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Image of Block Island Wind, off of Rhode Island

As noted in the Asbury Park Press, here, Orsted (DKK, DNNGY). with support from PSEG, will build Ocean Wind, a 1.11 GW farm about 15 miles east of Atlantic City.  “Ocean Wind” should come online in 2024. NJ’s Board of Public Utilities, BPU approved the $1.6 Billion, $1.44 per watt plan. (Press Release. Financial Information.)

That’s about twice the nameplate capacity of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant, built in the late 1960’s and turned off in 2018, at 12.8% of the cost of new nuclear.

Back in 2008, NASA published this on Global Ocean Wind Energy Potential

Ocean Wind will power roughly 500,000 homes beginning in 2024. NJ Gov. Phil Murphy set the state’s Energy Master Plan to build 3.5 GW offshore wind to power 1.5 million homes by 2030.

Meanwhile, in Georgia, the newest nuclear power plants, the 2.234 GW Vogtle 3 and 4, the first new nuclear reactors built in the United States in 30 years, are now 6 years late and estimated to cost $28 billion. (Taxpayer.net).  That is a cost overrun of $14 billion, 100% over the initial cost of $14 billion.  (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Power).

New nuclear is 8.7 times the cost of new wind power capacity. And nuclear needs fuel, waste management, and the safety and security concerns with nuclear power can not be understated.

A co-founder of Popular Logistics, I hold an MBA in “Managing for Sustainability” from Marlboro College and a Bachelor’s of Science in Biology from the City University of New York  College of Staten Island. I also hold a PMI’s PMP and CompTIA’sNetwork+ certifications. Available as a speaker and consultant, I can be reached at “Popular Logistics . com” as “L Furman.”

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Popular Logistics by L J Furman, Mba - 3M ago

Vogtle 3 and 4, the first new nuclear reactors built in the United States in 30 years, are now 6 years late and estimated to cost $28 billion. (Taxpayer.net).  That is a cost overrun of $14 billion, 100% over the initial cost of $14 billion.  (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Power).

The 2.234 GW plants at Vogtle will cost $12.5 per watt, if there are no more overruns, plus the costs of fuel, security, maintenance, etc. Utility scale solar is under $2.00 per watt. Utility scale wind is $2 to $3 per watt. Neither require fuel or military security forces.  The money used to construct a 2 GW nuclear reactor could construct a 3 GW solar farm AND a 2 or 3 GW Wind Farm. 
 
Why, given the cost of nuclear, the bankruptcy of Westinghouse, the dearth of young nuclear engineers, and the costs of wind and solar are we even thinking about, let along sinking $Billions of taxpayer dollars in nuclear? 

According the the DOE loan program office, here, “The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a total of up to $12 billion in loan guarantees to Georgia Power Company (GPC),  Oglethorpe Power Corporation (OPC), and three subsidiaries of Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia (MEAG Power) to support the construction of Vogtle Units 3 and 4 – the nation’s next generation of advanced nuclear reactors – at the Alvin W. Vogtle Electric Generating site in Waynesboro, Georgia.” 

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Popular Logistics by L J Furman, Mba - 4M ago

Miami during Hurricane Irma in 2017. Image by Kevin Hagan for the NY Times

“Climate Change,” according to Ban Ki Moon and Francis Suarez, writing in the New York Times, here,  “is not a distant threat for Miami; it’s a daily presence in people’s lives. The city has been fighting to stay above water for decades. It knows that its future as a vibrant international hub for business, tourism, arts and culture depends on making the city more resilient to the impact of global warming.”

Eileen Mignoni, In “Flooding is the new normal in Miami In Miami,” here, in Yale Climate Connections, wrote, “sea-level rise is not a problem for future generations. It’s a present-day reality.

Moon, the former Secretary General of the U.N. and Suarez, Miami’s Mayor, wrote, 

The Coming Once A Year Flood

If emissions continue to grow and sea levels respond moderately, by 2100 about 10 percent of the city of Miami will be below the height of a once-a-year coastal flood. Map shows areas likely to be affected, absent resilience measures, during an event that could typically be driven by higher-than-usual tides and non-hurricane winds.

By saying “Annual flooding by 2100 [in 81 years],”  Moon and Suarez seem to be saying, “Don’t worry. We have time.” They are doing the people of Miami and the readers of The New York Times a disservice. Miami is already flooding on an annual basis, and has been since 2013, if not earlier. 

Here’s anecdotal evidence from the news media. 

2018, Kevin Loria, Business Insider, “Cities around the US are flooding at high tide and on sunny days at record rates.”

2017, Brian McNoldy, The Washington Post, “The Miami area endured an absurd flooding event Tuesday afternoon”

2016, Jenny Staletovich, Miami Herald, “Miami Beach flooding spiked over last decade, UM study finds”

Also in 2016, Joey Flechas, Miami Herald, “The king tide is high, but South Florida is holding on”

2015, Elizabeth Kolbert, in The New Yorker, wrote, “The Siege of Miami, As temperatures climb, so, too, will sea levels.”

and also in 2015 on Directac123, “The 10 Worst Floods In Florida History”

2014, Robin McKie, The Guardian, “Miami, the great world city, is drowning while the powers that be look away”

2013 on YouTube, a mash-up of flooding. 

A co-founder of Popular Logistics, I hold an MBA in “Managing for Sustainability” from Marlboro College and a Bachelor’s of Science in Biology from the City University of New York  College of Staten Island. I also hold a PMI’s PMP and CompTIA’s Network+ certifications. Available as a speaker and consultant, I can be reached at “Popular Logistics . com” as “L Furman.”

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