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Let me share this unique recipe from Filipino food advocate, author and restaurateur Amy Besa at The Maya Kitchen cooking demo. Amy Besa relates the origins of Kulawong Talong.

“My first introduction to the concept of a kulawo was in 2003, when I visited Ugu Bigyan’s home and pottery studio in Tiaong, Quezon. Visitors could call ahead and arrange to have lunch in one of his beautiful gazebos, where they would savor his signature dish, the banana-heart kulawo.

In Laguna, a neighboring province north of Quezon, it is the kulawong talong that stirs many nostalgic food memories among the locals. Both versions are tart because vinegar, instead of water, is used to extract the milk from freshly grated coconut singed with a hot coal. Interestingly, if one travels further south, the Bicolanos’ burnt coconut cream is not vinegary at all, since water is used as the prime medium of extraction.

The use of burnt coconut cream has been one of my most treasured discoveries in Philippine cooking, and I have never stopped wondering why I never encountered this while growing up in Manila, which is just a two-hour drive from Laguna and Quezon.

We would like to thank Nicholetta Labellachitarra, a Filipino chef working in Boston, who shared her memory of this dish —grilled eggplant with burnt coconut cream—with Romy, inspiring him to create a version of his own.”

Try cooking Kulawong Talong:

Burnt Coconut Cream:

Makes 2 to 3 cups

Two 16-ounce packages frozen grated coconut
1 cup coconut sap or rice vinegar
2 cups canned coconut milk
5 cloves garlic, peeled
One 1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced
2 shallots, peeled and sliced
2–3 bird’s-eye chiles (optional)

Grilled Chinese Eggplant:
8 Chinese eggplants
Sea salt, to taste

1. Preheat the oven to 400° F. Defrost the coconut and mix with the coconut sap or rice vinegar, kneading to extract as much cream from the coconut as possible. Wrap the coconut-vinegar mixture in cheesecloth and squeeze the coconut milk into a bowl until all the milk has been extracted (this should yield approximately 21/2 cups of liquid). Set the extracted coconut milk aside.

2. Spread the squeezed, grated coconut evenly on a baking sheet and bake, stirring every 15 minutes, until it is dark brown, about 50 minutes. Turn on the broiler, and place the baking sheet under it for another 5 to 10 minutes to slightly char the coconut—but be careful not to burn it too much.

3. In a saucepan, combine the extracted coconut milk, half of the pan of burnt coconut, the canned coconut milk, garlic, ginger, shallots, and chiles, if using. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and allow the mixture to simmer for 10 minutes. Strain through a very fine-mesh sieve, using the back of a big spoon to squeeze out as much liquid as you can. Return the liquid to the saucepan and keep warm while grilling the eggplant.

4. Place the eggplants on a stovetop grill or under a broiler and cook until the skin is charred and the interior is soft. When just cool enough to handle, peel the eggplants and use a fork to spread and flatten the flesh a little. Season to taste with sea salt.

5. Arrange the eggplants on a dish and pour the warm burnt coconut cream over them.

S e r v e s 8

The post Kulawong Talong: grilled eggplant with burnt coconut cream appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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When I think of Chicken Macaroni salad, I remember myself as a teenager, assigned by mom as the salad maker. This is such a childhood memory. I stopped preparing Chicken Macaroni salad when I became a mother , simply because I thought my kids and my husband would not like it. It is so old-school. A few years ago, I decided to bring it back to the table when I had a lot of left-over turkey. Well, turkey is not exactly like Chicken but it surely tastes like one. To my surprise, my husband loved it so much . He said it reminded him also of his childhood. His mother also prepared Chicken Macaroni salad. See, it is such a classic. This Christmas, I prepared Chicken Macaroni Salad. It was such a hit that it soon got consumed by family members and relatives. You can also serve this during fiestas, parties and picnics, either as snack or main dish.

Chicken macaroni salad is so easy to prepare. Salt, pepper will depend on your taste. You can also use different types of short pasta.

