive impacts on the mental and physical well-being of both students and teachers.
  • Amber Trails has achieved over 50 per cent reduction in water use. The school division reported that they are saving approximately $7,224 per year on water and it was found that the average water consumption for Amber Trails is 1.21 m3 per student, in comparison to 3.2m3 per student at a similar school.

“I would like to congratulate Amber Trails Community School and their dedicated staff and students on winning the 2017 Greenest School in Canada,” says Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of the CaGBC. “Amber Trails is an excellent example of a school that not only teaches students about sustainability and innovation, but that puts it into practice. By weaving sustainability into the culture and curriculum of their LEED Platinum certified school, Amber Trails is teaching its students the most important lessons about the our natural environment, while inspiring them to be next generation leaders.”

The runners up of the 2017 Greenest School in Canada competition were:

For a closer look at the schools and their many initiatives including videos and photos, visit the CaGBC’s website here.

Launched in 2014, this the Greenest School in Canada competition seeks to showcase kindergarten to Grade 12 schools across the country that truly exemplify how sustainability can be woven into the infrastructure, culture and curriculum of a school. The competition is part of a series of initiatives from the CaGBC and the Canada Coalition for Green Schools.

In addition to the Greenest School in Canada competition, CaGBC encourages Green Apple Day events in Canada at any time of the year, as a contribution to the larger initiative started by the U.S. Center for Green Schools. Green Apple Days gives parents, teachers, students, companies and local organizations the opportunity to transform all schools into healthy, safe and productive learning environments through local service events.

Media Contact:
Renée Rietveld
Manager, Communications and Content Strategy, CaGBC
Desk: 613-288-8075
Cell: 613-894-7772
media@cagbc.org

About the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC)
The CaGBC (www.cagbc.org) GBCI Canada are the leading national organizations dedicated to advancing green building and sustainable community development practices. As the voice of green building in Canada, CaGBC works closely with our national and chapter members in an effort to make every building greener. It does this through project certification, advocacy and research, and has helped meet the demand for skilled workers by providing green building education to over 30,000 professionals across the country since 2002. It also developed the country’s first Zero Carbon Building Standard and is a member of the World Green Building Council, supporting international efforts to reduce environmental impacts from the built environment.

About the Canada Coalition for Green Schools

The CaGBC joined the Global Coalition for Green Schools as a founding member in 2013, and went on to form the Canada Coalition for Green Schools (www.cagbc.org/greenschools) in November 2013. The Canadian coalition is comprised of members of the green building industry contributing their time and expertise to support communities in the transformation of their schools. This will be achieved through a variety of initiatives, including: Green Apple Day of Service and the Greenest School in Canada competition.

L’école communautaire Amber Trails de Winnipeg remporte le concours de l’école la plus verte au Canada en 2017  

En plus d’offrir un programme d’études environnementales exemplaire, l’école a réduit de 68 pour cent sa consommation d’énergie et de 50 pour cent sa consommation d’eau

Ottawa (Ontario), le 27 septembre 2017 –
Le Conseil du bâtiment durable du Canada (CBDCa) et la Coalition canadienne pour des écoles vertes ont annoncé aujourd’hui que l’école communautaire Amber Trails de Winnipeg, au Manitoba, remporte le concours annuel de l’école la plus verte au Canada du CBDCa. Située au cœur d’un nouveau quartier au nord de Winnipeg, l’école Amber Trails est un bâtiment récemment construit de 78 000 pieds carrés qui sert aussi de carrefour ouvert et accessible dans la communauté. L’école a reçu la certification LEED® Platine en 2016 et a remporté le Prix d’excellence en bâtiment durable du CBDCa pour une nouvelle construction en mai 2017.

Le jury de l’école la plus verte du CBDCa, formé d’experts du bâtiment durable des quatre coins du pays, a choisi Amber Trails pour son excellent programme d’études environnementales et sa détermination à maintenir un bâtiment réellement vert, comme en font foi sa cote ENERGY STAR de 92 et ses économies d’énergie totales de 68 pour cent. Les membres du jury ont reconnu les mérites de la vision écopositive de l’école qui met en valeur l’engagement de la communauté, ainsi que l’espace d’apprentissage extérieur intégré aux sentiers publics environnants qui encourage les enseignants à donner des cours à l’extérieur. Ils se sont également réjouis que l’école ait adopté la tenue d’une journée d’école « équilibrée » qui donne aux étudiants plus de temps pour jouer dehors.

