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The last month has been busy to say the least, which is why we haven’t gotten around to posting a recent Blogpost Roundup, but it looks like you all have been busy as well! Thanks as always for continuing to share your knowledge around RDO and OpenStack. Enjoy!

Lessons from OpenStack Telemetry: Deflation by Julien Danjou

This post is the second and final episode of Lessons from OpenStack Telemetry. If you have missed the first post, you can read it here.

Read more at https://julien.danjou.info/lessons-from-openstack-telemetry-deflation/

Unit tests on RDO package builds by jpena

Unit tests are used to verify that individual units of source code work according to a defined spec. While this may sound complicated to understand, in short it means that we try to verify that each part of our source code works as expected, without having to run the full program they belong to.

Read more at https://blogs.rdoproject.org/2018/04/unit-tests-on-rdo-package-builds/

Red Hatters To Present at More Than 50 OpenStack Summit Vancouver Sessions by Peter Pawelski, Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat OpenStack Platform

OpenStack Summit returns to Vancouver, Canada May 21-24, 2018, and Red Hat will be returning as well with as big of a presence as ever. Red Hat will be a headline sponsor of the event, and you’ll have plenty of ways to interact with us during the show.

Read more at https://redhatstackblog.redhat.com/2018/04/13/openstack-summit-vancouver-preview/

Lessons from OpenStack Telemetry: Incubation by Julien Danjou

It was mostly around that time in 2012 that I and a couple of fellow open-source enthusiasts started working on Ceilometer, the first piece of software from the OpenStack Telemetry project. Six years have passed since then. I’ve been thinking about this blog post for several months (even years, maybe), but lacked the time and the hindsight needed to lay out my thoughts properly. In a series of posts, I would like to share my observations about the Ceilometer development history.

Read more at https://julien.danjou.info/lessons-from-openstack-telemetry-incubation/

Comparing Keystone and Istio RBAC by Adam Young

To continue with my previous investigation to Istio, and to continue the comparison with the comparable parts of OpenStack, I want to dig deeper into how Istio performs RBAC. Specifically, I would love to answer the question: could Istio be used to perform the Role check?

Read more at https://adam.younglogic.com/2018/04/comparing-keystone-and-istio-rbac/

Scaling ARA to a million Ansible playbooks a month by David Moreau Simard

The OpenStack community runs over 300 000 CI jobs with Ansible every month with the help of the awesome Zuul.

Read more at https://dmsimard.com/2018/04/09/scaling-ara-to-a-million-ansible-playbooks-a-month/

Comparing Istio and Keystone Middleware by Adam Young

One way to learn a new technology is to compare it to what you already know. I’ve heard a lot about Istio, and I don’t really grok it yet, so this post is my attempt to get the ideas solid in my own head, and to spur conversations out there.

Read more at https://adam.younglogic.com/2018/04/comparing-istio-and-keystone-middleware/

Heading to Red Hat Summit? Here’s how you can learn more about OpenStack. by Peter Pawelski, Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat OpenStack Platform

Red Hat Summit is just around the corner, and we’re excited to share all the ways in which you can connect with OpenStack® and learn more about this powerful cloud infrastructure technology. If you’re lucky enough to be headed to the event in San Francisco, May 8-10, we’re looking forward to seeing you. If you can’t go, fear not, there will be ways to see some of what’s going on there remotely. And if you’re undecided, what are you waiting for? Register today. 

Read more at https://redhatstackblog.redhat.com/2018/03/29/red-hat-summit-2018-openstack-preview/

Multiple 1-Wire Buses on the Raspberry Pi by Lars Kellogg-Stedman

The DS18B20 is a popular temperature sensor that uses the 1-Wire protocol for communication. Recent versions of the Linux kernel include a kernel driver for this protocol, making it relatively convenient to connect one or more of these devices to a Raspberry Pi or similar device.

Read more at https://blog.oddbit.com/2018/03/27/multiple-1-wire-buses-on-the-/

An Introduction to Fast Forward Upgrades in Red Hat OpenStack Platform by Maria Bracho, Principal Product Manager OpenStack

OpenStack momentum continues to grow as an important component of hybrid cloud, particularly among enterprise and telco. At Red Hat, we continue to seek ways to make it easier to consume. We offer extensive, industry-leading training, an easy to use installation and lifecycle management tool, and the advantage of being able to support the deployment from the app layer to the OS layer.

Read more at https://redhatstackblog.redhat.com/2018/03/22/an-introduction-to-fast-forward-upgrades-in-red-hat-openstack-platform/

Ceph integration topics at OpenStack PTG by Giulio Fidente

I wanted to share a short summary of the discussions happened around the Ceph integration (in TripleO) at the OpenStack PTG.

Read more at http://giuliofidente.com/2018/03/ceph-integration-topics-at-openstack-ptg.html

Generating a list of URL patterns for OpenStack services. by Adam Young

Last year at the Boston OpenStack summit, I presented on an Idea of using URL patterns to enforce RBAC. While this idea is on hold for the time being, a related approach is moving forward building on top of application credentials. In this approach, the set of acceptable URLs is added to the role, so it is an additional check. This is a lower barrier to entry approach.

