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PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Shooting a star

Take six consecutive letters of a somewhat well known movie director’s last name followed by the last three letters of the director’s first name. 
Change the second letter of this result to a different vowel to form the name of a movie star. 
What is the name of this movie star?
What is the name of this movie director?


Appetizer Menu

Cryptic Crossword Appetizer
Peppy intro, original lyrics, bouncy ending

Below is another ingenious Patrick J. Berry Cryptic Crossword Puzzle for you to solve. Patrick, also known by his screen name “cranberry,” has now created and contributed eight great cryptic crosswords to Puzzleria! Each of Patrick’s intricate puzzles is wordplayful work of art. Links to all seven of his previous cryptic crossword puzzles can be opened here:
SEVEN; SIX; FIVE; FOUR; THREE; TWO; ONE
Regarding the Across and Down clues and their format:
The number in parentheses at the end of each clue tells how many letters are in the answer. Multiple numbers in parentheses indicate how letters are distributed in multiple-word answers.
For example, (6) indicates a six-letter answer like “jalopy,” (7, 5) indicates a seven-and-five-letter answer like “station wagon,” and (5-5) indicates a five-and-five-letter hyphenated answer like “Rolls-Royce.”
(For further insight about how to decipher these numbered cryptic clues, see Patrick’s “Cryptic Crossword Tutorial” in this link to his November 17, 2017 cryptic crossword. The Tutorial appears below the grid that contains the answers in that edition of Puzzleria!)


ACROSS

4. Most familiar with top gunman going in recalled murder trial(8)
8. City girl going past post office(6)
9. Worthless weapon turned on a British politician(8)
10. Disease producing scab?(8)
11. (along with 1 DOWN and 20 ACROSS) Approve of Mick Jagger on Facebook, according to song by 23?(4,1,7,5)
12. Burnout, lazy and free(8)
14. Stop by to welcome old guy starting on the way down?(8)
16. Where recruits train for official debut in combat possibly, with pay at first(4,4)
19. Angry, getting rough with sex to make one sore(8)
20. See 11 Across
23. Manufactured boy band using original lyrics from famous songwriter?(3,5)
24. Last season, with pitcher making comeback(8)
25. Sick feeling experienced primarily in sauna, perhaps?(6)
26. Drink always put in sack by closing time(8)

DOWN

1. See 11 Across
2. Doctor can perform the operation, it’s agreed(9)
3. Song by 23, song 23 almost finished with bouncy ending(3,4,3)
4. Song by 23, being a dull tune, rewritten to have peppier intro(7,2,2,4)
5. Crazy to have a practical joke go the other way(4)
6. Half the ice cream for all?(5)
7. Swell working with the doctor(7)
13. Using skill to move up in study group? It’s forbidden!(10)
15. Woman possessing sultry disposition, though it’s not much(6,3)
17. Power failure right in the middle causing great anger(7)
18. Kept getting a little restless and wandered(7)
21. Uncle’s girl, pretty and full of energy(5)
22. Second wager, second race(4)


MENU


Municipal Slice:
Urban redevelopment

Rearrange the letters of a major U.S. city three separate times to form: 
1. a body part and what it helps you do; 
2. something you see in a museum and what kind of museum it is; and 
3. a two-word direction in a lamb chop recipe. 
What is this city?

Riffing Off Shortz And Chapus Slices:
Oy Veyance, oil those wheels!

