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With unemployment rates lower than they have been for decades, now is the perfect time to ask your employer for a raise. There are currently more jobs than job seekers in the USA, so people can afford to pick and choose the best positions to suit their skills, needs, and aspirations. As a premium recruitment agency, we allocate staff for a range of professions, including registered nurse jobs in Philadelphia and inventory controllers and forklift operators in New Jersey.

Do you think you deserve a pay increase? Consider some of the advice below!

Prepare Carefully

Never ask for a raise without being fully prepared for the conversation with your manager, no matter how good your working relationship is with them. Managers will want proof that you deserve a salary increase, and they won’t like it if you haven’t prepared some reasons and figures backing up your request.

Try to find some performance data that proves you’ve acted above and beyond your pay grade. Use a salary calculator to look at actual figures that your boss should be competing against within your industry, and always have a solid number to bring to negotiations when you ask for a raise.

Choose the Perfect Moment

Picking the right time to ask for a raise is as important as preparing for the discussion. Try to find out when your company plans their annual budget so that you can make sure your pay rise can be factored into their plans.

Consider asking after an annual performance review; bosses could find it hard to say no if your performance is consistently excellent. Another perfect time to ask is upon completion of important projects, or when the business is doing well, and your boss is generally in a good mood.

How to Justify Your Request

Write down a list of recent accomplishments with specific examples of your achievements to back the reasons that you deserve a pay increase. Try to quantify the value that you bring to the business with data about how you contribute to company profits and their bottom line.

Try and raise all of your points as a logical progression and respond to any questions from your manager tactfully and logically while maintaining a professional level of respect.

For additional information, and to view a list of currently available positions including warehouse jobs in Burlington, just browse our site!

The post How to Ask for a Raise appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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Some jobs come with more risk than others. Those who work in the healthcare field are very familiar with these risks and the injuries and illnesses that can occur. It is essential for employees to take precautions to prevent any workplace accidents.

  1. Defend yourself against bloodborne pathogens. At some point in a healthcare workers career they will come in contact with a patients bodily fluids. However, wearing the proper protective gear such as gowns, gloves, and face shields will help protect employees. Implementing proper hand hygiene, using antiseptics and disinfectants on skin prior to procedures and cleaning and decontaminating of instruments also help to prevent contact with bloodborne pathogens.
  2. Practice safe patient handling to prevent musculoskeletal disorders. Healthcare workers are 7 times more likely than any other industry to suffer from musculoskeletal disorders. This occurs from not using the proper methods and equipment to lift and move patients. OSHA has compiled a list of resources for the hazards and solutions for proper lifting and moving of immobile patients.
  3. Be aware of chemical, drug and radiation hazards. Some of the chemicals and devices used to diagnose and treat illnesses also carry hazards when used improperly or without the proper protection. OSHA has in depth guidelines on the hazards, solutions, and how to properly handle these hazardous materials.
  4. Properly store, use, and dispose of sharp instruments. When handling needles, scalpels and other sharp tools, it is important to practice safe handling to reduce or eliminate the risk of puncturing skin. The wound is not as much an issue as the possibility of spreading diseases from contaminated tools. By passing sharp instruments in basins and disposing of used needles immediately after use, contamination can be reduced.

Practicing these 4 tips will help minimize the chances of injuries on the job. All Protocall healthcare employees must meet Joint Commission credentialing standards that evaluate clinical competencies and mandatory in-service education. This ensures all of our employees know and practice proper safety procedures.

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/healthcarefacilities/safetyculture.html

https://medium.com/@BastionSafe/five-safety-tips-for-health-care-workers-6e62eaadd9a3

https://ohsonline.com/blogs/the-ohs-wire/2015/05/five-safety-tips-for-health-care-workers.aspx

About The Protocall Group Established in 1965, The Protocall Group is a full service recruitment and staffing firm. As a full-service, family-owned and operated business, it has led regional industry in the Greater Philadelphia area and southern New Jersey to much acclaim. Recognized by NJ Biz, South Jersey Biz, and the Best Companies Groups as among the Best Places to Work, Protocall’s expert professionals connect exceptional associates with their client companies across Light Industrial, Healthcare and Professional industries.

