Loading...

Follow Pati Jinich on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The story goes, governor shrimp tacos, or tacos gobernador de camarón, were created in the state of Sinaloa in the early 1990s to surprise governor Francisco Labastida Ochoa, after he told a few friends how much he loved his wife’s shrimp tacos. That bit of information was passed on to the owners of Los Arcos in Mazatlán restaurant, before he headed there to visit.

The chef was given the quest not only try to match the governor’s wife’s tacos, which no one besides the governor had tried, but to beat them. So quite a few taco recipes were developed and tested. When the governor showed up to eat, he liked them so much he named them “tacos gobernador.”

Now, I do not know if that story is entirely true. But, what I do know is, these tacos became so popular you no longer only find them at Los Arcos in Mazatlán. They are all over Sinaloa and beyond. I had them as far away as Los Angeles and Miami.  Yet, I saw the most renditions on the 800 mile drive throughout the entire Baja Peninsula.

I felt more than obliged to offer my take on tacos gobernador, since my travels in Baja are featured on “Pati’s Mexican Table” in my new season premiering in a few weeks (you can watch the trailer here). And I am thrilled to share my recipe with you, as we all love these tacos in my home!

So what’s in tacos gobernador? First, a combination of shrimp and cheese makes them a cross between a taco and a quesadilla. A ton of cheese is really essential.

Second, cooked onion that is often accompanied by other vegetables, typically bell peppers and sometimes poblano chiles. If you ask me what I prefer, hands down, not even a second of hesitation, poblano chiles. I absolutely adore them. I feel lukewarm about green bell peppers to put it mildly. So my take has a combination of slivered onions and poblanos with just a bit of tomato.

Third, the seasonings. Some renditions have no sauce, only salt and pepper. Some have a simple to a more seasoned tomato sauce. I go for a seasoned, very thick sauce that is almost a paste, really. It combines tomato paste, La Costeña chipotles in adobo and the W sauce — Worcestershire — or as we call it in Mexico “salsa inglesa.”

Lastly, you can opt for corn or flour tortillas. There are no strict guidelines here, different from other kinds of tacos.

There are so many reasons why I like these tacos so much. They end up being a complete meal, they are so easy to prepare, they are irresistibly delicious and messy, the cheese creates an inviting crust as it melts… and they have a great story behind them. I do love a good story.

Print
Governor Shrimp Tacos
Governor Shrimp Tacos recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 701 “Tijuana’s Culinary Revolution” 
Course Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword Antojo, Mexican, pati’s mexican table, Shrimp, Sinaloa, Taco
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 6 Tacos
Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 white onion slivered
  • 2 poblano chiles stemmed, seeded, slivered
  • 5 garlic cloves finely chopped
  • 2 ripe Roma tomatoes cored, seeded, slivered
  • 3 tablespoons sauce from chipotles in adobo
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper or to taste
  • 1 1/2 pounds (about 11-15) shelled large shrimp cut into large chunks
  • 3 cups shredded Oaxaca, mozzarella, asadero or Muenster cheese
  • 6 to 8 flour or corn tortillas
  • Sliced avocado for garnish
  • 1 Chile Manzano sliced and mixed with the juice of a lime, 1/4 red onion and salt to taste
Instructions
  • Heat the butter in a large nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat. Once it melts and begins to bubble, add the onion and poblano and cook until wilted, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, stir, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Incorporate the tomatoes, cook for a minute, and as they begin to soften, add the sauce from the chipotles in adobo, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Stir well, cook for another minute, then add the shrimp and cook just until they change color, about 1 to 2 minutes. Turn off heat and scrape into a bowl to prevent the shrimp from overcooking.
  • On a preheated comal set over low heat, heat the tortillas on both sides for a minute. Add about 1/2 cup of shredded cheese onto each one. Once the cheese begins to melt, add a generous amount of the shrimp mixture, fold in half and continue heating until cheese has completely melted and the tortillas have begun to lightly brown and create a crust.
  • Serve with sliced avocado and Manzano chiles and onion.
Video
Pati Jinich - Tacos Gobernador - YouTube
Notes
Tacos Gobernador de Camarón
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

To me, one of the most fascinating kinds of salsas is salsa macha. It defies any preconception that many people have about a salsa. No pureed tomatoes or tomatillos, not even any tomatoes or tomatillos in it! No onion either. Also, rather than the chiles being toasted, simmered or roasted, here they are cooked in oil. And there are nuts. Tons of nuts.