À titre d’école la plus verte du Canada pour 2017, Amber Trails recevra un prix de 2 000 $ pour réaliser un nouveau projet de durabilité ou poursuivre un projet en cours.

« Ce prix est un immense honneur et nous remercions le Conseil du bâtiment durable du Canada de nous offrir cette merveilleuse opportunité », a déclaré Shivram Raveendrabose, qui enseigne à Amber Trails. « Ce montant nous aidera à poursuivre dans la voie de la durabilité et de l’innovation verte. Nous aimerions profiter de l’occasion pour souligner l’apport de toute notre communauté dans cette réalisation. Nos divers projets écologiques ont permis aux étudiants, au personnel de l’école et aux familles de tous horizons d’intégrer un mode de vie durable comme élément essentiel de la vie communautaire. »

Parmi les nombreux faits saillants qui ont permis à l’école communautaire Amber Trails de remporter ce prix, mentionnons :

  • Une ferme maraîchère biologique a été exploitée par des étudiants l’été dernier et leur a permis de travailler avec un coordonnateur pour cultiver plus d’une vingtaine de variétés de légumes qui sont vendus au personnel de l’école et aux résidents du quartier.
  • Le calendrier d’enseignement de l’école établit un lien entre les saisons climatiques et la ferme maraîchère, afin de favoriser une formation basée sur la mise en valeur des terres, de promouvoir un plus grand sens du lieu, et de sensibiliser aux impacts humains et à leurs liens avec les cycles naturels.
  • Le propriétaire du projet, la division scolaire Seven Oaks et la Commission des finances des écoles publiques, a pris la décision d’éliminer le gaz naturel du projet pour réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre et les coûts d’entretien mécanique futurs. Grâce au chauffage et à la climatisation géothermiques, au chauffage radiant des planchers, aux appareils à faible débit et à d’autres caractéristiques écologiques, le bâtiment a réalisé des économies d’énergie de plus de 68 pour cent tout en diminuant son empreinte carbone.
  • Chaque classe compte trois grandes fenêtres et un mur partiellement vitré qui la sépare du corridor, ce qui permet d’approvisionner les locaux en air frais et en lumière naturelle tout en offrant des vues sur l’extérieur. Cette mesure a plusieurs incidences positives sur le bien-être mental et physique des étudiants et des professeurs.
  • Amber Trails a réduit de plus de 50 pour cent sa consommation d’eau. La division scolaire a rapporté des économies d’environ 7 224 $ par année sur la consommation d’eau qui a été établie en moyenne à 1,21 m3 par élève alors qu’elle s’établit en général à 3,2 m3 par élève dans une école semblable.

« Je félicite l’école communautaire Amber Trails et ses employés et ses étudiants engagés pour avoir remporté le Prix de l’école la plus verte au Canada en 2017 », a pour sa part déclaré Thomas Mueller, président et chef de la direction du CBDCa. « Amber Trails est un excellent exemple d’une école qui ne se contente pas d’enseigner la durabilité et l’innovation, mais qui les met en pratique. En intégrant la durabilité dans la culture et le programme d’études de son école certifiée LEED Platine, Amber Trails enseigne à ses étudiants les leçons les plus importantes sur notre environnement naturel tout en les motivant pour être les leaders de la prochaine génération. »

Les écoles suivantes se sont classées aux deuxième et troisième rangs du concours de l’école la plus verte du Canada 2017 :

  • École primaire Dewdney, à Dewdney (Colombie-Britannique)
  • École secondaire Windermere, à Vancouver (Colombie-Britannique)

Pour un supplément d’information sur ces écoles et leurs nombreuses initiatives, y compris des vidéos et des photos, visitez le site Web du CBDCa (l’information française sera disponible la semaine prochaine).

Lancé en 2014, ce concours de l’école la plus verte du Canada cherche à présenter des écoles du niveau préscolaire jusqu’à la 12e année, de partout au pays, qui illustrent comment la durabilité peut être intégrée à l’infrastructure, à la culture et au curriculum d’une école. Le concours fait partie d’une série d’initiatives du CBDCa et de la Coalition canadienne pour des écoles vertes.