The post Workplace Safety for Healthcare Workers appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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By Strategic Human Resources, Inc.

The best way to prepare for an emergency is before it happens. The workplace is not immune to emergencies even with the best preparations. Each day, companies across the world deal with small issues like health and safety to major incidents like natural disasters.  While we can’t control the weather to stop hurricanes, tornadoes, or even wildfires, we can help mitigate and prevent some of the smaller issues from turning into larger concerns.

It’s always a best practice for a company to have a solid Emergency Action Plan (EAP). Regardless of the size, location, or industry, a company’s EAP is an important document to help employees follow best practices and guidelines when incidents occur (see strategic HR inc.’s Emergency Preparedness Toolkit).  To help you get started, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) provides great checklists.

Most EAP’s cover the major incidents that can put employees or companies in jeopardy. But what about the smaller incidents that are not covered? Here is a list of minor steps companies can take to handle the small stuff before they get more serious:

  1. Appoint a Safety Officer or Safety Team: Safety should be the number one priority for an organization. Having a safety team can be a great way to boost awareness of issues that are pertinent to each area of the business. The team can develop a plan to promote awareness and to perform minor checks/drills to make sure the team is on the ball.

  2. Promote a Safety-First culture: Great leaders understand that their employees need to come to work every day feeling safe and secure to do their jobs. Leadership should empower a safety-first culture with “open door” and “See something. Say Something” policies. Many companies should also look into, “Stop Work Authority” policies which give any person the ability to shut down their area due to safety concerns.

  3. Have the right equipment! We aren’t advising for each company to have a doomsday prepper bunker, but there are basic minimum standards such as flashlights, batteries, first aid kits, access to minimal food and water, and sanitary cleaning supplies. These supplies are not expensive, and they can help incidents remain an inconvenience and not turn into calamities.

  4. Empower the team with training: It is a great idea to diversify the safety knowledge for each member of the team. Having multiple team members trained in basic medical emergency preparedness will boost the chances of success. Encourage your team to learn basic first aid skills and CPR. Many local organizations will come onsite to train your team on how and when to act in certain emergencies onsite. Some first responder organizations will even provide some training for free under the right circumstances.

  5. Conduct regular inspections: Steps 1-4 will have no lasting impact on a company’s safety readiness if they are not maintained. The leadership and safety team should work in unison to ensure that these supplies are regularly checked for expiration dates and quantities. Weekly safety briefs are a great way to foster the safety culture in an organization.

Strategic Human Resources Inc. is a national full-service HR management firm based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Its president and founder, Robin Throckmorton, can be reached at Robin@strategichrinc.com.

About The Protocall Group Established in 1965, The Protocall Group is a full service recruitment and staffing firm. As a full-service, family-owned and operated business, it has led regional industry in the Greater Philadelphia area and southern New Jersey to much acclaim. Recognized by NJ Biz, South Jersey Biz, and the Best Companies Groups as among the Best Places to Work, Protocall’s expert professionals connect exceptional associates with their client companies across Light Industrial, Healthcare and Professional industries.

The post Emergency Action Plan: Preparing for an Emergency Before It Happens appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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By Hugh Murray, III and Peter Stergios

Under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), groups of employees are allowed to determine whether they wish to be represented by a union for purposes of collective bargaining, which sometimes results in businesses having both union and nonunion employees. How an employer treats its nonunion workforce in relation to its union workforce can impact employee morale and raise some significant legal issues. In the recent case of Merck, Sharp & Dohme Corp., 367 NLRB No. 122 (May 7, 2019), the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) clarified and reaffirmed that for the most part, employers are free to treat union and nonunion workforces differently as long as the employer does not have an improper anti-union motive in doing so.

At issue was an impromptu decision by pharmaceutical company Merck to give employees an extra paid holiday on the Friday before Labor Day 2015 as an “appreciation day” for the company’s success. When Merck announced the extra day off five weeks in advance, the company noted that it applied to all company employees except for “those in the U.S. who are covered by a collective bargaining agreement.” Therefore, about 20,000 nonunion U.S. employees were given September 4, 2015, as a paid day off from work, while 2,700 employees represented by three different unions were expected to report to work as usual that day.

