Loading...

Follow Ovrld | The Austin Music Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Mason Hankamer has a theory that our generation’s main personality trait is exhaustion. He took that theory out on the road with his friend Daniel Talton for their collaboration Sweet Teeth and worked to find some kind of salve for our tiresome woes. The result is “Lucky Boys,” a dream folk single that might not give you the kind of superpowers you’d need to not feel perpetually exhausted by the state of things but at least gives you some tranquility and hope to make the day go by just a bit easier no matter how bad it gets, reminding you that “only lucky boys get to feel a heart break.” Recalling the Norwegian indie folk sounds of Kings of Convenience and Sondre Lerche, “Lucky Boys” is a pleasantly breezy break from the darker tones that are en vogue with the Austin indie scene at the moment, with brushed drums, stand-up bass and even a horn interlude. You can check it out and download it below (or stream it on Spotify if that’s your preference) and keep an eye on their Facebook page for details on their upcoming debut album!

Sweet Teeth "Lucky Boys" - SoundCloud
(248 secs long, 41 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Are there any tv shows that have left a musical impact as large as David Lynch’s Twin Peaks? I’m going to hazard a guess that the answer is a big no. No Good, the new solo project of Nevil and Van Mary’s Emily Ng, is an apt example of that Twin Peaks sound, with simple and dreamy New Age-like production paired with vocals that sound more supernatural than human. For the track’s music video, director Urzulka expands on the Lynch vibes, complete with velvet red hues and ominous shadows, while also bringing some Man Ray style composition to the mix. But the eroticism of the video stands out from the usually sinister tones of Lynch’s work, leading to a dark but ultimately warm and comforting experience. Take a look for yourself and look for more No Good material this summer:

Let Me Leave - Vimeo

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

by Nick Hanover

If you live in Austin then you already know there’s too much damn music to keep track of. And sometimes you just want to sift through it in bite-sized chunks. We totally understand. Allow us to introduce you to The Latest Toughs, five tracks from five artists to get you up to date and make each of your workdays a little easier.

Wil Cope “End of the Bed (End of the World)”

If you asked me to pick a real place that fit my vision of the end of the world, I’d likely say the flat and desolate terrain of West Texas on the road out to California. It’s not apocalyptic in the way we see in movies, with all that fire and screaming and rubble. Instead it’s the emptiness of a true end, a place that Wil Cope describes on “End of the Bed (End of the World)” as “down the highway, where those buffalo used to roam,” but now is only home to the ghostly moans of coyotes and other creatures what walking between shadow and light. It’s an area you only seek out if you’re running from something or looking for a runner, and on “End of the Bed (End of the World),” Cope’s doomed protagonist fits both, desperate as he is to follow in the footsteps of a lover who fled into the night, packing only bullets and cocaine in a place where no one knows her name. But the madness and futility of such a voyage is clear even before Cope gasps the lyrics out in the drawl of someone lying in a pool of their own blood– you hear it in lonesome shuffle of the rhythm guitar, in the faraway gunshot echo of the drums. Cope’s lovers worlds ended the moment they left their shared bed, the only thing left to do was to head out to some place that felt as apocalyptic.

Kathryn Legendre “Going Crazy”

Kathryn Legendre may lack Dolly Parton’s big hair and huckster grin but on her single “Going Crazy” she makes a strong case for herself as heir to Dolly’s country queendom, with all the sass and humor and charm that entails. Legendre is aided in that endeavor by a crack backing band that are able to give “Going Crazy” that classic ’70s radio country sound without the sterility that throwbacks too often have, with Zach Moulton’s pedal steel and Eddie Dickerson’s fiddle in particular sharing the spotlight with Legendre’s vocal. All in all, “Going Crazy” has the makings of a future Texan dancehall classic and you’d be crazy not to add it to your personal rotation.

Trashdog “Apologize to the Rice”

Andrew Jackson’s label Digital Hotdogs is celebrating its 50th release this month with a compilation showcasing what has become one of the freshest rosters in indiedom. Appropriately enough, the first offering from the compilation is “Apologize to the Rise,” from Jackson’s own project Trashdog. Strange, captivating and just the right amount of goofy, “Apologize to the Rise” is about as good a summary as you could hope to provide for a label as hard to define as DGHD, mashing together art-punk oddness with garage rock primitivism resulting in something akin to Swell Maps and Devo squatting together in an abandoned laboratory.

Institute “Dazzle Paint”

Having your roster split between two states hundreds of miles away from each other would kill most bands, but luckily Institute are not most bands. If anything, being a half-Texas/half-New York outfit has done Institute well, breathing new life and fresh influences into their sound, as “Dazzle Paint” from their new LP Readjusting the Locks effortlessly proves. Institute’s rhythm section in particular has made a major leap forward, with the bass now taking on more melodic responsibility without losing any of the grimy thuggishness that has always been a key component of Institute’s style. The impressive melodic interplay between the bass and the lead guitar also leaves more room for frontman Moses Brown to occupy the midrange, allowing his cottonmouthed yaps and howls to hit harder while remaining as mysterious and indecipherable as ever.