I think one of the most common versions of salsa macha is a take from the state of Veracruz that uses dried chipotle chiles, garlic and peanuts. But there are of course countless versions. In this one, I use some of my favorite nuts —walnuts, pistachios, and pine nuts. And I play with the crowd-pleasing taste of guajillos and the feisty bite of chiles de árbol.

I also add something new that I’ve never put in a salsa macha before — amaranth seeds.

You can play with your own versions of salsa macha, too: choose dried chiles and nuts that you like, cook in oil until the ingredients transform, then season with some vinegar, and adjust with your favorite sweetener to add a hint of sweet to balance all that savoriness.

However, before you play… try this one. I find it so addicting. It is toasty, nutty, a little bit spicy, and a touch sweet and tangy, with a chunky and consistency and the most satisfying crunch. I use it as a topping for guacamole, soft scrambled eggs, baked potatoes, and my latest favorite is on an avocado toast.

You could also try it over French toast for a sweet/savory version, or on plain yogurt sweetened with a touch of honey for quick breakfast or snack.

But the options are endless, and it keeps forever in your refrigerator. 

Print
Salsa Macha with Pistachios, Walnuts and Pine Nuts
I think one of the most common versions of salsa macha is a take from the state of Veracruz that uses dried chipotle chiles, garlic and peanuts. But there are of course countless versions. In this one, I use some of my favorite nuts —walnuts, pistachios, and pine nuts. And I play with the crowd-pleasing taste of guajillos and the feisty bite of chiles de árbol. I also add something new that I've never put in a salsa macha before — amaranth seeds.
Course Appetizer, Snack
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword chiles de arbol, guajillo chiles, Macha, pine nuts, pistachios, Salsa, walnuts
Prep Time 12 minutes
Cook Time 3 minutes
Servings 1 cup approximately
Ingredients
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 guajillo chiles stemmed, seeded and cut into small squares with
    scissors
  • 3 chiles de árbol remove stems but keep seeds, and cut into small
    rings
  • 3 garlic cloves chopped
  • 3 tablespoons raw unsalted walnuts roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons raw unsalted pine nuts
  • 3 tablespoons raw unsalted pistachios roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons amaranth seeds
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
Instructions
  • Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the chiles, garlic, and nuts and sauté until lightly toasted and fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. Turn off heat and stir in the amaranth seeds. Scrape into a bowl and let cool. 
  • When cool, mix in vinegar, brown sugar, and salt. 
Notes
Salsa Macha con Pistaches, Nueces y Piñones
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Pati Jinich by Pati Jinich - 2M ago

By Eduardo | @cazadordelomejor

Walking along Liverpool street in Mexico City’s Colonia Juárez, I stumbled upon a tiny, beautiful space filled with natural wood, large containers with different kinds of heritage corn varieties displayed, and hard-working people hand-making tamales on a large workspace with stools for customers to sit and enjoy the action.

Regina and José are the founders of Tamales Madre. Friends and cousins that are on a mission to find the best corn varieties in Mexico. Heritage corn, free from genetic modification, pesticides, chemicals and toxins. Tamales Madre works with different heritage corn producers that deliver corn varieties that are rich in flavor, texture and color. 

Both Regina and José were convinced that the tamal scene in Mexico City wasn’t represented correctly. Mexicans perceive tamales as street food, far from something delicate or looked after, and the cousins teamed up to change that. 

After lots of test runs and analyzing recipes and methods used in traditional Mexican kitchens, Regina and José realized animal fat wasn’t a necessary ingredient in the preparation.

The tamales here are prepared with vegetable shortening, as opposed to traditional tamales that are made with lard. This means lighter on the stomach, healthier, and leaving the corn as the protagonist in the batter, instead of dominating the flavor of the heritage corn.

The decadent tamales range from savory to sweet. Black beans and hoja santa, mole and plantain or cacao with pinole custard. Each month there’s a new tamal available on the menu, a special that focuses on representing a certain region’s techniques and flavors. 