The unions filed charges with the NLRB. The unions alleged that the company violated the NLRA by denying the union employees the extra paid day off. After a trial, an administrative law judge (ALJ) agreed with the unions and ordered the company to pay each union employee a day’s pay. However, a divided NLRB reversed the ALJ’s decision, holding that the company did nothing wrong.

The board members all agreed on the basic legal requirements. The NLRA provides that employers may not “interfere with, restrain, or coerce” employees in the exercise of their rights under the NLRA, including the right to unionize. Employers may treat represented and unrepresented employees differently “absent an unlawful motive.” To determine whether an employer had an “unlawful motive,” the NLRB must show (1) protected activity, (2) the employer’s knowledge of the protected activity, and (3) the employer’s “anti-union animus.”

The employer in this case gave two related justifications for not granting the paid day off to the unionized employees. First, Merck maintained that it would be unlawful to simply unilaterally grant the paid day off without bargaining with the unions. Second, Merck did not want to bargain with the unions during the life of the collective bargaining agreement because when it had in the recent past requested certain midterm modifications of the contract, the unions had declined to agree. The ALJ and a dissenting board member concluded from these stated justifications that the company had therefore conceded an unlawful motive by relying on the unions’ lawful past refusal to change terms of a collective bargaining agreement in the middle of its term.

The majority of the NLRB, however, held the employer’s action lawful because nothing in the NLRA requires negotiation over mid-contract changes, and in view of the parties’ negotiation history, Merck’s unilateral withholding of the benefit from its unionized employees was a “rational business decision” given the dynamics of the negotiation process.

In dismissing the complaint, the majority said, “In sum, we find that [Merck’s] decision not to grant represented employees the paid holiday was simply a reflection of the ‘competing forces and counteracting pressures’ that were a part of the historical collective-bargaining relationship.”

While this is a good result for the employer, it took almost four years of litigation to obtain the result. Moreover, because the decision does not establish a new legal rule but purports to merely apply an established rule, the next employer in a similar situation may get a different result. Employers with a workforce consisting of represented and unrepresented employees should carefully consider the ways in which they treat the two workforces differently and be very deliberate about how they explain such differences when challenged.

If an employer decides to grant a benefit to nonunion employees but not to propose granting it to union employees, the employer should have a clear reason for that decision that cannot be characterized as simply “anti-union.” As is often the case, some advance planning can reduce the risk of the years of litigation, expense, and disruption of labor relations experienced in this case.

Hugh F. Murray, III is a partner with McCarter & English, LLP. He provides advice and representation to management clients on all aspects of the employment relationship. Peter Stergios is also a partner with  McCarter & English, LLP. He helps municipal and private employers address traditional labor union and employment law matters

About The Protocall Group Established in 1965, The Protocall Group is a full service recruitment and staffing firm. As a full-service, family-owned and operated business, it has led regional industry in the Greater Philadelphia area and southern New Jersey to much acclaim. Recognized by NJ Biz, South Jersey Biz, and the Best Companies Groups as among the Best Places to Work, Protocall’s expert professionals connect exceptional associates with their client companies across Light Industrial, Healthcare and Professional industries.

The post Dealing With A Divided Workforce: NLRB Clarifies Standard For Treating Union And Nonunion Workers Differently appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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By Adam Miller

As technology evolves, the skills gap – the disparity between the skills employers need to succeed and those workers actually have – keeps getting wider. If your company isn’t already addressing this gap, start now – no matter how big or small you are, or what business you’re in. If you don’t, you might be left behind.

To employers, I offer the following solution: Devote 5% of employees’ time at work to learning. In my experience, doing so can help you reduce talent turnover by up to 20% and save your company money. Even better, your people will have more of the skills they may need to get the job done.

The Situation Is Dire
The skills gap is like climate change. Most people know there’s a problem, but few are doing anything meaningful about it. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, today there are fewer unemployed Americans (6.2 million) than there are open jobs (7.3 million). It’s entirely possible that if people had the right skills, we could be at full employment.