Read more at https://adam.younglogic.com/2018/03/generating-url-patterns/

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It’s time for the community to help determine the winner of the OpenStack Vancouver Summit Superuser Awards, sponsored by Zenko. Based on the community voting, the Superuser Editorial Advisory Board will review the nominees and determine the finalists and overall winner.

Now, it’s your turn.

City Network is one of the seven nominees for the Superuser Awards. Review the nomination criteria below, check out the other nominees and rate the nominees before the deadline Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

Cast your vote here!

Who are the team members?

City Network’s dev ops, professional services, education and engineering teams: Marcus Murwall, Tobias Rydberg, Magnus Bergman, Tobias Johansson, Alexander Roos, Johan Hedberg, Joakim Olsson, Emil Sundstedt, Mattias Nilsson, Lars Östergaard, Erik Johansson, Joel Svensson, Erik Arenhill, Ioannis Karamperis, Johan Hedberg, Namrata Sitlani, Christoffer Carlberg, Daniel Öhberg, Florian Haas, Adolfo Brandes, Syed Armani, Priscila Prado.

How has open infrastructure transformed your business? 

Shifting to 100 percent focus on OpenStack has been key to the global expansion of our organization in general and our cloud offerings in particular. City Network is now a global provider of public, compliant, private and hybrid-cloud solutions based on OpenStack.
With OpenStack and all its features, ease-of-use and popularity as the catalyst we have added value through multiple data centers in Europe, the U.S., Asia and the United Arab Emirates. With a clear strategy and implementation of data protection and regulatory aspects, City Network is leading the way for cloud and OpenStack adoption in the financial services industry.

How has the organization participated in or contributed to an open infrastructure community? 

  • Our CEO is a member of the OpenStack Foundation Board. His goal is to help the community and the ecosystem to leverage this open platform and drive the transformation for a more open, future-proof IT infrastructure.
  • City Network founded and is still organizing OpenStack Days Nordic, 2018 marks our third year. We are also involved in OpenStack Days Israel and India and attend multiple OpenStack Days events across the globe.
  • We have participated in every summit for the past six years and contribute to the user groups; public cloud and the security project.
  • City Network provides OpenStack training and is working to bridge the OpenStack and Open edX communities through mutual collaboration with the common ambition of providing quality education to anyone with access to a browser.

What open source technologies does the organization use in its IT environment?

We are very pro open source and use it in every case where open source is a viable option. A selection of the Open Source technologies we are currently using: CentOS, OpenBSD, Ubuntu, Nginx, Apache, PHP, Python, Ansible, MySQL, Mariadb, Mongodb and Ceph, Open edX.

What is the scale of the OpenStack deployment? 

We run our public OpenStack based cloud in eight regions across three continents. All our data centers are interconnected via private networks. In addition to our public cloud, we provide a pan-European cloud for verticals where regulatory compliance is paramount (e.g. banking and financial services, government, healthcare) addressing all regulatory challenges. Over 2,000 users of our infrastructure-as-a-service solutions run over 10,000 cores in production.

What operational challenges have you overcome during your experience with open infrastructure? 

Since we’re running OpenStack as public IaaS there have been a lot of hurdles to overcome as OpenStack is not yet fully adapted for public clouds. We had to build our own APIs in order to get network connectivity over several sites to work and also we had to add features such as volume copy and the ability to move volumes between sites. We have also had our fair share of issues with upgrading to new OpenStack versions, however we do feel as this process have been getting better with each upgrade.

How is this team innovating with open infrastructure? 

We innovate with OpenStack on two main focus areas. One is figuring out how we can interconnect all our OpenStack data centers over a global, private network and all the benefits that comes from doing so—including being able to provide customers with a direct, private access to our cloud services.

The other focus area has to do with our focus on helping regulated companies, mainly in the financial and healthcare industries with their digital transformation and cloud adoption. By building completely separated cloud services compliant with regulations such as ISO 9001, 27001, 27015, 27018, Basel, solvency and HIPAA, we allow for these industries to go cloud with a pay-as-you-go model and be truly agile.

How many Certified OpenStack Administrators (COAs) are on your team?

None.

Voting is limited to one ballot per person and closes Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

The post Vancouver Superuser Award Nominee: City Network appeared first on Superuser.

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It’s time for the community to help determine the winner of the OpenStack Vancouver Summit Superuser Awards, sponsored by Zenko. Based on the community voting, the Superuser Editorial Advisory Board will review the nominees and determine the finalists and overall winner.

Now, it’s your turn.

OICR is one of seven nominees for the Superuser Awards. Review the nomination criteria below, check out the other nominees and rate the nominees before the deadline Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

Cast your vote here!

Who are the team members?
George Mihaiescu (cloud architect)
Jared baker (cloud engineer)
Francois Gerthoffert (project manager)
Rahul Verma (software developer)
Robert Tisma (software developer)
Dusan Andric (software architect)
Vincent Ferretti (principal investigator)
Lincoln Stein (principal investigator)

Site: www.cancercollaboratory.org

How has open infrastructure transformed your organization? 

OpenStack made it possible for OICR to build the Cancer Genome Collaboratory, a cloud that enables research on the world’s largest and most comprehensive cancer genome dataset.

Researchers can run complex analysis across a large repository of cancer genome sequences. Instead of spending weeks to months downloading hundreds of terabytes of data from a central repository before computations can begin, researchers can upload their analytic software into the Collaboratory cloud, run it and download the computed results in a secure fashion.

