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I’m going to catch hell for this one, but being a stay-at-home dad is easy peasy lemon squeezy. Some people say I’m not really retired because being a stay at home parent is hard. Other stay at home parents don’t call themselves retired, right? Well, I gotta say, being a stay at home dad is a lot closer to retirement than working full time. I have been a stay at home dad for 6 years and it got a ton easier over time. The amount of work is directly correlated to the age and number of the kids. It also depends on the children too, of course. Some kids are harder to manage than others. We have one son who is behaving better and better so we are already over the hump. For me, being a stay at home dad is way easier than working full time.

Which is more difficult, SAHD or work full time?

I did a quick Twitter poll yesterday and here is the result.

Interestingly, it looks like a lot of people think being a stay at home parent is more difficult than working full time. I wonder if most of the votes are from working people who had to be home occasionally. If you’re not used to being at home with the kids all day, it can be a big shock. Little kids need constant attention and you don’t have any time to yourself. It’s exhausting. However, that is just a phase. Once they are a bit older, they don’t need 100% of your attention anymore. Our son is at this point now. He still needs attention, but I can send him off to read or watch TV if I really need a break. Life is good now.

Current SAHD duty

RB40Jr is 7 years old and he is finishing up first grade. My SAHD life improved tremendously once he started kindergarten. Here is my typical day.

I love my unglamorous SAHD lifestyle. It really isn’t that much work anymore because RB40Jr goes to school full time. This is way less work than when I was an engineer. Back then, I had to work full time and be a dad. I think most people voted for SAHD because they’re thinking of the period before kids start kindergarten. That period was more difficult, but still easier than full time work for me. Let’s rewind a bit.

Birth to 18 months old

Mrs. RB40 and I both took time off when our son was born. I took 11 weeks off to try being a stay-at-home dad. Mrs. RB40 had 3 months maternity leave. Mrs. RB40’s parents also came up to help. We overlapped our time off and RB40Jr was home for 6 months. The daycare didn’t take babies under 6 months anyway.

This was a rough period because a baby is a huge disruptor to your regular life. There was a big learning curve and we didn’t get much sleep. Those first 6 months were very challenging, but we loved it. It was a huge luxury to spend time at home as a new family. RB40Jr was a super cute baby. We sent him to a nice daycare when he was 6 months old.

All of us disliked daycare. It sucked because we didn’t get to spend any time with our son. We dropped him off at 7 am and picked him up at 6 pm. He’d be awake for a little while and fall asleep quickly after a meal. RB40Jr didn’t sleep through the night for a long time so we never got a good nights rest. Anyway, we didn’t like other people raising our son.

This period was way more difficult than now. I think the learning curve was the big issue. It’s like going from high school to college. The level of difficulty increased so quickly and it was tough to adjust. We got used to functioning with minimal sleep and got through this period somehow.

18 months to 2 years old – Full time SAHD

This is when I retired from my engineering career and became a SAHD. RB40Jr was 18 months old and it was perfect timing. He was still young and he didn’t cause much trouble. That summer, he already walked very well and we had a great time exploring the city. I think 18 months to 2 years old is the best time to be a stay at home parent. Kids are still very cute and they are not very rebellious at that age. After 2, they talk back a lot more.

During this time, being a stay at home dad involved many tedious tasks. I had to change diapers, clean up messes, feed the kid, lug a big bag around whenever we went out, and all kind of little things. RB40Jr also needed 100% attention from me when he was awake. This meant I had to blog after he fell asleep at night. This period was tough because I didn’t have any time to myself. I had to wait until Mrs. RB40 got home to hand him off. It was still easier than working full time. I think the difficulty was between working half time and full time.

Here is a fun post from when he was 2 years old and touched dog poop.

2 to 5 years old – preschool years

When he turned 2, we got him off the diapers and tried to send him to a preschool. He was so attached to me at that point and the first preschool was a no go. He cried until he fell asleep during that first week. The preschool kicked him out because they couldn’t handle it. RB40Jr was only about 2 and a half when we tried that preschool.

It all turned out okay, though. We found another preschool nearby a few months later. He had a rough first day, but he adjusted. This preschool was at a community center and the cost was very reasonable. We stayed here mostly until RB40Jr was old enough to go to kindergarten.

  • 2 years old – 2 days of school from 9 am to 1 pm.
  • 3 years old – 3 half days.
  • 4 years old – 4 half days.

This period got easier gradually as he went to school more. There are fewer tasks to deal with as he got older. Getting off the bottle and diaper were awesome. This made it much easier to go out. I did not have to pack a huge bag whenever we went out anymore. However, a different aspect got much more difficult. Our son developed a rebellious streak and we butted heads all the time. There were a lot of meltdowns, arguments, and general unpleasantness. I already forgot why we fought so much, but it was a tough stretch. I think it was mainly trying to get him to do what I wanted that was so frustrating. At least, I got a little break whenever he went off to preschool. There were some disciplinary problems at preschool too. He was quick to hit other kids and punched a teacher in the crotch once. You gotta watch yourself around these little kids. Warning: Don’t go to YouTube to look up crotch punch. You’re going to waste a ton of time and laugh too loud at work.

This period was a little more difficult. While there were fewer tasks to deal with, it was harder emotionally. It’s frustrating to deal with kids this age, as I’m sure most parents can attest. Being a SAHD during this period was still less difficult than working full time because it got progressively easier as the preschool time increased.

Kindergarten and full time school

World’s Largest Virtual #Hallelujah Chorus - YouTube

Thanks God for full time kindergarten. Life got so much easier at that point. My schedule improved a ton and I had time to exercise and blog more. RB40Jr , but he improved over time with a lot of diligent help. Let’s just say he got to know the principal, the nurse, the counselors, and the office staff very well that first year. It became much better in first grade. He rarely gets in trouble now. He is also a lot more reasonable and can follow instructions much better. I haven’t been mad at him in a long time. So stay-at-home parents with little kids, hang in there! It will get a lot easier once they go to school full time.

SAHD problems

There were periods where I got really frustrated with RB40Jr, but I had similar issues at work too. The SAHD workload is much less and way easier than engineering. Also, I didn’t have a lot of problems like many other stay-at-home parents.

Isolation – This wasn’t a big problem for me because I’m an introvert. Blogging was my outlet and I have an online community to vent to. That was enough. I also became friends with a few moms so RB40Jr occasionally had play dates.

