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“What a blessing it is to love books as I love them;- to be able to converse with the dead, and to live amidst the unreal!” 
― Thomas Babington Macaulay

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Filmmaking Is Like Combat: Boredom, Panic & Terror – Filmmaking

Why Artists Are Exploited So Often – KQED

The Photographer Using Softness to Challenge Hatred – I-D

Unreal People, Unreal Settings, Real Moments – Washington Post

I Built My Darkroom for Under $500 – Emulsive

Photographers on Rule Breaking – Don’t Take Pictures

Check Out My Experimental Photo Apparatus – Niklas Roy

The New Mother of Indie Cinema – Huck

Taking Big Risks on a Photo Book – PDN

Shaft? We’re Talking About Gordon Parks – New York Times

The Photographer Fighting Visual Cliches of Africa – The Atlantic

The Social Media Metrics That Really Matter – Rangefinder

Impossible Photography Transforming the Ordinary World – My Modern Met

How the Creative Brain Is Different – Scientific American

5 Ways GoPro Can Bounce Back – Digital Rev

Two Views from the Same Side – Drool

Is It Possible to Be Authentic In Front of the Lens – British Journal of Photography

The 1970s Polaroids of Studio 54 – AnOther

Between Bar Fights & Booty Shakes – San Antonio Chronicle

20 Photographers from a Decade of Lens – New York Times

The Photographer Exploring Sex & Gender Taboos – Roads & Kingdoms

Partner Post: How the Camera Shapes My Life

Tech: The Lenny Kravitz Leica | Fujifilm’s 100MP Monster

More Reads: Great Weekend Reads for Wedding & Portrait Photographers

Deals: Canon Holiday Savings: Lenses, Free Grips & More!

**** Watch

Two artists alarmed by climate change, tackle the challenge of public awareness through imagery of fire and ice.

Artists harness the power of fire and ice to shape attitudes on climate change - YouTube

The post Great Weekend Reads in Photography & Filmmaking appeared first on PDNPulse.

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In addition to launching a special edition Leica M Monochrome, the musician Lenny Kravitz is also exhibiting some of his photographic work at the Leica Gallery in Wetzlar, Germany.

Leica has released a selection of the work so you can take a look for yourself from the comfort of wherever it is you are at the moment.

The photo series, which is on display now, was inspired by Kravitz’s nomadic lifestyle. It features “intimate portraits, laconic snapshots, carefully observed scenes from the street and well-composed moments in hotel rooms, all captured during his time on the road,” according to Leica.

BAHAMIAN LOVE © Lenny Kravitz LOLA © Lenny Kravitz Seeing a Man About a Horse © Lenny Kravitz TROMBONE SHORTY ON PHONE © Lenny Kravitz STRUT © Lenny Kravitz YASS DAN IS BURNING © Lenny Kravitz

The post Here’s a Selection of Lenny Kravitz’s Photography appeared first on PDNPulse.

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When advertising and editorial clients meet in person with photographers, they want information they can’t learn from viewing a photographer’s website or Instagram feed, as we explain in our recent story “You Got a Meeting with a Client. Now What Do You Do?” To make the most of those meetings, photographers should prepare what they want to say about their work and how they shoot.

Advertising photographer Caleb Kuhl showed Jennifer Lamping, senior art producer at RPA in Los Angeles, a memorable portfolio with a bright yellow cover. Kuhl says that when he meets with an art producer, he explains some of the technical or logistical challenges of a particular photo. “I try to drop that bug in their ear that I can do that, that I understand production and I’m not just some dude with an iPhone on Instagram,” he says. When ad agency art directors or art buyers flip through his book and “come across a particularly difficult shot, or something that took three assistants, I can talk about that process. I can educate them about what went into it: Here’s the technical aspect.”

He adds that he often has to show his book to several ad agency creatives and account managers at a time in a conference room. He has learned he can’t wait until they ask him questions before he speaks. “They don’t necessarily ask or want to know. You have to take the opportunity to present yourself.”