According to a 2018 report for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, not all industries are experiencing skills gaps, but there are significant shortages of qualified candidates for many high-skill roles such as healthcare practitioners, business and financial operations professionals, computer and mathematics professionals and architects and engineers.

And the issue goes beyond jobs demanding rare or complex skills. The National Skills Coalition says that 53% of the U.S. job market consists of middle-skill jobs, but only 43% of workers have the right skills for these jobs.

Employment Numbers Hide The Truth
The skills gap can hit companies where it hurts: their bottom line. Consider manufacturing: According to a study by Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute, a shortage of skilled workers could reduce the U.S. manufacturing gross domestic product by up to $454 billion by 2028.

But many in business don’t understand the urgency of the situation. They consider the skills gap a vague threat existing in the far-off future. How could there be a problem, they ask, when unemployment is so low?

Here’s how: Official unemployment statistics significantly understate the number of jobless Americans. As reported by Quartz, at less than 63% as of June 2018, the labor force participation rate – which measures the share of employment-age Americans who are working or actively looking for work – is at roughly the same level as it was during the late 1970s, when far fewer women were part of the workforce. This shows that the joblessness problem is far bigger than the unemployment numbers suggest – and that many have likely given up even looking for work. I believe it could be because they don’t have the skills required by the jobs that are available.

So What Can Employers Do?
Finding and keeping the right people with the right skills is a must for companies. But as business change accelerates, doing so is growing more difficult. What can you do?
In a better world, governments, universities, companies, and employees would all pitch in to solve this problem. But

I don’t think that elected officials, academics and employees have the power or the will to drive the kinds of policies and practices that are required. Meanwhile, the problem is too important to wait for someone else to take care of it. Do that, and you may fall behind.

You can try to solve the problem by recruiting new talent, but qualified talent can be expensive to source and hire – and there’s a real chance that you won’t find people with the right skills. Or you could try accelerating the automation of key functions. But that can be risky.

Bridge The Skills Gap By Investing In Learning
I believe the answer is to upskill your existing employees – something that millennial workers, who want more from a job than compensation, are particularly enthusiastic about. To drive employee-learning success, think beyond just offering training options, and take the following steps:

  • Enable success by addressing different learning styles. Devote 5% of employees’ time to learning – but beyond that, give them a variety of learning options so that they’ll engage fully regardless of learning style.
  • Get managers at all levels to buy into your approach. Spread the word about what you’re doing, and show the business case: Upskilling employees can drive a healthier bottom line by reducing employee turnover and increasing productivity and engagement. Without buy-in from managers, employees are less likely to receive the time and resources they need to learn new skills successfully.
  • Make learning an ongoing practice. This way, your people will always be adding new skills – and your business will be better prepared for the changes waiting around the next corner.
  • Measure results. To justify your employee-upskilling efforts to management and employees alike, track quantifiable results of your training programs – employee satisfaction scores, for instance, or productivity rates.

Future-Proof Your Business Today
I believe there’s far too little urgency around the growing skills gap caused by technology and the acceleration of business. If you run a company, aim to devote 5% of your employees’ time to upskilling and development. You’ll be more likely to keep your top talent and save money – and your employees can gain the skills they may need to keep your business alive and thriving.

This article was originally published on Forbes.com.

Adam Miller is the President & CEO of Cornerstone OnDemand (NASD: CSOD). He founded Cornerstone in 1999 in his one-bedroom apartment to help people realize their potential, and he has grown it to be one of the largest cloud computing companies in the world with over 18 million users in 191 countries. Under his leadership, Cornerstone has grown at a compounded annual growth rate of over 50% since 2007 and today the Cornerstone global team operates in over 20 countries.

About The Protocall Group Established in 1965, The Protocall Group is a full service recruitment and staffing firm. As a full-service, family-owned and operated business, it has led regional industry in the Greater Philadelphia area and southern New Jersey to much acclaim. Recognized by NJ Biz, South Jersey Biz, and the Best Companies Groups as among the Best Places to Work, Protocall’s expert professionals connect exceptional associates with their client companies across Light Industrial, Healthcare and Professional industries.