Tamales Madre is a deep dive into culture, tradition, and knowing the origin of the ingredients that are used to prepare tamales you’ll crave each time you walk by.

Tamales Madre, Calle Liverpool 44a, Juárez, Ciudad de México

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Pati Jinich by Pati Jinich - 4M ago

By Eduardo | @cazadordelomejor

I have enjoyed being the Mexico City picks correspondent here at PatiJinich.com. Today’s recommendation is quite personal and may be a bit biased because the place I am recommending was opened by my mom (Karen) and I. It is called Niddo.

Niddo is a small corner space on a quiet, tree-filled street called Dresde. In Mexico City’s Colonia Juárez, just a block behind Paseo de la Reforma and a couple minutes away from the iconic Diana Cazadora statue. It’s a street most people had never heard of or drove by, yet it’s located in the very heart of this city. 

The space is divided into two concepts: the open kitchen and the café. Breakfast, lunch and Sunday brunch in the kitchen space. Coffee from Chiapas, baked goods, beverages and a collection of items that we’ve been curating for some time are for sale in the café space.

We like to call our food “comida que apapacha,” which means food that hugs your soul — and your stomach. We make very simple food with the best ingredients and let some of our family roots and history into each dish. From babka to shakshuka to chilaquiles or a grilled cheese sandwich. I grew up in a Jewish family in Mexico. My great-great-grandparents were Polish, and we lived for a long time in Vancouver, a very multi-cultural city. We picked up on a lot of different cuisines along the way.

Niddo is tiny, yet was designed to feel abundant with mirrors on almost every wall, tall ceilings and arched passageways — and a guaranteed view of the open kitchen at every seat. One of our main goals while designing the space was to eliminate the division you usually find between the kitchen and dining room at a traditional restaurant. Niddo’s entrance is actually through the kitchen.

The shakshuka at Niddo is the perfect breakfast. A rich and hearty tomato and bell pepper stew mixed with cumin, cayenne pepper, zaatar, fresh parsley, two poached eggs, and Lebanese yogurt. My mom learned to make it during the frequent trips to Israel as a child and perfected it after years and years of making it at home.

Niddo’s menu is small and is constantly changing and evolving. We try to travel as much as we can around Mexico and different countries to absorb different cultures into our food and bring home ingredients.

Niddo feels like home and tastes like it too. 

Niddo, Dresde 2, Colonia Juárez, CDMX

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The leaves have already turned orange, yellow, red and brown here in DC meaning it’s the most celebration-packed time of year. There is Hispanic Heritage Month, Fall and Harvest celebrations, Day of the Dead, Thanksgiving, Passover, Christmas and New Years, just to mention some. I did not even include all of the year end office, school, neighborhood and friend get-togethers.

Boy did this year fly by! I’ve had no time to think about my 2019 New Years resolutions. Not that I ever follow through on them, but I used to at least think about them…

Lately, I’m telling my boys how amazed I am at how fast the time passes. When I was in middle school like Juju, I remember feeling every hour of every day pass, as if churning ice cream by hand… so slow. Coming home from school was a long awaited haul, and getting to the weekend an eternity. As I got older though, time seemed to be marked by the weeks. By college the months seemed to run into each other, only to stop and catch their breath during school breaks.

When I got married and moved to the US, I was so stunned by the change of seasons. It was their passing the baton from one to the other that seemed to mark my pace. Witnessing the seasons changing was new to me having come from Mexico City, where there seems to be one eternal season with a crazy rainy interruption.

Well, the last few years I’ve barely been able to grasp what the marks of time are and can only feel it whirling on! I blink an eye and it’s summer. I blink again, and we seem to be speeding like mad to wrap up the year. I swear the entire year feels like what an hour used to feel like when I was Juju’s age. No surprise then, the faster the years seem to go, the more I want to celebrate anything and everything.

For us Mexicans, celebrating means having tequila around. We even joke about it. You got a promotion at work? Come over for some tequila! You are getting married? Do you have enough tequila?!? You have a dinner at home and are having me over? Can’t show up without your favorite tequila because, frankly, you probably don’t have enough.

