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This is the third in a series of blog posts and photo sets in my 28 Project - featuring 28 of my favourite cameras, with 28 different 28mm lenses. Most are film cameras. All photos taken with Ilford HP5 400 iso film, or if digital processed after HP5. Each camera used with 2 rolls of film (or 72 digital files) only, edited down to my favourite 7 or 8 shots, with short review. I hope to post something new from the 28 project every couple of weeks, so that in a year or so I shall be able to move to my 35 project. Larger size files can be seen in my flickr collection, here.


28:3: Canon P & 28mm Serenar f3.5 (800g)
August 2017 

I absolutely love the look of my black Canon P. One of the most handsome cameras in my collection. And it’s a great camera to use too, with a very large and bright 100% size viewfinder. Though it’s made for 35mm and 50mm lenses. I had to use the excellent Canon accessory shoe finder with the 28mm lens. It balances well with the camera and is a joy to use.




The Serenar lens is tiny, really tiny and good looking. Chrome lens on black body looks cool too.

The weight, feel, and look of the whole set up is near perfect. It was only 800g, despite being solid metal. That’s lighter than both the Leica M and the Pentax Spotmatic. But I still noticed its weight after carrying it around in my bag for a few hours.




I used the first film around Broadway Market in Hackney on a Saturday I somehow felt able to get a little closer in to people, perhaps because of the small camera, and the fact it looks old and eccentric – less threatening. Or the quite cloth shutter. Or maybe it was just my mood.



I shot at f8 and 1/125s for most of the shots in Broadway market, barely checking exposures except every ten shots. And I hardly focussed either, just zone focussing and bringing the accessory viewfinder up to my eye to compose. Yet most of the shots turned out in focus and exposed fine. 




I used the second film on a sunny Sunday walk in Richmond visiting my Dad. It was a beautiful day and I shot a lot more slowly than on the first day. 




Canon made the P rangefinder between 1958-1961. It competed with Leica’s landmark M3 (1954-1967), which also has a large bright viewfinder ideal for using 50mm lenses. But, unlike the M3, the P was a Leica M39 screw mount camera, has 35mm frame lines and easy back opening film loading. P stood for ‘Populaire’, and in my mind it is the most beautiful yet useful camera the Japanese company has ever made. 




All in all I greatly enjoyed using the camera and lens, and I’m happy with the results. 






Black Canon P, Serenar 28mm lens & matching hotshot finder, coffee & cake 


























Next Up: Ricoh GR1v
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This is the second in a series of blog posts and photo sets in my 28 Project - featuring 28 of my favourite cameras, with 28 different 28mm lenses. Most are film cameras. All photos taken with Ilford HP5 400 iso film, or if digital processed after HP5. Each camera used with 2 rolls of film (or 72 digital files) only, edited down to my favourite 7 or 8 shots, with short review. I hope to post something new from the 28 project every couple of weeks , so that in a year or so I shall be able to move to my 35 project. Larger size files can be seen in my flick collection, here.

At Loftus Road


28:2 - Pentax Spotmatic F & 28mm Super-Takumar f3.5 (860g) 
August 2017

The first thing that surprised me about this handsome duo was its weight. The old Pentax Spotmatic F (1973) looks and feels like it is built like a tank – a well engineered one though. It has a solid metal body yet, weighed with lens, is nearly 15% lighter than my Leica M digital with 28mm Summicron lens was. That was a surprise and at least one advantage for the Pentax over the Leica M for street photography.


To be honest, I felt that was the only advantage over the Leica rangefinder though, in use on the street at least (portraits a different issue). The viewfinder, whilst bright, does not have the easiest focussing screen. The metering is good and simple, so long as it is bright enough to read. I found it harder to work quickly with this camera than I do with a Leica.



Then there is the shutter noise. It makes a very satisfying mechanical kerr-chunk, but it is not discreet. I’m guessing you could hear it 10 metres away. All these things make the camera far from ideal for street photography. Which is a shame because as a general system camera is it great, and the lenses made for it are amongst the best for an SLR camera. That includes the 28mm super-takumer f3.5 I used.



I thought the disadvantages in use affected my photography – but when I saw the negatives there were a few good enough to select to post here. I was less confident using the camera, and less able to use it speedily. 



I started at the football (QPR v Hull) then, on the Sunday used the rest of my roll of HP5 walking to, then along, Brick Lane. I put a second film in but, as the light suddenly got dimmer, pushed it one stop, exposing it as an 800 film. Most of the second roll was no good.