Ingredients

400 grams salad macaroni, cooked (check package for cooking instructions)
1 kilo boneless chicken breast, boiled and cubed
1 1/2 cup pineapple tidbits, drained
1 1/2 cup Queso de bola, cubed
1 cup pickle relish
1 cup diced carrots, previously boiled
2 cups mayonnaise (you can also use reduced fat mayonnaise)
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon white pepper
1 teaspoon salt


Directions

1. Boil the salad macaroni as directed in the package

2. Place the macaroni in a large mixing bowl.

3. Add the carrots, pickle relish, diced queso de bola and pineapple tidbits. Mix well.

4. Lastly, add the diced chicken and mix well.

5. Mix the mayonnaise into the mixture.

6. Add garlic powder, salt and pepper to taste

7. Chill.

The post Pinoy Chicken Macaroni salad appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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Wikipedia says that Arroz a la cubana, means Cuban-style rice. Maybe the Philippines version came from our Spanish ancestors. The Philippine version consists of rice; ground beef sauteed with onions, garlic, tomato sauce, diced potatoes and diced carrots; a fried egg and a native plantain (saba), sliced length-wise and fried. I love dishes with anything that contains “saba” so here is a simple recipe I want to share with you.

1/2 cup ground pork
1/2 cup ground beef
1/4 cup raisins
2 cloves garlic
1/4 cup onion , sliced
1/3 cup tomatoes, sliced
4 saba bananas
salt and pepper to taste
cooked rice
eggs

1. Saute garlic in oil. Add onions, tomatoes, and when soft, add the ground pork and ground beef.

2. Cook covered until meats are done.

3. Add raisins and cook a while longer. Season to taste.

4. Peel bananas and slice lengthwise. Fry in a little cooking oil.

5. Arrange hot rice on individual platters and spoon meat mixture on top.

6. Arrange fried bananas around rice. Just before serving, fry eggs and top dish with one egg.

The post Arroz a la Cubana appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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I always prepare my basic pork adobo recipe whenever my husband and I travel to visit our coffee farm 10 hours away.  As you might know, adobo keeps well and is best served after a day.  Now, there are 101 ways of cooking adobo and we all have our own recipe. I am sharing this recipe because others who have never cooked adobo just want to know how to prepare it the basic way. This is mine and I leave you some tips so you can adjust to your preference.

Here are my ingredients
  • 1 kilo pork belly, cubed (Pork Liempo is best, tastiest and is better with skin-on. When cooked, becomes sticky and gelatin-y and helps thicken the sauce gloriously.)
  • 1/3 cup Marca Piña soy sauce ( this can be reduced to 2-4 tablespoons if you need to add salt in the end)
  • 1/2 cup Marca Piña vinegar
  • 1 1/2 cup water or beef broth
  • 1 ½ teaspoons whole peppercorn (Crush peppercorn at the last minute to retain its aroma.)
  • 2-3 pieces dried bay leaves  (1 medium-sized laurel leaf can add flavor and aroma to 1/2 kilo meat. If you have the chance, use fresh laurel leaves)
  • 8 cloves garlic, crushed (Crush only when about to be used)
  • 1 chopped onions
  • 4 tablespoons cooking oil
  • salt to taste (If you add salt, reduce soy sauce proportion to 2 -4 tablespoons)

(Optional: Mix with liver spread or mashed liver. Broiling or roasting liver over coal adds a nutty flavor. I did not add it in my adobo because my husband cannot take liver in his diet)

Procedure
In cooking adobo, the tip here is to cook the  meat in low fire from start to finish (till the meat is tender) and sauce is reduced [Cook uncovered in the last 10 minutes]

The usual ratios are

  • 1 kilo meat (chicken or pork): 1/2 cup native vinegar (reduce accordingly to acidity of vinegar).
  • 1 kilo meat (chicken or pork): 1/2 cup vinegar: 1/4 cup water
  • Soy sauce can range from 2 tablespoon to 4 tablespoon per 1/2 cup vinegar
  • 1 kilo meat: 1/2 cup vinegar or acid: 1/2 tablespoon coarse salt
  • 2-4 tablespoon soy sauce: 5- 10 peppercorns: 1 laurel leaf

Let’s start cooking

  1. Heat the oil in a cooking pot.
  2. Add the garlic. Saute until light brown . Then add onions. Not many people like to add onions but I like the sweetish taste of the onions in my adobo
  3. Put the pork belly in the pot. Stir and cook until it turns light brown.
  4. Add the soy sauce and water to the pot. Let boil. Cover and cook in low heat for 30 minutes or reduce until the pork is tender. Add more water if the  liquid starts to evaporate too much. The amount of sauce depends on how you want your adobo to look like. I prefer mine to have little sauce.
  5. Pour-in the Marca Piña vinegar and comtinue to boil. Mix and cook for 10 more minutes. Do not stir vinegar till it has cooked. That is, when all the acid has evaporated. Your nose will tell.
  6.  Taste your adobo if it needs more salt. I find that the Marca Piña soy sauce has adequate salt already. But just add a pinch of salt as it  helps balance the acidity.