Aside from sipping it neat, I love coming up with one new and fabulous cocktail every year to mark our holidays. It has become a trendy thing around here and now my friends expect it. So this year, this is the one. I was daring and bold and it paid off. I call it Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón and it is a delight! And it’s very easy to make. You could even make it ahead of time, too.

I start off with a flavored simple syrup. Many people seem baffled when they hear the term simple syrup. Mixologist jargon for sure, it sounds like something complex to prepare or something you get at a hard to find specialty store. But simple syrup is nothing more than sugar dissolved in water! And you can flavor it any way you want. For this cocktail, I flavor it with whole allspice berries, true cinnamon also known as canela, a whole clove, and the rind of a lemon. It makes for a simple syrup that is fragrant, citrusy, lightly spiced up, and has warm comforting tones from the canela. The more you let the simple syrup sit and become infused, the more the lemon rind will also absorb the simple syrup and become candied. Then it is a treat of a garnish to bite into as you sip your cocktail.

Once you have the spiced up simple syrup, you blend it with the lively and tart pomegranate juice, an entire fresh and grassy jalapeño – do not remove the seeds please – and fresh squeezed lemon juice. For the tequila, I use Gran Centenario Reposado, which is mildly fruity and teasingly sweet. It has a woody fragrance, and you can taste an echo of almond and vanilla in it that compliments the syrup and the pomegranate. They have a page on Facebook and Instagram, if you want to know more about them.

This Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón cocktail is so multilayered and irresistible it’s never an afterthought. You want to savor every single sip. It will claim its delicious place at center stage of your celebration.

Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón Cocktail

Coctel Picosito de Granada, Chile y Limón

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 4 allspice berries
  • 1/2 stick (about a 1” piece) true cinnamon or canela
  • 1 whole clove
  • Rind of a lemon, plus a quarter of the lemon (to rim the glasses)
  • 3/4 cup Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 1 1/2 cups pomegranate juice
  • 3/4 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 fresh jalapeño stemmed (seeding optional) (more to taste)
  • 2 cups ice
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground true cinnamon or canela
  1. In a small saucepan, combine the granulated sugar, water, allspice berries, cinnamon, whole clove and lemon rind. Set over medium heat and let the sugar dissolve, stirring occasionally for 3 to 4 minutes, until you cannot see the sugar granules anymore.
  2. Remove from the heat. Let it steep anywhere from 30 minutes to 12 hours. When ready to use, strain the spiced syrup into a small bowl or measuring cup. Reserve the lemon peel and cut it into 6 pieces.
  3. In the jar of a blender, add the tequila, pomegranate juice, lemon juice, jalapeño and strained spiced syrup. Puree until completely smooth. Add the ice and puree again.
  4. On a small plate, combine the turbinado sugar, salt and ground cinnamon. Rub the top of 6 glasses with a quarter lemon or water and rim with the sugar mixture. Fill each glass with the pomegranate drink, garnish each with one piece of the sweetened lemon peel, and serve!

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Jaw-dropping. As soon as you set it on a table it will fly off. Guaranteed. Especially if I am around!

Queso fundido is the epitome of an antojo. What we Mexicans call a food craving that can be eaten anytime of day as a quick snack, or a full meal if eaten in a big enough amount. Antojo literally translates to craving, and I don’t know a single Mexican that doesn’t drool over the thought of a queso fundido.

Queso fundido is not a cheese dip. Queso fundido is not a cheese sauce. Queso fundido is the real deal. It is real cheese. Tons of it. You throw a combination of deliciously flavorful melty cheeses onto a baking dish or a traditional earthenware cazuela. Then place it on a heat source — it can be on a burner, in the oven, under the broiler — until the cheese not only melts, but becomes super bubbly on top and starts making a crust all around the edges.

Wait. Then come the toppings. The most typical and popular toppings in restaurants in Mexico City, where I grew up, are poblano rajas, chorizo and mushrooms. They are separate offerings, so you choose if you want your queso with chorizo or with rajas or mushrooms. Different restaurants have their variations, for example, it can be rajas with caramelized onions, different kinds of chorizo, cultivated or wild mushrooms cooked with epazote or dried chiles, to name some.