The Collaboratory is home to the data holdings of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), a global collaboration involving more than 40 countries/jurisdictions to sequence the genomes across 50 major cancer types. Users of the Collaboratory have fast and easy access to this unique data set.

How has the organization participated in or contributed to an open infrastructure community? 

OICR is hosting the Toronto OpenStack meetups in 2018. George Mihaiescu and Jared Baker have presented at past OpenStack Summits (Barcelona, Boston and soon Vancouver) as well as reporting bugs and providing feedback on the mailing list and IRC channels.

Mihaiescu has been involved with OpenStack since the Cactus release, with the first conference attended being in Boston 2011 and active in the OpenStack scientific working group, as well as a member in the OpenStack Day Canada 2018 organizing committee.

The team also writes blog posts on http://softeng.oicr.on.ca/, sharing knowledge of open-source technologies.

What open source technologies does the organization use in its IT environment?

All the technologies used in Collaboratory are open source, including: Linux, OpenStack, Ceph, Ansible, Zabbix, Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana, Grafana, MaaS, ARA.

We are proud to always choose open source alternatives for our technology. We benefit from the flexibility and freedom provided and using the cost savings to invest in increased capacity for cancer research. Most importantly, we couldn’t offer cancer researchers a cloud environment at this scale and price point if we weren’t using open-source technologies like OpenStack and Ceph.

What is the scale of the OpenStack deployment? 

The Collaboratory has 2,600 cores and 18 terabytes of RAM, as well as 7.3 petabytes of storage managed by Ceph. More than 40 research labs and 95 researchers across four continents are using Collaboratory to access the 670 terabytes of protected cancer genome data stored.

The Collaboratory has contributed to the research underlying 43 peer-reviewed papers, with an additional 50 papers from the Pan-cancer project currently in preparation or review.

The genomic cancer research workloads are special in their needs, so the Collaboratory provides very large flavors to accommodate the storage, CPU and memory requirements. Because of its use of only open source and commodity hardware, the cost for using the Collaboratory is almost 40 percent less than that of the leading commercial cloud provider.

What operational challenges have you overcome during your experience with open infrastructure? 

We initially deployed OpenStack on the Juno release and upgraded live multiple times all the way to the Ocata release, with a planed upgrade to Pike in the weeks to come.

We also live upgraded the operating system from Ubuntu 14 to 16 and Ceph from Hammer to Jewel. From packaging issues to documentation mistakes, we gained a lot of operational experience over time managing OpenStack and Ceph.

With a infrastructure support team of just two people, we have to stay close to the latest OpenStack version and careful of the projects supported in our environment while keeping the environment stable and secure.

Both infrastructure support people are OpenStack certified (COA) and spend considerable time researching and testing new OpenStack releases and features.

How is this team innovating with open infrastructure? 

The Collaboratory team has developed two open-source applications for our users:

– A cost-recovery application providing the principal investigators with daily usage and cost metrics.

– An enrollment application, allowing researchers to request OpenStack tenants to be created, or users to be added to existing tenants.

Also, we developed and open sourced metadata and storage software used to provide granular and time-limited access to the protected data sets only to approved researchers.

Another open-source project developed at OICR is called Dockstore and its goal is to allow researchers to package and share bioinfomatics tools and workflows.

How many Certified OpenStack Administrators (COAs) are on your team?

Two.

Voting is limited to one ballot per person and closes Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

The post Vancouver Superuser Award Nominee: Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) appeared first on Superuser.

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It’s time for the community to help determine the winner of the OpenStack Vancouver Summit Superuser Awards, sponsored by Zenko. Based on community voting, the Superuser Editorial Advisory Board will review the nominees and determine the finalists and overall winner.

Now, it’s your turn.

SmartMe is one of seven nominees for the Superuser Awards. Review the nomination criteria below, check out the other nominees and rate the nominees before the deadline Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

Cast your vote here!

Who are the team members?

The core of SmartMe.io is a young, dynamic team of 15 at the University of Messina. Fujitsu also supports SmartMe with a team of 20. The teams work together on development, test and documentation; the joint team is based in Europe and Asia.

How has open infrastructure transformed the organization? 

Organizational culture has been forged by collaboration since the very beginning. In fact, the first step of SmartMe.io was a crowdfunding campaign that funded our initial development. After that, working with the OpenStack community enhanced the quality of the software. This philosophy helped SmartMe to be more agile, fast and gain a better understanding of the global market.

How has the organization participated in or contributed to an open infrastructure community? 

SmartMe works closely with the OpenStack Monasca team to develop Monasca and Stack4Things (IoTronic, under incubation) further. We’ve also participated in OpenStack Days and Summits to share our story and help the community with topics such as edge computing, artificial intelligence, anomaly detection and monitoring. SmartMe also collaborates with FIWARE to deploy our solution for a global audience. We have been working with the OpenStack community since our beginning in 2014.

The Italian government has recently launched a nation-wide contest (Open Community 2020) for the reuse of best practices and the transfer of results to other interested municipalities. The city of Turin, after being favourably impressed with Messina’s experience, gathered a consortium with the cities of Padua, Lecce, Syracuse, and together with the municipality of Messina and the University of Messina, submitted its proposal to reuse Messina’s practices. The consortium won E500K+ to spend on this project and the activities just started.

