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The PHSC hosts the BIG ONE

Toronto. Some things change, some don’t! We have held the spring fair for over 40 years now. Come on down to the Trident Hall in south Etobicoke (south-west Toronto to visitors) and see what you can add to your personal collection – or add to your user gear too.

Click on the icon at left for full details (members already got this info with a copy of Photographic Canadiana, issue 45-1).

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Nagel Recomar c1930 courtesy of The Living Image Vintage Camera Museum

Toronto. In the 1970s while living in Montreal, I saw a newspaper ad and went off one weekend to the English enclave of Montreal West to look at a Kodak 3A autographic folder. The camera complete with case cost $25. For another $10, the old chap threw in a strange looking folder that used glass plates or cut film. It was a technical camera called a Recomar  and made by a company called Nagel Werkes. Eventually I donated both to the PHSC for an auction. (Ironically I once had an uncle by the name August Nagel – not the same person.)

I later discovered that August Nagel and an associate formed a company which became part of Zeiss-Ikon. Nagel was a camera designer. He split from Zeiss after Zeiss-Ikon was created and formed his own company in Stuttgart making some small cameras including the Recomar. When the minicam revolution hit in the 1930s, Kodak bought the Nagel Werkes to form Kodak AG. Kodak went on the make Recomars and the first versions of the Retina in the Stuttgart factory.

Nagel is perhaps best known for designing the original Kodak 135 35mm film cassette which quickly became the industry standard, fitting almost all 35mm cameras.

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Satchmo in his bathroom 1971

Toronto. Check out the exhibition at the Galerie GADCOLLECTION in Paris.

The exhibition of prints by American photographer Ormond Gigli runs from April 18 to May 21.

Time is going fast, so take a look tout suite and see what fits your print collection.

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Camera at the OCCS auction and trade show May 17, 18.

Toronto. The Ohio Camera Collector’s Society across the lake in Columbus, Ohio are a small dedicated group of enthusiastic collectors. Drop in at the Embassy Suites next Friday, May 17th  to preview the auction items (noon) and participate in the auction starting at 1:00 pm.

Opening speaker, Retina expert Dr David Jentz. begins his talk at 8:00pm. Dr Jentz spoke the the PHSC in Toronto way back in May, 1997.

The following day, Saturday May 18th, the trade show begins at 9:00am (set up at 7:00am). See the above Embassy link for details.

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Dachshunds c1930s by Ivan Dmitri

Toronto. The title is from a song Irving Berlin wrote for the 1946 Broadway musical “Annie Get Your Gun” The ditty epitomizes that spunky minicam of the 1930s. The big challenge for the marketeers was to convince professionals that indeed the fashionable little cameras could do a professional job matching the bigger cameras favoured by the photographers of the time.

The most exciting camera of that period was the tiny Leica which touted small negative – big photograph. A popular American book on using the camera was Morgan and Lester’s Leica Manual. Morgan, who worked at Leitz NY made many well designed accessories for the little camera rapidly expanding its capabilities.

The Leica Manual had a decades long run from pre war to post war. The manual was divided into chapters. In the earlier editions, various chapters were written by people who were expert in the field and in applying the camera to that field. Part I was called Basic Leica Technique and had chapters showing how to use the camera and its accessories practically to create professional photographs. Part II covered chapters on Leica in Science and Technology while Part III was called The Leica in Specialized Fields.

In most chapters the reader was shown how the Leica could be used instead of a larger traditional camera to create even better photographs.

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Sir Sydney Smith

Toronto. Sir Sydney Smith was born in New Zealand in 1883. He left for Edinburgh to become a doctor and ultimately held a prestigious chair in medicine at Edinburgh University. He was a well travelled author who wrote many books and articles including the text-book Forensic Medicine first published in 1925.

While Sir Sydney was both an author and educator in Britain and abroad, his skills were often called upon by the police and the courts. In his autobiography he uses many police scene of crime photographs to illustrate his text.

