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(AP) — Apple and Google are rolling out dozens of new emojis that of course include cute critters, but also expand the number of images of human diversity.

The announcement coincides with Wednesday’s World Emoji Day .

Apple Inc. is releasing new variants of its holding hands emoji that allow people to pick any combination of skin tone and gender, 75 possible combinations in all. There are also wheelchairs, prosthetic arms and legs, as well as a new guide dog and an ear with a hearing aid.

This image provided by Apple shows new emoji’s released by Apple. Both Apple and Google are rolling out dozens of new emojis that, as usual, included cute crittters, but also ones that expand the boundaries of inclusion. The announcement coincides with Wednesday, July 17, 2019 World Emoji Day. (Apple via AP)

And then there’s the sloth, the flamingo, the skunk, the orangutan, as well as a new yawning emoji.

New emojis routinely pop up every year. Earlier this year the Unicode Consortium approved 71 new variations of emoji for couples of color.

Apple’s new emojis will be available in the fall with a free software update for the iPhone, iPad, Mac and Apple Watch. Google said its emojis will be released with Android Q later this year.

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SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — A group of protesters scuffled with police and blocked an intersection of San Francisco’s Market Street Sunday, bringing the annual San Francisco Pride Parade to a halt for more than an hour.

About 12 protesters lay down on Market Street, linking their arms covered by protected pipes painted with the rainbow colors, at around 11 a.m. Several other protesters pushed and shoved a contingent of San Francisco police, throwing water bottles at them, as the nearby crowd angrily shouted and jeered at them.

Police took two people into custody during the incident.

The Dykes on Bikes contingent was halted at the front of the parade while helicopter video showed police officers handcuffing at least one protester. The protesters were cleared from the street and the parade began moving again at around noon.

The group reportedly was taking the action to protest the corporate involvement in the parade which stirred up controversy in the weeks leading up to the event.

Additionally, the group also said the disruption was being staged to protest police brutality in America.

A contingent of Google employees petitioned the Pride parade’s board of directors to revoke Google’s sponsorship over what they called harassment and hate speech directed at LGBTQ people on YouTube and other Google platforms.

San Francisco Pride declined to revoke the sponsorship or remove the company from the parade, but Pride officials said the Google critics could protest the company’s policies as part of the parade’s “resistance contingent.”

The San Francisco Chronicle reported that the protesters were chanting “Stonewall was a riot” in reference to the 1969 Stonewall Riots in New York City.

The 49th annual parade had attracted estimated 700,000 people to the streets of San Francisco and politicians including U.S. House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, California Governor and former San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom and Senator Kamala Harris, who is among the current front runners for the Democratic nomination for president.

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SAN FRANCISCO — KPIX 5 broadcast the 49th Annual San Francisco Pride Parade live online Sunday, June 30, 2019. That full webcast is presented below in numbered segments beginning with the traditional Dykes on Bikes opening ride up Market Street.

SEGMENT 1: 10:30 a.m. to 11:10 a.m.


 

SEGMENT 2: 11:14 a.m. to 10:34 a.m.


 

SEGMENT 3: 11:34 a.m. to noon


 

SEGMENT 4: noon to 12:34 p.m.


 

SEGMENT 5: 12:35 p.m. to 1 p.m.


 

SEGMENT 6: 1 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.


 
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SAN FRANCISCO — Nearly 1 million people were expected to line the streets for San Francisco’s 49th annual Pride Parade.

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SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) – Pride weekend revved up as the 27th annual Dyke March rolled through the Mission and the Castro Saturday evening.
 
“Just stay free, and be yourself, love who you want, and everybody keep an open mind,” said Gaya Blair Pendleton of San Francisco.
 
That’s the message that Pendleton wanted to send as she rode her motorcycle for the third year in a row.
 
The Dyke March has become a tradition for hundreds of participants, but this year, it takes on a greater importance for Lisa Cohn of San Francisco.