What open source technologies does the organization use in its IT environment?

The technology stack for edge computing at SmartMe.io includes OpenStack (especially IoTronic, Neutron, Monasca), Docker, LXD, InfluxDB, Node.js, Node-RED, WebSockets, WAMP.ws, FUSE, Darknet.

What’s the scale of the OpenStack deployment? 

The original test project in Messina was made of 5+ OpenStack instances, with 5+ tenants per instance, and 50+ VMs per tenant. Similar configurations were deployed for the initial production.

What operational challenges have you overcome during your experience with open infrastructure? 

Rolling upgrades are still a steep hurdle. Activities on internet of things infrastructure use IoTronic that supports remote software updates of the fleets of edge node.

How is this team innovating with open infrastructure? 

SmartMe uses new OpenStack subsystems for IoT/edge devices enrollment as infrastructure, their management and virtualization. Examples of used projects are: containerization, filesystem virtualization, SDN/NFV/SFC. We use these projects to develop smart cities, smart building, smart parking, facial recognition (particularly for security) and industry 4.0 etc.

How many Certified OpenStack Administrators (COAs) are on your team?

We believe in know-how, best practices and learning. Recently eight people attended COA training and one of them is already COA-certified. The others plan to get the certification too.

 Voting is limited to one ballot per person and closes Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

The post Vancouver Superuser Award Nominee: SmartMe appeared first on Superuser.

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It’s time for the community to help determine the winner of the OpenStack Vancouver Summit Superuser Awards, sponsored by Zenko. Based on the community voting, the Superuser Editorial Advisory Board will review the nominees and determine the finalists and overall winner.

Now, it’s your turn.

Telia is one of seven nominees for the Superuser Awards. Review the nomination criteria below, check out the other nominees and rate the nominees before the deadline Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

Cast your vote here!

 Who are the team members?

Telia – Aurimas Baubkus, IT products manager.

How has open infrastructure transformed the organization’s business? 

Telia became a primary advocate for OpenStack in the Baltic region after experiencing the transformative benefits of its public cloud offering. In their nine data centers, they use several integrations including VMware, Hyper-V and Citrix among others. Their extensive knowledge and first-hand experience with multiple distributors has competitively positioned the company and attracts customers who many not have considered building an OpenStack cloud. OpenStack has allowed Telia to provide infrastructure sets and new revenue streams to customers.

How has the organization participated in or contributed to an open infrastructure community? 

OpenStack is a fairly new product in the Baltic region and Telia has stepped up to be a huge advocate for building OpenStack awareness. The largest data center in Finland has over 5,000 racks, allowing perspective OpenStack users to see first-hand how powerful OpenStack is and why they should seriously consider starting their journey.

The team has extensive experience with other distributions and frequently uses first-hand examples to show tenants how OpenStack wins over other options, like VMware. Telia has taken a leadership role in the region, advising individual countries in the Baltics  how OpenStack can transform their cloud environment and reach this level of architecture. The Telia team attends the Summits and local meetups.

What open source technologies does the organization use in its IT environment?

Telia uses Open MNS, which is completely open source. Before adopting OpenStack it used the monitoring solution as well. The company is currently adopting the technology for their internal needs and has made it a main focus for 2018.

What is the scale of the OpenStack deployment? 

Telia is currently running 30 compute nodes in their environment and has plans to rapidly expand as they anticipate more customer needs.

What operational challenges have you overcome during your experience with open infrastructure? 

As any experienced OpenStack user knows, the process of adopting the platform varies for every organization. Telia was no different and ultimately had to switch distributors after a “failed” first attempt. The team started out with no experience building or managing OpenStack and heavily relied on the second distributor they hired, Red Hat, to produce a new platform that took into account the lessons learned from their first try. In the second initiative, Telia understood the importance of a strong partner, which allowed them to cater to more of their customer demands. Red Hat was able to proactively support their team and solve their human resources issue as it was a steep learning curve for everyone on their team as well as everyone else in the organization.

How is this team innovating with open infrastructure? 

At first, the Telia team was very ambitious, building a custom self-service platform platform using Swift. The second time around, it was imperative that they succeeded and the benefits were felt throughout the organization. They took the more traditional route to build a platform that was bullet-proof by avoiding any risky projects. Today, they take pride in their partnership with Red Hat and anything beyond minor bugs that their internal team can solve, they consult the Red Hat team or other distributors like Trilio who specialize in each component.

How many Certified OpenStack Administrators (COAs) are on your team?

Telia has four Certified OpenStack Administrators on their team.

Voting is limited to one ballot per person and closes Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

The post Vancouver Superuser Award Nominee: Telia appeared first on Superuser.

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It’s time for the community to help determine the winner of the OpenStack Vancouver Summit Superuser Awards, sponsored by Zenko. Based on the community voting, the Superuser Editorial Advisory Board will review the nominees and determine the finalists and overall winner.

Now, it’s your turn.

T-Mobile is one of seven nominees for the Superuser Awards. Review the nomination criteria below, check out the other nominees and rate the nominees before the deadline Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

Cast your vote here!