Will Shortz’s May 12th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by David Chapus of Rush, New York, reads:
Think of a 6-letter conveyance on wheels. Drop the first letter. Add a new letter at the end. The result will be another 6-letter conveyance on wheels. What conveyances are these? 
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Chapus Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of the name of a 6-letter British sports car manufactured by a company whose name is a fruit that figures in a work of literature whose title happens to be a Honda model. 
Move the first letter to the end. The result will be the name of another 6-letter British sports car. 
What sports cars are these?
ENTREE #2:
Think of a 6-letter breed of bird dog. 
Drop the first letter. 
Add a new letter at the end. 
The result will be baby bird of prey. 
What critters are these? 
ENTREE #3: 
Think of a 6-letter critter. Add a letter to the beginning. 
Divide the result in two. 
The final result will be a 2-word term for a particular “aquatic claw” or “marine antenna.” 
What critter and term for “claw” or “antenna” are these? 
ENTREE #4:
Name a feathered critter. Add a letter to name a more general term for feathered critters. 
What critter and term are these?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a color. Drop the first letter. Add a new letter at the end. The result will be an adjective of a color that is quite a contrast to the first color. What colors are these?
ENTREE #6:
Think of a profession. Drop the first letter. Add to the end tools used by auto racing pit crews. The result will be laborers in another profession. A laborer in this other profession wields a tool that rhymes with the tools used by pit crews. What profession and members of another profession are these?


Dessert Menu 


Number Two Graphite Pencil Dessert:
Victor’s verbal pat on the back

After completing a mental challenge successfully, Victor utters a self-congratulatory word under his breath.
A letter appears twice in the name of the challenge; remove one of them and rearrange the result to spell the self-congratulatory word. 
What is this word?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.
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Schpuzzle Of The Week:
What did Quixote don, crypto-lodge-ically?

A number of consecutive letters at the beginning of the name of a fictional character spell something the character might wear. 
Interchange two consecutive letters of the character’s last name to spell something that might get lodged in what the character might wear.
Who is this character, and what might the character wear? 
What might get lodged in what the character might wear, and where might it come from?


Appetizer Menu

Unbeatable TV Conundrums Appetizer:
Bring these fuzzy puzzles into high resolution

📺1. Think of a television actress, first and last names, whose first name starts with an S and ends with an H and whose last name contains SH. Take her last name, add another SH, and rearrange to name a type of drug.
📺2. Think of a modern device for watching movies and television. Reverse the order of its letters and shift one letter one place to the right on a computer keyboard to get a shorthand phrase for a kind of news article.
📺3. Think of a TV personality known for collecting and repairing cars, first and last names. Remove the middle two letters of the last name, add a P and rearrange to name a type of car in need of repair.
📺4. Name an iconic symbol of a contemporary television show in three words, in which the third word can be constructed by dropping the first letter of the second word and placing the remainder of the second word inside the first word.
📺5. Think of something that people might do on a trashy daytime talk show. Drop a vowel and reverse the first two letters to name the inciting emotion.
📺6. Think of the first name of an actress in a current TV sitcom. Remove a vowel to name a piece of furniture that might be used while watching the sitcom.


MENU

Damn Easy Slice:
Mincemeat, Cardigans and the Buddha

Give answers to the following clues:
1. Tree that sounds like a sleek or silky coat
2. Letters in an ancient alphabet that don’t sound so ancient
3. Home of saunas, and home of sweaters... Cardigans, for example
4.  A discourse of the Buddha
5. Mincemeat pie ingredient that is also for the birds (but not for the blackbirds that may be baked in the pie!)
6. Parisian name
7. Smarts
What do your answers suggest?
Why might the hint below help you solve the puzzle?
Hint: This puzzle is damn easy! 

Riffing Off Shortz And Burg Slices:
A tale of three titletowns

Will Shortz’s May 5th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Erik Burg of San Francisco, reads: 
Name a popular movie of 2018. Add an R. You can rearrange the result to get three different titles for people. What are they?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Burg Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Name a dramatic biographical movie of 2018.
You can rearrange the letters in the movie to form a one-word soap brand and, in two words, where someone might use it. 
What are this brand and two-word location?

ENTREE #2:
Name a limited-theater-release and video-on-demand movie of  early 2018.  
Add an R and S. You can rearrange the result to get a two-word term for the Korean War, Vietnam War, Gulf War or the Iraq War. What are this movie and two-word term?
ENTREE #3: 
Name a cult comedy movie of 1992. Add an R. 
You can rearrange the result to get three different titles for people. 
What are they?
Hint: Two of the titles, if you double a letter in one of them, will be first names of two family members who live in a house with a flower shop, carpenter’s shop, and a dentist’s office in its basement. 
ENTREE #4:
Name a cult comedy movie that spawned a sequel in 2018. 
You can rearrange the letters in the movie’s title to get a two-word shorthand term for proponents of a landmark Supreme Court ruling. 
What is this shorthand term?
Hint: A person whose name appears in the ruling (but not in this “shorthand term”) prosecuted Jack Ruby. 


