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The Ritz-Carlton Perspective How much time are you spending each week speaking to your employees about passion and the purpose of their work? DOs and DON’Ts of Making Work Meaningful
  • DO emphasize purpose. Employees who only see the day-to-day tasks of their jobs can begin to feel unsatisfied and disengaged. On the other hand, employees who feel connected to a greater purpose within the organization tend to bring more passion to the workplace.
  • DON’T let employees get isolated and siloed. Employees who never have the opportunity to connect with others—customers or colleagues—may feel lonely at work. Employees who are isolated may feel trapped in a seemingly dead-end job.
  • DO empower employees. Empowered employees have more autonomy and feel like their decisions and actions can make a difference.
  • DON’T let employees become stagnant. Give employees opportunities to grow, develop and learn new skills.
  • DO point out to employees how their work is impacting others. Employees may not always see the fruits of their labors and hearing how their efforts led to achievements and success will reinforce their importance within the organization.
  • DON’T neglect gratitude—and fun! Employees who feel appreciated and have their work recognized generally feel happier at work. ∞

Join us on June 8 and 9, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, St. Louis in St. Louis, MO for two days of courses. On Thursday, attend  Service Excellence Culture and hear about the processes behind the legendary service of The Ritz-Carlton, and on Friday, learn about the principles of Memorable Customer Service.

The Blog Post Making Work Meaningful appeared first on The Ritz-Carlton Leadership Center.

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Customer Experience Airlines

A couple arrived at the airport for their flight, and the monitor indicated that their plane was on time. However, when the couple arrived at the gate, they could see that their flight was delayed. No one could tell them how long the delay would be, and the gate personnel suggested calling the airline’s customer service department. The husband called and the customer service representative told him the flight was on time. He pointed out that the flight couldn’t be on time because it had been scheduled to leave two hours ago. The representative then confirmed that the flight was delayed but could provide no other information. The couple waited four hours for their flight. After arriving home, the husband visited the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) website and complained about the lack of communication. The airline then reached out to the husband and offered him a $100 voucher to be used within six weeks.

CUSTOMER SERVICE TAKEAWAYS

  • The couple was much more upset over the lack of communication than they were by the actual delay. Also, since none of the employees had information, the couple felt the company was incompetent.
  • The financial incentive to use the airline again was underwhelming. Plus, the six-week time frame made the flight voucher impossible for them to use, only adding to their dissatisfaction.
  • There are many airline choices, and although customers might select a flight based on the best price, if the service is horrible, customers will not choose that airline in the future—even if the price is cheap. Bad service never earns customer loyalty. ∞

Join us on June 8 and 9, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, St. Louis in St. Louis, MO for two days of courses. On Thursday, attend  Service Excellence Culture and hear about the processes behind the legendary service of The Ritz-Carlton, and on Friday, learn about the principles of Memorable Customer Service.

The Blog Post Customer Experience Airlines appeared first on The Ritz-Carlton Leadership Center.

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The Ritz-Carlton Perspective Peering at your computer or smartphone or having your back to the customer is not a warm welcome. It leaves a bad first impression. DOs and DON’Ts of Greeting Customers in Person
  • DO be ready to serve. You should never make your customer wait while you take care of personal matters. You were not hired to text your friends or play games on your smartphone.
  • DON’T make the customer feel as if they have interrupted you. Your goal is to make your customers feel wanted and valued.
  • DO look for clues. A customer may be in a hurry or wet from the rain. What can you do to improve your customer’s experience right from the start?
  • DON’T treat your customer as if they’re invisible. This is especially true if customers are waiting in a line. You may not be able to get to each customer immediately. However, you can let customers know that you see them, and you will get to them as soon as you can.
  • DO smile and if possible use the customer’s name. Greeting your customers with a smile will help them feel welcome and referring to the customer by name will make them feel recognized.
  • DON’T mumble or use slang. If your customers are older, they may not understand slang or may even be offended by it. Your greeting should be warm, genuine and professional. ∞

Join us on June 8 and 9, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, St. Louis in St. Louis, MO for two days of courses. On Thursday, attend  Service Excellence Culture and hear about the processes behind the legendary service of The Ritz-Carlton, and on Friday, learn about the principles of Memorable Customer Service.

The Blog Post Greeting Customers appeared first on The Ritz-Carlton Leadership Center.

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Customer Experience Online Retailer

A family returned to dine at a chain restaurant that had recently changed its menu. The menu had fewer choices, but all the dishes were made from scratch. One person in their party told the waiter about her food allergies. After the family ordered, the head chef came over to their table. He talked to the diner about her food allergies and he wrote down her restrictions. The family was very impressed with the personalized service, and throughout the evening, they noticed the head chef visiting other tables as well. Although they hadn’t eaten at the establishment in a while, they decided to make the restaurant their new family gathering spot.

CUSTOMER SERVICE TAKEAWAYS

  • Customers with allergies often have concerns that the kitchen will not follow through on their dietary restrictions. By having the chef visit the table and write down the particulars, the chef and the restaurant earned the trust of the customers.
  • The customers felt cared for, and they noticed that other customers were receiving personalized service as well. By seeing this consistency of service, they were encouraged to patronize the restaurant more frequently.
  • The smaller menu with an improved product combined with attentive service earned the restaurant customer loyalty.∞

Join us on June 8 and 9, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, St. Louis in St. Louis, MO for two days of courses. On Thursday, attend  Service Excellence Culture and hear about the processes behind the legendary service of The Ritz-Carlton, and on Friday, learn about the principles of Memorable Customer Service.

The Blog Post Customer Experience Online Retailer appeared first on The Ritz-Carlton Leadership Center.

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The Ritz-Carlton Perspective Emotion should not be a part of problem resolution. Data is key. Ask employees for facts—not feelings. DOs and DON’Ts of Helping Employees with Problem Resolution
  • DO listen carefully to employees when they tell you about a problem. Employees will feel more respected if you pay attention to their explanations.
  • DON’T let employees go off on tangents or get lost in emotions. Try to keep narratives to key facts about the situation. Don’t allow yourself to become part of an unnecessarily dramatic situation.
  • DO ask questions. When problem-solving, you want to be making well-informed decisions.
  • DON’T ask leading questions. If employees suspect you are about to blame them for any challenges, their answers will become more defensive and less helpful.
  • DO involve employees in the problem-solving process. Ask for their suggestions and help them improve their conflict resolution skills.
  • DON’T forget to follow up with employees and find out whether the solutions effectively solved the problem or whether the situation still needs attention. ∞

Join us on March 21 to 23, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner near Washington, DC for our three-day Executive Education course and learn how to create a sustainable customer-centric culture.

The Blog Post Helping Employees with Problem Resolution appeared first on The Ritz-Carlton Leadership Center.

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RESTAURANT CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

A family returned to dine at a chain restaurant that had recently changed its menu. The menu had fewer choices, but all the dishes were made from scratch. One person in their party told the waiter about her food allergies. After the family ordered, the head chef came over to their table. He talked to the diner about her food allergies and he wrote down her restrictions. The family was very impressed with the personalized service, and throughout the evening, they noticed the head chef visiting other tables as well. Although they hadn’t eaten at the establishment in a while, they decided to make the restaurant their new family gathering spot.

CUSTOMER SERVICE TAKEAWAYS

  • Customers with allergies often have concerns that the kitchen will not follow through on their dietary restrictions. By having the chef visit the table and write down the particulars, the chef and the restaurant earned the trust of the customers.
  • The customers felt cared for, and they noticed that other customers were receiving personalized service as well. By seeing this consistency of service, they were encouraged to patronize the restaurant more frequently.
  • The smaller menu with an improved product combined with attentive service earned the restaurant customer loyalty. ∞

Join us on March 1 and 2, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Marina del Rey in Marina del Rey, CA for two days of courses. On Wednesday, attend  Service Excellence Culture and hear about the processes behind the legendary service of The Ritz-Carlton, and on Thursday, learn about the principles of Memorable Customer Service.

The Blog Post Restaurant Customer Experience appeared first on The Ritz-Carlton Leadership Center.

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The Ritz-Carlton Perspective The best leaders teach employees to take ownership for their mistakes. Everyone makes mistakes, and everyone can learn from them. DOs and DON’Ts of Handling Employees’ Mistakes
  • DO let employees know that making mistakes is part of the job. Give them a safe place to fail and learn.
  • DON’T tell employees that you’re disappointed or angry when they make a mistake. Employees may try to hide mistakes if they think their bosses will have a negative reaction.
  • DO include the employee in the solution. Ask leading questions such as, “How would you change the process in the future?” or, “Are there other resources you could have used?”
  • DON’T make it personal. Try to focus on the mistake and possible solutions rather than underscoring the employee’s shortcomings.
  • DO show your support by offering additional training for the employee if needed.
  • DON’T hold a grudge or continually remind the employee of past mistakes. Give employees the opportunity to have a fresh start. ∞

Join us on March 21 to 23, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner near Washington, DC for our three-day Executive Education course and learn how to create a sustainable customer-centric culture.

The Blog Post Handling Employees’ Mistakes appeared first on The Ritz-Carlton Leadership Center.

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