Please specify your team and organization for nomination. Who are the team members?

In the true spirit of supporting T-Mobile’s un-carrier efforts along with minimizing time to market and solving industry pain points around data growth, T-Mobile is deploying OpenStack-based virtual evolved packet core (EPC) so that we can continue to support large scale, consumer-facing data connectivity to devices and better prepare for upcoming 5G deployments. There are multiple OpenStack programs within T-Mobile with a mission to virtualize network functions. In this nomination, we’re presenting the largest use-case which is EPC VNF running on OpenStack. Team Leaders: Suliman Albasheir, Senthil Kaliappan, Rahul Pal, Viraj Silva, John Lazarte and Tom Browning.

How has open infrastructure transformed your business? 

T-Mobile is looking for exponential footprint growth in EPC network to serve the growing demands. OpenStack is a key component to address this demand and being used for other NFV programs. Working with OpenStack for NFV improved deployment cost and cross functional interaction among different teams. Having OpenStack as a baseline for telecom core systems helps in automation and shortens time-to-market for launching services. The T-Mobile NFV team has provided a tremendous number of improvements to the NFV implementation of EPC on OpenStack improving stability, increasing capacity and improving availability. These improvements were identified via NFV solution design, lab testing, live traffic and VNF rollouts in production network. Scale: approximately 6,000 bare-metal and VMs.

How has the organization participated in or contributed to an open infrastructure community? 

At T-Mobile, we did not contribute on code level in the past but this might change in future. We have identified numerous bugs with various vendors/partners during the solution design/validation phase and worked with partners to provide resolutions at the OpenStack level for the same. All these resolutions were identified, reported and resolved through collaborative NFV design with vendor, NFV lab testing, validation, live traffic stress testing and VNF rollouts in production network environment, thereby making deployment of telecom virtual applications more stable.

The T-Mobile NFV team has worked with many vendors and partners to excel the OpenStack integration for telco-grade NFV. Also, T-Mobile organizations have active/regular participation in OpenStack Summits.

What open source technologies does the organization use in its IT environment?

We use Ansible, Puppet, Red Hat Satellite, Zabbix, Kafka, etc. for managing life cycle but this is not an extensive list of tools that we use.

What is the scale of the OpenStack deployment? 

Our OpenStack footprint is supporting virtual EPC production traffic, with around 6,000 bare-metal servers and VMs.

What operational challenges have you overcome during your experience with open infrastructure? 

IP/NFV issues

  • Parity between EPC PNF and OpenStack based VNF.
  • Manageability of VNF from FCAPS standpoint, lengthy VNF validation process.
  • Layer2 convergence’s impact on RabbitMQ/OpenStack intra process calls.
  • Impacts on VNF state machine from: Transport link bundling design’s behavior during Spine/Leaf failover, lack of bi-directional flow detection, NIC bonding setup issues.
  • Uneven load balancing on Intel’s Chip’s hashing for SR-IOV stack.

OpenStack issues:

  • OpenStack upgrade is a key challenge.
  • Issues with OpenStack Fencing.
  • Several issues with RabbitMQ that impacted the VNF availability.
  • Issues with CEPH that caused VNF restart.
  • Ceilometer services causing the slowness in ceph cluster.
  • Issues with Galera DB availability.
  • Unstable IPMI/ STONITH network.
  • Cinder volume service failure.

How is this team innovating with open infrastructure? 

NFV use-case:
Currently T-Mobile U.S. is in the phase of deployment of mobility grade data call processing applications as a VNF within its OpenStack environment. EPC VNF is the largest use case. In this setup, IP infrastructure is still treated as PNF and the EPC application is running as a VNF within OpenStack Domain. IP infrastructure is a tag separated domain for various workstreams needed to bring up the VNF as a workload. VNF itself is a fixed workload and there is no elastic scaling in scope for this iteration. Elastic scaling is planned as future use-case.

Future workloads: 5G, IoT, Private APN, Edge computing, MVNO.

How many Certified OpenStack Administrators (COAs) are on your team?

Two people are certified as OpenStack administrators (Mirantis certification).

Voting is limited to one ballot per person and closes Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

The post Vancouver Superuser Award Nominee: T-Mobile appeared first on Superuser.

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It’s time for the community to help determine the winner of the OpenStack Vancouver Summit Superuser Awards, sponsored by Zenko. Based on the community voting, the Superuser Editorial Advisory Board will review the nominees and determine the finalists and overall winner.

Now, it’s your turn.

VEXXHOST is one of seven nominees for the Superuser Awards. Review the nomination criteria below, check out the other nominees and rate the nominees before the deadline Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

Cast your vote here!

Who is the nominee?

VEXXHOST is a leading Canadian public, private and hybrid cloud provider with an infrastructure powered by 100 percent vanilla OpenStack.

How has open infrastructure transformed your business? 

The open infrastructure of OpenStack allows VEXXHOST to speed up the delivery of new services to customers by accelerating the ability to innovate. The team can focus resources to deliver quality services without dealing with infrastructure issues which are solved by OpenStack. Every release of OpenStack has offered new features that were utilized to deliver higher performance.

How has the organization participated in or contributed to an open infrastructure community? 