In summary, here is how adobo is made:

The “Flow Chart” of Cooking Adobo

Marinate –> braise–> simmer –> tenderize –> fry –> reduce –> keep for a day –> serve!

The post Look: my basic adobo recipe with cooking tips appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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I am familiar with Locavore, because its first branch at Kapitolyo, Pasig is so near home. Locavore is best known for introducing Filipino food to diners who grew up with familiar flavors of homecooking. My husband and I recently visited the S Maison branch at the Conrad Manila to taste the new additions to the menu exclusively created by Chef Mikel for this Locavore location.

These are the following:

Pinipig- Cereal Sugpo (Jumbo black tiger prawns, salted egg floss, wansoy, smashed saba, radish pancit) on the upper right of the photo)

Roasted Tocino Asado (Tocino style roasted pork tenderloin asado, romaine taco, smashed saba, Dijon mustard, reduced Tocino glaze, radish pancit)

Halabos na Suahe with Kelly sauce (steamed live suahe, awesome Kelly sauce, radish pancit), 

Soft-shell Crab Negra with Alavar Sauce (Soft shell crab tempura, squid ink batter, alavar sauce, chimichurri sauce, labuyo aioli, edamame, smashed saba, radish pancit).

I am planning to bring my balikbayan sister here when she visits next month. Well, the new menu times are also intended to the families holding their regular gatherings and the expats who want to enjoy good food inspired by local dishes made with sustainable, locally-sourced components.

“With these dishes, we are keeping the identity of Locavore where we are offering something different and yet familiar. These may be inspired by food from other countries, like in the case of the Pinipig Cereal Sugpo, which is derived from the Cereal Prawn, but here we use Itlog na Maalat,” the chef explains.  “The dishes we are bringing in are meant to be our piece de resistance at large family gatherings, because in our culture, the piece de resistance is usually seafood.”

It’s good to know that the seafood used for these exclusive menu are sourced from places such as Palawan.  Now this is sustainability by elevating Filipino flavors by using locally grown ingredients.

With Locavore promoting sustainable dining, this helps  support and empower farmers where rural communities financially benefit; safer farming practices are encouraged, and the food industry as a whole gains access to fresher and better quality ingredients; and ultimately, diners are served healthier and more delicious fare.

I just love their other regular dishes like the Sizzling Sinigang and Lechon and Oyster sisig. They go well together.

This is our favorite sinigang dish but with an innovative way of preparing it. The same sourness is there but instead of a soup, it is served like a stew. A must try.

This Lechon and Oyster sisig is my husband’s favorite. He nearly finished the whole platter. The sauce was amazing.

The street platter containing Fish balls,  Squid ,  Kikiam, Kwek-kwek with  Manong’s Sauce , Sweet Chili  and Honey Vinegar is so appetizing. The colors in itself make me want to devour the whole platter.

You should visit  the new Locavore branch at the ground floor of the S Maison at the Conrad, and try the new and usual menu fare. For more information, visit http://www.locavore.ph/.

Some  dishes to try:

Boneless Lechon belly

Sugpo con Mayonesa

Torta Alimasag

Grillied Tocilog

Grilled Bistek

Duck Lugaw

Crispy Corned beef

Champorado ni Speedy

The post Locavore introduces a new way of enjoying Filipino food appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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Pinoy Food | Free Filipino Food Recipes by Noemi Lardizabal-dado - 1y ago

Don’t you just love hot soup during the cold rainy days? Here is a new twist on Japanese cooking – Bulalo Ramen or Beef Shank And Marrow Bone Stew With Japanese Ramen Noodles. It was Chef Seiji Kamura who gave a demo on his new take of Japanese dishes at The Maya Kitchen Elite Culinary Series. The recipe is easy even for beginners.

Soup Stock:
2.5 kilos beef bones (bulalo or osso bucco cut)
200 grams white onions
150 grams carrots, quartered
150 grams garlic
100 grams sliced ginger
5 liters water
2 tablespoons salt to taste

4 packs ramen (boiled for 3 minutes)
4 pieces boiled eggs

Topping:
60 grams pechay tagalog, blanched
120 grams whole corn
80 grams fried garlic

Mariner sauce:
150 ml soy sauce
60 ml sake
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar

1. Boil together ingredients for soup stock for 3-5 hours or until meat is tender. Strain and set aside.
2. To serve: Remove meat from soup stock bones and marinate the meats in the mariner’s sauce. Pour soup stock and season with pepper. Add in boiled ramen. Top with pechay tagalog, whole corn and salt.