Dessert Menu

Dnar By Dnac Dessert:
St. Nims Edna? Pope is toot? Zep?

Spell each word in the brand name of a candy backward.
Do not change the order of the words. 
The result, read aloud, sounds like another candy brand. 
What are these candy brands?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.
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PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
The secret life of plants

Why is “plants” a doubly fitting heading for each of the words in the following list?
PLANTS:
yams
wheat
vines
tulip
pine nut
juniper 



Appetizer Menu

Correct ProNantesciation Appetizer
“I say London, I say France...”

Note: This tasty French Appetizer was composed by our friend Mark Scott of Seattle (also known by his screen name skydiveboy.) Mark has contributed many excellent puzzles to Puzzleria! over the years; this is one of my favorites. Enjoy!) 
Pronounce France correctly as the French do. Now see if you can find the well known French city that rhymes with France. 
Hint: It only shares two letters with France.


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Zoological Slice:
Not a feature of this creature

Move the last letter of a large creature to the middle of the word and add an “r” to the end to form a word describing some other large creatures, but not this particular one. 
What creature is this? 
What word does not describe it?

Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices:
Icicles and broomsticks

Will Shortz’s April 28th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle is created by Joseph Young who conducts the blog “Puzzleria.” It reads: 
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Move the first letter of the third word to the start of the first word, and you’ll form two means of transportation. What are they?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form a slang term for “messed up” and what sounds like a general term for a curse, plague or menace. What are these terms?
ENTREE #2:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “or” in the middle (“___ or ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words, and you’ll form what sounds like a pair words used to describe possessions of two late Democratic politicians – one whose nephew died in an airplane crash and the other who himself died in  an airplane crash.  
Who are they?
Hint: The pair words used to describe possessions of two late Democratic politicians are possessive proper nouns.
ENTREE #3: 
Think of a somewhat familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Move the first two letters of the first word to the start of the third word, and you’ll form an expression of disgust and a synonym for “nauseated.” What are they?
Hint: Add a letter to the beginning of the expression of disgust to form another synonym for “nauseated.”
ENTREE #4:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form a 3-letter word for where an animal can’t go if attached to a homophone of the altered third word. Where can’t the animal go? 
To what might the animal be attached?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form the last names of a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame and a quarterback who played in two Super Bowls. 
Who are they?

Lexicographical Dessert:
Words on the dictionary

Name two words sometimes seen side-by-side on a dictionary. 
Rearrange 5 of the first word’s  6 letters, then rearrange 4 of those same 6 letters to form two specific examples of the second word. 
What are the words on the dictionary?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.
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PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED


Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Setting a pugilistic gem in a ring 

It was billed as “The Fight of the Century.”  More than 20,000 watched it in person, with a worldwide audience of millions more who tuned in to take a gander on closed-circuit broadcast screens. 
Each boxer was a pugilistic dynamo. Muhammad Ali had more charm and a 3-inch height advantage, and had mastered the domains of both promotion and showmanship.  
But, Joe Frazier won the fight.
A trio of words in the recap above are a clue to the the setting of this epic 1971 event. What are the words and what was the three-word setting?  
Note of caution: A pair of words in the recap are red herrings. Do not be fooled!

Appetizer Menu

Modes Of Movement Appetizer:
TransPortlandia

Note: This appetizing puzzle was created by Mark Scott of Seattle (screen name: skydiveboy). 
Thanks, Mark.
Think of a country and replace its first vowel with a different vowel to name a mode of human transportation. 
What are they?