When I make queso at home, I like to make a combo of my favorite toppings. No one can stop me and no one should stop you! My take combines caramelized onions and poblano chiles, throws in a bit of seeded and diced tomato for an added juicy bite and tons of crisp chunks of flavorful chorizo.

Most people I know like their queso fundido on flour tortillas. But it is you and your guests’ choice if they want corn tortillas, too. If you have some some salsas and guacamole, place them on the table for optional add ons.

If you are planning to have friends and family over during the holiday season, this is a crowd pleasing appetizer to have up your sleeve when guests arrive. Also have your Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila out to toast and to wash down that queso fundido. I like to serve it neat or on the rocks as it has such a smooth taste.

Once everything is on the table, all bets are off. Run for it, if you want a chance to make a queso fundido taco before it disappears.

Poblano Rajas and Chorizo Queso Fundido

The popular Mexican antojo, or craving, Queso Fundido topped with chorizo, onion, poblano rajas, and tomato. 

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil (plus more to grease the baking dish)
  • 1/3 pound Mexican chorizo (casings removed, coarsely chopped)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1/4 white onion (halved and thinly sliced (about 1 cup))
  • 1 poblano chile (roasted, sweated, peeled, cut into strips)
  • 1 ripe Roma tomato (cored, seeded, cut into small dice)
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt (or to taste)
  • 1 pound (or 4 cups) combination of shredded Mexican-style melty cheeses (such as Asadero, quesadilla and Oaxaca (can sub with mozzarella, Muenster and Monterey Jack))
  • 8 to 10 flour or corn tortillas
  • 1 ripe avocado (sliced)
  • Serve with salsa of your choice (optional)
  • Pair with Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila (neat or on the rocks)
  1. Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the chorizo, cook for 4 to 5 minutes, breaking it into smaller pieces with a couple of spatulas or wooden spoons until crisp and brown. Remove from the heat and scrape into a bowl.
  2. Set a rack on upper third tier of the oven and preheat to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Return the skillet to medium heat, add the butter and once it melts, add the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally and scraping the bottom of the pan, for 6 to 7 minutes, until they have wilted and begun to brown around the edges. Add the poblano pepper strips, tomato, and salt, and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and transfer to a bowl.
  4. Place shredded cheese in a gently oiled shallow baking dish that can comfortably hold it. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until completely melted. Remove from the oven. Top with the crispy chorizo and poblano rajas mixture. Place back in the oven and bake for another 7 to 8 minutes, until cheese is oozing and browned along the edges and part of the top.
  5. Meanwhile, preheat a comal or large skillet over medium-low heat. Heat the tortillas, making sure they are not on top of each other, until completely warmed, puffed and slightly browned. Place in a tortilla warmer or wrap in a clean cloth or kitchen towel.
  6. Remove the queso from the oven and place on the table along with the warm tortillas, ripe avocado slices, and salsa of choice, if desired. Let everyone assemble their tacos!

Queso Fundido

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Thanksgiving has become my favorite American holiday.

Though when I first arrived to the US, more than 20 years ago to Texas, I had never heard of the celebration. I was a bit perplexed as to why people where roasting turkeys so early in the year (in Mexico turkey is a Christmas tradition). Now, I totally get it.

I love how everything seems to stop and be put on hold. I love how attention shifts almost entirely to food and the kitchen takes center stage. I love the intense emotions that surround the holiday. I love the time of year. And, since Alan left for college, I love that our family will all be together for a few days, mostly eating.

I especially love how Thanksgiving opens the door to celebrate the contributions that immigrants have historically brought to the American table. Now, more than ever, this is deeply meaningful to me.

I love how Thanksgiving embraces and holds onto to classic recipes and traditions that have been passed down through generations. But I also love how it welcomes new and surprising additions that complement the rest.

In that spirit, I created a Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon Chocolate Pecan Pie.

I had never tasted pecan pie before moving to the US. And then about a decade ago, my dear friend Debra introduced us to her dark chocolate version of pecan pie… which we devoured so fast that she started bringing, not one, but two each year. Last year, I told her I was tempted to make it a bit more outrageous and decadent by incorporating Dulce de Leche Caramel to that super gooey filling.