“Especially now in the difficult political times, where everything is so precarious, basic human rights are precarious, people’s human rights are being caged right as we speak, we feel like it’s really important to stand out and be proud,” said Cohn.

Hundreds of participants danced and performed – all decked out in their rainbow best.

“For us it means that we are proud lesbians, that are excited to be here and we’re not going anywhere,” said Kelley Carrasco of Oakland.
 
Whether it was parade marching, parade watching or bar hopping, getting around events slowed to a crawl by car.
 
Sunday the city’s iconic Pride Parade celebration will close and tie up city streets around Market Street, starting on Beale Street and ending at Civic Center Plaza.

About 100,000 people are expected to attend the festivities.
 
Saturday night, partiers were celebrating well into the night in the Castro District.
 
“Just the community, it’s so much different from LA, it’s more family-oriented, just true to values out here, this is what I really, really enjoy,” said Elias Palacios, who is in town from Los Angeles.
 
SFPD will have a heavy police presence Sunday. The department is urging people to leave extra time to get to the Civic Center venue, because there will be metal detectors. They are also asking people to leave bags at home.

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SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) — Crews were busy setting up booths and readying Civic Center Plaza Friday night, prepping the space for two days of entertainment and LGBT community engagement.

The nearby Castro neighborhood will welcome tens of thousands of visitors over the weekend.

For many businesses, it will be their biggest weekend of the year.

“We sell way more than normal,” said Justin Barrett, bar manager of Midnight Sun. “Business is probably five to ten times the amount than a normal weekend.”

CONTINUING COVERAGE: SF Pride 2019/Stonewall At 50

The Midnight Sun has nearly doubled its staff and brought in at least three times the amount of alcohol it normally does.

Staff at Harvey’s Restaurant and Bar on 18th Street say they’re prepared to stay open late each night until last call.

The 16th Annual Trans March kicked off Friday evening from Dolores Park and ended in the Tenderloin. It is one of the largest trans pride events in the country.

Ashley Benson is trans and flew from Missouri for her first march.

“Every single community I’ve ever seen here has been welcoming and friendly, and we don’t have that in small town Missouri,” Benson said.

This is the fifth time Diane Alcala is walking.

“It’s important for me, because I believe that trans people need to be free and be living as who they are,” she said.

2019 also marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York, which sparked the modern gay-rights movement.

“If only Stonewall had corrected everything … moving forward we still have lots and lots of problems and challenges,” said SF Pride Parade board member Bruce Beaudette. “So every year I march in Pride and I march in the Trans March because I want to support change.”

SFPD officers will be highly visible this weekend. The department is reminding Sunday’s pride parade-goers to leave bags at home, allow extra time to get through security at the Civic Center celebration and do not bring alcohol to the venue. There will be no open containers allowed on city streets.

The Pride Parade will start on the Embarcadero and end at Civic Center Plaza and will be streamed online live at cbsSF.com

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NEW YORK (AP) — New York City is marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, days of unrest in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village that began with a police raid on a gay bar and developed into a sustained LGTBQ liberation movement.

The streets outside the modern incarnation of the Stonewall Inn were blocked off Friday in preparation for a day of celebrations that include musical performances and an evening rally.

The city’s huge Pride parade on Sunday also swings past the bar and a tiny, green park outside, which is at the center of the Stonewall National Monument.

In 1969, the Stonewall Inn was part of a gay scene that was known, yet not open. At the time, showing same-sex affection or dressing in a way deemed gender-inappropriate could get people arrested, and bars had lost liquor licenses for serving such people.

The police raid on the bar began early the morning of June 28. It was unlicensed, and the officers had been assigned to stop any illegal alcohol sales.

Patrons and people passing by on Christopher Street resisted, shoving and hurling objects at the officers.

Protests followed over several more days. A year later, gay New Yorkers marked the anniversary of the riot with the Christopher Street Liberation Day March. Thousands proudly paraded through a city where, at the time, gay people were expected to stay in the shadows.