I thought I got some nice shots from the first film in Brick Lane though.



Overall, I would not reach for the Spotmatic again for 28mm street photography. Using it with a 50mm fast lens, slowly, wide open with great bokeh makes more sense.


My Black Pentax Spotmatic F with the 28mm Super-Takumar



























Next up - Canon P & Canon Serenar 28mm f3.5 LTM
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This is the first in a series of blog posts and photo sets in my 28 Project - featuring 28 of my favourite cameras, with 28 different 28mm lenses. Most are film cameras. All photos taken with Ilford HP5 400 iso film, or if digital processed after HP5. Each camera used with 2 rolls of film (or 72 digital files) only, edited down to my favourite 7 or 8 shots, with short review. I hope to post something new from the 28 project every couple of weeks , so that in a year or so I shall be able to move to my 35 project. Larger size files can be seen in my flick collection, here.



28:1
Leica M (Typ 240) Leica 28mm Summicron f2 ASPH (1kg)
Friday, 18 August 2017

It’s had been a long time since I have used my digital Leica M. It’s heavy, but lovely to use for this kind of street photography. So easy to just set and go. I set iso at 400, shutter speed automatic and aperture either f8 or 5.6 (except for last selfie, f2). Zone focussed half the time and then all I needed to do was raise the camera to my eye and shoot. Click. No focussing, no AF, no checking the meter, no delay. Except of course when the camera went to sleep and would not take at all – I missed a shot then. One of the things that is annoying about some digital cameras…



Most of the time with the M I was experimenting with my own confidence, with getting close to people, or trying to. It’s hard to get close at first. I must keep trying. And even if you do and catch the photo perfectly it doesn’t mean it’s any good!




I set the live view to black and white so when I looked at the photos I was thinking in b/w, and I decided to limit myself to 36 shots walking to work, as if I had a film. No deletions allowed.



It was a bright sunny day most of the time. The conditions were good, I should have done better myself.

After shooting the first 36 photos (and not sure if any good enough), since I was still walking and had my camera with me, I decided to shoot another 36, this time thinking of emulating colour film.  I decided I would limit my use of each camera/lens in future to two films, or 72 exposures. 


Then, when I arrived home and started editing, I decided to keep all the photos as black and white, and used a free Lightroom plug-in to re-create the look of Ilford HP5, the film I have bought for the project.



I found the M an ideal camera with the excellent sharp 28mm summicron. I was able to shoot from the hip a couple of times too, and found the live view helpful for that. The ability to see the photos I took was both helpful but also distracting. It helped me realise I must get closer, but it distracted me from taking more photos of experimenting without feeling the need for re-assurance as I do with film because it is a necessity.



I think the 28mm Summicron is one of the best 28mm lenses ever. I never tire of it. But the camera and lens together was heavier than ideal for carrying around all day, and for the type of street photography I was doing, shooting mainly at f5.6-8, the additional cost of the digital M and Summicron ASPH is difficult to justify. It is nevertheless a lovely camera – both to use and with its results. So lovely I had to stop myself taking more photos and limit myself to the equivalent of two films.



I first selected 29 photos from the 72, then paired it down to 13. Finally, I have decided for this project to display no more than 7-8. These are those.



The Leica M, 28mm Summicron & coffee, while shooting.


























Next up - Pentax Spotmatic F & 28mm Super-Takumar f3.5
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Rangefinder Chronicles by Nickdemarcofoto - 1M ago

Villa Latina Bar (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f1.8)
For the first time in quite a few years I have bought myself a new digital camera - the Sony A7iii. It arrived a couple of days before my trip to Italy this Easter 2019, so I had a chance to take it with me and give it some good use.


Villa Latina old house (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f1.8)

I am ambivalent about digital photography these days. I rarely pick up one of my few, very good, digital cameras, generally preferring film. Not because I don't think you can get excellent results from digital - like my Leica M for example, which is a beautiful camera making extraordinary files - it is more to do with the discipline of shooting, or not over-shooting, that film gives me. And I love the look of film.

View from my house, Colleruta (Sony A7iii,  Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f1.8)
My digital cameras are under-used, and I cannot really justify buying a new one. But recently I felt the need for a digital camera more than usual. In part it's because of starting to paint, and wanting to photograph the subjects I paint or the finished paintings. I felt like having a good quality but light and simple digital camera I could carry around with me.