Chores – Before I became a SAHD, the cooking duty was about 50/50. Once I was a SAHD, I took over cooking on the weekdays and it worked out well. That’s probably the biggest household chore I took on. I do the other chores minimally and that’s good enough. Our home is far from sparkling clean and we can live with it. Mrs. RB40 occasionally goes on a deep cleaning spree.

Mental stimulation – This is another common complaint. When you’re a stay-at-home parent, you mostly interact with kids. There isn’t a lot of mental stimulation. Retire by 40 came to the rescue for me again. I keep busy and mentally stimulated by blogging about personal finance. It’s not technical like engineering, but it’s helped a lot and besides, I have to do a lot of research, too.

Depression – This wasn’t a problem for me when I was a SAHD. Depression was a much bigger problem when I was working in a job I disliked. I had bouts of frustrations occasionally, but I recovered quickly from those. I know postpartum depression is a problem for many stay-at-home parents. If you feel down, talk to your doctor and get some help.

No time off – When you’re a stay-at-home parent, you’re on duty 24/7. This was a tough one and I struggled with it too. It got better over time as you can see. We only have one child so I had it easy.

Okay, I’d better wrap it up. This post went on a little too long. For me, being a stay-at-home dad was easier than working full time. Now that RB40Jr goes to school full time, it is way easier. This is as close to retirement as you can get. It is not more difficult than working full time, or even half time. I’d probably be bored if I didn’t have Retire by 40.

Now, it’s your turn. Let me know what you think. Is being a stay-at-home parent more difficult than working full time? It’s different for everyone so don’t feel bad if it’s more difficult for you.

Bonus joke from RB40Jr

What does one volcano say to another volcano?

I lava you.

Hilarious!

Starting a blog is a great way to build your brand and generate some extra income. You can see my tutorial – How to Start A Blog and Why You Should. Check it out if you’re thinking about blogging. 

The post Being a Stay-At-Home Dad Is Easy appeared first on Retire by 40.

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Is housing affordability a problem where you live? It’s a big problem in Portland. Our homeless population is growing and becoming increasingly visible. Portland is not alone, though. Many West Coast cities are experiencing an explosion in homelessness. A lot of this has to do with housing affordability. The West Coast has done very well economically over the last decade. Housing prices and rents have increased tremendously as a result. Well compensated workers can afford nice houses and apartments. However, low wage workers and people on fixed income haven’t been able to keep up.  Some people who were able to scrape by previously can’t do it anymore. They become homeless and the problem continues to worsen.

Homelessness is getting worse

From personal experience, I see that our homelessness problem has been growing over the years. I lived in Portland from 1997 to 2000 and I don’t remember any tents on the sidewalk. There were homeless people, but they were not as visible. In 2000, we moved to the suburb so I could be closer to work.

We didn’t really like driving everywhere so we moved back to the city in 2007 and turned our house into a rental. Ten years ago, the homeless problem still wasn’t that bad. There are areas in downtown where homeless people congregate, near free services. There are always a lot of scruffy looking people around the central library. Chinatown and certain parks have a lot of homeless people hanging around. However, we didn’t really see them around our condo. We’re on the southern side of downtown which is a long walk from various social services.

The homeless problem got worse gradually. Tents sprouted along sidewalks, under overpasses, and pretty much any available green space. The city sweeps up these camps occasionally and they move around. The homeless propagated out of the core downtown area and spread outward. There are tents in many neighborhoods now. Parks are overrun with homeless people and you can see them sleeping everywhere. Out of state visitors are surprised by the prevalence of problem. It doesn’t feel like the same country as where they’re from. Homelessness is very visible here.

*Chart from the Oregonian. They had a pretty good report on our homeless crisis (Jan. 2015).

Is housing affordability a problem where you live?

Unfortunately, the homelessness/housing affordability problem in Portland probably will worsen. I don’t think we’ve hit rock bottom yet. It also seems to be a growing problem in many cities on the West Coast. I read that it’s pretty bad in LA, San Francisco, Seattle, Tacoma, Eugene, and other cities of all sizes. Homelessness is more prevalent on the West Coast because the weather is milder. Maybe it isn’t as bad in other areas of the country?

Recently, I got into a minor argument on Twitter. A prominent blogger argued that it’s best to ignore the news and look at the well-being index instead. Some locations are going in the crapper, but the overall well-being index has improved in recent years. The news will focus on problems and amplify them because that’s what sells. Avoid the news and don’t worry about it. This strategy works very well if you live in small town Colorado, but it’s harder to ignore the homelessness when you live in bigger cities and are confronted by panhandlers daily.

So that’s why I want to get your input and see if there is a housing affordability problem where you live. Generally, it is an affordability problem if you’re spending more than 30% of your income on housing. If there are a significant homeless population and panhandlers in your town, then there is some kind of problem.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

This is a very simple poll. Please elaborate in the comment section if you have more to say. Housing affordability is a big issue. It benefits some of us, but it hurts many too.

Well-being index

FYI, here is the latest well-being improvement map from Gallup. Last year’s state indexes don’t look too great. For the first time, zero states improved from the previous year.

Am I part of the problem?

I think housing affordability is a growing problem in the US, no matter where you live. You might not see a problem now, but it’s coming down the pipeline. Why?

We have 2 rentals in Portland, a condo and a duplex. I charge a little below market rate and my tenants are doing fine financially. Investing in rental properties is a great way to build wealth. It’s a proven system. However, I can’t invest in local real estate anymore. The housing price is too high here. I’m sure there are deals to be had, but I don’t know how to find them. The professionals probably scooped these deals up before they hit the market. Who knows…

I still believe in real estate investing so I’m looking further. There are many markets where real estate is still a great investment. Housing in non-coastal states is still very affordable. That’s why I’m investing more in real estate crowdfunding. A local company will buy a cheap apartment, fix it up, raise the rent, and sell it a few years later. We have seen this over and over again in Portland. Poorer people get displaced and they have to find another cheap place to live. This kind of investment probably exacerbates the housing affordability issue. Even if your city is affordable now, it will probably worsen in the future. Entrepreneurs and investors will follow the money. That’s capitalism.

Micro apartments

You’ve seen tiny homes, but have you seen micro apartments? This is one answer to the housing affordability problem on the West Coast. Check out this micro apartment in Seattle.

This 175 sq ft apartment rents for about $1,000/month. This is pretty neat. It’s almost like a hotel room. There is a nice common kitchen, onsite laundry, and bike storage. These micro apartments are usually located in areas with very good Walk score. There are many amenities nearby and renters can spend a lot of time away from their tiny home.