Dulce de leche caramel, or Mexican cajeta, is an iconic ingredient in Mexican kitchens. We Mexicans are crazy about it. Made from goats’ milk, rather than cows’ milk, as in some other countries, it is also made in a traditional way – cooked down slowly as layers of flavor build into each other in a single product. It’s so good you can eat it with a spoon, or top your bananas or apples with it.

In this recipe, dulce de leche caramel makes for a more gooey, more sticky, more chewy filling with a rich, deep and intrinsic rustic caramel taste. I went for Coronado’s dulce de leche caramel cinnamon variety to give it a hint of the sweet spice so familiar in holiday recipes. The pecans have a better cushion to sit on and be coated in. The chocolate chunks can shine even more.

Pati Jinich - Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon Chocolate Pecan Pie - YouTube

Below is the recipe, and above is a video clip from an upcoming episode of the new season, where I make it. And we all eat it. We are going to be making it again for our Thanksgiving table, and my hopes are that you will give it a try too…

Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon Chocolate Pecan Pie

Pay de Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon y Chocolate con Nuez

  • For the crust:
  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour (plus more to work the dough)
  • Pinch of kosher or sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1 stick (or 1/2 cup) cold unsalted butter, (diced)
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • For the filling:
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup Coronado® Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 2 cups (or 8 ounces) pecan halves (coarsely chopped)
  • 2 ounces (or 1/3 cup) chopped bittersweet chocolate
  1. To prepare the crust: Place the flour, salt, sugar and diced cold butter in a food processor. Process a few times, until the mixture looks like a coarse meal. Add the cold water and process again a few times. The dough should become more moist. Turn out of the food processor and gather into a ball. Lightly dust your countertop with flour, and knead the dough 3 to 4 times until it comes together. Shape into a flat ball, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for until firm, about an hour.
  2. To prepare the filling: In a bowl, beat the eggs with a whisk until foamy. Incorporate the Coronado® Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon, brown sugar, corn syrup, melted butter and salt and whisk until it is well blended. Add the chopped pecans and chocolate and mix well.
  3. To assemble the pie: Set an oven rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove the dough from the refrigerator. Lightly dust your countertop, hands and a rolling pin with flour. Roll out the dough into about an 11” to 12” round. Place it in a pie mold, pressing the bottom and sides into the mold and crimp the edge on top.
  4. Pour the filling into pie crust. Cover the pie loosely with aluminum foil and place in the oven. Bake for 55 minutes, or until the pie is set and edges have lightly browned. Remove from the oven and let cool before serving.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Jaw-dropping. As soon as you set it on a table it will fly off. Guaranteed. Especially if I am around!

Queso fundido is the epitome of an antojo. What we Mexicans call a food craving that can be eaten anytime of day as a quick snack, or a full meal if eaten in a big enough amount. Antojo literally translates to craving, and I don’t know a single Mexican that doesn’t drool over the thought of a queso fundido.

Queso fundido is not a cheese dip. Queso fundido is not a cheese sauce. Queso fundido is the real deal. It is real cheese. Tons of it. You throw a combination of deliciously flavorful melty cheeses onto a baking dish or a traditional earthenware cazuela. Then place it on a heat source — it can be on a burner, in the oven, under the broiler — until the cheese not only melts, but becomes super bubbly on top and starts making a crust all around the edges.

Wait. Then come the toppings. The most typical and popular toppings in restaurants in Mexico City, where I grew up, are poblano rajas, chorizo and mushrooms. They are separate offerings, so you choose if you want your queso with chorizo or with rajas or mushrooms. Different restaurants have their variations, for example, it can be rajas with caramelized onions, different kinds of chorizo, cultivated or wild mushrooms cooked with epazote or dried chiles, to name some.

When I make queso at home, I like to make a combo of my favorite toppings. No one can stop me and no one should stop you! My take combines caramelized onions and poblano chiles, throws in a bit of seeded and diced tomato for an added juicy bite and tons of crisp chunks of flavorful chorizo.

Most people I know like their queso fundido on flour tortillas. But it is you and your guests’ choice if they want corn tortillas, too. If you have some some salsas and guacamole, place them on the table for optional add ons.