Lamping affirms Kuhl’s strategy. “If you come in and you’re quiet and you don’t really talk much and you have to get prompted with questions to say anything, or if you don’t seem very flexible or interested in being there, that conveys a lot that doesn’t make you want to work with that person.”

See the full story for more insight about what clients are looking for when they meet face-to-face with photographers.

Related:

Landing Ad Jobs in Today’s Market

What Photo Editors Want from Photographers Now

Art Producing Across Platforms: Landing Work with Creative Agency RP

Quick Tip: Dana Scruggs on How to Get Clients and Assignments

Quick Tip: Y&R Art Producer Kaia Hemming’s Advice for Landing Advertising Work

The post Quick Tip: Showing Your Portfolio? Speak Up about It appeared first on PDNPulse.

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Street photography is just about as old as photography itself.

In this video, Guy Jones compiles a collection of street images taken from 1838 through 2019 and pairs them with the music of the age. It’s journey that illuminates the photographic styles, personal fashions and urban evolutions around the globe.

1838-2019: Street Photography - A Photo For Every Year - YouTube

Don’t Miss: Photographers on What ‘Street Photography’ Means to Them

How Street Photographers Do Their Work

The post Take a Street Photography Journey from 1838-2019 appeared first on PDNPulse.

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“I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train.” 
― Oscar Wilde

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The Microbiologist Who Can Spot Fake Images – PhotoShelter

The Enduring Legacy of Frederick Douglass – Aperture

20 Rising Female Photojournalists – Artsy

Have We Finally Fixed Photography’s Gender Imbalance? – Independent

On Making It in a Male-Dominated Industry – GirlTalkHQ

Video Marketing Tips to Build Your Photo Brand – Rangefinder

Bringing the Female Gaze to Advertising – Quartz

The Creepy Robot Photos Shot Like Humans – Fast Company

What Are Memes & Instagram Doing to Photography? – Artnet

Why Photographers Should Pivot to LinkedIn – DIY Photography

You Can’t Be Sure That Video Is Real Anymore – USA Today

Sony Tips Hand Toward Camera of the Future – PDN

The Social Movement Photography of David Bacon in Iraq – Progressive

How Wet Plate Photography Erased a Cultural Tradition – Hyperallergic

Set Photog on ‘Game of Thrones’ on Her Favorite Images – BuzzFeed

Snapchat Has Become a Creation Tool for Instagram – The Verge

A Beginner’s Guide to Buying Photography – AnOther

More Reads: Great Weekend Reads for Wedding & Portrait Photographers

Tech: Here’s What’s New in Lightroom | Profoto’s Newest Flash

Deals: Nikon Spring Savings & Instant Rebates

**** Watch

A documentary exposes the “lawless economics” of the Instagram economy.

Why fake accounts dominate Instagram | #followme - YouTube

The post Great Weekend Reads in Photography & Filmmaking appeared first on PDNPulse.

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Book publisher MACK announced today that Jerome Ming’s book Oobanken has won the 2019 First Book Award. Ming’s book is comprised of black-and-white images of scenes constructed by the artist using common objects and, sometimes, people and animals. The photographs were made while Ming, who is currently based in South Africa, was living in Yangon, Myanmar. The photographic narratives draw on “fragments of [Ming’s] personal history, of memory and imagination,” according to MACK’s description of the book. Ming has said in a previous artist’s statement he made the images while living in relative isolation in a compound, as Myanmar was opening its once-isolationist society. “As the country further opened to the outside, with embargoes lifted and sanctions eased, uncertainty about the future and yet unknown prospects were concerns quietly considered as my work progressed with Oobanken.” In one photograph, a severely dented spoon is held up by a mismatched pair of clamps. Another image shows a black rabbit sitting on a board in front of a white cloth backdrop in a makeshift, outdoor portrait studio.

© Jerome Ming. Image from Oobanken (MACK, 2019). Courtesy of the artist and MACK.