I think West Coast cities should encourage more of these micro apartments. It’s one way to bring the cost of housing down.

Should you care?

Anyway, I hope I didn’t ruin your Monday. If you’re reading this, you probably have a job to go to and a decent place to live. No matter how bad your job is, it’s better than being homeless, right?

What do you think about housing affordability? Is it a real problem or just fake news? Should you care about homelessness if you don’t see it in your town?

Sign up with RealtyShares to browse the current projects and see if real estate crowdfunding is a good match for you. Capitalism, right?

Image credit: Zoku Amsterdam

The post Is housing affordability a problem where you live? appeared first on Retire by 40.

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Have you ever been in so much financial trouble that you thought – this is rock bottom? Personal finance is not easy and most of us have been through a few tough situations. I think that’s how people discover personal finance blogs. They get in trouble financially and want to turn things around. When you’re rock bottom, there is nowhere to go but up, right? Anyway, I want to share my financial rock bottom with you today. Check it out and share your story in the comment section.

Charmed financial life

Unbelievably, I lived a charmed financial life since I became an adult. My lowest point financially was right when I graduated from college. I had a 15 year-old beater Toyota and about $200. That was it. Fortunately, I did not have any debt. My parents helped out and I was able to finish college without any student loans. That’s a lot better than many new grads today. I feel bad for the young folks that have to start their professional life with debt. That’s why I plan to help our son graduate with as little debt as possible.

After I graduated from college, I drove from Santa Barbara to Portland to begin an engineering career. The paychecks started rolling in and I was on my way to financial independence. My financial journey was relatively smooth because I had good income and I lived modestly. I never spent more than I made and I had a likeminded partner. We worked together to build our wealth from scratch. That’s how I was able to retire at 39 and become a stay at home dad/blogger. Life is awesome now and I don’t have any complaint.

Okay, that is one boring story. Having a charmed financial life is amazing, but it is not an interesting story. You want to hear about some struggles, right? For a better story, I have to dig deeper. Let’s try again.

My Real Rock Bottom

Did you notice the qualification in the previous section? My finance was good since I became an adult. Before that, my family had many difficult moments. This is the one I remember most because I was a teenager by then.

In 1985, my family immigrated to United States from Thailand. I was 12 years old and it was a strange time for our family. In Thailand, my dad was a business owner and my mom was a college professor. When they immigrated here, they worked minimum wage jobs and hustled to make a living. The first year was not too bad because my aunt lived here. She was a nurse and had a nice big house in the San Fernando Valley. My dad rented a room from her and 5 of us slept in that room. I have 2 younger brothers. It really wasn’t bad because we spent a lot of time in the shared space. My aunt also had 3 young kids so they were used to having kids around.

My parent bounced around from one low skilled job to another and never found a steady job. This was fine when they had my aunt, our safety net. However, my uncle decided to move his family back to Thailand in 1986. That meant my parents had to make it on their own.

On our own

They found an affordable apartment near Granada Hills High School and moved in. My dad was a delivery driver for a nearby pizza joint. My mom also worked in the same place. They didn’t make a lot of money, but they lived very frugally. They usually worked late and weren’t home much in the evening. I remember eating a lot of pizza from the restaurant they worked in. That was fringe benefit for the workers. Life was steady for a few years while they tried to save.

One day, my dad went out on a delivery and the customer wouldn’t pay him. My dad refused to give him the pizza and the guy hit him with a bat*. It was literally daylight robbery. The boss gave my dad the rest of the day off and he came home. At first, he thought his arm was sprained. He didn’t want to go to the hospital because he had no health insurance. He asked me to pull on his hand to set it. I tried, but it didn’t work. He was in too much pain. Eventually, he couldn’t stand it and went to get it checked out at the hospital. It turned out that his arm was broken. They checked him in for an overnight stay and performed a surgery to repair his arm.

*If someone wants to rob you, let them take the pizza. It’s not worth it.

He tried to continue working as a driver, but he couldn’t do a good job with one arm in a cast. I’m not quite sure what happened next, but both my parents became unemployed soon after. That was the real financial rock bottom. I remember them being around all day and trying to find jobs. It was very stressful for the whole family for many weeks. Having no income is an impossible situation for poor families.

A new start

One day my mom was searching through the classified ads in the newspaper when she came across a Thai restaurant for sale. It was located in Thousand Oaks, about 45 minutes away. My dad didn’t want to take the long drive out there, but my mom kept pestering him to go check it out. A few days later, they took the trip to Thousand Oaks. My dad walked through the tiny restaurant once and told the owner, we’ll take it. The seller wanted $16,500, but my dad bargained it down to $9,000. We put $5,000 down and paid the rest in 2 installments. The guy had 3 restaurants and he was going through a divorce. He was desperate to cash out fast.

Somehow my parents came up with $5,000. How did they do that? I checked with my dad and he told me they had some cash savings. Before he got hurt, he was working 3 jobs. He put flyers on doors, delivered pizza, and was a gas station attendant. The gas station job was the stand out. He worked the midnight shift at a gas station on Sunset Blvd. near Beverly Hills. He said the tips were great there. Some people gave him a hundred dollar bill to fill up and didn’t come back for the change. Wow! Gasoline was 89 cents/gallon back then. Those were big tips. He didn’t get much sleep in those days.

Anyway, my parents had just enough for the down payment and we moved to Thousand Oaks. They learned how to run a restaurant and the existing chef stayed on. My dad learned to cook and my mom ran the front. The kids helped out in the evenings and weekends. It was a family effort. This hole-in-the-wall restaurant put us through college and set a solid foundation for my future. See, the only way from rock bottom is up.

What was your financial rock bottom?

I don’t know how close my parents were to moving back to Thailand. If they didn’t buy that restaurant, I might not be here now. They had families and other options in Thailand. It would have been much easier for them to fight it out in a more familiar environment. I’m glad they stuck it out in the US, though. It worked out really well for us kids.

Alright, I hope you enjoyed that. Now you might wonder why they immigrated to the US in the first place. Let’s just say that’s another low point and I’ll have to tell you another day. That’s enough reminiscing today. It’s emotionally draining. Anyway, I was too young to know much about family finances when we lived in Thailand.

What about you? What was your rock bottom financially? I bet many of you can beat my story.