The post Don’t Fall Behind on Learning–Close the Skills Gap Today appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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By O.C. Tanner

The modern workplace is disconnected. Although the Internet and social media give us a sense of connectivity, we’re more disconnected than ever before. Employees send emails (or texts) to people that sit a couple of desks away instead of just walking over to chat. Leaders have no idea what people are working on, much less what their individual goals and dreams are. Employees would rather work remotely because they don’t enjoy the office atmosphere. And we’re seeing lower morale and wellbeing in the workplace worldwide than ever before.

Not only does this disconnection lower each individual’s happiness, it can also lower innovation, teamwork, collaboration, passion, enthusiasm and ultimately bottom-line business results. So, what’s the answer? It’s simpler than one might think: Create a stronger connection between employees and your company. Make sure you inspire people with a corporate purpose that makes work meaningful. Give employees opportunities to make a difference together at work. Discuss goals they can align with. Create a culture where people feel like they belong. And you can accomplish it all with employee recognition.

Some organizations try to create a feeling of connection by dressing up their culture with ping pong tables, free massages, or catered lunches. There’s nothing wrong with those things. But if employees don’t frequently experience a sense of shared accomplishment, if they don’t understand how their day-to-day work impacts your business, or better yet changes the world, they will be disengaged and disconnected.

Employee recognition has a disproportionate impact on connecting people to their work. Celebrating everyday victories and shared successes has a galvanizing effect on teams and overall workplace culture. When someone gives or receives an e-Card, points, merchandise, a trophy, or is otherwise appreciated for a job well done, they feel a sense of pride, contribution, and belonging. They begin to see how the work they do benefits the organization. They feel needed. Important. Connected.

Curtis Kesler, Human Resources Operations Service Line Leader at Dow Chemical, describes how recognition has improved connection and benefitted both the culture and business results at Dow. “When employees feel validated and feel a part of the bigger picture and a part of the strategy, we all work harder. We do more. We put more effort into everything we do and we do better work.” Kesler continues, “that impacts the shareholders. That impacts corporate initiatives. That impacts the bottom line. It’s very good business sense to make sure that we have an engaged workforce.”

Take a moment to think about the companies everyone wants to work for: the Googles, Netflixes and the Apples of the world. These are organizations that attract top talent. Their names look great on resumes. Overall, they just have that ‘cool’ vibe every company (and employee) wants to be associated with. The truth is, what they are doing right, from a culture perspective, can easily be replicated. They are open and inspirational about their goals and mission statements. They clarify how each individual’s role contributes to the overall success of the company. They provide excellent opportunities for career growth. They succeed together. They celebrate. They create a feeling of connection.

Zoe Mills, Recognition and Engagement Manger at Virgin Trains, explains how the organization creates a connected culture by thanking employees for living up to brand values. “We ask a lot of our people. We ask them to create amazing. We ask them to do that with heart. We also want them to be insatiably curious and daringly bold,” Mills Continues, “and we ask for them to do all that as well as delivering the ‘virginness’. It’s a lot. So it’s important that we appreciate our people and let them know that what they do has a huge impact.”

Ultimately, employee engagement is nothing more than a measure of connection. Companies that give their employees a reason to connect become great places to work with exemplary workplace cultures. Think about it this way: people want to do more than just earn a paycheck. It’s deep in our DNA to want to create something amazing, to do work others love, and to contribute to the world around us in a meaningful way. It’s innately human to want to be a valued player on a winning team. Dana Ullom-Vucelich, Chief Human Resources & Ethics Officer at Ohio Living explains how a culture of belonging at Ohio Living made it one of the best health care organizations in her state.

“Our workplace culture is definitely one of our biggest differentiators. People work here because they believe in our mission and culture. It’s up to us to ensure that culture is sustainable. By having effective recognition solutions in place, we are able to encourage people to align with our mission while demonstrating their own unique work ethic and passion.”

When employee recognition provides a better line of sight to how an individual’s work impacts company success, they produce better work. They feel more connected to their team and to the company, and they bring more passion, love, care, and commitment to their work—the very definition of engagement.