Dogs of Colleruta.1  (Sony A7iii,  Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f1.8)
I already have many options, and no camera is perfect. I love the Leica M the most, though in large part because of the lenses I can use on it. Sometimes I want autofocus, and I have used good SLRs before from Canon and Nikon. Then there is the Leica Q, great lens and lightweight, with AF, but only a 28 mm lens.

Dogs of Colleruta.2  (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f1.8)
I have owned and enjoyed the Sony A7R before, but I ended up selling it finding the shutter too clunky, the files larger than I needed and too much distortion while using some Leica M lenses while not having enough (in those days) Sony lenses. I bought a Sony A7S instead - which I have used on and off for a few years and always been happy with. 


Before lunch on my terrace (Sony A7iii, Zeiss Loxia 25mm f2.4)

My interest perked up when Sony brought out the A7Riii, but I resisted the urge to buy it, and I don't need 30+ megapixel resolution. But then I started reading about the A7iii introduced last year.
St Nicola chapel, Picinisco (Sony A7iii, Zeiss Loxia 25mm f2.4)
A few things caught my attention. Much better and faster autofocus, the ability to rapid fire like a DSLR, longer battery life (very important) and an improved 24mp sensor. 24mp seems to me to be the ideal amount to pack in for a full frame (35mm) digital sensor, and is certainly enough for me. 

By the Castello, Picinisco (Sony A7iii, Zeiss Loxia 25mm f2.4)

It also had excellent reviews for video. Though I don't shoot video enough, in part because as a former video editor I can then obsess for far too long editing, but also because I am a former video maker I do like to have the ability to have a good video camera with me, and from what I read (and have thus far experienced) the Sony A7iii gives me all I could want.

Bust stop, Picinisco (Sony A7iii, Zeiss Loxia 25mm f2.4)
The A7iii has better ergonomics that the original A7s (better to grip in your right hand), and the high iso is very good indeed. As with the Sony A7s the dynamic range of the camera is very high, reputedly beating the Leica M. 


Alimentari, Picinisco (Sony A7iii, Zeiss Loxia 25mm f2.4)
Third party lenses seem to work better with the camera than earlier A7 models but, perhaps more importantly, there are now many more excellent lenses made for the Sony A7 series.


 Picinisco (Sony A7iii, Zeiss Loxia 25mm f2.4)
I already had the excellent Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f1.8, a fast super sharp standard/portrait lens with which I took 7 of these photographs.  I also had the very small and flexible Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2.8 (again responsible for 7 of the photos) and another AF lens, the Sony FE Vario-Tessar 24-70mm f4 (4 of these photos) - a versatile and decent quality lens BUT it's a zoom (and I don't really like zooms) and it is too big (because it is a zoom).


My Great Grandfather's house, Picinisco (Sony A7iii, Zeiss Loxia 25mm f2.4)
Since buying the A7iii I have added to my collection a couple more Zeiss Loxia lenses (I already had the 50mm f2). I got the 25mm f2.4 just before the holiday and took 8 of the above photos with it. It is a superb wide angle lens up there with some of my favourites (the Leica 28mm f2 Summicron M Asph. and the Zeiss Distagon 25mm f2.8 ZM). It's not too large, very well made, and has minimum or no distortion. 

Anthony, singing his novel (Sony A7iii,  Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f1.8)
I also bought a used 35mm f2 Loxia for a very good price, but that didn't come until after I got back from Italy. I'm using it now. 


Pruning the Olive Trees (Sony A7iii, Zeiss Loxia 25mm f2.4)
Despite fast autofocus (which I found to be very accurate) being one of the reasons I got the A7iii I expect I shall use the Loxia lenses the most. I love the feel of them and the files they make. I am used to and generally prefer manual focus lenses with aperture rings but the beauty of the Loxia range is that they are so easy to focus quickly. As soon as you turn the focus ring it magnifies the image in the electronic viewfinder. 


Salt fish at Casino Market (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Vario-Tessar 24-70mm f4 @ 32mm)
In use during my stay in Italy I really enjoyed the Sony A7iii. The longer battery life certainly makes a big difference. As before, I don't like the over complicated Sony menu system - but I just need to spend a while working out what and how to add to the custom buttons - so that's an easy fix.


Tomatoes at Casino Market.1 (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Vario-Tessar 24-70mm f4 @ 49mm)
I was very happy with the files it made, for nearly every shot. Bad shots were as a result of my errors, over boring subjects, not the camera.