Abe “Begin (ft. Nobel)”

Virtual Feelings operates in the opposite end of the musical spectrum from Digital Hotdogs but their intents are similar– curate odd music that pushes boundaries while remaining listenable. Abe’s “Begin (ft. Nobel)” is their latest release, a combustible club track that sounds like someone dumped a bunch of amphetamines into a fax machine and had it call up Skepta. If that doesn’t sound like a pleasant auditory experience to you, well, I can understand your reticence, but in execution it’s addictive and hypnotic, particularly when the glitched out skronks and skritches lock into the groove and then step back out before you’ve even noticed.

Got a single you’d like to be considered for Latest Toughs? with Latest Toughs in the subject!

Nick Hanover got his degree from Disneyland, but he’s the last of the secret agents and he’s your man. Which is to say you can find his particular style of espionage here at Ovrld as well as Loser City, where he mostly writes about comics. You can also flip through his archives at  Comics Bulletin, which he is formerly the Co-Managing Editor of, and Spectrum Culture, where he contributed literally hundreds of pieces for a few years. Or if you feel particularly adventurous, you can always witness his odd .gif battles with his friends and enemies on twitter: @Nick_Hanover

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

by Nick Hanover

With his enviable eye for detail and well-honed aesthetic, Curbside Jones has quietly become one of the most disciplined and talented musical figures in Austin. Though that has mostly manifested in his solo releases and production for other artists in Austin hip hop, over the past few years Curbside Jones has embraced his photo and design sides, releasing everything from hardcover books to zines to fashion. We chatted with Curbside Jones about his latest photo collection, SXSBlack, a stylish and topical street photography work that slyly comments on representation at SXSW and Austin gentrification issues at large, while also catching up with him on his music, including his ever expanding Adventure Time-influenced series Milk Tea Chronicles.

Ovrld: It’s been a while since we talked, so I guess to kick things off, tell me about the new photography projects you have. You’ve just put out a collection of SXSW street photography, right?

Curbside Jones: Yeah, SXSBlack.

Ovrld: I know you’ve done street photography of your Japan trips before, so what made you decide to bring it back home this time?

CJ: So after doing stuff in Japan and everything, I started actually studying it more, because I wasn’t really studying it before going to Japan, it was more like knowing I wanted to put everything I shot there in a book. Once I was able to do that I started looking more into street photographers and I started seeing people who inspired me through their work.

I started to get into podcasts really heavy, which isn’t new to me, but specifically podcasts about art and things of that nature. The one I’ve been listening to most has been The Collective podcast and on there I came across two photographers who have inspired me a lot, one of which is Cody Ellingham, he’s a street photographer from somewhere in Europe, and he lives in Japan and does street photography there. And there’s also Liam Wong, who frequently visits Japan and does street photography. Seeing the stuff they’re doing inspired me to do it in Austin.

It was tricky at first, because Austin you don’t think of in the same way you think of Japan, where they’ve got all the crazy architecture and neon lights and all that. So at first it was kind of hard trying to figure out what angle to attack it from. But once I found my angle and started shooting things like mundane buildings but catching them from different angles it kind of evolved into doing street portraits. Because I want to be well-rounded, I don’t want to just do, like, rooftop shots or anything like that.

So after doing my studying on YouTube, one of the hardest things they were saying to do with photography was walk up to a random person on the street and ask to take their picture.

One of the photos from SXSBlack

Ovrld: I imagine that’s especially true for something like SXSW…

CJ: Actually, SXSW I feel like was easy. Without something like SXSW, without having a reason for all these people being in town, it can be a little hard, just because you have a random guy trying to take a picture of you and that’s weird. Sometimes you may get more nos than you get yeses but it’s making the most out of the yeses that you get. So SXSW, to me, was easier because to me, it seemed like everyone that was in town was there to be seen. Everyone wants to feel like a superstar during SXSW.

Ovrld: That makes sense.

CJ: I could walk up to people and be like “Hey, can I take your portrait?” and I didn’t even really have to say what it was for. They would just be like “Yeah, for sure!” And afterwards they’d be like “Yo, when can I see it?” And I’d hand them a business card and say “You can follow me here, and I’ll post it, I’ll have it up by whenever.” It was really easy.

The reason behind why SXSBlack was to highlight the kind of demographic that goes to SXSW now. From what I’ve noticed over the years, there has been an influx of African-Americans being in town for SXSW and with that, I think the climate of SXSW has changed as far as the type of music that is being pushed. I feel like hip hop, rap, R&B and soul has taken the front stage in terms of what I’m hearing when I’m walking past venues.

Ovrld: I wanted to ask about that, because you’ve titled the project SXSBlack and there has been a lot of talk recently about how entities like SXSW and the brands that come out for it have co-opted a lot of hip hop culture without necessarily paying it back to hip hop. I’m sure you saw the conversation that broke out after Fader claimed they were the first to bring hip hop to SXSW which erased the work of figures like Keir Worthy and Matt Sonzala, who actually originated hip hop booking at SXSW.

As an artist, were you wanting to reclaim some of that? Both as someone who works in local hip hop and as a photographer?