Modern day police organizations are major users of photography to record events and scenes and to capture the details of a crime. In January, 2007, we had the pleasure of hearing from Larry O’Grady on “The History and Applications of Photography in the Toronto Police Service“. Larry’s talk included some photographs that were deemed in appropriate for publication on the web for various reasons. So while the basis for photographs is often forensic medicine, the actual photography belongs to the police and is used in the courts to demonstrate key points on any criminal case.

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Left c1985 post op x-ray of a partial nephrectomy. Right c2019 pre op x-ray of hip joint surgery

Toronto. With media speed improvements, photography became a tool as well as an art. Many industries employed the technology to provide diagnosis, records, and text books.

Nevertheless, one of the earliest examples was a daguerreotype taken in an operating theatre in Boston in the 1840s showing ether being applied to a pre-surgery patient. For us simple folk, x-rays – usually dental – are the most common.  In fact Kodak made film of many sizes just for x-ray use. Modern day practice significantly reduces the amount of x-ray energy required to make a usable image. My dentist uses digital technology making sharp computer images almost instantly with a far lower dosage of radiation.

As cameras evolved, many doctors chose to use photography in their every-day practice of medicine whether eyes, feet, hands, skin, or any other specialty.

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War and Home

NEXT MEETING: Wed May 15th, 2019
Photography, War and Alternative Narratives – Louie Palu. Louie discusses his experiences as a war photographer. Click the PHSC News page 2 icon attached at left for details.

The Golden Age of Super 8 and the Humble Home Movie – Terry Lagler. Terry is a film archivist and collector of films. See a sample of Terry’s collection at the May PHSC meeting.

Come on out and share an interesting evening with Louie and Terry. The public is welcome.  Go to our Programs page for times and directions.

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Floating Flora (Japan)

Toronto. Editor Sonja Pushchak has released volume 19-1 of her epic newsletter.

Page 1 features “Floating Flora” – 1896 photographs from collotype photographer Ogawa Kazumasa. Page 2 covers or program of speakers for this month.

Following this are pages covering Exposure Secrets, our Spring Fair, Equipment Review (4×5 film from a Florida trip), Photographer Carrie Weems and this year’s CONTACT, Web Links, and more.

Click here or the icon at left to read and print this attractive 10 page issue – and don’t forget to read Vi and Dot’s column on the “3 Horsemen of Photography”!.

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Dr Robert Wilson, 2011
by Bob Lansdale

Toronto My good friend and fellow PHSC member Bob Wilson passed away late Tuesday this week.  Bob joined the PHSC in 1977 after coming to Toronto. Prior to coming here, Bob worked out west as a geologist in the Oil Industry.

I met Bob when he was membership secretary and wanted to convert the PHSC membership list to a computerized version. My company had recently bought a TRS-80 from Radio Shack so we experimented on that system. Some month’s later I transferred to our data centre out in Don Mills and Bob took back the PHSC’s 8 inch floppy disk plus a paper copy of the membership records.

Bob became our membership secretary the summer of 1982 through April 1989 when the post was held briefly by Phil Berkowicz until I took it over November 1989. Bob went on to be the PHSC president for 1997-99.  And in 1997, he also earned an Honourary Award for his contribution to photographic history. He continued to monitor and advise on government forms, PHSC by-laws, PHSC elections, etc. He was an expert on books, stereo, and images. Until very recently he did the Photographic Canadiana  journal sorting and distribution for domestic addresses.

Bob managed the record keeping at our auctions and was a regular at the society fairs with his large selection of books. He and May even contributed to the Toronto meetings for many years by managing the monthly refreshments.

In later executive meetings, he wrote and kept the meeting minutes, back-up procedures, etc. as well as contributing his wisdom to assess the value of some image and equipment donations. His ideas helped to improve our society. Bob wrote a photographic historical text on Benjamin Baltzly plus a great many journal articles.

Bob was a quiet but important part of the PHSC with his broad knowledge and skills. I will post funeral and celebration of life arrangements as they become known.

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