O.C. Tanner helps organizations inspire and appreciate great work. Thousands of clients globally use our cloud-based technology, tools, and awards to provide meaningful recognition for their employees. Learn more at www.octanner.com.

This article was originally published on O.C. Tanner’s blog, ‘a’ Magazine (www.amagazinedaily.com)

About The Protocall Group Established in 1965, The Protocall Group is a full service recruitment and staffing firm. As a full-service, family-owned and operated business, it has led regional industry in the Greater Philadelphia area and southern New Jersey to much acclaim. Recognized by NJ Biz, South Jersey Biz, and the Best Companies Groups as among the Best Places to Work, Protocall’s expert professionals connect exceptional associates with their client companies across Light Industrial, Healthcare and Professional industries.

The post Engagement Is Really Just Connection appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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There are over three million registered nurses currently in the USA, with male RNs making up almost 10 percent of this figure. Trained nurses have many career options when they qualify as registered nurses, and as a leading recruiting center in Philadelphia, we advise and assist hundreds of nurses every year.

Some of the popular places with positions suitable for registered nurses include:

  • Physicians’ Offices
  • Hospitals
  • Nursing Homes
  • Home Healthcare Services
  • Military Nursing
  • Travel Nursing
Physician’s Office

For registered nurses who aspire to a 9-5 working schedule, a physician’s office is an ideal place to begin your career. RNs assist with patient examinations, wound dressings, injections, blood sampling, and laboratory work. These jobs are relatively competitive due to regular working hours and comfortable working environments.

Hospitals

Although hospitals can be stressful and busy, RNs who work in them can benefit from several advantages. They get to care for many patients and can train in a specialty such as Midwifery, Oncology, or Cardiac Nursing.

Nursing Homes

There is a demand for RNs in residential care facilities due to our aging population, especially in treating conditions such as Alzheimer’s and other memory-related impairments. RNs will assess and monitor the health of patients, create treatment plans, and perform medical procedures.

Home Healthcare Services

Home healthcare positions give RNs a level of autonomy that is unrivaled in the nursing profession. This role offers a personal, one-on-one patient experience and is often required during respite periods for patients who have recently left the hospital.

Military Nursing

Those who want to serve their country while helping others can consider becoming a military RN. This role includes tuition reimbursement and global travel. Once qualified, military RNs to work in either military or civilian hospitals.

Travel Nursing

With assignments lasting between 8 and 26 weeks, travel nursing is an ideal career path for nurses that are keen to relocate frequently. There are also bonuses available as this job requires a significant level of commitment.

To find out more about any of these RN career paths call our Philadelphia recruiting office or click here now.

The post What Jobs Can A Registered Nurse Do? appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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By Diane Cross, Compliance Analyst at HORAN

A seller and buyer may contractually allocate COBRA responsibility as part of the transaction. If that is the case, COBRA responsibility will be outlined by the terms of the contract. In absence of contracted terms, or if the party who was contractually responsible for providing COBRA fails to do so, the IRS provides guidelines that outlines who has COBRA responsibility. Generally, if the seller maintains any group health plan after the transaction, the seller bears responsibility for providing COBRA coverage to the M&A qualified beneficiaries.

Who are M&A qualified beneficiaries?

For the purposes of COBRA, M&A qualified beneficiaries include (1) individuals who are receiving COBRA coverage under the seller’s group health plan at the time of the transaction; and (2) individuals who experience a loss of coverage due to a qualifying event in connection with the transaction.

If the seller does not maintain any group health plan after the sale, who bears COBRA responsibility will depend on the structure of the transaction. In a stock purchase (buyer assumes the role of the seller and generally assumes responsibility for all the seller’s employee benefit plans as a matter of law), the buyer is responsible for providing COBRA coverage to M&A qualified beneficiaries. However, in an asset purchase (buyer usually does not assume any plans or plan liabilities unless a buyer affirmatively adopts or continues the seller’s plans), buyer is responsible for providing COBRA coverage to M&A qualified beneficiaries only if the buyer maintains a group health plan and is considered a successor employer.

When is a buyer a successor employer?