The judges for the award were MACK publisher Michael Mack; Tate Modern assistant curator Sarah Allen; Financial Times director of photography Emma Bowkett; photographer and writer Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa; and Wilson Centre of Photography director of special projects Polly Fleury.

Given annually since 2012, the First Book Award is open to photographers who are pursuing publication of their first monographic photo book. Previous award winners are Hayahisa Tomiyasu, Emmanuelle Andrianjafy, Sofia Borges, Ciarán Óg Arnold, Joanna Piotrowska, Paul Salveson and Anne Sophie Merryman.

The Wilson Centre for Photography and Kraszna-Krausz Foundation provide support for the First Book Award.

Oobanken is now available from MACK.

Related:

New ICP Award for First Photo Book Now Calling for Entries

Want to Publish a Photo Book? Here’s What You Need to Know

Notable Photo Books of 2018

The post Jerome Ming Wins 2019 First Book Award appeared first on PDNPulse.

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The International Center of Photography (ICP) and London-based book publisher GOST books has announced a new prize to promote the publication of a first book by an unpublished photographer.

The winner of the ICP/GOST First Book Award will have their first photo book designed, edited, printed and published under the ICP/GOST imprint. GOST will handle distribution and provide the opportunity to exhibit the work at a venue to be announced. The winner will also receive a portion of personal copies of the book from the first print run. The deadline for entries is September 2.

Judges for the prize have not yet been announced.

The ICP/GOST partnership is the latest to sponsor a first book award competition.

The Kraszna-Krausz Foundation, which offers awards for photography books, teams with Mack Books to present its First Book Award. The 2019 Mack First Book Award will be announced tomorrow.

Center for Documentary Studies at Duke and the Honickman Foundation have been hosting the biennial CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography since 2000.

The fee to submit a book project to the ICP/Gost First Book Award is $35 (or $25 if you enter before May 31). Considering how many photographers are paying book publishers to publish their books, that’s a bargain.

Related Articles

Want to Publish a Photo Book? Here’s What You Need to Know

Winner of Kraszna-Krausz First Book Award Has Best Title We’ve Seen This Year

Nadia Sablin Wins CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography


The post New ICP Award for First Photo Book Now Calling for Entries appeared first on PDNPulse.

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In our story “How to Find Work as an Assistant,” photographer Frances F. Denny explains what gets her attention when would-be assistants e-mail her in search of work.

“I’m most compelled by people who reach out in a very professional manner and exhibit good communications skills,” Denny says. “I like to see that somebody has personalized the email to me. I want to know: Why are they reaching out to me among thousands of photographers they could email? I would like them to be informed about the work I do and what king of help I might need.”

A resume isn’t necessary, Denny continues. “Keep the email brief. Tell me your skills, and where you went to school. That’s all I need to know right off the bat.” Her other advice is to spell correctly (especially her name), and avoid getting too personal or sentimental in the email. “I’ve had people tell me [in introductory emails] too much about their struggle to find work. That might come up in a conversation when I meet them, but leading with that is not good,” Denny says.

Denny notes, “The number one thing I’m always asking prospective assistants, especially those who have just graduated from art school, is whether or not they now how to run Capture One [and] whether they know how to shoot tethered to a computer…If I were just graduating from art school I would try to get work as a digitech, because it is so much more lucrative than any other kind of assisting, and in more informal shoots I often need somebody to run [Capture One] on my computer for me.”

While some commercial shoots have the budget to hire crews that include several assistants and PAs, Denny notes, “Often the shoots I’m doing are scrappier than that, and I need to ask my assistant to wear a couple of different hats.”

See the full story for a lot more insight and advice from other photographers about how to get work as a photo assistant.


Related:
So You’ve Graduated with a Photography Degree. Now What?