Pineapples (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Vario-Tessar 24-70mm f4 @ 32mm)
I especially liked the Loxia 25mm lens and expect to use this along with the Loxia 35 and 50 most on my A7iii.

Colleruta (Sony A7iii, Carl Zeiss Distagon C/Y 18 mm f4)
But I also look forward to using third party and legacy lenses. This weekend I plan to use some of my favourite Leica M lenses and see how it goes. 


Studio (Sony A7iii, Carl Zeiss Distagon C/Y 18 mm f4)
This is not a review of the A7iii - many others, better at writing camera reviews then me, have already done that - and the positive reviews written were one of the things that led me to finally buy a new digital camera.


My painting of my house in Colleruta (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Vario-Tessar 24-70mm f4 @ 49mm)
But from a personal perspective, as someone who enjoys using high quality but preferably compact and light cameras, the A7iii is one of the best cameras, and perhaps the best all round digital camera, for the type of things I like to do.


A country garage (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2.8)


Luigi with Ripon's portrait of him (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2.8)



Colleruta barn (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2.8)



View from my house (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2.8)
I always find one of the hardest things to capture, especially on digital, is the dramatic high contrast in some of the skies around Picinisco at sunset time. The high dynamic range of the Sony A7iii did one of the best jobs with this, as I hope the next few shots show. 


Picinisco dramatic skies.1 (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2.8)

Picinisco dramatic skies.2 (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2.8)


Picinisco dramatic skies.1 (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2.8)
As usual, you can find higher resolution versions of the photographs here on my flickr site.


'Cesidio' - my portrait of former neighbour and relative  (Sony A7iii, Sony FE Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f1.8)
Thanks for looking

Nick

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Rangefinder Chronicles by Nickdemarcofoto - 2M ago



In Autumn 2018 Kodak announced it was bringing back its legendary Ektachrome 100 iso slide film.



I bought a couple of rolls and tried them out.



First, during a walk on a November summer near Waltham Abbey.



Most of the walk was through parts of Epping Forest.



It was a cold, sunny winters day. 




The light was beautiful, but not always easy, in a forest to capture.




I had with me my Leica M7 rangefinder camera and 50mm Summilux f1.4 lens - one of my favourite lenses and one that is beautiful wide open.






The slides came out beautiful. I'm not sure if I scanned the colours as well as I should have, and I had under-exposed them a bit, but they still looked full of detail and fine transitions.












The second roll of slide film was taken at my house in Italy just after Christmas.



This time I used the diminutive Contax TVS III






It's a great little compact 35mm film camera with a tiny 'zoom', a Zeiss Sonar 30mm-60mm f3.7 - f6.7



Not so fast, and not half as lovely as the Contax T2 (one of my favourite 35mm film cameras) with its sharp 38mm fast f2.8 lens, but still very sweet and its nice to have such a range of focal lengths in pocketable form sometimes.




Again, the colours here are a little off - that's my scanning I think, not the slides.




I was lucky again with some sunny winter days and good light.




The camera and lens are sharp, and the Ektachrome gorgeous








I like Ektachrome very much, and it's nice to see your photos as slides before you scan them.




Slides work out more expensive than negatives, though the way I bought them included processing so they were not that much more. 




I shall stick to negative film for most things though. It's more forgiving, these days very sharp and clean, I prefer 400 iso for colour, and if I wanted super clean I would use digital. 



I'm glad I shot these two rolls of Ektachrome though, and I have a nice record of it with these photos. 



I have jumped way ahead in time with my blogging and scanning - so shall get back to my Japan project (2016) and my updates from scanned negatives, where I am only up to some time in May 2017 so far. So many photos to get through ... so little time!






Thanks for looking - check these in my flickr here.




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Japan! - Cute Dogs & Vending Machines - Part IV - Arrival in Kyoto



This is the 4th part of my series of photographs from our trip to Japan in 2016. The series makes up a book.

Previous posts in the series, taken in Tokyo, are here: I, II & III.



The first thing we saw in Kyoto (having arrived by bullet train) was the incredible railway station. Designed by  architect Hiroshi Hara in the 1990s this amazing futuristic structure is one of the biggest and most striking railway stations in the world. If there was an architectural equivalent of Blade Runner, this would be it.



These first 5 square format photos were all taken in or around the station with the LOMO LCA-120 medium format wide camera and Fuji Pro 400H colour film.