CJ: Yeah, it was kind of one those things where hip hop has always been at SXSW. No doubt, it’s always been there. Where things got a little messy was when you have these venues downtown who typically don’t play hip hop at all, nor do they try to cater to that specific crowd or demographic, start to profit off the music of the demographic that they shun and dismiss during regular downtown hours. That, right there, was what kind of inspired the whole thing. Because to me, it’s crazy.

I’m not gonna compare it to Afropunk at all but that’s kind of what it seemed like seeing all these fashionable black people out, seeing all these black people performing, seeing all these black people in attendance at these shows. I was like “Man, this isn’t normal,” but to the people who come from out of town, they may think this is what normal Austin looks like. That’s what I wanted to highlight, that this is not normal Austin, this is just because of SXSW. You won’t see this many black people in one place at one time any other time, ever.

So I wanted to shine a light on that. Like, okay, you want to profit off this market but you don’t want everything that comes with it during normal times. That’s what I really want to highlight with this piece.

Ovrld: It also seems like you’re commenting on how street photography, at least in the US, tends to focus on “white spaces,” like Coachella, which is a big event for scene photography. Or things like EDM festivals, or even Burning Man. I was wondering if you were also making a point about how scene photography, and fashion at large, appropriates a lot of the personality and style of black culture.

CJ: That’s exactly what it is. I try to capture more than just the “artsy fartsy” black people at SXSW. That would have been too easy in a sense. I was trying to go up to people normal photographers probably wouldn’t want to approach to ask for portraits. Because this is a part of it too, there’s a spectrum of people who are out at SXSW. Yes, you had your artists and your artsy fartsy types but you also had your people who were just here from out of town and were just coming down to see performances and stuff like that. And then you had your other end of the spectrum, where there were people who were literally just down there to flex and promote themselves on the street.

To me that’s what embodies what SXSW is, the hustle. It’s that one time of year where you can come to get your name out. You can put on your best outfit, you can put on your best whatever, have CDs pressed up, have t-shirts with your logo and business and whatever on there and you’re out there promoting yourself. I wanted to capture those people as well because I feel that’s a very important piece to what makes SXSW what it is.

I think because of how those individuals are dressed, or how they carry themselves or the stigma that’s attached to those people, most photographers wouldn’t want to approach them and ask for a portrait. So I wanted to definitely highlight those people because they are living the spirit of SXSW.

Ovrld: And there’s also the difference in how the city responds to SXSW versus, say, Texas Relays, which happens right after…

CJ: Uh huh!

Ovrld: For people who don’t live here and don’t see that shift, it’s pretty strange how it gets talked about. Even things like the belief that more shootings go on during Relays, even though this year at SXSW alone we had at least five shootings, including one resulting in a death. But the view in Austin is that Relays brings a crime wave, which I don’t think is statistically true.

CJ: Yeah. Let’s see, how can I put this? It’s like one of those situations where everybody wants to be down until shit gets real. When you’re pushed out of your comfort zone it’s all of a sudden like “Oh my gosh, this is a problem.” Shootings and stuff happen all the time. Obviously I’m not trying to minimize the fact that people got shot and people got injured, but I feel like it’s something that people who aren’t coming from these areas it’s shocking, but for me it’s like well, it happens.

Ovrld: Right. And violence can happen at any event where you get a lot of people crowded together in a space.

To shift gears a bit, I wanted to talk to you about how you seem to be developing yourself as more of a general artist rather than an artist in a musical sense. You’ve especially stepped up your merch game. You’ve put out books, a backpack, and for your Milk Tea Chronicles, you put out a photography collection to accompany the release. You’re probably the only artist I’ve seen in Austin doing this consistently, rather than just as a single thing. I want to talk about the origins of that and how it’s working out for you and whether it’s more fulfilling to you as an artist to go about things this way rather than just putting out endless digital releases.

CJ: Man, I think what really inspired it all was having a conversation with my wife when we were doing Wolves’ Clothing and I did the whole box set. We were sitting down, and I have what I call “Kanye moments,” where I just start ranting and vomiting these streams of consciousness at others, so I was having a Kanye moment and I was talking to her about how art has shifted in a way where the consumer is no longer getting what they used to get. Before with music, someone would drop a boxed set and you’d get like a t-shirt or a concert DVD or whatever the case may be with the album or some type of photo booklet.

An example of Curbside Jones’ incredible merch options

Rihanna did it recently with Anti, where she dropped the deluxe edition that came with a poster and a picture book with pictures of her and everything. She didn’t have to do that, because the reality of what we’re in with music is that you probably lose money making these things when you can just throw the album up on iTunes or whatever for basically nothing and people can buy it or stream it. But I feel like that experience of being surprised or knowing “Hey, I’m gonna go buy this person’s album and I’m gonna get something beyond the album” is what helped propel me forward with doing the merch with the music.

Once I did Wolves’ Clothing and it was a hit, I was like now that I know there are people who are willing to spend their money to support what I’m doing, outside of just the music but also with physical things, then I should probably pursue this more often.