A buyer is a successor employer if it continues the operations of the business without substantial change or interruption, and the seller does not provide any group health plan after the transaction.

Why is this important?

Aside from employers understanding their COBRA responsibility generally, the impact of COBRA liability for M&A beneficiaries could be significant. For example, a buyer assuming COBRA liability could result in a negative impact to the buyer’s premiums; for a self-funded plan, a buyer assuming COBRA liability can impact the plan’s finances especially if M&A beneficiaries have high claims expenses. Such issues, if determined early enough in the process, could be factored into negotiations (through the purchase price or handled another way by agreement).

When negotiating the purchase or sale of a business, employers should be mindful to include COBRA considerations early in its due diligence and discuss with counsel to understand any potential responsibility.

Reprinted with permission from HORAN’s Health Benefits Compliance Blog

About The Protocall Group Established in 1965, The Protocall Group is a full service recruitment and staffing firm. As a full-service, family-owned and operated business, it has led regional industry in the Greater Philadelphia area and southern New Jersey to much acclaim. Recognized by NJ Biz, South Jersey Biz, and the Best Companies Groups as among the Best Places to Work, Protocall’s expert professionals connect exceptional associates with their client companies across Light Industrial, Healthcare and Professional industries.

The post Cobra Coverage to Qualified Beneficiaries After a Sale or Merger appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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By Jeff Miller 

I’ve spent my entire career either learning or teaching. I’ve studied the psychology of learning, and I’ve been involved in helping everyone from executives to middle schoolers get better at it. I’ve learned a lot myself in that time – including that learning is consistently pushed last on the priority list.

My sixth graders were always looking for shortcuts around it, and in the workplace, it’s avoided in favor of more tangible deliverables – even despite the positive impact it can have. Deloitte research suggests companies with strong learning cultures are 92 percent more likely to innovate, not to mention 52 percent more productive. What’s more, giving employees learning opportunities helps promote long-term retention. A 2018 LinkedIn Jobs Report found 94 percent of employees would stay at a company longer if that company invested in their career development. Yet 6-in-10 managers say getting employees to make time is the biggest challenge for talent development.

Even at my company, where a bulk of our business is centered around helping other companies implement learning, we’re not perfect at ensuring our own employees make time for personal development. In fact, this year we’ve decided to challenge ourselves to increase the amount of time employees spend learning. And, by implementing the following strategies, your company can too.

Stop the Excuses

Often, the reason learning falls by the wayside comes down to one excuse: “I’m too busy.”

When big projects come up or your team is overwhelmed with tasks, it’s easy to tell employees to prioritize the work and skip the 30-minute course on something like problem solving or communication. But in my experience, you can almost always find the time for learning. Just think about the times when the CEO gives a presentation, everyone is magically available for an hour.

One way to get time back? Take a closer look at meetings. Meetings have increased in number and in length since the 1960s, according to the Harvard Business Review, and over 70 percent of executives surveyed in their study agreed most meetings are unproductive and inefficient. In my experience, most one-hour meetings can be done in 15 to 20 minutes. If your meeting doesn’t have a specific action or outcome, maybe you don’t need to have it in the first place. And not everyone has to be in every meeting; review the meeting goals to ensure your employees are only in the meeting if they need to be.

Make Development Important to Management

Even outside of busy periods at work, it can be challenging to get employees to invest time in learning. I think this stems from the decades-old perception that if an employee has free time, it’s an indication they’re not working hard enough. And that’s still ingrained in some company cultures today. One of my colleagues came from an environment where pursuing learning instead of billable client work meant that she wasn’t proving her value to the company.

The only way to start to change this cultural habit is to start to change expectations and that’s a directive that needs to come from senior leadership. If managers are being measured by their ability to complete projects, there is no incentive for them to help to develop their employees. But, if one of the company’s core management competencies is for managers to be developers of people, managers are much more likely to prioritize learning.

When the colleague I mentioned started at Cornerstone, she told me she struggled to adjust to the expectation that she make time for learning in her schedule. The person who helped her make the switch? Her manager.

Start Seeing the ROI

Managers worried about time lost to learning might actually find that learning actually improves their employees’ work. According to LinkedIn research, employees who engage in learning regularly are 47 percent less likely to be stressed, 23 percent more ready to take on additional responsibilities, and 21 percent more likely to feel confident and happy. Learning can also increase productivity: Research suggests a break from your traditional job can promote creative thinking and productivity.

Moreover, employee retention is tied closely to learning. According to research from the Institute for the Future, 42 percent of millennials report they are likely to leave a company because they are not learning enough. Meanwhile, the same study revealed 52 percent of employers consistently struggle to fill open positions – at a cost of 150 percent of the salary of a mid-level employee. Learning can help reduce employee churn and even address hiring challenges across the organization.

Finally, a learning culture can future-proof your organization as things like automation and the rise of the gig economy continue to change the workforce. According to one study, 90 percent of global managers and executives expect their work to be disrupted in the near future, but only 44 percent say their organizations are adequately prepared for it.

Rather than looking elsewhere for the talent to fill those gaps as needs arise, companies have the opportunity to start developing their current workforce today by building a learning culture. By dedicating more time for employees to learn and grow their skills, companies will maintain a workforce that is on the cutting edge of whatever change comes next in the world of work.







Jeff Miller, Ph.D., is the Associate Vice President of Learning and Organizational Effectiveness at Cornerstone OnDemand, where he oversees employee engagement and motivation, learning and development, tech enablement, career mobility and the company’s executive leadership development program.

About The Protocall Group Established in 1965, The Protocall Group is a full service recruitment and staffing firm. As a full-service, family-owned and operated business, it has led regional industry in the Greater Philadelphia area and southern New Jersey to much acclaim. Recognized by NJ Biz, South Jersey Biz, and the Best Companies Groups as among the Best Places to Work, Protocall’s expert professionals connect exceptional associates with their client companies across Light Industrial, Healthcare and Professional industries.

The post A Learning Culture Is Key to Increase Innovation, Productivity, and Retention appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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By Sharlyn Lauby 

While it is true that employees aren’t the same as customers, on some level, they do expect the same experiences.

Technology is doing some wonderful things for the customer experience. I can make doctor appointments and see my lab results using an app. If my flight is delayed and I miss my connection, the Delta Airlines app will automatically rebook me on the next flight. It’s those little things that make life easier. And if individuals can get that experience in their personal lives, it could drive the employee experience they expect it in their work lives.

Use technology strategically. There are times when “going old school” is fun. But there are moments when it demonstrates otherwise. Organizations do not want to appear to be “behind the times”. The goal of technology is to free us up from the mundane so we can focus on things that technology can’t do – like having team conversations or making business decisions.

Technology is definitely a part of the employee experience. Organizations use technology to run their operation. They use technology to source and hire the best talent. Employees expect technology to help them do their jobs. This includes everything from email to artificial intelligence and employee self-service. Employees can see how technology is helping them manage their personal lives and they want to know their employer is going to do the same.

Organizations don’t have to be early adopters for everything. Let me balance the push for organizations to adopt technology with a caveat. Companies do not have to adopt every single new piece of technology that comes to market. It’s perfectly okay to wait a while, see what others are saying, and test drive it before buying. The challenge comes when organizations take years to do that.

While employees and customers are different, they are both essential to our business. And they expect a good employee experience with the company – both in terms of their face-to-face and technological interactions.

Sharlyn Lauby is the author of HR Bartender (www.hrbartender.com), a friendly place to discuss workplace issues. This article was reprinted with permission from Kronos (www.kronos.com), a leading provider of workforce management and human capital management solutions. You can connect with them on Twitter at @KronosInc and@HRBartender.

About The Protocall Group Established in 1965, The Protocall Group is a full service recruitment and staffing firm. As a full-service, family-owned and operated business, it has led regional industry in the Greater Philadelphia area and southern New Jersey to much acclaim. Recognized by NJ Biz, South Jersey Biz, and the Best Companies Groups as among the Best Places to Work, Protocall’s expert professionals connect exceptional associates with their client companies across Light Industrial, Healthcare and Professional industries.

The post Employee Experience Must Mirror the Customer Experience appeared first on The Protocall Group.

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