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Trendy Slice:
Instrumental gymnastics

Remove a vowel from the name of a musical instrument. 
The remaining letters, in order, are the initial letters of the words in a trendy phrase, including those in the two-word hyphenated noun that begins the phrase. 
What is this phrase?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Kenny “The Snake” runs a quarterback sneak

Will Shortz’s April 14th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads: 
Think of a word for a deceitful person. Move the middle letter to the end and you’ll get another word for a deceitful person. What words are these?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of a word for a wild beast. 
Move the middle letter to the end and you’ll get a word for an implement that might precipitate the process of transforming this wild beast into a piled-high feast. 
What words are these? 
ENTREE #2:
Hard labor, fatigue or exhaustion might do something detrimental to your strength. 
Think of a verb for what they might do to your strength and energy. Move the middle letter to the end and you’ll get a word for a place where you may renew your strength. 
What verb and place are these?
ENTREE #3: 
Take the first five letters of a synonym of genesis. Move the middle letter to the end and you’ll get another word for a creature from the Book of Genesis. 
Now remove the third through sixth letters from the synonym of genesis. The remaining letters form the same word for a creature from the Book of Genesis.
What is this synonym of genesis? What is the word for a creature from the Book of Genesis? 
ENTREE #4:
Think of a two-letter word you hear in the context of meditation and a three-letter word you hear in the context of medication. 
Put these words side-by-side. Move the middle letter to the end and you’ll get the name of a city with a population of about half-a-million. 
What words are these? 
What is the city?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a word for what IQ testing serves as, in five letters, for measuring one’s intelligence level. 
Move the middle letter of this word to the end and you’ll get a society that uses IQ as a criterion for membership.
What words are these?
ENTREE #6:
Think of a word for ancient farmers as they prepared the soil for planting. 
Move the middle letter to the end and you’ll get a word for a beast of burden that less-ancient farmers hitched to a plow to till their fields. 
What words are these?
ENTREE #7:
Think of the first word in the title of a Simon & Garfunkel album. 
Move the middle letter to the end and you’ll get a plural synonym of the last word in the seventh track on the album. 
What words are these?
ENTREE #8:
“Their,” “they’re” and “_____” are pronounced identically but are spelled in _____ different ways. Move the middle of the word that belongs in the first blank to the end to get the word that belongs in the second blank. 
What words are these?
ENTREE #9:
When a group (not pictured here) known for its Gospel music roots recorded a song about a young orphan boy coming of age and being raised by a small-town madam who ran a house of ill repute, did it _______ their fan base? 
No, the _______ Brothers became even more popular!
Move the middle of the word that belongs in the first blank to the end to get the word that belongs in the second blank. 
What words are these? 

Dessert Menu

Cloyingly Sweet Dessert:
“What’s in your Easter basket?”

Name something you eat that sometimes is sweet, followed by a word describing an eater who refuses to eat it. 
The result sounds like a palindromic treat that you eat that always is sweet, followed by what the same eater, mentioned above, might (or perhaps should) exclaim after eating it. 
What are these four words?
Hint: The treat that you eat that always is sweet is sometimes found in an Easter basket.


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

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PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED



Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Lasting cast-in-stone impressions

Place the second-person form of a verb in front of the third-person form of the same verb.
The result is a synonym of  “fossils.” 
What is this synonym?


Appetizer Menu 

Metronational Appetizer:
Munici-pals & country cousins

Note: This Appetizer was created and contributed to Puzzleria! by Mark Scott of Seattle (screen name: “skydiveboy”). Thank you greatly, Mark.
Think of a major U.S. city
Remove two adjacent consonants within to spell a well known country when the remaining letters are pushed together. 
What are this city and country?