So I did another book, this time for Milk Tea Chronicles called MTC: The Book. That one was a 7”x7” hardcover book for my first trip to Japan and I dropped that on my birthday with Milk Tea Chronicles. I only printed three of those and they sold out in ten minutes or something like that. That was cool. At first I was going to do the book with the PDF version but I figured I’d wait and do the PDF version later. Then it was the bag, where I thought “If I’m making this music that’s all about my travels, why not make a bag?” So I did that, dropped the bag and it sold out in ten or fifteen minutes.

Once I saw that I could do this and people were hyped for it, then I can take it a step further and build on what I had already done. The first book was about 30 pages, so the next thing was to give them a 100 page hardcover book and release it with a beat tape that shares the same title. You get the beat tape and you get the book together. At first I was like “I don’t know, this is a big commitment,” because it’s 100 pages, so I actually started on that on the day we got back from Japan. We flew in got, home, I unpacked, took the laptop out and started working on editing the picture.

Ovrld: Yeah, your timeline seems super compressed. Every time I see you do a project, you announce an idea and then it’s executed pretty quickly.

CJ: I sat and I literally worked on that every single day up until about maybe two or three weeks before the book came out. From August to November I worked on that book every day. Editing, studying up on editing, trying to create a style. That’s where people like Liam Wong came into play, because I was studying their photography and the whole cyberpunk trend that’s going on right now in photography, and I was trying to apply it to my style.

I put it out, it sold out, to my surprise. I didn’t think it would because of the price point. I was like “Ooh, it’s pretty steep, it’s $70.” But it is art, you know what I mean? I feel like music is the only realm of artistry where people feel like artists shouldn’t be paid prices they’re asking for. This goes back to the photographers I was studying. Cody [Ellingham] sells his prints on his website and I think the cheapest print is like $300. Everything else is $400, $500. When I was looking at it, at first I was like “Wow, the balls on this guy! Selling a print for $500?!” [laughs] But then it hit me. Why shouldn’t he ask for $500? He bought his equipment, he went out and scouted his location, he probably staked it out for several days waiting for the sun and light to hit at exactly the right moment. There were so many things that went into play. So I thought “You know what? Maybe he’s doing it so it’s not accessible to everyone because it doesn’t have to be accessible to everyone.”

There’s no rule that says I have to put out a single and charge 99 cents, just because that’s the iTunes price. I could put out a single that’s $50, and whether you buy it or not, that’s up to you, but you can still appreciate it from afar. That’s what museums are. You can’t just go into a museum and go “I like this Monet, let me buy that.” You could pay your fee and go in and stand and look at it all day if you wanted to, but in order to really appreciate it later, you’d have to come back and look at it again. Especially back when we didn’t have cellphones, you’d be like “Well, cool, I gotta come back tomorrow and look at this painting again because I really like it.”

Ovrld: Right, you could maybe buy a museum book featuring it or a print of it, but you wouldn’t have the real thing. Like you said, the real thing would have a very high price on it to own.

CJ: Yeah, and I feel like with music, people don’t take it seriously. Especially within the realm of rap. They’re not going to take a rapper selling his album for $100 seriously. Not at all. It’s like this artist gave you eight, nine, whatever tracks, they went to a studio and got it mixed and mastered, someone took the time to make the beats, to write it and record it, do all the promo. And then they say “Hey, I think this is worth what it’s worth.” But then people don’t see music as collecting art.

So to bring it back, putting out the physical things, like the books and all that, with the music is like giving you the best of both worlds. I’m giving you the single with the book, so it’s like you’re really only paying the price of the book, or whatever the case might be. As musicians, I want to see more people do that. I want to see more artists give people an experience. The beat tape I put out falls directly in line with the book, so it’s like you can listen to the tape and go through the book and understand why the beats sound the way they do. You listen to certain beats during certain chapters of the book and get a feel for where I was, and understand these were emotions I had at this particular point in time and was able to capture.

Ovrld: That’s an approach that is becoming more common in the book and comic world, too, with creators releasing soundtracks to go along with their releases. So it makes sense to me to bring that back to music.

You touched on this a little bit, but it seems to me that in the indie and folk and punk scenes, the physical artifacts are coming back to a place of prominence. Cassette releases and vinyl are especially popular right now. But it seems like hip hop artists, for whatever reason, are usually less interested in having physical releases at all. It’s rare that you see an independent hip hop artist sell a CD or a tape or vinyl let alone what you’re doing. Why do you think that’s the case?

CJ: Honestly, I can only speak for myself, but I feel like people just aren’t buying music anymore and hip hop fans especially don’t buy music. Streaming has become such a thing that for artists to appear successful, they have to get the streams. I have to get people to play this song over and over and over and over again and hope that with those streams comes clout and a bunch of other things. So with indie and DIY, the focus has shifted to instead of getting experience; I have to get those streaming numbers as quick as I can. I’m not going to waste my money, as an artist, with getting merch made.