VEXXHOST has been contributing to the OpenStack community since its second release in 2011. We have had a presence in the community by regularly attending OpenStack summits and being part of the interop challenge during the Boston summit. Our co-founder Mohammed Naser, who is the project team lead (PTL) for Puppet OpenStack, has given talks at Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto OpenStack meetups.

We also play a part in the community by actively contributing upstream code and sharing feedback with PTLs and developers. When we encounter bugs, we report them, diagnose them and work with the community to get a full fix in. We are active on the mailing list and provide feedback and fixes. We also contribute to the community by being a proud infrastructure donor for the OpenStack infrastructure team.

What open-source technologies does the organization use in its IT environment?

We run exclusively OpenStack services across our entire infrastructure. Our offering is fully open source without any proprietary licensed technology. Among many others, in our IT environment we use Nova with KVM with Libvirt, Ceph centralized storage, Pacemaker for high availability, MySQL Galera for database and Puppet for config management.

What’s the scale of the OpenStack deployment? 

Being a public cloud provider, we cannot disclose metrics regarding the scale of our users’ consumption. Our public cloud is able to handle several production-grade enterprise-scale workloads with private and hybrid cloud solutions delivering the same level of stability and robustness as our public cloud. Both our infrastructure and users production workloads are powered by OpenStack. OpenStack compute, network and storage are the backbones that are powering all our managed solutions.

What kind of operational challenges have you overcome during your experience with open infrastructure? 

Initially, we faced some challenges in terms of rolling upgrades as they were difficult though they have become much easier with new releases. After upgrading our infrastructure to Pike, we found a bug in the code which we reported. The developers at OpenStack were very responsive and happy to cooperate — as they always are — to help fix the bug. The bug was fixed in less than 24 hours in trunk and less than 48 hours in stable branches. This increases our trust the OpenStack CI and in turn grows our confidence in the software.

How is this team innovating with open infrastructure? 

As a public and private cloud provider, we’re heavily invested in improving and extending our list of managed services. Using OpenStack has helped us innovate in our managed services. In August 2017, we launched Kubernetes services using Magnum on the Pike release. We worked with the Magnum project team to ensure delivery of the best possible Kubernetes and OpenStack experience. VEXXHOST is currently one of the very few cloud providers to offer Magnum. OpenStack has also facilitated the delivery of big data solutions with the help of Sahara integration. We were also able to speed up the deployment of clusters with the help of transient clusters which provide huge cost savings.

How many Certified OpenStack Administrators (COAs) are on your team?

None.

 Voting is limited to one ballot per person and closes Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

The post Vancouver Superuser Awards Nominee: VEXXHOST appeared first on Superuser.

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It’s time for the community to help determine the winner of the OpenStack Vancouver Summit Superuser Awards, sponsored by Zenko. Based on the community voting, the Superuser Editorial Advisory Board will review the nominees and determine the finalists and overall winner.

Now, it’s your turn.

Wingu is one of seven nominees for the Superuser Awards. Review the nomination criteria below, check out the other nominees and rate the nominees before the deadline Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

Cast your vote here!

Please specify the team and organization for nomination. Who are the team members?

Wingu – Thomas Lee, CEO.

How has open infrastructure transformed the organization’s business? 

Wingu’s entire business is built around OpenStack. Led by Thomas Lee, an OpenStack expert and self-described enthusiast, the company was an early adopter of OpenStack and has delivered innovative solutions to its enterprise customers throughout South Africa. In the past 18 months, Wingu has grown extensively, as an OpenStack public cloud provider, delivering full OpenStack technologies with APIs immensely improving customer agility and time-to-market.

How has the organization participated in or contributed to an open infrastructure community? 

Wingu has contributed extensively to the OpenStack community across South Africa, most notably by providing OpenStack infrastructure to the local Durban Infrastructure User Group. They also provide and track code improvements through their partner, Canonical. Lee’s over 20 years of experience make him a valuable expert in this region as Wingu supports OpenStack users starting their OpenStack journeys. Wingu proactively works with vendors and partners to build an enterprise-grade platform that will deliver not only a strong public computing platform, but also the skills and services to assist customers in successfully adopting cloud technologies. Wingu has attended several OpenStack Summit events since 2014.

What open-source technologies does the organization use in its IT environment?

Wingu is an early adopter and massive OpenStack user. It uses open source software on desktop machines and tools like Alfresco for their document management platforms, native monitoring and logging tools. There are no commercial tools in their environment except for Trilio. In addition, Wingu is the project sponsor for the Tachyonic open source web framework technology, powering NVF automation and a portal front-end for a OpenStack billing platform.

What is the scale of the OpenStack deployment? 

Wingu currently is running 10 compute nodes in their environment with the capability to host over 1,920 virtual machines. The platform runs Ubuntu OpenStack with more than 100 commercial customers on the platform.

What kind of operational challenges have you overcome during your experience with open infrastructure? 

A major operational challenge for Wingu is upgrades. They have overcome scaling network environments, so they are able to build OpenStack clouds in a custom way that is extremely scalable and very fast. Wingu is focusing on how to improve rolling upgrades and is currently utilizing tools like Livepatch to make the process much easier.

How is this team innovating with open infrastructure? 