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Globe Theater Slice:
“Egad! Bard gabbed as oboe bebopped”

The following seven words share an interesting and unusual property in common — it is something that pertains to all letters in each of the seven words. 
What is this property? 
When you know it, think of a word from the title of a Shakespeare play that shares the unusual property.
PAGODA
BEBOP
DODGE
OBOE
EGAD
ADAGE
GABBED


Riffing Off Shortz And Krozel Slices:
Frozen foods and freeze frames

Will Shortz’s March 31st NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Joe Krozel of Creve Coeur, Missouri, reads: 
Name something you see when going to the movies, in two words. Change the sixth letter to an R, and you’ll get something you might buy at a grocery, in three words. What things are these?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Krozel Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Name an viewing option, in two words, available to patrons attending movies in swanky theaters with loges and balconies during the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. 
Place an R between the fifth and sixth letters. Remove the first two letters from each word and put them together to form the brand name of the sound system with which the theater might have been equipped. 
The remaining letters will form a hyphenated word for a label attached to one Oscar-winning movie, and also to another movie with an Oscar-nominated actor and director. Both movies were shown in theaters during that era. 
What is this movie-viewing option?
What is the brand name of the sound system?
What label was attached to the two movies?
ENTREE #2:
Name concessions you might see patrons carrying into the movies, in two words. Double the fifth letter and remove the first letter, and you’ll get noisy interruptions you might hear during dramatic scenes — interruptions perhaps perpetrated by patrons who may have shaken too much pepper on those concessions. 
What are these concessions and noisy interruptions?
ENTREE #3: 
Take the first name of the mess sergeant in an old-school comic strip followed by a single-syllable catchphrase exclaimed by a newer-school animated sitcom patriarch. The result sounds like the main ingredient in bite-sized morsels you can purchase at many movie theater concessions stands. What ingredient is this? Who are the mess sergeant and patriarch?
ENTREE #4:
Place the fifth word of an American short story title after the word  “Movie” to form a synonym of “cinema.” 
The final word in the title is the title of a flashlight-wielding employee who was once ubiquitous at this synonym of “cinema.”
What is this short story title?
ENTREE #5:
Name a certain preliminary bonus feature you used to sometimes see when going to the movies, in four words. 
If you remove one of the double letters in the fourth word you’ll get a container you might buy at a grocery in December. It contains  a six-letter beverage with three “g’s” that you might mix with rum and cognac to make a batch of the treat formed by first three words of that “certain preliminary bonus feature.” 
What are these four words?
ENTREE #6:
Name something you see when going to the movies, in two words. 
Rearrange the letters of the first word to get things you buy at the grocery deli. 
Rearrange the letters of the second word to get a homophone of what the Hays Code was created to do. 
What things do you buy at the deli? 
What was the Hays Code created to do?
ENTREE #7:
Name something you see when going to the movies, in one word. Divide the word in two. Place a one-letter abbreviation for a positive response at the end of the first part to form a woman’s name. 
Place a one-letter abbreviation for a negative response at the end of the second part to form a woman’s title. 
Place the title before the name to form the name an ocean liner. 
What is the name of this ocean liner?
ENTREE #8: 
Name a puzzle maker who made a puzzle about going to the movies, in two words. Drop the last letter. Switch the third and fourth letters. Move the fifth and sixth letters to the end. Divide the result in half to form two derogatory terms that do not apply to this puzzle maker. 
Who is the puzzle maker and what terms are these?
ENTREE #9:
Name something you see (and eat) when going to the movies at a Cobb Theatres franchise, in two words. 
Change the sixth letter to an R (or, if it already is an R, keep it as an R). If you now add a space you’ll get things you might buy at a grocery, in three words (of 3, 4, and 7 letters) as you prepare for a Fourth of July picnic. 
What things are these?
Note: Thanks to “Ben,” a poster on the Blaine’s Puzzle Blog, for inspiring this ninth riff-off puzzle Entree.


Dessert Menu

A Penny Earned Dessert:
Heeding sage advice from an adage

A well-known adage offers advice one ought heed when compensated by an employer for services rendered. 
Rearrange the initial letters of the adage’s eight words to form two words: one a synonym of  “heed,” the other a synonym of “compensated.” 
What is this adage?   


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.
Read Full Article
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PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED


Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Huntin’ down a ’hopper

Bait-and-switch supermarkets are always angling to hook us by hiking up prices. 
What’s worse, the bar code scanners used by price checkers sound like that chirping cricket I’d like to squash as he darts about my swimming pool deck. 
Perhaps I could capture the critter, boxing him inside a Polo Club cigarette carton then tossing it off a bridge. 
Or, because I am a proficient stoker and poker, I could instead just toss the carton into my fireplace with wisps of smoke curling above chirp-choking flames.