I don’t know how it is with other artists, but for me, I pay for merch out of pocket. I pay for everything I make. That’s the gift and the curse of having a full time job– I still have money to live and to put into music. I know going in that there’s a chance I’m going to lose money. It is what it is. You hope the money comes back. But for someone who doesn’t have a full time job and music is all that they do, they’re not going to take the risk on merch because they might not make that money back. They put the money into playlists or promotion or in the hands of someone that’s gonna get the music to where it needs to be so that they can get the streams.

Ovrld: It also seems like with you, while your audience may not be as huge as some other artists’, it’s very passionate and willing to put serious money into what you put out. What was the process of cultivating that audience like? Because it seems like it works pretty well for you. What is it about you that connects with the kind of audience that’s willing to pay, say, $70 for a piece of merch you put out?

CJ: I think it just comes with time. Some of the people that are out here really supporting were listening to my music since MySpace, which is really crazy to think about [laughs]. I don’t think I made the transition to Twitter until 2009 or 2010. Once I hit Twitter, those people stuck around and I think it’s because they feel a connection with me as well as with the music.

It’s kind of like how things are with Tyler, the Creator. We were able to grow up with Tyler, the Creator. We were able to see him in Odd Future being a knucklehead teenager to now where he’s…I don’t know if I want to call him a fashion icon, but he’s on the way to fashion icon status, like a GQ, Esquire type of person. And we were able to see that whole entire transition, sonically and visually. I feel like it has been the same with my music, where people have been able to see me as early Curbside Jones, doing everything DIY and the progression of everything. For some people, or so I’ve been told, it’s inspirational. I inspire them to do things, I inspire them to get out and travel, I inspire them to pick up a camera. I’ve had people tell me “Yo, man, you inspired me to buy a camera and do photography.” And that’s crazy, because I haven’t been showcasing my photography as long as I’ve actually known how to do photography.

I think for some people it’s about having someone to believe in, like when you have your favorite artist and knowing “Yo, he’s gonna keep it real no matter what. This dude is gonna be him no matter what, so when I’m buying into him and listening and supporting, I know what I’m getting up front and there’s not gonna be any surprises. It’s gonna be quality work every time and it’s gonna be something I can connect with.” The crowd that I have, they know that. They know I’m gonna drop something and it’s gonna be a piece of merch and there’s only gonna be x amount available in the world and they’re gonna be first in line to get it.

I don’t want to say it’s like making it into a game but I see people support my music go back and forth with each other, jokingly, and say like “When Curb drops that merch, I’m gonna buy all three books” and go “Nah, fam, don’t do that, I want one too.” They have these conversations with each other and they end up connecting. They learn about artists that I like and connect with them, and they end up being in contact with each other just through supporting me. It’s like building a family, almost.

Ovrld: That makes sense. You spoke about growth and development and it feels to me like the music you’ve been making for a long time is finally having its moment. Like the whole lo-fi hip hop scene is exploding, in some ways because of the digital streaming avenues you talked about earlier, through things like that YouTube channel “Lofi beats to relax/study to.” As an artist, what is that experience like, of seeing something you’ve done, and that has been your aesthetic for a long time, finally pick up, if not mainstream, then at least wider recognition?

CJ: It’s interesting because there was actually two waves that hit that kind of made me have a “Really?” moment. First was that whole anime reference rap wave. I had been doing that since 2009. And it wasn’t, like, Goku or anything whack like that. It was me taking series, breaking them down, finding plot points or character flaws or something I could take and use as a concept for a song or album.

That was what “Pink” was. I was watching Tenchi Muyo in Love and I sat with that on mute and I made the beat to “Pink” while watching that. The writing with the whole “falling awake” and the dream world and all of those things, that was what the movie was about, with Tenchi falling in and out of these dreams and his consciousness was skipping to different timelines and universes where he existed. So then a couple years back when..

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

by Nick Hanover

If you live in Austin then you already know there’s too much damn music to keep track of. And sometimes you just want to sift through it in bite-sized chunks. We totally understand. Allow us to introduce you to The Latest Toughs, five tracks from five artists to get you up to date and make each of your workdays a little easier.

mario “Lotto Love ft. PiiNG”

With its glimmering synths and surging bass, mario’s “Lotto Love” featuring PiiNG feels more like it time warped in from the smooth R&B and hip hop fusions of the early ’00s than came from the subterranean darkness of the trap era. As far as I’m concerned, that’s a very good thing– mario is a rare beatsmith who knows how to sprinkle in just enough lightness in his nocturnal production to make the end result something bright and crisp rather than soft and saccharine. Credit is also due to PiiNG for enlivening the production further with his svelte and sharp vocals, situating him as the Usher plus the Weeknd hybrid I never knew we desperately needed.

Black Pumas “Fire”

On their previous singles, Black Pumas— the collaboration between prolific Austin producer Adrian Quesada and vocalist Eric Burton— have proven themselves to be skilled practitioners of Dapstones style neo-soul. But on “Fire,” the duo twist that sound in a thrilling and unexpected way, with Quesada adding fuzz soaked spy guitar licks to accompany Burton’s throat searing vocals. There’s still plenty of soul horns and in the pocket drums but that hint of danger the lead guitar provides allows “Fire” to truly live up to its namesake, building up even more excitement for what other twists we’ll hear on Black Pumas’ upcoming self-titled debut.