En plus de ce concours, le CBDCa encourage les activités de la journée de travail communautaire Green Apple au Canada, en tout temps de l’année, comme contribution à l’initiative de plus grande portée lancée par l’U.S. Center for Green Schools. Les journées Green Apple donnent aux parents, aux enseignants, aux étudiants, aux entreprises et aux organisations locales la possibilité de transformer toutes les écoles en milieux d’apprentissage sains, sécuritaires et productifs par la tenue d’activités de services locales.

Personne-ressource pour les médias :
Renée Rietveld
Gestionnaire, Communications et stratégie de contenu, CBDCa
Bureau : 613 288-8075
Cell. : 613 894-7772
media@cagbc.org

Au sujet du Conseil du bâtiment durable du Canada (CBDCa)
Le CBDCa (www.cagbc.org) et GBCI Canada (Certification en affaires écoresponsables Canada) sont les principales organisations nationales vouées à la promotion des pratiques liées aux bâtiments durables et à l’aménagement de collectivités durables. En tant que porte-parole du bâtiment durable au Canada, le CBDCa travaille étroitement avec ses membres nationaux et les membres de ses sections régionales dans une volonté de verdir tous les bâtiments. À cette fin, il mène des activités de certification de projets, de sensibilisation et de recherche. Il a aussi contribué à combler les besoins en main-d’œuvre qualifiée en offrant de la formation sur le bâtiment durable à plus de 30 000 professionnels du pays depuis 2002. Le CBDCa a également élaboré la première Norme du bâtiment à carbone zéro au Canada, et il est membre du World Green Building Council (Conseil mondial du bâtiment durable) appuyant ainsi les efforts internationaux visant à réduire les impacts environnementaux du cadre bâti.

Au sujet de la Coalition canadienne pour des écoles vertes

Le CBDCa s’est joint à la Coalition mondiale pour des écoles vertes à titre de membre fondateur, en 2013, et a créé la Coalition canadienne pour des écoles vertes (www.cagbc.org/greenschools) en novembre 2013. Cette coalition canadienne est formée de membres de l’industrie du bâtiment durable qui offrent leur temps et leur expertise pour appuyer les collectivités dans leur démarche de transformation de leurs écoles. Diverses initiatives les aident à atteindre cet objectif, y compris la journée de travail communautaire Green Apple et le concours de l’école la plus verte au Canada.

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HVAC Load Reduction® Technology Also Helps Campuses Save Energy

Boston, MA—September 26, 2017—As colleges and universities are opening up their classrooms this month, the last thing on their minds is that the indoor air could be impacting their students’ health and performance. Yet, studies show that most schools have inadequate indoor air quality (IAQ) and that this results in increased health issues and lower student performance. Symptoms like headache, dizziness, and tiredness were found to be higher in classrooms with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide, as well as increased difficulty concentrating. Other studies found students had less attention and vigilance in classrooms with low IAQ, and even more negative impact on higher-order complex tasks. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) specifically recommends that schools have a comprehensive IAQ management plan. So, how can schools ensure a healthy learning and working environment for their students, faculty and staff, without accruing incremental costs to do so?

Colleges and universities are turning to solutions like enVerid Systems, Inc.’s HVAC Load Reduction® (HLR®) technology, which effectively captures and removes all contaminants from indoor air, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), aldehydes, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM2.5). In doing so, the HLR system ensures superior indoor air quality to help improve students’ cognitive performance, and the health and comfort of individuals on campuses. Moreover, research by Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health has shown that improved indoor air quality through reduced contaminants in buildings can help boost the cognitive performance of individuals by as much as 101 percent. In addition, by cleaning and recycling indoor air, HLR technology enables universities to reduce outside air intake in their buildings, and thereby decrease the load on HVAC systems, resulting in significant energy and cost savings.

Using traditional HVAC systems, the entire volume of a school building’s inside air is replaced by outside air every one to two hours. While this helps limit concentrations of indoor contaminants, the high volume of outside air must be heated or cooled to maintain comfortable temperatures and humidity inside the building – a significant waste of energy. What’s more, outside air is often not clean air, bringing in its own harmful pollutants, especially for school buildings located near highly-trafficked roads, airports or in busy urban centers. In fact, a study by researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine and Boston University School of Public Health indicated that people living, working or studying within 1,500 feet of a highway have a greater likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease from the pollutants caused by highways and traffic.

A university in Florida decided to proactively address these issues. Implementing enVerid’s HLR technology helped the school to not only achieve superior indoor air quality for students, faculty and staff, but also achieve a 28 percent average reduction in total HVAC energy consumption and 41 percent peak HVAC capacity reduction.