Identify twelve words in the paragraph above that share something in common. 


Appetizer Menu

S  enic  Ex  ibition  Appetizer:
“Hush Hush, Sweet arlotte”

(Note: The following excellent puzzle is the generous contribution of Mark Scott of Seattle, screen name “skydiveboy.”)
The adjacent letters CH are pronounced in several different ways in words, such as: chair, chrome, gauche. 
Can you find a common English word where the CH is silent?


MENU

Bookworld And Billboard Slice:
Page turners and stage burners

Lop five letters from the end of the first name and add a letter to the end of the last name of a best-selling author. 
Switch the positions of these two altered names to form the name of a best-selling rock band. 
Who are these two best-sellers?



Riffing Off Shortz And Stoll Slices:
Treetops under the tundra

Will Shortz’s March 10th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Hugh Stoll of Harrisonburg, Virginia, reads:
Think of a 4-letter word for something commonly seen in the winter. Write it in lowercase letters. Turn it upside-down, and you’ll name a device you use with this thing. What is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Stoll Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of a 5-letter word for an implement one might have seen in a bag along with a brassie, baffie, cleek, jigger, mashie and niblick. Write it in lowercase letters. Replace the fifth letter with a letter next to it in the alphabet. Turn the result upside-down, and you’ll name a general term for these 5-letter implements, as well as for brassies, baffies and certain cleeks. What is this implement?
ENTREE #2:
Think of a 5-letter word describing the common color of two objects often pocketed. (The word is not the color itself but rather a word that modifies the color.) Write it in lowercase letters and turn it upside-down. Place a space between the fourth and fifth letters of the result and replace the fifth letter with one of its homophones. You’ll name a device, in two words, that you can use to help put the objects in pockets. What is it?
Hint: The “sum” of the two objects is 14.
ENTREE #3:
Think of a 5-letter verb for what an aerial predatory attack in the wilderness often does to the victim. Write it in lowercase letters. Turn it upside-down, and you’ll form a verb for what raptors often do before seizing their prey. What is it raptors do?
Hint: As a noun, the verb is sometimes preceded by the word “fell.”
ENTREE #4:
Think of something in five letters that can be found at the center of a diamond. 
(Hint: The beginning of this word can also be found at the center of a diamond.) 
Write the 5-letter word in lowercase letters. Turn it upside-down and you’ll form two new words: something that may elicit a groan and an expression of such a groan. What are the 5-letter word and the two new words?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a word for a martial art. 
Write it in lowercase letters. 
Turn it upside-down, and you’ll name a verb for what one might say a dominating practitioner of this martial art does to his opponents. 
What is it? 
ENTREE #6:
Think of a 5-letter slang term for edibles usually served hot, but that originated from Chile. Write it in lowercase letters. 
Turn it upside-down, and you’ll name the first name of a canine mascot that once shilled for a potable on television. 
What are this term and name?
ENTREE #7: 
Think of a 3-letter term for a bunch of whales. Write it in lowercase letters. Turn it upside-down, and you’ll name a container for edible spheres. What are this term and container?
ENTREE #8: 
Think of a 5-letter hyphenated word for how Annie Glenn might have replied to the question, “How much did you miss your husband John, and how much did you kiss him when you greeted him after he orbited the Earth three times?” 
Write Annie’s reply in lowercase letters, and in a Century Gothic, Avant Garde or Futura font. Turn the result upside-down and ditch the hyphen, and you’ll have the last name of a fine puzzle maker. 
What did Annie reply, and who is the puzzle maker?


Dessert Menu

Moonpie Dessert:
Fixin’ luncheons for lunatics

M-O-O-N
Name what I’m doin’ above, in two words. Switch the initial consonant sounds. The result sounds like a kitchen utensil. What is this utensil?
Hint: The utensil is likely used more in summertime than in wintertime.


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.
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