9 Tips for Getting Hired (and Re-Hired) as a Photographer’s Assistant

How Fashion & Beauty Photographer Maria del Rio Got Her Start

How Several Female Photographers Got Started in Today’s Photo Market

How Frances F. Denny Made the Jump from Assistant to Fine Art and Ad Photographer

Frances F. Denny: Clean Linens and Good Manners in a Family History of
Virtue


Modern-Day Witches in America

The post Quick Tip: Just Earned Your Photo Degree? Here’s How to Ask for Work as a Photo Assistant appeared first on PDNPulse.

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In ancient times, humans would sacrifice animals and burn entrails in an often desperate attempt to divine the intentions of their mysterious gods. Today, we engage in our own series of baroque rituals hoping to curry favor with an equally mysterious and mercurial force: Instagram’s algorithm.

While its specific operation is a closely-guarded secret, it’s not completely opaque. The social media scheduling tool HootSuite has published a detailed explanation of how it believes Instagram’s algorithm functions based on a briefing they’ve received from Instagram itself, plus their own research.

Here are some takeaways.

The algorithm uses “ranking signals” to help organize which posts appear where on your feed. So what are those signals? According to Hootsuite, there are three big ones: relationship, interest and timeliness.

The relationship signal consists of cues that tell Instagram that you’re engaged with another user, including likes and comments on their posts, DMs, tagging and whether or not you’ve turned on notifications for that user’s content. The interest signal is just that, an educated guess on the content you’re likely to want to see based on your past behavior on the app. Finally, the timeliness signal prioritizes posts of more recent vintage.

Hootsuite also dispels a few myths about how the algorithm works, including the idea that using Instagram Live and Stories will somehow make your posts more visible. “[T]he feed’s algorithm doesn’t discriminate based on how often your account makes use of other tools within the app,” Hootsuite says. You’re also not getting a broader reach if you’re verified or a business account.

That said, there are some things you can do to increase your visibility. Hootsuite advises you to post often, post video (not because the algorithm likes video but because people like video) and encourage your followers to turn on their notifications for your posts.

Don’t Miss: Chronological Feeds Sound Good, But They Aren’t Really

Is Posting to Instagram Just Like Working for Free?

** Manfrotto, Gitzo & Joby Sales **

The post Making Sense of Instagram’s Algorithm in 2019 appeared first on PDNPulse.

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Lens, the photo blog of The New York Times, will stop publishing at the end of May and go on a “hiatus” for an indefinite period. Meaghan Looram, director of photography at The Times, announced the news today in a note to staff. James Estrin, who has co-edited Lens with David Gonzalez, David Dunlap and Josh Haner, shared the note on social media.

Looram says in her staff note that the decade-old blog was founded during a “different era.” She explains, “Digital platforms were presenting new challenges to the industry, and Lens provided one of the few dedicated showcases for photography. But since then, the means of consuming photography have changed and expanded. We believe that this is the perfect time to take stock of and celebrate what Lens has achieved and to give serious thought to how to better position Lens for the future.”

She says the goal is to have Lens “evolve into an unrivaled source for those who want to read about and think about photography” and “We want to reach new readers.”

Though Looram described the change as a “hiatus,” she also struck a note of finality. She bid “a final nod” to the producers of caretakers of Lens. She also said, “There will be time to celebrate Lens and its wonderful run,” suggesting an ending more than a hiatus.

Since its founding, Lens has helped boost the careers of many emerging photographers and also highlighted forgotten or under-appreciate projects from throughout the history of photography. Lens is one of the few photo blogs to pay the photographers whose work it features. Looram also notes, “Lens took the lead in guiding the public conversation on the increasingly critical issues of diversity and representation with stories that showed how digital technology has empowered a new generation of photographers.”

The annual New York Portfolio Review, which Lens runs at the School of Journalism at the City University of New York, will continue, Looram says.

A 2014 Lens feature on photographer Zun Lee’s work on black fathers, which Lens had previously showcased.

Related Article

Of the Trillion Photos Taken in 2018, Which Were the Most Memorable?

How to Put together a Stand-Out Submission for Open Calls and Juried Reviews

The post New York Times Closes Lens Blog: A Hiatus or the End? appeared first on PDNPulse.

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