Wingu’s customer base is extremely Microsoft-centric in South Africa. With over 40 percent of its enterprise customer base using Microsoft, Wingu has put extensive efforts into ensuring OpenStack is a strong partner of these workloads. By running features like VPN as-a-service, customers are able to extend their Microsoft directory into the cloud. Wingu is doing extensive work in bringing virtual network functions such as firewall-as-a Service (IP Tables, Juniper & FortiNet), load balancer-as-a-service (HA Proxy, F5, AVI Networks) and VPN-as-a-service to public cloud customers.

How many Certified OpenStack Administrators (COAs) are on your team?

None at this time, we are working on the certification testing.

Voting is limited to one ballot per person and closes Tuesday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time Zone.

The post Vancouver Superuser Award Nominee: Wingu appeared first on Superuser.

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The 2015 OpenStack Summit Vancouver was one of my favorites. Besides the obvious beauty of the water and mountains, there’s more to this “Canadian Manhattan.” Much like the diversity of the OpenStack community, Vancouver reflects its rich past with influences from India, China, Japan as well as its sibling states in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The result is a veritable cornucopia of food and lifestyle options in the city — I like to think of Vancouver as one of those cities that personify the OpenStack project and community.

Vancouver was also my very first North American OpenStack Summit. I remember being apprehensive about meeting the people that I’d been rubbing virtual elbows with online. Even though I’d been working with OpenStack for over a year, I had never been involved with the larger OpenStack community. Suddenly, here I was in Vancouver, ready to take the plunge into a like-minded gathering of thousands of OpenStack aficionados.

Even with a year of OpenStack under my belt, I still felt like an amateur. So I sought some guidance to help me navigate the event. Some of the resources I used were published right here on Superuser (surprise!).  Articles like “Making your list and checking it twice for the OpenStack Vancouver Summit” that outlines planning, packing and arrival information for Vancouver were invaluable in preparing me for the logistics of travelling to Vancouver. Today, just like in 2015, there are already articles being published on Superuser about specific topics like,  “What’s new at the Vancouver Summit” and Must-see sessions at the Vancouver Summit that give readers some good suggestions about the general direction and even specific sessions to see.

“Wearing your 6-inch stilettos or funky pointed-toe Florsheim’s might leave you in flip flops by Tuesday”

 

Even after reading everything I could get my hands on about the summit in 2015, I remember still feeling overwhelmed by all the sessions and the registration process and deadlines. So let me give you some suggestions to help you relax and get the most out of your OpenStack Summit in Vancouver.

General tips
  • Register early. Typically there’s plenty of time to register prior to the Monday morning rush. If you’re like me, you don’t like standing in lines. Tear yourself away from snapping pics of the beautiful vistas and get that OpenStack badge early!
  • Pick your sessions in advance and adjust at the conference. Go to the Summit Schedule and choose the sessions you really want to see first, then schedule the ones you are just curious about next. Get to sessions early, some up fill fast.
  • Don’t schedule every single day with back-to-back sessions. Listen, I know you’re excited and don’t want to miss a single session, I get it. However, if you don’t schedule some downtime during the day (and no, lunch is “a” break, not “the” break), your brain will feel like butterscotch pudding by the last session and you’re not going to retain anything. Be nice to your brain.
  • Hydrate. Hydrate. Hydrate. Most conference centers do a great job of having water available in strategic areas, but a lot of times they aren’t exactly close-by. I recommend bringing a water bottle of your own and keeping it filled throughout the day. The brain needs water to function and I guarantee you’re going to be using the ol’ noodle a lot.
  • Wear comfy shoes. You’ll be walking a lot at the OpenStack Summit and afterwards. I routinely do 12-20,000 steps each day of the Summit. So if you look at your Fitbit right now you’re clocking in 3,ooo steps a day you’ll understand why wearing your 6-inch stilettos or funky pointed-toe Florsheim’s might leave you in flip flops by Tuesday.
  • Get out of your hotel room. There are plenty of parties and gatherings in the evening at every OpenStack Summit and Vancouver will be no different. Attending some of these events is a great way to see the city, plus it’s an excuse for a walk down to historic Gastown, an area chock full of eating and people-watching opportunities.
Tips for beginners
  • In the Summit Schedule, use the filter button that allows you to see only beginner sessions. I remember looking them when I was a rookie and wondering if everyone had a different definition of  “beginner.” Find some sessions that appeal to you and give them a try. If they’re too far over your head, use your mobile device to find another session and head over there. No one expects you to be an expert, the Summits are for everyone. As a primer on OpenStack, check out my Sydney session on YouTube entitled “OpenStack for Absolute Amateur” it will get you well on your way to understanding the other sessions.
  • Talk to lots of people. I made the mistake my first Summits by not getting involved in the hallway conversations. They’re the best source of what’s really going on out there and what people are doing with OpenStack.
  • Ask questions. There are some really knowledgeable people at the Summit and it’s one of the few opportunities where you’ll get them all in one place. Plus, there are lots of operators, engineers and developers in attendance so no matter what the question, someone will have the answer or will be able to point you in the right direction.
  • Get involved. There are so many ways to get involved including contributing code. There will be a lot of OpenStack Ambassadors available as well folks from the User Group community who would love to talk to you about what they’re doing in your city or town. Check out the Summit schedule for community events where you’ll run into them.
  • Is AWS your thing? No problem. If you’re coming to OpenStack from AWS or from any other cloud provider, you might enjoy my session on OpenStack for AWS Architects. It will present a Rosetta Stone approach to translating AWS products to OpenStack projects and how the two stack up.