Being Dead “Underworld”

While Being Dead don’t really sound like Fiery Furnaces, the way they blend childhood whimsy and a near operatic approach to arrangements makes it impossible for me to avoid a comparison. “Underworld” is perhaps the best example of this: in two minutes, the psych-pop duo cram in everything from Modern Lovers proto-punk to Beach Boys harmonies to The Shaggs primitivism, providing a tsunami of hooks to catch your ear and short circuit your brain for years to come. And then, like some puckish youths yanking a $20 bill away from you on the sidewalk with the aid of some unseen fishing line, they slow everything down to a molasses thick halt, forcing you to hit rewind to do it all over again.

Young June “Sleep Tough”

It’s not just the washed out production that makes Young June’s “Sleep Tough” seem like something half-remembered from a dream– everything from the mumbled vocals to the shimmery lead guitar feels like it’s being played by a band of sleepwalkers. That’s a quality untold numbers of shoegaze and dream pop acts strive for but Young June don’t fit comfortably into either of those categories. Instead, Young June are closer to a pairing of Replacements brattishness and Cure moodiness, with guitars that smirk and howl alongside unexpectedly melodic basslines and emphatic rhythms.

Vapor Caves “Hurry Up and Wait”

Vapor Caves’ recent slate of singles have emphasized their ’90s R&B influences but on “Hurry Up and Wait,” they take things way back and sound all the better for it. Bursting at the seams with electro-funk grooves (complete with call-and-response vocoder) and a beat that’d be equally at home in an impromptu breakdance battle on a subway car or an arty loft party, “Hurry Up and Wait” is Vapor Caves at their most gleeful. But the most impressive element is Yadira Brown’s vocal, which manages to bring a perfect amount of melancholy to all that bubbly funk, driving home the paradox of the title and how it applies to the unique sensation of striving for greatness while attempting to be patient for the achievement of such.
Got a single you’d like to be considered for Latest Toughs? with Latest Toughs in the subject!

Nick Hanover got his degree from Disneyland, but he’s the last of the secret agents and he’s your man. Which is to say you can find his particular style of espionage here at Ovrld as well as Loser City, where he mostly writes about comics. You can also flip through his archives at  Comics Bulletin, which he is formerly the Co-Managing Editor of, and Spectrum Culture, where he contributed literally hundreds of pieces for a few years. Or if you feel particularly adventurous, you can always witness his odd .gif battles with his friends and enemies on twitter: @Nick_Hanover

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

by Nick Hanover

There are a lot of videos coming out of Austin these days, so we’ve decided to make life easier for you by compiling some of the most notable into a recurring feature called Out of Focus. 

Mélat “Weak”

Mélat - Weak (Official Video) - YouTube
Title aside, nothing about Mélat is weak on “Weak.” The enchanting R&B queen has truly come into her own over the past couple years, with an increasingly more powerful voice and a strong aesthetic, the latter of which is beautifully showcased in Sanetra Longno’s video for the single. Shot in royal hues that emphasize Mélat’s regal air while also giving a sensual atmosphere, the video for “Weak” is a perfect match for the song’s mood of romantic longing and desire. Austin is home to quite a few R&B sirens, but “Weak” once again proves that few artists here or anywhere are as suited to being in front of a camera as they are on stage.

Pataphysics “Computer Chair”

Pataphysics - Computer Chair (Official Video) - YouTube
The humble computer chair finally gets its moment to shine in Pataphysics’ spaced out mini-synth rock opus “Computer Chair.” The lyrics talk of “traveling across the universe in a computer chair,” but Amber Navarro‘s video keeps things a little more down to earth, with a generic office standing in for the universe at large. But our pink dress protagonist sure acts like she’s on a celestial journey, rocketing across the empty office after hours, using the titular computer chair as a vessel for some decidedly unprofessional antics. Sure, an office park isn’t exactly a bold new frontier, but the message is clear: the right computer chair will make you feel like you’re exploring the cosmos while you’re filing those TPS reports.

SpaceMan Zack x The Teeta “Audrey Hepburn”

SpaceMan Zack x The Teeta - Audrey Hepburn (Dir. by T.Aubrey) - YouTube
Despite how dark and ominous The Teeta’s music frequently is, his visuals tend to be more dayglo than goth, with neon graphics and floating cats and lasers. But for “Audrey Hepburn,” Teeta’s collaboration with emo rap act SpaceMan Zack, director T. Aubrey fuses together early ’00s emo MySpace imagery and grimy street styles for the most accurate visual representation of Teeta’s style yet. The color mostly comes from Zack and Teeta’s fashion aesthetics, with Zack in particular standing out in pink and purple flashes. Meanwhile the footage has the burned out and degraded feel of scorched home movies, making even the neon backdrops Zack and Teeta pose in front of come across as muted and haunting. It’s a far cry from the default Austin rap video aesthetic, where hordes of kids rocking fake assault rifles party in either McMansions or hollowed out shacks or both. And thank the mixtape gods for that.