If you are planning to have friends and family over during the holiday season, this is a crowd pleasing appetizer to have up your sleeve when guests arrive. Also have your Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila out to toast and to wash down that queso fundido. I like to serve it neat or on the rocks as it has such a smooth taste.

Once everything is on the table, all bets are off. Run for it, if you want a chance to make a queso fundido taco before it disappears.


Poblano Rajas and Chorizo Queso Fundido
Queso Fundido
Servings4 to 6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1tablespoon vegetable oilplus more to grease the baking dish
  • 1/3pound Mexican chorizocasings removed, coarsely chopped
  • 1tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1/4 white onionhalved and thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 1 poblano chile,roasted, sweated, peeled, cut into strips
  • 1 ripe Roma tomatocored, seeded, cut into small dice
  • 1/4teaspoon kosher or sea saltor to taste
  • 1pound (or 4 cups) combination of shredded Mexican-style melty cheesessuch as Asadero, quesadilla and Oaxaca (can sub with mozzarella, Muenster and Monterey Jack)
  • 8 to 10 flour or corn tortillas
  • 1 ripe avocadosliced
  • Serve with salsa of your choiceoptional
  • Pair with Gran Centenario Añejo Tequilaneat or on the rocks
Instructions
  1. Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the chorizo, cook for 4 to 5 minutes, breaking it into smaller pieces with a couple of spatulas or wooden spoons until crisp and brown. Remove from the heat and scrape into a bowl.
  2. Set a rack on upper third tier of the oven and preheat to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Return the skillet to medium heat, add the butter and once it melts, add the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally and scraping the bottom of the pan, for 6 to 7 minutes, until they have wilted and begun to brown around the edges. Add the poblano pepper strips, tomato, and salt, and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and transfer to a bowl.
  4. Place shredded cheese in a gently oiled shallow baking dish that can comfortably hold it. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until completely melted. Remove from the oven. Top with the crispy chorizo and poblano rajas mixture. Place back in the oven and bake for another 7 to 8 minutes, until cheese is oozing and browned along the edges and part of the top.
  5. Meanwhile, preheat a comal or large skillet over medium-low heat. Heat the tortillas, making sure they are not on top of each other, until completely warmed, puffed and slightly browned. Place in a tortilla warmer or wrap in a clean cloth or kitchen towel.
  6. Remove the queso from the oven and place on the table along with the warm tortillas, ripe avocado slices, and salsa of choice, if desired. Let everyone assemble their tacos!
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Thanksgiving has become my favorite American holiday.

Though when I first arrived to the US, more than 20 years ago to Texas, I had never heard of the celebration. I was a bit perplexed as to why people where roasting turkeys so early in the year (in Mexico turkey is a Christmas tradition). Now, I totally get it.

I love how everything seems to stop and be put on hold. I love how attention shifts almost entirely to food and the kitchen takes center stage. I love the intense emotions that surround the holiday. I love the time of year. And, since Alan left for college, I love that our family will all be together for a few days, mostly eating.

I especially love how Thanksgiving opens the door to celebrate the contributions that immigrants have historically brought to the American table. Now, more than ever, this is deeply meaningful to me.

I love how Thanksgiving embraces and holds onto to classic recipes and traditions that have been passed down through generations. But I also love how it welcomes new and surprising additions that complement the rest.

In that spirit, I created a Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon Chocolate Pecan Pie.

I had never tasted pecan pie before moving to the US. And then about a decade ago, my dear friend Debra introduced us to her dark chocolate version of pecan pie… which we devoured so fast that she started bringing, not one, but two each year. Last year, I told her I was tempted to make it a bit more outrageous and decadent by incorporating Dulce de Leche Caramel to that super gooey filling.

Dulce de leche caramel, or Mexican cajeta, is an iconic ingredient in Mexican kitchens. We Mexicans are crazy about it. Made from goats’ milk, rather than cows’ milk, as in some other countries, it is also made in a traditional way – cooked down slowly as layers of flavor build into each other in a single product. It’s so good you can eat it with a spoon, or top your bananas or apples with it.

In this recipe, dulce de leche caramel makes for a more gooey, more sticky, more chewy filling with a rich, deep and intrinsic rustic caramel taste. I went for Coronado’s dulce de leche caramel cinnamon variety to give it a hint of the sweet spice so familiar in holiday recipes. The pecans have a better cushion to sit on and be coated in. The chocolate chunks can shine even more.