The Stonewall Inn itself closed not long after the raid.

Since then, the space has been a bagel shop, a Chinese restaurant and other establishments, including a gay bar called Stonewall that briefly operated in the late 1980s.

The current Stonewall Inn dates to the early 1990s.

For years, its path was pitted with financial strains, business vagaries and loss. One co-owner, Jimmy Pisano, died three months before the Stonewall rebellion’s 25th anniversary in 1994.

Current owners Stacy Lentz and Kurt Kelly bought the business in 2006 and have sought to keep its legacy current.

“We understand we’re the innkeepers of history,” Lentz said. “We really feel like the fire that started at Stonewall in 1969 is not done,” Lentz says. “The battleground has just shifted.”

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NEW YORK (AP) — Fifty years ago, the Stonewall Inn was an underground gay bar where a police raid sparked a rebellion that fueled the modern LGBTQ rights movement.

Today, it’s still a bar, but a highly visible one. It’s a landmark, and the patrons flocking in this week to honor the riots’ legacy include a gay police officers’ group.

The tavern in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village has undergone physical and ownership changes over the years. At points, it wasn’t a bar at all.

But as the rebellion’s anniversary approaches Friday, the Stonewall Inn stands in part of its original space and serves as a gathering place and beacon for LGBTQ people and others.

“We understand we’re the innkeepers of history,” says co-owner Stacy Lentz.

In 1969, the Stonewall was part of a Greenwich Village gay scene that was known, yet not open. At the time, showing same-sex affection or dressing in a way deemed gender-inappropriate could get people arrested, and bars had lost liquor licenses for serving such people. Some gay nightspots simply operated illegally.

A onetime horse stable in adjoining buildings at 51 and 53 Christopher Street, the Stonewall was a divey, unlicensed spot with darkened windows, black-painted walls and a doorman who scrutinized would-be patrons through a peephole. But it also had a popular, pulsating dance floor that attracted a diverse, largely young crowd.

The police raid in the wee hours of June 28, 1969, stirred a sudden resistance, as patrons and others outside the bar hurled objects at officers. Protests followed over several more days and led to new, more extensive and militant LGBTQ activist groups than the U.S. had seen before.

The bar itself didn’t last long after the raid. Over the ensuing years, the space was divided and used by a bagel shop, a Chinese restaurant and other establishments, including a gay bar called Stonewall that briefly operated at 51 Christopher in the late 1980s. Renovations changed the interior decor.

The current Stonewall Inn, at 53 Christopher, dates to the early 1990s.

For years, its path was pitted with financial strains, business vagaries and loss. One co-owner, Jimmy Pisano, died three months before the Stonewall rebellion’s 25th anniversary in 1994.

His boyfriend, Thomas Garguilo — a marketing executive who had never planned on managing the bar — recalls a struggle to keep the business afloat for the milestone.

When it came, the Stonewall was indeed open, drawing so many people that a line formed just to take photos in front.

“It just felt like such a relief, a blessing,” recalls Garguilo. Long gone from the Stonewall, he recently launched a website to highlight Pisano’s role in maintaining what would later become a National Historic Landmark and part of the first national monument to LGBT rights.

“People walk past that place today and assume it’s always been there,” Garguilo says.

Two other figures from Pisano’s tenure, friend and business partner Bob Gurecki and renovation contractor Dominick DeSimone, oversaw the bar’s next chapter, grappling with noise complaints and other issues.

Lentz and co-owner Kurt Kelly acquired the business in 2006, with investors’ help, and have sought to keep its legacy current. They founded the Stonewall Inn Gives Back Initiative in 2017 to raise money to aid LGBTQ organizations in Kansas, Tennessee and elsewhere outside U.S. coastal cities.

“We really feel like the fire that started at Stonewall in 1969 is not done,” Lentz says. “The battleground has just shifted.”

The Stonewall Inn itself remains a place to measure key points in the arc of LGTBQ life in America.

People gathered there to cheer when the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage nationwide in 2015; to mourn the next year when a gunman killed 49 people at a gay nightclub in Florida; and to protest in 2017 when President Donald Trump rescinded guidance that encouraged letting transgender students use the bathrooms of their choice in school.

The Stonewall has also become a sometime political campaign stop. Democratic presidential hopeful and former Vice President Joe Biden visited last week , for example. Former City Council speaker Christine Quinn, who tried in 2013 to become the city’s first female and first openly gay mayor, remembers a rally at the Stonewall as a very meaningful “moment about aspirations and potential” in a campaign that ended at the Democratic primary days later.

The bar still gets police attention, but a very different kind than in 1969.

The Gay Officers Action League, which counts hundreds of active members in the New York Police Department and other nearby law enforcement agencies, holds its monthly meetings in the Stonewall’s upstairs room. The organization planned a get-together at the bar Thursday for members and officers visiting for LGBTQ Pride events to reflect on the rebellion’s 50th anniversary.

“As queer police officers, I think we have an added responsibility of acknowledging and ensuring that that ugly history doesn’t happen again. So it’ll be a nice night of absorbing and really taking a moment to be inside of that place,” GOAL’s president, NYPD Detective Brian Downey, said last week. “It’ll be sort of a pilgrimage.”

The NYPD itself apologized earlier this month for the 1969 raid, which Commissioner James O’Neill called “discriminatory and oppressive.”

The Stonewall’s recent history has some difficult moments, including a 2010 attack on a patron by two men who eventually pleaded guilty to hate crime assault. But problems have been few, says Kelly, who likes to tend bar from time to time.

He’s especially pleased when customers who don’t know its history wander in.

“Because,” he says, “I get to tell the story over and over again.”

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MARIN COUNTY (KPIX 5) — Robin Lowey is on a mission. The North Bay author maneuvers quickly around stacks of boxes cluttering her living room, each one packed with copies of her book, Game Changers: Lesbians You Should Know About.

As she cracks open a box, Lowey proudly declares that she “has about a 1,000 books in [her] living room.”

Lowey’s dining room table is also piled high with copies of the book. Crowded around the table are friends she’s recruited to help pack and ship it to public high schools all across the Bay Area for free.

So far, Lowey has donated around 1,500 copies to over 300 schools, reaching 300,000 students.

“I got the idea that I should be the one to create this fun book about lesbian heroes that are living who created queer culture now and they are sort of the people that young people today should consider as their heroes,” said Lowey. “I don’t know anyone who has ever done anything quite like this and I don’t know where it came from but it just kind of sprung out of me and I’ve just been enjoying the ride.”

A graphic designer by trade, Lowey created Game Changers to look and read like a graphic novel that showcases the crucial role lesbians have played in the LGBTQ movement. 30 women including Lowey herself have profiles that range from several pages to quick blurbs.

But all the women seem to leap off the book’s colorful pages like super heroines. Lowey says she enjoyed curating theses amazing stories.

“The criteria is that they are alive,” explained Lowey of how she selected her heroines. “And that they are over 50 and that they came out young and that they created significant cultural contributions to queer culture specifically.”

Lowey’s own journey as a lesbian mom of two sons, and her role as a guest educator on LGBTQ history for several Marin County public schools inspired the book as a way to educate others. Lowey says at times when she spoke in classrooms, she was surprised at students’ lack of knowledge about LGBTQ history.

“The kids, they ask questions that are startling to me,” said Lowey. “Like I’ll say a simple fact like the right for same sex marriage was passed nationally in 2015 and like a hand will shoot up and they will say, ‘Wait I didn’t know that.'”

Making sure every generation hears these ‘herstorys’ has become Lowey’s passion. So her classroom has expanded to include queer bars like Jolene’s in San Francisco — where she recently hosted a book signing — and political hot spots like Manny’s in the Mission, where those profiled in the book speak openly about their own journey.