The post What Was Your Lowest Point Financially? appeared first on Retire by 40.

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Earlier this month, Mrs. RB40 (my wife) came home from work in a huff and gave everyone a hard time. Turns out, her boss is leaving soon and her job will most likely change. She really enjoys her current job so this upcoming change unsettled her. Luckily, we already achieved financial independence so she has more choices than many of her coworkers. Things have calmed down a bit since then. She plans to stay for a while and see how everything shakes out. For now, she’ll stick to her 2020 early retirement target date. Anyway, it is a good time for us to go over her retirement benefits and see where she stands. Should she work longer to increase her pension and other retirement benefits?

401k Plan

The first part of Mrs. RB40’s retirement benefits is her 401k plan. She started working with her current employer in 2006 and she maxes out her 401k contributions every year. When she retires in 2020, she can rollover this 401k plan into a traditional IRA or just keep it with her employer. Both choices are good. Her employer’s 401k plan has very low fees and it is a great place to park her retirement fund and let it accumulate.

However, if she wants to access this stash before turning 59 ½, then it’s best to roll it over into a traditional IRA. Once there, she can build a Roth IRA ladder by doing a partial conversion every year. This way she can access her retirement fund and avoid the 10% early withdrawal penalty. You can read more about the Roth IRA ladder here.

Her 401k plan did very well over the last 12 years. She started with nothing in the account and now it is worth more than $360,000. This is why I think the 401k plan is awesome. You won’t even miss the money because it comes out of your paycheck before you see it. Most workers should contribute as much as they can to their 401k.

This 401k plan is easy because it doesn’t matter when she retires. She will get to keep the whole amount whenever she retires.

Social Security

Next is Social Security benefits. This one is pretty easy too. Mrs. RB40 has already worked long enough to receive Social Security benefits. She can start receiving the full benefit when she turns 67. Alternatively, she could start collecting when she turns 62, but the benefit will be reduced. Both cases are a long way off so we won’t see these checks anytime soon. I think it’s probably best to delay the Social Security benefit until she turns 67. That way, she’ll get the full amount.

Her current Social Security benefit estimate is around $2,400/month. This Social Security estimate will decrease a bit if she retires early because her future earnings will be less.

Pension benefits

This is the tricky one. Mrs. RB40 is lucky enough to work for an employer with pension benefits. Their pension program is somewhat complicated so I’ll just give an estimate.

When Mrs. RB40 retires in 2020, she will be 46 years old. That’s way younger than the usual retirement age and she won’t be eligible for pension right away. However, she can defer her pension benefit until she turns 62.

From what I understand, Mrs. RB40 will receive about $1,100/month from this program when she turns 62, assuming she retires in 2020 and defers it. At this rate, working a few years longer won’t make a big difference in her pension benefit. Each year will be incremental. She’d need to work many more years to increase this benefit significantly.

I haven’t looked at her pension benefit closely before so this is a pleasant surprise. I thought she wasn’t going to get anything. $1,100/month is a very nice bonus. As a comparison, my pension benefit from 16 years at Intel will be about $350/month when I turn 65.

She won’t get this pension benefit when she retires in 2020, but it will be there when she turns 62. I think that’s fantastic.

Healthcare benefit

Lastly, there is one more great benefit from her employer – healthcare coverage. However, she probably won’t be able to take advantage of this one. If she works here until she turns 57, then she can keep her healthcare coverage into retirement. This is a huge benefit for early retirees. However, Mrs. RB40 is just 44. I don’t want her to work full time for 13 more years. 57 is a long way off.

We are on her health insurance plan right now and it’s great. The premium is affordable and the coverage is good. We’re very happy with this plan and our doctors. This is my biggest worry when Mrs. RB40 retires in 2020. We’ll probably get a silver plan through healthcare.gov. This will cost us about $500/month. Mrs. RB40’s current plan is better, though. It costs less and has better benefits. Too bad she can’t keep it after she retires early.

However, there is a hack. From what I read, she can go back to work when she’s 56 in 2030. She can enroll in the employer sponsored health insurance plan for a year and retire again at 57. Then she can keep this health insurance forever. This sounds like a good trick, but I doubt she would want to go back to work full-time at that point. Also, this hack might not work by then. Things change all the time.

We’ll have to note it down and investigate this again when she’s closer to 57. This trick might come in handy if healthcare cost continues to skyrocket in the US.

Early Retirement Summary

In summary, Mrs. RB40 has a pretty sweet retirement package. She won’t be able to take advantage of everything right away, but the benefits will be there for her in the future. Here are the important dates.

  • Early retirement in 2020 – Mrs. RB40 retires early at age 46, around midyear. We’ll get health insurance from healthcare.gov and go with medical tourism for expensive procedures.
  • Roth IRA ladder from 2020 to 2030 – Over this 10 year period, she can build a Roth IRA ladder to avoid the 10% early withdrawal penalty.
  • Back to work in 2030 – Mrs. RB40 turns 56. Maybe she’ll go back to work for a year to get good health insurance coverage? This is entirely optional.
  • Retire again in 2031 – Mrs. RB40 turns 57. She can retire after working for one year and keep the health insurance.
  • Begin withdrawal from her retirement accounts in 2034 – She turns 59 ½. At this point, she can withdraw from her 401k and traditional IRA with no penalty. My back-of-the-envelope calculation indicates she can withdraw about $2,400/month. This is a very rough estimate based on 4% withdrawal.
  • Receives pension in 2036 – She turns 62 and receives her pension benefit, about $1,100/month.
  • Medicare in 2039 – Mrs. RB40 turns 65 and becomes eligible for Medicare.
  • Social Security benefit in 2041 – She turns 67 and receives full social security benefit, about $2,400/month.
Why she shouldn’t work longer than 2020

Mrs. RB40’s retirement looks great to me. The most challenging period financially will be the first 14 years, from 2020 to 2034. She will need to figure out how to fund her expense while minimizing withdrawal. It looks okay for now because our passive income + blog income are enough to cover our living expense. We will build a Roth IRA ladder and use it to cover any shortfall.

Once we both turn 59 ½, then withdrawal will become much easier. We can withdraw from our retirement accounts as needed. A few years after that, pensions and social security benefits will start rolling in. At that point, our retirement finance looks golden and we’ll probably both fully retire to a life of leisure.

I really don’t think she needs to work longer than 2020 unless she really wants to. Her finances look really good. There is income from various sources and the total amount looks very good.