Pati Jinich - Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon Chocolate Pecan Pie - YouTube

Below is the recipe, and above is a video clip from an upcoming episode of the new season, where I make it. And we all eat it. We are going to be making it again for our Thanksgiving table, and my hopes are that you will give it a try too…

Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon Chocolate Pecan Pie
Pay de Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon y Chocolate con Nuez
ServingsServes 10
Ingredients
  • For the crust:
  • 1 1/4cups all-purpose flourplus more to work the dough
  • Pinch of kosher or sea salt
  • 1teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1 stick (or 1/2 cup) cold unsalted butter,diced
  • 1/4cup cold water
  • For the filling:
  • 3 eggs
  • 1cup Coronado® Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon
  • 1/2cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/2cup light corn syrup
  • 4tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/2teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 2cups (or 8 ounces) pecan halvescoarsely chopped
  • 2ounces (or 1/3 cup) chopped bittersweet chocolate
Instructions
  1. To prepare the crust: Place the flour, salt, sugar and diced cold butter in a food processor. Process a few times, until the mixture looks like a coarse meal. Add the cold water and process again a few times. The dough should become more moist. Turn out of the food processor and gather into a ball. Lightly dust your countertop with flour, and knead the dough 3 to 4 times until it comes together. Shape into a flat ball, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for until firm, about an hour.
  2. To prepare the filling: In a bowl, beat the eggs with a whisk until foamy. Incorporate the Coronado® Dulce de Leche Caramel Cinnamon, brown sugar, corn syrup, melted butter and salt and whisk until it is well blended. Add the chopped pecans and chocolate and mix well.
  3. To assemble the pie: Set an oven rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove the dough from the refrigerator. Lightly dust your countertop, hands and a rolling pin with flour. Roll out the dough into about an 11” to 12” round. Place it in a pie mold, pressing the bottom and sides into the mold and crimp the edge on top.
  4. Pour the filling into pie crust. Cover the pie loosely with aluminum foil and place in the oven. Bake for 55 minutes, or until the pie is set and edges have lightly browned. Remove from the oven and let cool before serving.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Eduardo | @cazadordelomejor

A 3- by 3-meter window in Mexico City’s Colonia Juárez where passionate people make perfect Italian gelato using seasonal Mexican ingredients, and the result is hard to compare to anything else.

It was during a dream one night that Kirén Miret (founder, co-owner and master gelato maker at Casa Morgana) decided she was going to open a gelato shop. That night, she quickly woke up and started jotting down ideas — flavors, ingredients, anything that came to her mind. This would result in becoming the root of the ice cream shop she’d always dreamed of. Kirén had no gelato experience. The next morning, she started searching for gelato courses in different parts of the world until one in Los Angeles popped up.

Shortly after, she was back in Mexico City making gelato with a small home gelato maker and bringing samples into her office. Kirén’s passion grew stronger, and a couple months later, she was all the way in Italy perfecting her skills. There she graduated as a master gelato maker.

Casa Morgana is run by Kirén, Diego (Kirén’s nana’s son), Elías (Diego’s father), Tani and Javi. It’s pretty much a family business. They make gelato because it makes them happy, not for any other reason. No artificial coloring, flavors or preservatives are used. Only fresh seasonal ingredients, sugar and milk, which are turned into gelato in a machine Kirén compares to a Ferrari.

The flavors at Casa Morgana range from mango, to rosca de reyes, to chocolate oaxaqueño. It all depends on the season, and each day means a different menu. November brings pan de muerto gelato, and December brings churros and ginger snap.

Each detail at Morgana is looked after. The containers in which the gelato is stored, the sugar to milk ratio, the cups that are flown in from Canada, the metallic spoons, the spades which are used to serve – they all work together to make Morgana’s gelato so creamy and irresistible.

Kirén has always been an ice cream person. When she was a little girl, she liked the more normal, chocolate-covered vanilla ice cream pops with sprinkles. Today, her mission is to make the best ice cream in Mexico – and she’s up there.

Heladería Casa Morgana, Calle Milán 36, Juárez, CDMX

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview