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From Visually.
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When I lived there almost 30 years ago. It's still going on. All the young people seem to be moving to cities. From Slate.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! What the selectiveness of your college says about where you’re likely to move after.
“There seem to be two different migrations going on,” observed Robert Kelchen, a professor at Seton Hall and author of a January paper on interstate migration of young graduates. “The selective schools seem to be sending a lot more graduates to the coast, and the less selective schools seem to be sending graduates, when they go out of state, to the Sun Belt states.” 
It’s not that big research universities that are easier to get into, like Oklahoma State or Texas A&M, aren’t sending kids to these high-gravity cities—but by and large their graduates are more likely to wind up moving nearby. For U.S. colleges, this pattern is the norm rather than the exception. More than half of recent University of Memphis grads stay in Memphis; more than half of Southern Methodist grads stay in Dallas. 
All this is fuel for a familiar debate in state legislatures when it comes time to debate how much to fund higher education. Lower-tier universities often advertise the fact that their graduates wind up sticking around, while higher-tier universities counter that while they may send grads nationwide, they’re also magnets for smart people from other states.

As Douglas Webber, a professor at Temple, reminded me, there is yet another divide among young college graduates that helps explain different data sets—the one between older and younger millennials. High-cost cities may be raking in young college graduates who are so-called job-first movers, but at some point, housing costs may drive them away. Where do they go next? Probably to low-cost Sun Belt metros, just like their parents. 
The Emsi data—which appears to show “creative class” cities hoovering up young co-eds—doesn’t always jibe with some big, long-term shifts underway between states. According to American Community Survey data compiled by Kelchen and Webber, college graduates between 2013 and 2015 were flowing out of the Midwest and the Northeast and into Washington state, Hawaii, California, Colorado, North Carolina, and Nevada. (Why Nevada? Likely because its low total number of graduates—the state had only 25,000 resident, Nevada-born graduates in 2010—translates any migration increases into bigger percentage gains.) In some places, like New York, highly educated immigrants make up for the loss of native-born grads. 
The overriding trend, though, is that college graduates are moving to big cities. And what the states battling persistent, long-term brain drain of young graduates have in common—the bottom five are the Dakotas, West Virginia, Iowa, and Mississippi—is a lack of them. Dual-earner couples have a much easier time in big labor markets. They’re flocking, above all, to places where they exist. 
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by ZocDoc.

From Visually.
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Make this list of the fifty worst cities to live in. Cities had have population over 50,00 and nine categories were examined: crime, demography, economy, education, environment, health, housing, infrastructure, and leisure. Detroit and Flint Michigan topped the list, with St. Louis third. God help me, I love lists like this. From 24/7 Wall Street.

50 Worst Cities to Live In
36. Knoxville, Tennessee
> Population:
186,238
> Median home value: $128,000
> Poverty rate: 25.4%
> Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 35.1% 
About one in every four Knoxville residents live in poverty, well above the 14% share of Americans and the second highest poverty rate of any large city in the state. Poorer areas often struggle with crime, and in Knoxville, both violent and property crimes are more than twice as common as they are nationwide. 
While the city struggles with low incomes and higher crime rates, the home of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville also has some positive attributes common in college towns. For example, 35.1% of residents have a bachelor’s degree, a larger share than is typical nationwide. Additionally, the city has a greater than average concentration of bars and restaurants than the United States as a whole. 
4. Memphis, Tennessee
> Population: 652,752
> Median home value: $96,800
> Poverty rate: 26.9%
> Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 25.6% 
In Memphis, serious financial hardship and high crime rate detract from the overall quality of life of many residents. Some 26.9% of area residents live in poverty, the largest share of any city in the state and well above the 14.0% U.S. poverty rate. Poorer cities often struggle more with crime, and Memphis is no exception. There were 1,830 violent crimes in the city for every 100,000 residents in 2016, a higher violent crime rate than in all but three other U.S. cities and nearly five times the comparable U.S. violent crime rate.
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Are in Iowa. I haven't been to Ithaca or Ann Arbor, but I've visited the rest. From Realtor.com.