“With the winter coming, there will be a growing temptation for colleges and universities to ventilate even less to help save on their energy costs, and that’s another reason the indoor air quality problem could get worse,” said Dr. Udi Meirav, CEO, enVerid Systems, Inc. “We are pleased to provide our innovative technology to solve this problem, and support the continued health and productivity of individuals on school campuses around the world.”

For more information on enVerid, please click here.


About enVerid Systems, Inc.
enVerid Systems, Inc. is committed to improving energy efficiency and indoor air quality in buildings worldwide through its innovative HVAC Load Reduction® (HLR®) solutions. Awarded the prestigious 2016 R&D 100 Award, enVerid is the only solution that helps commercial, educational and government buildings remove carbon dioxide (CO2), aldehydes, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM2.5) from indoor air, reducing the outside air intake required for ventilation. enVerid’s HLR technology is ASHRAE-compliant and has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. General Services Administration’s Green Proving Ground Program, and the U.S. Green Building Council. For more information, please visit www.enverid.com.

enVerid Media Contact
Caroline Legg
Warner Communications
978-255-4488
caroline@warnerpr.com

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From Natural Resources Canada

August 15, 2017                        St. Andrews, New Brunswick                  Natural Resources Canada

Improving energy efficiency contributes first-hand to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, improving industrial competitiveness and increasing profitability, and is an important part of Canada’s national approach to address climate change.

Today at the Energy and Mines Ministers’ Conference, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources, the Honourable Jim Carr, launched the new ENERGY STAR for Industry program. The program is an expansion of the existing ENERGY STAR Canada program that will see Canadian industry contribute more to the transition to a low-carbon and clean-growth economy.

Canada’s industrial sector contributes approximately 37 percent of the country’s GHG emissions. ENERGY STAR for Industry will improve energy efficiency in Canada’s industrial sector by helping facilities track, analyze and reduce their energy consumption. These actions will help industrial facilities reduce their operating costs and improve competitiveness.

ENERGY STAR for Industry certification provides energy performance indicators (EPI) that can be used to benchmark industrial facilities’ energy performance. The Integrated Steel Mill EPI is the first to be available in Canada. Additional EPIs are being developed to expand ENERGY STAR for Industry certification to include commercial baking, automotive assembly and cement and fertilizer manufacturing in Canada.

Quotes

“ENERGY STAR for Industry will help Canadian industrial facilities reduce energy use and save money, helping Canada meet its commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and combat climate change.”

Jim Carr
Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources

“New Brunswick industries see the value in improving their energy efficiency to help them compete and thrive in the marketplace. When industries reduce their consumption, they cut costs allowing them to be more competitive, make new investments and create jobs right here in New Brunswick.”

Rick Doucet
New Brunswick’s Minister of Energy and Resource Development

“Energy efficiency is key to a clean and prosperous Canadian economy. The CSPA is proud of the work of its members in helping to bring ENERGY STAR for Industry to Canada.”

Joseph Galimberti
President of the Canadian Steel Producers Association (CSPA)

Quick Facts

  • In December 2016, Canada adopted the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (PCF), a commitment to take action on industrial energy efficiency, including working together to accelerate the adoption of energy management systems. The PCF highlights that improving industrial energy efficiency is needed to help set the path for long-term clean growth and the transition to a low-carbon economy.
  • The ENERGY STAR Canada program is a voluntary partnership among the Government of Canada and more than 1,500 organizations working to use our natural resources more wisely through greater energy efficiency.
  • ENERGY STAR for Industry builds on the Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, an internationally recognized government–industry partnership aimed at improving energy efficiency in Canada.
  • Certification recognizes individual facilities whose energy performance is determined to be among the best within their industries in Canada. Industrial facilities that score in the top quartile “best-in-class” can apply for certification and recognition. Natural Resources Canada publicly recognizes the most energy-efficient Canadian facilities with ENERGY STAR for Industry certification.
  • Information on how to use the Integrated Steel Mills EPI is available at ENERGY STAR for Industry

Associated Links

Contacts

Alexandre Deslongchamps
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Natural Resources
343-292-6837

Media Relations
Natural Resources Canada
Ottawa
343-292-6100
NRCan.media_relations-media_relations.RNCan@canada.ca

Follow us on Twitter: @NRCan (http://twitter.com/nrcan)

NRCan’s news releases and backgrounders are available at www.news.gc.ca

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