These two (top: Painting the railings; bottom, Unsymmetrical symmetry) were made with the Contax T2 35mm compact film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 colour film




The next two, Nighttime Panama hat man and Employees only in the basement were also taken around the station with my Hasselblad XPan II 35mm panoramic film camera, 45mm lens and Fuji 800 Pro Z, pushed to 1600 ISO.






Next, a reflection of the radio tower in the station tiles, taken with the Contax T2 35mm compact film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 colour film



And a double exposure, Kyoto subway double exposure, with the Hasselblad XPan II 35mm panoramic film camera, 45mm lens and Fuji 800 Pro Z.




Finally, Businessman with brief case, Lomo LCA-120 wide, Fuji Pro 400H.


As usual you can view all these photos (and others from the Japan series) on my flickr album.

And please do check out the  book.


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Above - my vineyard and the mountains


In April 2017, during an Easter trip to my house in Italy, I decided to take with me my Rollei-Wide TLR camera and some black and white film.



I previously made a full review & comparison of the rare Role-Wide in this blog.


Above - The Road to Colleruta
Below -  The Departed Remembered



Just using a fixed lens wide angle medium format camera can be limiting, but it was  perfect for this environment. 



Above & Below - Colleruta







Above & below - The view from my house in Colleruta



The wide, but not ultra wide, lens allowed me to get in the views, the landscape, the buildings that a standard TLR would not have done.


Below (following two) Views of Colleruta from my terrace








Below - my favourite two local dogs resting on my terrace




Below, Abandoned House, Colleruta




Below - Old cooking pot, Colleruta








Above - Colleruta
Below - Picinisco




Below - Colleruta (again)



Below - The remains of a sheep




Below - Anthony's house, Picinisco



The photos in Colleruta and Picinisco were made using the Rollei-Wide and two rolls of Ilford FP4 125 iso film.

Below, Wind shaped tree, mountains around Picinisco







Above - the Role-Wide & Cappuccino, at the Bar in Picinisco looking over the view 





During the stay we went for a day trip to Capua, about 1hr 15 min south on the way to Napoli





I had always wanted to go because I heard they had some Roman ruins and I liked the name.


In fact the day of this trip, 15 April 2017, shall remain special to me.  The other reason for going was I found on the internet that there was a big art supplies shop in Capua and Ripon wanted to get back into painting during our trip ...

 When we got there I decided maybe, despite my age and never doing it before, it was time for me to try and learn to draw and paint. And so I have. It all started in Capua.



The important site near Capua is the splendid Roman Amphitheatre - built in the time of Augustus, then Hadrian.



It is second biggest Amphitheatre after the Colosseum and thought to be the model for it. It was the location of the first gladiator school and  of the outbreak of the revolt of Spartacus in 73 BC.



Many of the ruins are well preserved, and unlike the Colosseum there are hardly any tourists here.







One of the most interesting things is that you can walk around the lower ground levels where the Gladiators would have waited before being brought up for gruesome battle.







I used two rolls of Ilford HP5 400 iso for the photos taken in Capua - and much appreciated having a wide angle medium format camera with me (even though it was a little too slow for the interior shots - I did have a tripod for a couple though).




You can find all the photos in higher resolution on my flickr site, here.

Nick

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Rangefinder Chronicles by Nickdemarcofoto - 4M ago

In this blog I follow, vicariously, the making of a very special table in Picinisco, Italy, for my house.

The table was made from some old (perhaps nearly 100 years) wooden oak beams that used to be in the room, now my garage, before a barn for animals. These are the beams, above.




My good friend from the village in Italy, the very talented photographer and artist, Luigi Giannetti, told me years ago to make sure I keep the old beams, because one day I can use them to make something special. 

Recently, we decided on a large dining table, above is one of his early plans for the work - for he is a designer too.




One of the wonderful things about our region in Italy is it is still populated by traditional, highly skilled, local craftsmen who take such pride in their work. One of these, a local carpenter, Mauro D'Agostino, took on the challenge to make the table from the old beams.




It was very difficult work, because these beams were so old they had withered, had woodworm, and are so solid and hard to cut or shape.



And yet, they were beautiful and it was a dream to make something beautiful for my house in Italy from these beams that had been there, no doubt cut from a local forest, for nearly as long as the house.



Above, you see the legs for the table, some with deep legions that needed filling with resin.



In this design by Luigi, above, you can see his idea of using thin strips of locally forged black metal the top corners and bottom of the legs - a unique feature for the table.