    A view of Vancouver. Photo: Ben Silverman.
Intermediate and advanced tips
  • Expand your mind. Now that OpenStack has matured, the OpenStack Foundation is moving into some other interrelated areas. Some of these areas like edge computing, Kata containers and other open-source container technologies. I would recommend branching out to some of the sessions in these new areas, they are very exciting and on the edge (pun intended) of cloud technology.
  • Bigger and better. OpenStack at scale has always been a favorite topic at the summit. But what happens when you start combining it with hybrid and multi-cloud architectures? What about cells now that they are a mandatory part of Nova? How do container technologies play a part in this? Good news for you, there are sessions for all of those questions. Get them on your schedule now!
  • Calling all telco/NFV fans. If you’re a service provider and telco/NFV OpenStack fanboy like me, you’re going to have a great week, there are over 40 telco/NFV sessions scheduled. You can hear sessions about everything from 5G, Edge, and autoscaling, VNF service chain orchestration to Ceph in Telco clouds.

Regardless of your experience level, you must do one thing: enjoy yourself in Vancouver and relax. Admittedly my last summit in Vancouver was anything but relaxing — and I’ve always regretted my high-strung activities in such a beautiful place.

Therefore, this year, I plan on relaxing before and after my session. My wish for all attendees is that they have fun, learn as much as they can (comfortably!) and get some time to unwind and process what they’ve learned throughout the week. I’ll be there all week, so if you see me staring out the enormous windows of the convention center overlooking the water, please come over say hello.  It might just remind us both to relax and take in the beauty of this City of Glass.

About the author

Ben Silverman is the Chief Cloud Officer for OnX. He considers himself an international cloud activist, and he’s also co-author of the book “OpenStack for Architects.”  Silvernan started his OpenStack career in 2013 by designing and delivering American Express’ first OpenStack environment, worked for Mirantis as a senior architect and has been a contributing member of the OpenStack Documentation team since 2014. He’s also written for Superuser on how to get a job with OpenStack.

 

Superuser is always interested in community content, get in touch at editorATopenstack.org

Cover Photo // CC BY NC

The post Return to the City of Glass: A guide to the Vancouver OpenStack Summit appeared first on Superuser.

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Unit tests are used to verify that individual units of source code work according to a defined spec. While this may sound complicated to understand, in short it means that we try to verify that each part of our source code works as expected, without having to run the full program they belong to.

All OpenStack projects come with their own set of unit tests, for example this is the unit test folder for the oslo.config project. Those tests are executed when a new patch is proposed for review, to ensure that existing (or new) functionality is not broken with the new code. For example, if you check this review, you can see that one of the CI jobs executed is “openstack-tox-py27”, which runs unit tests using Python 2.7.

How does this translate into the packaging world? As part of a spec file, we can define a %check section, where we add scripts to test the installed code. While this is not a mandatory section in the Fedora packaging guidelines, it is highly recommended, since it provides a good assurance that the code packaged is correct.

In many cases, RDO packages include this %check section in their specs, and the project’s unit tests are executed when the package is built. This is an example of the unit tests executed for the python-oslo-utils package.

“But why are these tests executed again when packaging?”, you may ask. After all, these same tests are executed by the Zuul gate before being merged. Well, there are quite a few reasons for this:

  • Those unit tests were run with a specific operating system version and a specific package set. Those are probably different from the ones used by RDO, so we need to ensure the project compatibility with those components.
  • The project dependencies are installed in the OpenStack gate using pip, and some versions may differ. This is because OpenStack projects support a range of versions for each dependency, but usually only test with one version. We have seen cases where a project stated support for version x.0 of a library, but then added code that required version x.1. This change would not be noticed by the OpenStack gate, but it would make unit tests fail while packaging.
  • They also allow us to detect issues before they happen in the upstream gate. OpenStack projects use the requirements project to decide which version of their own libraries should be used by other projects. This allows for some inter-dependency issues, where a change in an Oslo library may uncover a bug in another project, but it is not noticed until the requirements project is updated with a new version of the Oslo library. In the RDO case, we run an RDO Trunk builder using code from the master branch in all projects, which allows us to notify in advance, like in this example bug.
  • They give us an early warning when new dependencies have been added to a project, but they are not in the package spec yet. Since unit tests exercise most of the code, any missing dependency should make them fail.

Due to the way unit tests are executed during a package build, there are some details to keep in mind when defining them. If you as a developer follow them, you will make packagers’ life easier:

  • Do not create unit tests that depend on resources available from the Internet. Most packaging environments do not allow Internet access while the package is being built, so a unit test that depends on resolving an IP address via DNS will fail.

  • Try to keep unit test runtime within reasonable limits. If unit tests for a project take 1 hour to complete, it is likely they will not be executed during packaging, such as here.

  • Do not assume that unit tests will always be executed on a machine with 8 fast cores. We have seen cases of unit tests failing when run on a limited environment or when it takes them more than a certain time to finish.

Now that you know the importance of unit tests for RDO packaging, you can go ahead and make sure we use it on every package. Happy hacking!

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