Adding my retirement fund to the mix

If we take my retirement accounts and various hustles into consideration, the picture looks even rosier. I’m pretty sure our retirement income will be over $10,000/month. That should be more than enough for a comfortable retirement.

For a more comprehensive look, I put everything into the Retirement Planner at Personal Capital. This tool is really neat because it takes our current portfolio into account.

We are in excellent shape. Our projected retirement spending ability is $25,467 per month. That’s a lot of money. I think 8.6% annual return is probably too high, though. Anyway, our retirement looks good financially.

We might even have some money left over for a small legacy to our son.

Do you have a pension? How long will you have to work to receive it? Will it be enough to fund your retirement?

*Sign up for a free account at Personal Capital to help manage your money. I log in almost every day to check on my accounts and cash flow. It’s a great site for DIY investors. Check them out if you don’t have an account yet.

Image credit: Eutah Mizushima

The post Should I Work Longer to Increase My Pension? appeared first on Retire by 40.

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It’s been a long while since I wrote about coffee so here is an update. In 2012, I was a financially independent millionaire and I refused to buy overpriced coffee. I didn’t need to because my old workplace offered free coffee as overtime pay for their overworked engineers. Great deal for the company! Now, I’m a retired engineer/blogger/stay-at-home dad and I still refuse to buy expensive coffee.

Okay, refuse is a strong word. Let’s just say I rarely visit our local Starbucks. The last time I went was to meet with the tenant who was moving out of our rental home. We sold that home in 2014 so that was about 4 years ago. I’ve visited a few coffee shops since then, but only to catch up with friends. We usually avoid Starbucks because I prefer to support the local shops. Am I just being a cheap bastard? Yes, that’s part of it, but let me justify my cheapness.

The picture is from our Cancun vacation. The coffee shop was part of the package. We drank a ton of cappuccino there.

***Don’t leave yet. Skip to the last section for an awesome coffee brewing tip if you don’t want to hear my take on the latte factor.

Work

Now that I don’t get free coffee anymore, I should buy coffee, right? Not really. These days, I only drink coffee in the morning. We brew it in a French press at home and that’s all I need. I blog from home so it would be more trouble to go out and get coffee. By the way, our French press is over 10 years old and it still going strong. Also, I don’t need the afternoon pick-me-up anymore. Life is less stressful and I don’t have to be ‘on’ all day long. That’s one huge advantage of early retirement, I could live life at my own pace. The free cafeteria coffee was never that good anyway.

Some people like to blog in a coffee shop, but that environment is too distracting for me. In that case, I think it is fine to buy coffee because you’re using their wifi and it is work related expense.

How much are you really saving?

Are you really saving that much money? Let’s crunch the numbers. A medium caffe latte cost around $4 at Starbucks. Let’s say you buy 2 drinks every weekday. That comes out to about $2,000 per year. If you invest that instead of drinking it, you’d have over $250,000 after 30 years (8% gains annually). That’s a quarter million bucks! It is a significant sum. This is David Bach’s “The Latte Factor” that most of you have heard about.

Focus on big wins

I enjoy our modest lifestyle and rarely go out for coffee. It works well for me, but many experts argue that you should focus on big wins instead. You only have so much energy and if you focus on the little things, you won’t have energy for the big stuff. Here are some big wins.

  • Live in a cheaper home. Housing is the largest expense for most American family. If you can cut expense here, it’s a very big win. Currently, we live in 2 bed, 2 bath condo. It’s a bit cramp and we’re looking to move into our duplex at some point.
  • Drive a cheaper car. We share one car so we’re doing pretty well here.
  • Move to a more affordable location, aka geoarbitrage. Portland is getting more expensive, but it is still the cheapest big city on the west coast. Seattle, Los Angeles, and San Francisco are way more expensive than Portland.
  • Don’t buy the latest gadgets. Do you upgrade to the new iPhone and other tech. gears every time there is a new release? This can be wasteful because cutting edge gadgets are always more expensive.
  • Cook at home and eat out less. We cook most of our meals at home. It’s more frugal and much healthier than eating out all the time.
  • Max out your 401k and Roth IRA. Everyone needs to save for retirement.
  • Stay healthy to avoid medical bankruptcy.
  • Get scholarship instead of paying for college. I hope our son can get a full ride, but we’re saving in a 529 plan just in case.
  • Make more money. This one is another big one. If you can make money at work, it will offset this coffee expense. Side hustling like blogging or driving for Uber can help increase your income too. Retire by 40 generated over $250,000 since I started blogging. Check out my awesome guide on How to Start a Blog, if you want to give it a go.

I don’t agree with this focus on big wins theory. If you can’t save on the little things, you probably can’t save on bigger things either. Most people spend too much on everything. Is there a real Starbucks customer who drives a cheap car and live in a smaller home purposely? When you’re living it up with your coffee, you’re probably living it up everywhere else too. Personally, I think it’s best to win big and small. They are not mutually exclusive. Let me know what you think in the comment.

The only exception on the list is the last one – make more money. If you can make more money, it will probably offset your coffee expense. This is easier said than done, though.

You shouldn’t buy expensive coffee if…

Hey, if you are doing well financially, then don’t worry too much about getting a nice Frappuccino® once in a while. However, you shouldn’t buy expensive coffee every day if…

  • You have consumer debt. Pay off your high interest debt first.
  • You spend more than you earn. This is the cardinal sin of personal finance. You have got to fix it because this is a downward spiral.
  • You’re not saving for retirement. Retirement saving should come way before a cappuccino.
  • You spend more on coffee than you save. People, get your priority straight. If you don’t know the answer to this one, then you need to closely track your expenses for a month or two.
  • You don’t know about compound interest, financial independence, or how to invest. Teach yourself these basic concepts before spending money on overpriced coffee.
  • You have kids, but don’t have a College Savings plan. What’s more important, your kid or your overpriced coffee?
  • Feel free to add more to this list.
Make awesome coffee at home

Here is the coffee brewing tip I promised at the beginning of this post. Once you figured out how to make good coffee at home, it’s not a hardship. I’ve been enjoying our French press coffee for many years and it just got a lot better. Cold brew – Oh Yeah!

Jeremy (Go Curry Cracker) was raving about cold brew coffee earlier this week so I looked it up on YouTube. Cold brew is extremely easy for us so I tried it out. All I needed to do was to put coffee into the French press, add room temperature water, and leave it on the counter at 5 pm. The coffee was ready by the next morning and it was fantastic.

I heated some milk and made a latte with the cold brew. It was chocolaty, smoother, and easier to drink. It was delicious. Try it at home if you haven’t tasted cold brew yet. I know, I’m a bit late to this trend.

And yes, the twitter conversation inspired this post. It was on the back burner for a while now because I wanted to respond to the win big theory. The cold brew talk pushed it back to the top of the queue. Also, Jeremy should go ahead and occasionally enjoy his nitro cold brew. He earned it. Thanks Jeremy and Justin! Justin (Roots of Good) also tried cold brew at home, but he wasn’t impressed. Feel free to jump into the conversation if you catch us on Twitter.

@retirebyforty

@GoCurryCracker

@RootsofGoodBlog

What do you think? Which camp are you in, win big or win everything? Have you tried cold brew?

The post Why I Still Don’t Buy Overpriced Coffee appeared first on Retire by 40.

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I’m a huge fan of Financial Independence. It’s the pinnacle of personal finance achievement and everyone should at least learn about the concept. Of course, it’s even better to pursue financial independence and then achieving it. We reached financial independence in 2012 and I retired from my engineering career soon after. My life improved so much since then, it’s unbelievable. I encourage everyone to shoot for financial independence because it’s such a great goal. There is no downside to it.

Well, that’s what I used to think. But, now I’m not so sure. Financial independence has been fantastic for us, but nothing is 100% good all the time. We’re running into one of these downsides now. Check it out and let me know what you think.

Trouble in Paradise

You may have seen this if you follow me on Twitter. Here is a tweet I sent out earlier this week. If you’re not following me on Twitter, click over and follow retirebyforty. I post regular life pictures and comments so you can see what the ER lifestyle is all about. You can also follow me on Instagram if you prefer that platform.

Change is the only constant in life

Mrs. RB40 (my wife) has been happy at work and she doesn’t mind working while I’m a stay at home dad/blogger. It’s a great situation for us because we can continue to save and we don’t have to worry about healthcare. However, she came home in a huff and gave everyone a hard time earlier this week.

It turns out that her boss is leaving for greener pastures and her job is going to change. That’s too bad because she is in a great spot at work. She gets to do what she enjoys and impacts the organization in a positive way. This shift means she will get a new boss. While the vision/mission of the organization won’t change, her role will (even though she is really happy for her boss). Her current project which sets a foundation for other projects may be deprioritized. She’ll either get pushed to work in a different area which she doesn’t care for or absorb those duties in addition to what she’s already doing. (It’s already coming down the pipe.) Of course, it’s an opportunity to move up as well, but she doesn’t want or need that either. Her current job is just right and she doesn’t want additional stress and responsibilities. Her current work/life balance is very good right now.

That’s the problem with a job. Even if you have the perfect job, it will change. A job won’t be perfect forever. I liked my engineering job when I first started, but I couldn’t stand it by the time I quit. That’s why saying you won’t retire because you love your job is a fallacy. You probably won’t love your job in 10 or 20 years. Also, there is no guarantee that your employer will still love you. These days, most employers prefer younger workers who are more driven, have long term potential, and are paid less. Experience doesn’t mean jack because technology changes so fast now. More and more jobs are outsourced or turned into independent gigs. No job is secure, so don’t ever think you’re indispensible. Everyone can be replaced.

The downside of financial independence

Fortunately, we are already financial independent. We will be fine if she quits her day job and joins the RB40 team full time. Sure, I’d miss her income and healthcare coverage, but it’s not a big deal. At this point, we can afford it. She’ll be much less stressed so it will be worth it. She always wanted more time to do non “work-related” things (more volunteering, designing and other creative arts stuff.) This is the opportunity to do it.

That’s the downside of financial independence. When you’re FI, your tolerance for workplace BS drops like a rock. If Mrs. RB40 wasn’t financially independent, then she would just soldier on like everybody else. But now she has more options. She doesn’t have to deal with any workplace BS if she really doesn’t want to. In all likelihood, the workplace will settle back into some kind of rhythm and her job will probably be fine even if it does change. I think she should hang on for a few months to see how things shake out. It might not be as bad as she imagines. Nothing is ever as good or as bad as it seems, right? Also, she’s not quite ready to retire yet. Let’s stick to the 2020 target date.

Okay, that’s it for today. This is a short one because it’s been a semi stressful week here at the RB40 household. In addition to Mrs. RB40’s problem at work, I’m trying to replace our undead HVAC from the 80s. I met a few contractors to get an estimate and they are all pretty expensive. It’s been somewhat disruptive because they all take about an hour each to go through everything.

What about you? Do you think there is any downside to financial independence?

Image credit: Daniel Pascoa

The post The Downside of Financial Independence appeared first on Retire by 40.

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Hey everyone, how was your month of April? It flew by for us. The weather finally improved in Portland and activities picked up for us. RB40Jr started spring soccer and he enjoyed it for the most part. The soccer spring season is pretty relaxed. They play a game every week with no practices. I’m the assistant coach this season so I can help him out a bit more. We’re also practicing a bit on our own and that should improve his game. He’s not too bad, but he needs to be tenacious and go after the ball more. Some kids tend to stand back and try to strategize (or goof off.) But at this age, that doesn’t work. At this level, they just need to get in there and mix it up. Kids that go after the ball persistently are much more successful. Anyway, it’s fun coaching the soccer league. It’s not too serious at this level and most kids are having fun without a lot of pressure.

The other thing that kept me busy was helping my mom with her doctor appointments. She visited her primary care physician, got an MRI, followed up with the neurologist, and saw the dentist about a broken crown. Whew, that’s a lot of health related appointments in one month. Yeap, I’m officially a part of the sandwich generation now. Helping my mom and taking care of our son is a lot of work. It’s difficult to add any activities at this point. My mom is turning 70 in a few months so she’s not really that old. Her health is okay, but her analytical ability is in decline. She can’t decide anything on her own so I need to make many decisions for her. This is another big reason why I think retiring at 65 is a terrible idea. I know some people are still going strong and enjoying life to the fullest at 70, but I probably won’t be. My genetics aren’t that great so I’d better enjoy life while I’m young. Early retirement is the right choice for me.

On the personal finance side, we had a very good month. Our income was great and our expenses were low. Our passive income held steady and everything is rolling right along. Okay, let’s go over my 2018 Goals first and then I’ll share the details of our cash flow in April.