Crystal Jang recalled her own experience as a young lesbian growing up in San Francisco’s Asian-American community.

“I was really looking for people like me,” said Jang.”I was looking to build community. I was trying to find a space that I felt comfortable in.”

Jang says writing her essay for the book brought back memories of fun times in 1960’s San Francisco. But the retired teacher is quick to point out we still have a long way go in both education and acceptance.

“When you talk about progress we have come a long way in terms of being visible,” explained Jang. “But we are still in the same sort of spot in terms of being understood.”

Which is why Lowey and her friends say they will not stop until every book in this living room has been signed, sealed and delivered.

“So that’s my mission and it’s happening,” said Lowey. “It’s really exciting.”

The book includes profiles on women in the military, legal experts, artists and educators. Lowey says there are many more women she would like to profile, so she is planning on publishing a second edition.

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MARIN COUNTY (KPIX 5) — Robin Lowey is on a mission. The North Bay author maneuvers quickly around stacks of boxes cluttering her living room, each one packed with copies of her book, Game Changers: Lesbians You Should Know About.

As she cracks open a box, Lowey proudly declares that she “has about a 1,000 books in [her] living room.”

Lowey’s dining room table is also piled high with copies of the book. Crowded around the table are friends she’s recruited to help pack and ship it to public high schools all across the Bay Area for free.

So far, Lowey has donated around 1,500 copies to over 300 schools, reaching 30,000 students.

“I got the idea that I should be the one to create this fun book about lesbian heroes that are living who created queer culture now and they are sort of the people that young people today should consider as their heroes,” said Lowey. “I don’t know anyone who has ever done anything quite like this and I don’t know where it came from but it just kind of sprung out of me and I’ve just been enjoying the ride.”

A graphic designer by trade, Lowey created Game Changers to look and read like a graphic novel that showcases the crucial role lesbians have played in the LGBTQ movement. 30 women including Lowey herself have profiles that range from several pages to quick blurbs.

But all the women seem to leap off the book’s colorful pages like super heroines. Lowey says she enjoyed curating theses amazing stories.

“The criteria is that they are alive,” explained Lowey of how she selected her heroines. “And that they are over 50 and that they came out young and that they created significant cultural contributions to queer culture specifically.”

Lowey’s own journey as a lesbian mom of two sons, and her role as a guest educator on LGBTQ history for several Marin County public schools inspired the book as a way to educate others. Lowey says at times when she spoke in classrooms, she was surprised at students’ lack of knowledge about LGBTQ history.

“The kids, they ask questions that are startling to me,” said Lowey. “Like I’ll say a simple fact like the right for same sex marriage was passed nationally in 2015 and like a hand will shoot up and they will say, ‘Wait I didn’t know that.'”

Making sure every generation hears these ‘herstorys’ has become Lowey’s passion. So her classroom has expanded to include queer bars like Jolene’s in San Francisco — where she recently hosted a book signing — and political hot spots like Manny’s in the Mission, where those profiled in the book speak openly about their own journey.

Crystal Jang recalled her own experience as a young lesbian growing up in San Francisco’s Asian-American community.

“I was really looking for people like me,” said Jang.”I was looking to build community. I was trying to find a space that I felt comfortable in.”

Jang says writing her essay for the book brought back memories of fun times in 1960’s San Francisco. But the retired teacher is quick to point out we still have a long way go in both education and acceptance.

“When you talk about progress we have come a long way in terms of being visible,” explained Jang. “But we are still in the same sort of spot in terms of being understood.”

Which is why Lowey and her friends say they will not stop until every book in this living room has been signed, sealed and delivered.

“So that’s my mission and it’s happening,” said Lowey. “It’s really exciting.”

The book includes profiles on women in the military, legal experts, artists and educators. Lowey says there are many more women she would like to profile, so she is planning on publishing a second edition.

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