The Best Affordable College Towns for Recent Grads—and Everyone Else
"People go [to college towns] with the intention of pursuing a degree ... but find these places have lots of the advantages of much larger places," says Blake Gumprecht, author of "The American College Town." He's also a graduate of the University of Kansas, in Lawrence, one of the towns that made our list. 
To find these top college towns best suited to putting down roots, we looked at the 700 largest markets around the country. We included only those with at least one four-year university with at least 10,000 undergraduates. Then we ranked them based on a variety of factors, including their percentage of college students, unemployment rates, home appreciation, and median income.* 
The biggest cities didn’t make our list—they're so large that the percentage of students isn’t as dominant as in smaller communities. In case you're wondering, if we had simply  looked at the country’s 50 largest metropolitan areas, Boston, the nation's ultimate college mecca, would come out on top, thanks to schools such as Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Boston University. But with so many other nonstudent residents, nearly 675,000 just in its city limits, Boston didn't make our list.
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The golden fleece of management mythology. Could the work we put into writing goals be put to better use. Hmmmm. From Amy Leschke-Kahle, writing in Forbes.

The Myth of Goals: An Honest Observation of What We All Wish Was True
Have you ever asked yourself why the goals we set last year somehow became virtually irrelevant by about March? Aren't goals supposed to be impermeable in helping us align, get the right work done, and create a means for measuring performance? Wouldn't it be great if goals made all those things happen? 
It's not that goals in and of themselves are bad; it's just that we use them badly.
Here are a few things to consider that will reveal how your organization is thinking about goals – and if they are truly achieving what you set out for them to do. 
Myth #1: SMART goals are smart 
While SMART (Specific Measurable Achievable Realistic Timely) goals were designed to standardize the goal development process, most SMART goals are actually not so smart. Do you have a valid, countable metric that determines success or did you make up a metric so you could check your "M" box? Are you confident that the work can be done in the specified time frame so you have a "T" or did you just guess? SMART often forces us to smoosh our work into a confining framework that often doesn't fit the actual work to be done. Sure, sometimes our work is SMART-worthy in which case we should absolutely use SMART. But let's not make everyone force fit their big chunks of work into a model that only works some of the time. 
Myth #2: Everyone should have goals 
If something is good for someone – it should be good for everyone, right? If only humans were that simple. Most people perform cycle work. Even highly skilled knowledge workers such as nurses, mechanics, and software engineers often do the same type of work every day. The context may change, but the work itself is doesn't really vary most of the time. So, goals really may not serve them. Why then should people whose work doesn't merit unique projects be forced to make goals? 
Myth #3: Measuring goals indicates employee performance 
The reason many organizations require employees to have goals is because they don't consider what else they could measure. At least goals give us something. But how much of your employee's time at work is spent working on the work outlined in "goals"? And does having more goals really mean more productivity? It's rare an employee's entire job is spent working on super specific, well planned out work. We have three big chunks of our jobs:
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I've had a few. But then again too few to mention....What would you change if you could do college over? I don't suppose waiting until word processing existed would be an option. From Campus Grotto.

The 7 Deadly Regrets of Former College Students
After four years of college, you sit at graduation and realize just how fast the time went. During this time, a slight sense of anxiety sets in as you begin a new chapter of your life and you realize all the opportunities that were presented to you in college have come to an end. As your college life comes to a close, it is easy to think of the things you could have done, rather than what you did do. 
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
- Mark Twain 
Here are 7 of the biggest regrets from those who went to college. This article isn’t meant for college grads to regret any lost opportunities they had in college, but rather to inform current and future college students of what former college students wish they had done differently.... 
1) Wish they had gone to class more 
Whether it is boredom, lack of a challenge, scheduling the class too early, or simply having no interest in the subject matter, the excuses for not going to class can pile up. If you realized just how much you are actually paying per class, you’d be more inclined to go and get your money’s worth. 
While some classes for your major will be required, you are free to choose from a wide selection of classes to make your class schedule more stimulating. Take classes that sound interesting or select subjects that are totally new to you, maybe you will stumble upon something you had no idea you liked or you even know existed. Taking a variety of classes will open you up to new ideas, new people, new professors, and will help keep your mind fresh rather than overtaxing yourself on a single subject
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