2018 Goals

This is my goal scheduling spreadsheet. Last year, I found that I needed to start these goals in the first half of the year. If I wait until summer, they just won’t get done. The first 4 months were slow. It’s hard to get be motivated in the winter. Hopefully, I can get myself going now that the weather is warming up. You can get a quick status update from the chart and see the details below.

Financial Goals
  1. Increase our real estate crowdfunding investment to $100,000. We’re doing well with this goal and now have $38,000 invested. I’m looking to invest more, but I haven’t found the right project to invest in yet.
  2. FI ratio > 100%. FI ratio is passive income divide by expense. So far, our FI ratio is 64for 2018. This is slowly improving and I think we’ll do pretty well by the end of the year. Our expense was higher than usual in Q1 because we paid for our summer vacation to Iceland.
  3. Increase bond/cash allocation to 30%. Going to 30% bond/cash will beef up our opportunity fund. However, I’m not in a big hurry to do this because I think the stock market will go up this year. I plan to get to 30% before the end of 2018.
  4. Travel hack 100,000 points. We’re doing well with this one. Mrs. RB40 signed up for a card and we should get the bonus soon. That should push us over 100,000 points.
Blog Goals
  1. Minor Redesign RB40. This one is really difficult to do because I can’t seem to budget time for it. It’s all I can do to write and keep the site running. I’ll work on this one in May.
  2. Blog 12 times at Fit by 40. This one is way behind now. I’m not motivated to write about fitness this year. At least, I’m still going to the gym regularly. For now, I’ll keep FB40 as test site for the redesign. You can see how I started the site here – How to Start a Blog and Why You Should.
  3. Blog income $100,000. This one is going to be very difficult so I’m grading it on the academic system. Q1 is the best quarter for blog income and we did very well. I made $23,344 so far in 2018. That’s actually pretty darn good, but we’re behind the pace. Maybe I should look at revenue instead. The taxes take a big bite out of the income. You can see more detail on my Blog Income page.
Personal Goals
  1. Join Toastmasters. I visited a local club and it was a nice experience. However, there are too many things going on right now. My mom needs help with her various doctor appointments. Also, summer is coming up soon and I’ll spend more time with RB40Jr. I just can’t squeeze Toastmasters into my schedule. This will have to be put off until RB40Jr is more independent.
  2. Not paying for leaf removal. Showdown in November.
  3. Consolidate down to one property. We plan to move into our rental duplex and sell off the other 2 properties. This one will definitely take more than one year. Our rental condo is rented for at least a year so the earliest we will be able to consolidate is 2019.
Fun Goal
  1. Visit Iceland. The trip is a go. I already booked our flight tickets, lodging, ferry, and rental car. Iceland is a very expensive country to visit, but it should be a great trip.
Net Worth (+0.2% YTD)

I’ve been tracking our net worth since 2006 and it is very motivating to see the progress we’ve made. 2018 started off with a bang and we had a great month in January. However, the stock market turned volatile after that and we gave up all the gains. I still think 2018 will be a good year for the stock market, but nobody knows how it is going to turn out. There is so much uncertainty now.

My bet with Warren Buffett – I’ll benchmark our net worth against VFINX for 10 years starting in 2018. VFINX is down about 1% since the beginning of 2018. Our net worth is flat so we’re ahead for now. We’re doing well against VFINX so far, but it’s early yet. Our net worth is diverse so it does better when the market drops.

Here is a graph of our 2018 net worth on Personal Capital. Our net worth decreased a little bit in April even with good income. Some of our stock holdings had a rough month. Philip Morris and Altria both dropped 30% YTD. These have been great dividend stocks for years, but the party might be ending for tobacco stocks.

*Sign up for a free account at Personal Capital to help manage your net worth and investment accounts. I log in almost every day to check on my accounts and cash flow. It’s a great site for DIY investors.

2018 Passive Income ($12,458 YTD)

Here is a quick summary of our passive income. You can see all the details at my new Passive Income page. We had a slow start in 2018 because one of our rentals was vacant for the first 2 months. It’s occupied now so the passive income is looking better. Hopefully, it’ll be smooth sailing for the rest of 2018. The only trouble spot now is P2P lending. We’re seeing more defaults and the interest payments aren’t enough to overcome the hits. I will look into selling these loans off. It’s probably better to get out fast.

April 2018 Cash Flow

Our cash flow was good in April. Our income was great and our expense was reasonable. The only hiccup was P2P lending. We had another small negative month, -$44. This is not looking good. It might be best to just sell the loans at this point. There is a way to do that, but I haven’t tried it yet. I will put this on my to do list in May.

Check out my Sankey diagram and see the details below.

Take Home Income (target > $10,000)

For 2018, our monthly take home income target is $10,000. April was a good month and we did pretty well. My blog income was good and it is still holding up well. It usually drops off in the summer when everyone is on vacation. We’ll see how it goes this year.

  • Mrs. RB40’s paychecks: $5,875
  • Blog Income: $5,354. You can read more details at my Blog Income pageRB40Jr is on the payroll now as model and photographer. The income will go straight into his Roth IRA. I’m excited to see how this experiment will turn out.
  • Rental Income: $902. All our rentals are occupied and we didn’t have any big repairs last month. Read more at the Rental Property Passive Income page.
  • Dividend Income: $999. More details at my Dividend Passive Income page.
  • Real estate crowdfunding: $239. RealtyShares is starting to pick up now and it is looking good. Read more at my Real Estate Crowdfunding Passive Income page.
  • Prosper P2P lending: -$44. P2P lending was negative last month.
  • Interest Income: $15.
Monthly Expenses (target > $4,800)

For 2018, our monthly expense budget is $4,800/month, an increase of $300 from 2017. This does not include contributions to 401k, Roth IRA, and college savings. We did pretty well in April and came in under budget at $3,804. We didn’t have a big expense in April.

  • Housing: $2,365. Our housing expense is getting spendy. This category is over 50% of our expense every month. There’s not much we can do at this point. This includes mortgage, HOA fees, and property taxes.
  • Groceries: $448. Our grocery bill was under control in April. I cooked many delicious meals and at well this month. Check out some pictures. Clockwise from top left – Pacific sole with shallot and caper sauce, Pajeon Korean seafood pancake with gyoza, Mrs. RB40’s baked empanadas, Shrimp tacos with mimosa. Yummm! Follow me on Instagramif you’d like to see more of my unglamorous early retirement lifestyle.

  • Cash: $180.
  • Transportation: $64. We share one car and we don’t drive much. I drop RB40Jr off at school in the morning and go grocery shopping on the weekend. That’s about it. We drive more in the summer when we visit local attractions.
  • Kid: $59. RB40Jr got a Lego set from Ebay for $21. We spent $30 on his art to help the school raise funds. Lastly, he went to an indoor playground with his friend for $8.
  • Pet: $34.
  • Bills: $240. Electricity and insurance (auto, home, term life, and umbrella.)
  • Health: $328. Dentist, eye specialist, vitamins, and gym.
  • Travel: $0.
  • Clothing: $20. RB40Jr got 2 new shorts from WMT.
  • Misc: $67.
  • 401k: $3,060. I contributed $1,630 to my 401k. Mrs. RB40 contributed $1,430 to hers.
  • Extra Savings: $6,475
Extra Savings 2018: $17,917

2018 is going very well and our extra saving totaled $17,917 so far. Unfortunately, about $10,000 went to the IRS in April. I didn’t send in estimated tax payments last year so we owed the tax man. I’ll do a better job this year and try not to owe as much. At least, taxes are done. Now I can focus on investing our extra savings.

Here is what I plan to do with our opportunity fund in 2018.

  • Invest more in real estate crowdfunding.
  • Pick up some dividend stock if I see a good deal. I purchased 50 shares of PM in April.
April 2018 Wrap Up

Overall, April 2018 went well for us. Our income was good and our expense was under budget. Our net worth went down a bit due to the IRS payment, but that’s not a big deal. I think the rest of 2018 should be pretty good. We’ll see how it goes.

May should be pretty similar to April. It looks like the blog income will stay about the same. Passive income might drop a bit because I need to get new window blinds for one rental unit. Our expense should be good next month because we don’t have a big expense planned in May. As for net worth, it depends on the stock market. I’m not too worried about it, though. Nobody knows what the market is going to do so we should focus on what we can control – our saving rate. The stock market will do well in the long term so don’t worry about short term volatility. Just stick to your plan and keep investing.

Did you have a good April? It was a busy month for me. May should be more relaxed because we have fewer healthcare appointments. Hopefully, I can get going on some of my New Year goals. Time is running out because summer is approaching fast. It will be really hard to get anything done once RB40Jr is out of school.

*Sign up for a free account at Personal Capital to help manage your investments. I log in almost every day to check on my accounts and cash flow. It’s a great site for DIY investors.

Disclosure: We may receive a referral fee if you sign up with a service through the links on this page.

The post April 2018 Goals and Financial Update appeared first on Retire by 40.

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I’m a huge fan of Financial Independence. It’s the pinnacle of personal finance achievement and everyone should at least learn about the concept. Of course, it’s even better to pursue financial independence and then achieving it. We reached financial independence in 2012 and I retired from my engineering career soon after. My life improved so much since then, it’s unbelievable. I encourage everyone to shoot for financial independence because it’s such a great goal. There is no downside to it.

Well, that’s what I used to think. But, now I’m not so sure. Financial independence has been fantastic for us, but nothing is 100% good all the time. We’re running into one of these downsides now. Check it out and let me know what you think.

Trouble in Paradise

You may have seen this if you follow me on Twitter. Here is a tweet I sent out earlier this week. If you’re not following me on Twitter, click over and follow retirebyforty. I post regular life pictures and comments so you can see what the ER lifestyle is all about. You can also follow me on Instagram if you prefer that platform.

Change is the only constant in life

Mrs. RB40 (my wife) has been happy at work and she doesn’t mind working while I’m a stay at home dad/blogger. It’s a great situation for us because we can continue to save and we don’t have to worry about healthcare. However, she came home in a huff and gave everyone a hard time earlier this week.

It turns out that her boss is leaving for greener pastures and her job is going to change. That’s too bad because she is in a great spot at work. She gets to do what she enjoys and impacts the organization in a positive way. This shift means she will get a new boss. While the vision/mission of the organization won’t change, her role will (even though she is really happy for her boss). Her current project which sets a foundation for other projects may be deprioritized. She’ll either get pushed to work in a different area which she doesn’t care for or absorb those duties in addition to what she’s already doing. (It’s already coming down the pipe.) Of course, it’s an opportunity to move up as well, but she doesn’t want or need that either. Her current job is just right and she doesn’t want additional stress and responsibilities. Her current work/life balance is very good right now.

That’s the problem with a job. Even if you have the perfect job, it will change. A job won’t be perfect forever. I liked my engineering job when I first started, but I couldn’t stand it by the time I quit. That’s why saying you won’t retire because you love your job is a fallacy. You probably won’t love your job in 10 or 20 years. Also, there is no guarantee that your employer will still love you. These days, most employers prefer younger workers who are more driven, have long term potential, and are paid less. Experience doesn’t mean jack because technology changes so fast now. More and more jobs are outsourced or turned into independent gigs. No job is secure, so don’t ever think you’re indispensible. Everyone can be replaced.

The downside of financial independence

Fortunately, we are already financial independent. We will be fine if she quits her day job and joins the RB40 team full time. Sure, I’d miss her income and healthcare coverage, but it’s not a big deal. At this point, we can afford it. She’ll be much less stressed so it will be worth it. She always wanted more time to do non “work-related” things (more volunteering, designing and other creative arts stuff.) This is the opportunity to do it.

That’s the downside of financial independence. When you’re FI, your tolerance for workplace BS drops like a rock. If Mrs. RB40 wasn’t financially independent, then she would just soldier on like everybody else. But now she has more options. She doesn’t have to deal with any workplace BS if she really doesn’t want to. In all likelihood, the workplace will settle back into some kind of rhythm and her job will probably be fine even if it does change. I think she should hang on for a few months to see how things shake out. It might not be as bad as she imagines. Nothing is ever as good or as bad as it seems, right? Also, she’s not quite ready to retire yet. Let’s stick to the 2020 target date.

Okay, that’s it for today. This is a short one because it’s been a semi stressful week here at the RB40 household. In addition to Mrs. RB40’s problem at work, I’m trying to replace our undead HVAC from the 80s. I met a few contractors to get an estimate and they are all pretty expensive. It’s been somewhat disruptive because they all take about an hour each to go through everything.

What about you? Do you think there is any downside to financial independence?

Image credit: Daniel Pascoa

The post The Downside of Financial Independence appeared first on Retire by 40.

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