The post Bulalo Ramen appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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Meghan Markle, now the Duchess of Sussex is very much in the news these days but one thing she is known for is her being a successful lifestyle blogger. Meghan can also cook. Her idea of Chicken Adobo is this:

Chicken adobo
I am a big fan of Sunday suppers. Whether we’re eating lamb tagine, pot roast or a hearty soup, the idea of gathering for a hearty meal with friends and family on a Sunday makes me feel comforted. I enjoy making slow-cooked food on Sundays, like Filipino-style chicken adobo. It’s so easy—combine garlic, soy (or Bragg Liquid Aminos), vinegar, maybe some lemon and let the chicken swim in that sauce until it falls off the bone in a Crock Pot. I have a beautiful Le Creuset that could also do the trick, but the Sunday supper “Americana” of it all calls for a Crock Pot. Set it and forget it and serve with brown rice and salad.

My daughter recently whipped up the chicken adobo recipe that Meghan Markle uses.

Remember, there are 101 ways to cook adobo but there are remarkable recipes to remember. What struck me with this adobo is the sweetish taste, that is attributed to the caramelized onions. Normally, I just put lots of garlic. Below is the original recipe which I got online and I will put the modification in brackets:

Ingredients:
2 tbsp vegetable oil
3-pound chicken cut into pieces
1 large sliced onion
2 tbsp minced garlic
1/3 cup white vinegar
2/3 cups soy sauce
1 tbsp garlic powder
1 tbsp black pepper
1 Bay Leaf

Instructions:

1. Heat the oil in a large skillet on a medium flame.
2. Add the chicken pieces and cook until golden brown in color.
3. Remove the chicken and add onions and garlic to oil.
4. Cook till the onions are brown.
5. Add vinegar, soy sauce, garlic powder, black pepper, and bay leaf. [added more soy sauce and vinegar]
6. Add the chicken and turn the flame to high and bring the mixture to a boil.
7. Reduce the flame to medium-low, cover the pan and let the dish simmer for about 40 minutes or till the chicken is tender. [slow cooking for one hour]

The post Meghan Markle Chicken Adobo appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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Menudo has been a mainstay in any Filipino dinner table. This rich dish of cubed pork, liver, potatoes, with a tomato base comes in as many variations as there are ingredients available to the adventurous cook. I am sure each of us have different way of cooking menudo. Chef Jill Sandique shares two exceptional versions of Menudo, by using with my favorite sauce Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce to add more zest to these Menudo dishes.

So here are two versions, the Everyday Menudo and Fiesta Menudo. The Fiesta Menudo is ideal to cook for parties when you want to prepare something more elaborate. Get ready to prepare a bunch of ingredients for Fiesta Menudo.

Everyday Menudo

INGREDIENTS:

500 grams pork kasim or pigue, washed and drained
250 grams pork liver, washed and drained
1½ teaspoons Lea and Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
1½ teaspoons calamansi juice
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
3 tablespoons cooking oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 medium-sized tomatoes, chopped
1 small red bell pepper, diced
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon patis, optional
2 ½ cups water
2 small potatoes, peeled and cubed
1 small can green peas, drained (about 155 grams)
salt and ground black pepper, to taste
sugar, optional


PROCEDURE:

1. Cut pork kasim (or pigue) and liver into ¾-inch cubes. Place in a bowl and add the Lea and Perrins Worcestershire Sauce, calamansi juice and black pepper. Set aside for a few minutes.

2. Pour the cooking oil into a sauté pan or wok. Place pan over medium-high heat then sauté the onion until transparent. Add the garlic and cook until aromatic. Add the tomatoes and sauté for another 3 to 5 minutes.

3. Stir in the pork kasim (or pigue) and liver. Cook until lightly browned. Add the red bell pepper, soy sauce and patis, if desired. Saute for 2 to 3 minutes then add the water. Bring to a boil then lower heat to a simmer. Cook until meat is tender. Add the potatoes and simmer until done. Stir in the green peas. Season with salt, black pepper and sugar, if desired. Serve hot.