Above, the table plane, and below the structure and legs being worked on in Mauro's workship.



Below: a local blacksmith forging the metal features for the table in his workshop



Here they are....







Below, the corners of the table without the metal borders



And here an unfinished look at the design in practice, with the metal strip dividing the leg and plane.



Below, the completed table in the workshop. You can also see the metal on the base of the legs.



And here is a photo of the man who made the table, Mauro, delivering it to my house in Colleruta along with what was left from the beams, returned.



They had to disassemble the heavy table to get it in the house.



It has gone to the Cantina - the ground floor large room in the house that was once used to make local wine, and is now where I store my wine, and in future shall eat big dinners on the table I hope with friends!



The room inspired the table, in fact. The old wooden door you see here was a rotting blue painted door when I bought the house, brilliantly restored by one of Mauro's previous employees, the artist and painter Rocco Iannelli - check this archived post from 2010 of Rocco and this Paintings.

And then you see, on the right, the recently made storage for wine bottles, designed and made by Mario De Vittoris, the owner of the exceptional Bellavista Ristorante & Pizzeria, Picinisco, whose son, Emanuele, a fantastic chef and baker, slow food fanatic/teacher and good friend, runs my vineyard.



So at last, the table in its place. I haven't seen it with my own eyes yet. It was made and put in place this January, while I have been working in London. Luigi took these photos on his phone, so they are all his - not mine. 

I can't wait to see it; to sit at it; to eat some lamb at Eatser with some of my red wine.

Thanks to everyone involved in making these old beams come to life in this beautiful table, especially to Mauro, who made it so lovingly, and to my friend Luigi, who came up with the concept, designed and project managed it, and sent me these photos to see the work in progress. 



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In this #tlrtuesday TLR review (number 16 in the series) I review the Iconic Koniflex



I often say, 'this is one of my favourite TLRs'. 

I love all my Rolleis, the 2.8F Planar (the TLR I have had the longest) being the best of the bunch. I was very impressed with the OlympusFlex, the Minolta Autocord and the Zeiss Ikoflex. I enjoyed the lightness and quality of the Yashica Mat, and I was pleasantly surprised with the Flexaret and the Seagull.



But if I had to say what (after the Role of course) TLR was my favourite I would have to choose this relatively rare KoniFlex.



I first fell in love with the simple, yet bold design and look of the camera.



I liked the fact the taking lens is an 85mm focus length - most 6x6 TLR (and other medium formats) have 75mm, or 80mm if you are lucky, as the standard lens. The Koni is a little more tele than the others without being a tele camera.



I had heard great things about the 5-element Hexanon lens used (said to be similar in design to the Voigtländer Heliar), and the photos I saw taken with it on flickr or instgram had a lovely look - so I searched hard and long for a working Koniflex.



I was delighted when I managed to find one...



I think mine is a Koniflex II - made in the mid-1950s by the Japanese Konishiroku company.



It does double exposures too - so in that respect beats the Rolleis in my book, since I love using TLRs for double exposures.



It is very well made and solid. 



The soft out of focus bokeh, especially when the lens is wide open (f3.5) s pleasing. 



Stopped down the lens is very sharp - the colours and tone great. 



Going through these photos I realised I was right to rate the Koni as a favourite. 



It's not just a beauty to use, but it takes some of the best images too. 



I took these photos in March and April 2017, and unlike the others in the series forgot to use one colour and one black and white film. I used two colour films.



The first film (ending with the photo of the red flower) is a Fuji Pro 160. 



The second, starting from the heads in a shop window, is Fuji Pro 400.



I really like the double exposures below of cherry blossom trees by the Mile End canal. 






I suppose it's fitting that my favourite photograph taken with this favourite Japanese TLR is the double exposure below. For me it really works, but it is also very Japanese.



As usual check my flickr site to see these pics in higher resolution. 



Thanks for looking

Nick

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Lettera 32 & Caffe
Followers of this blog may have noticed my Adventures with Analogue have led to an interest in collecting and using a few classic typewriters...


Olivetti in Italy

Here is my first, typed, review of the first typewriter in my collection, the Olivetti Letters 32. 
(Click the pic to enlarge to read better).




As you will have read, this 32 lives in my house in Italy, where I typed the review.



And here it is in its carry case, resting on some of our wine.



Look out here for Typewriter Review No. 2 sometime soon...



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