Lou Rebecca “Break It Apart”

Lou Rebecca - Break it Apart (Official Video) - YouTube
Lou Rebecca’s new material has an exciting amphetamine club vibe to it that deviates from the lush and stately mood of her early work, so it’s only natural that her video aesthetic would shift towards something more vivid too. “Break It Apart” is the first sign of that, with Rebecca adding grand, HD nature scenes to her signature dreamy 9mm style. There’s still a degree of the macabre and eerie to the visuals, though, as Rebecca– now clad in purple-gray hair rather than blonde– dons a forest-spirit-at-a-disco outfit and sashays around the hills and woods. The effect is as alluring as ever, but also more bracing and clear, much like the music itself with its pulsing beat and ’80s action movie synth pad bursts.

Nick Hanover got his degree from Disneyland, but he’s the last of the secret agents and he’s your man. Which is to say you can find his particular style of espionage here at Ovrld as well as Loser City, where he mostly writes about comics. You can also flip through his archives at  Comics Bulletin, which he is formerly the Co-Managing Editor of, and Spectrum Culture, where he contributed literally hundreds of pieces for a few years. Or if you feel particularly adventurous, you can always witness his odd .gif battles with his friends and enemies on twitter: @Nick_Hanover

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

by Adrian Gandara

Everything you need to know about The Infinites’ eponymous debut you can learn from lead single and album opener “Nina Segovia.”

The song isn’t in a hurry to get anywhere. The first half of the two-minute song lounges in feel-good summer surf pop before Jared Leibowich’s adorkable voice comes in.

“I’d like to tell you about Nina Segovia, and when I’m done talking you’ll fall in love with her,” he sings as an admirer from afar. Nina holds a chemistry book. She’s always friendly. She’s alright.

It’s a brief snapshot of one of the invented characters Leibowich has brought to life in this album, each song named after and about a different character: Nina Segovia, Jimmy Smith, Nathan Wray. The cover art for “Nina Segovia” is a simple photo of a girl at the lake facing away reading a paper in hand. Second single “Scott McMurray” has a yearbook photo of an All-American running back charging down the field in black in white.

Like the classic early 1960s surf songs these characters inhabit, they seem to exist in a more simplistic world of suburbs, swimming pools and aimless strolls around town — a “Pleasantville” world in an “Endless Summer” vacation.

There’s Scott McMurray, whose boredom with everything around him takes him on a trip to the local library. “He opened a book/And took a look/And time passed by/And started to fly/So Scott McMurray ended up staying there the rest of the day.” Ok, the writing and rhymes aren’t particularly complex. Neither was Best Coast’s 2010 summer sound album Crazy For You, nor were the surf albums that record labels churned out in the 1960s. They didn’t need to be. You weren’t listening to these albums for innovation, virtuosity or lyrical complexity. You played them because they had feel-good bops, were fun to move to, and because you really, really liked surf music.

On The Infinites, every song after “Nina Segovia” sounds exactly the same in the best kind of way. It’s a satisfying answer to getting really into a new song and desperately needing more of it. You hope, too often in vain, every other song sounds like and makes you feel just like this one does. The Infinites does just that. It’s a throwback to when early rock vinyls were made to be packed with hits and played over the airwaves for voracious kids to devour.

Surf and garage rock already had a revival c. 2010. That was the year Best Coast, Wavves, The Drums and Beach Fossils all released albums eschewing the previous decade’s style of rock for the idealized sounds of the 1960s California coast. What makes The Infinites different is the influence of the mid-2010s indie pop that eventually replaced surf and garage revival. The Infinites isn’t afraid be a neatly packaged and unabashedly pop album. It feels no need to set itself apart with introspective lyrics, lo-fi rocking garage fuzz or reverb big enough to get lost in. It’s enough to just be fun, be catchy, make you feel warm and fuzzy and make you want to dance.

Photos from The Infinites show release party at Hotel Vegas:

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Sour Notes are at it again, this time with a new 7” that includes their latest single “Peak”. One of the things that has always impressed me about this band is how they manage to change and try new things while still retaining a signature sound. With “Peak” and its B-side “Dandy”, The Sour Notes are again tweaking their tried and true formula with great results.

According to frontperson Jared Boulanger the band’s approach to these tracks was to “keep things simple, turn up our amps and play more dynamically as a 3-piece”. That along with a lack of vocal harmonies or overdubs and a healthy helping of amp-stacking and fuzz leaves these two tracks feeling like a stripped down version of the band we’ve come to know, while buzzing with an urgency and intensity that one expects will translate brilliantly to live performances.

The Sour Notes will be performing May 17th at Hard Luck Lounge with Born Twins and Tortuga Shades.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

by Nick Hanover

Xiu Xiu have been a major force in the more abstract realm of indie rock for close to two decades now, releasing uncompromising albums paradoxically full of both brutal and twee (and occasionally scatological) imagery that matches the violent and sweet music. Their latest is Girl with Basket of Fruit, a particularly explosive work that feels especially fitting for our apocalyptic era. We spoke with Xiu Xiu leader Jamie Stewart about the band’s longevity, its history of mindblowing covers, Stewart’s family musical legacy and much more just before their show tonight at Mohawk.