Yield: 3 to 4 servings

Fiesta Menudo

INGREDIENTS:

500 grams pork kasim or pigue, washed and drained
250 grams pork liver, washed and drained
1 tablespoon Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
2 teaspoons calamansi juice
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 small potatoes, peeled and cubed
cooking oil, for frying potatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 medium-sized tomatoes, chopped
1 small red bell pepper, diced
1 piece chorizo Bilbao, sliced
1 teaspoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons patis
2 tablespoons liquid from sweet pickles
1 teaspoon annatto/atsuete powder
2 ½ cups water
1 small carrot, peeled and cubed
1 small can garbanzos, drained (about 225 grams)
1 small can green peas, drained (about 155 grams)
1 small can Vienna sausage, sliced (about 230 grams)
2 pieces whole sweet pickles, cubed
1 small box raisins (about 30 grams)
salt and ground black pepper, to taste
sugar, optional

PROCEDURE:

1. Cut pork kasim (or pigue) and liver into ¾-inch cubes. Place in a bowl and add the Lea and Perrins Worcestershire Sauce, calamansi juice and black pepper. Set aside for a few minutes.

2. Cook potatoes in hot oil until golden brown. Set aside.

3. Meanwhile, pour olive oil into a sauté pan or wok. Place pan over medium-high heat then sauté the onion until transparent. Add the garlic and cook until aromatic. Add the tomatoes and sauté for another 3 to 5 minutes.

4. Stir in the pork kasim (or pigue) and liver. Cook until lightly browned. Add the red bell pepper, chorizo Bilbao, soy sauce, patis, and pickling liquid. Saute for 2 to 3 minutes.

5. In a small bowl, dissolve the annatto/atsuete powder in water. Add to meat mixture and bring to a boil. Lower heat to a simmer and cook until meat is tender. Add the carrot and simmer until done. Add the rest of the ingredients and season with salt, black pepper and sugar. Cook for 2 minutes then toss in the fried potatoes. Serve hot.

Yield: 5 to 6 servings

The post Two Delectable Ways with Menudo appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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I am not too fond of deep fried foods so whenever I cook this, I use Olive oil which is the healthier oil. I love dipping it though with vinegar and garlic sauce. I will show you two ways to prepare Lumpia Ubod, the fried and fresh lumpia version.

Ubod Mixture
2 kilos ubod (coconut heart) cut in shoestring manner, boiled and drained
2 cloves of garlic, crushed
1 onion, chopped
1/2 kilo shrimps, shelled and sliced in small portions
2 Tablespoons patis (thin sauce)
1/2 kilo boiled pork cut into think strips
salt and pepper to taste
3 pieces Green beans, sliced (optional for accent)
1 piece carrots, sliced(optional for accent)
Lettuce for the fresh lumpia version

Procedure for Ubod Mixture

1. Saute garlic and onion in very little oil in the saucepan.

2. Add the shrimps and patis until the fishy taste is gone.

3. Add the pork and bring to a boil.

4. Season with salt and pepper.

5. Add the ubod and cook until tender.

6. Wrap ubod mixture in lumpia wrapper

  • if fried, you can buy ready made wrapper at the supermarket. Tuck in green beans and carrots in between the ubod mixture. Deep fry and serve with vinegar-garlic mixture
  • If fresh lumpia, Wrap Ubod mixture in lumpia wrapper (see recipe below) with a piece of lettuce inside. Serve with sauce (recipe below)

Lumpia wrapper

2 whole eggs
2 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 cup cornstarch
1 1/2 cups water
1/2 teaspoon salt

1. Beat eggs until thick then add oil.

2. Mix in alternating with cornstarch and water. Season with salt.

3. Heat little oil in a teflon pan before using to prevent sticking.

4. When oil is hot, line the bottom of the pan with thin layer of batter and cook until wrapper can be easily taken off the pan. Tilt the pain to spread the batter evenly.

Yield is 12 pieces so make 3 recipes to wrap the above ubod mixture

Sauce
1 cup sugar
3 cups water
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons cornstarch
1 1/2 teaspoon salt

Melt sugar in a saucepan using low heat. In a bowl, mix a little water, soy sauce, cornstarch and salt and mix until it comes out into a smooth paste. Add all the water to this paste. Pour this mixture in the saucepan of melted sugar. Stir until thick

The post Two versions of Lumpiang Ubod appeared first on Pinoy Food Recipes.

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