Nick Hanover for Ovrld: I moved to Austin from the Pacific Northwest, so my introduction to your music was through bands like Parenthetical Girls, the Dead Science and that whole avant noise pop scene…

Jamie Stewart of Xiu Xiu: The early 2000’s, baby! [laughs]

Ovrld: [laughs] It feels like Xiu Xiu is the last remaining band in that scene. Why do you think this project has had such longevity?

JS: Oh, probably a greater sense of worthlessness than those guys. I don’t think I can do anything else.

Ovrld: [laughs] That’s an interesting way to put it. Something else that’s interesting to me about Xiu Xiu and your sound, and I was noticing this while doing research for this interview, is that it feels like the music you were creating back then, with its noisy, violent electronic aggression mixed with surprising melodicism, is something we’re just now catching up to culturally.

In their review of your new album, Pitchfork compared your sound to Death Grips, even though your project has existed far longer. Do you get the sense that culture at large is getting closer to embracing your aesthetic now?

JS: I don’t mean this in a flippant way at all, but I don’t really care. Maybe? Maybe not? [laughs] I think from the beginning, and hopefully in perpetuity, we’ll just keep our head down and keep chugging forward and not be super aware of what’s going on around us [laughs].

I mean, I have been hearing more and more people over the past few years citing Xiu Xiu as an influence and obviously that is extraordinarily gratifying and flattering. But as to whether or not the greater aesthetic zeitgeist is “catching up to what we’re doing,” it doesn’t really matter. People are going to do what they’re going to do and hopefully it’s incredibly good and will mean something to the people who listen to it. That’s really all I care about.

Xiu Xiu - Scisssssssors [OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO] - YouTube
Ovrld: You’ve been working a lot recently with Thor Harris, who is an iconic figure in Austin but is also connected to Swans who feel like one your closest relatives in a musical sense. How did that come together?

JS: We met in 2007, he was playing in the band Shearwater at the time and we did a US tour together and we just hit it off and became friends. I don’t think we ever hung out socially. And then in 2012 through 2014, Xiu Xiu opened for Swans, so we got to tour together again. As is often the case with something like that, we became really close. So he played on a record of ours called Angel Guts: Red Classroom that came out in 2014.

Sort of by attrition and by regular association, we became colleagues and he was gracious enough to join Xiu Xiu. We’re incredibly fortunate to get to play with such an extraordinary artist. Christopher Pravdica, who’s also in Swans, also joined the band and is equally wonderful and creative. For me, as a fan of both of them, I can say it’s a truly superlative line-up due to those guys.

Ovrld: Yeah, Thor is always such an interesting figure, and they both bring so much to the table.

Something I really enjoy about the new album Girl with Basket of Fruit is that it sounds like it brings together a lot of different styles you’ve explored over the years while expanding on that sound. In particular, you integrate Haitian drumming on top of the rhythms you more frequently utilize, and that reminded me of your early experiments with gamelan music, which makes me feel like you write your music in a percussive style. Is that accurate?

JS: I would probably agree with that. I never really thought about it like that before but that definitely makes sense. The first instrument that I became deeply acquainted with was a drum machine. My dad bought me one when I was fifteen.

Rhythmically oriented music, like Motown, was a lot of what I grew up listening to. So anything with a beat– either an abstract one or a metered beat– was a deep part of my musical foundation. Very frequently my songs will start with a drum machine part or some kind of rhythmic part. Particularly on this new record. So yeah, I would agree.

And also, as you mentioned, gamelan music, although incredibly melodic, is largely rhythmically based and played almost entirely on percussion instruments. That has been a huge influence on us. So, short answer, yes [laughs].

Ovrld: I think for new audiences who may not have been aware of your work from the early 2000s the entry point to Xiu Xiu was that amazing ZZ Top cover you did for the AV Club, which you more or less reinvented as a drum focused song instead of a guitar song. I remember friends hitting me up and sending that video to ask if I had heard of you, it was great to see people click with your approach to it.

JS: That’s good to know, it was fun to play it. I had not really been a fan of ZZ Top before that but now I realize their mastery. I had no idea [laughs].

Xiu Xiu takes on ZZ Top’s “Sharp Dressed Man” - YouTube
Ovrld: You have a long history with unexpected covers where you remain faithful to the intent while making the song unmistakably yours. The one that comes to mind for me and I think a lot of other fans is of course your cover of Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car.” What draws you to cover certain songs? And how do you strike that balance of remaining faithful while also making it a truly Xiu Xiu work?

JS: Our approach to every cover is for it to be an attempt to say thank you for that song. There are always songs that have meant a lot to us as fans. There has never been anything that we’ve covered where we’ve thought “It will be funny if we do this,” or we could do it better or that it would be cool or prescient or something if we covered it. It’s always an attempt to be gracious to the original song. I think possibly because of that, the original intent of the song and then whatever it is that we do, both of those things support each other. We’re not trying to reinvent the song. Or to reinvent it for its own sake. Any reinvention would come as a nod to what we have learned from it.

Ovrld: I know your dad was a pop producer himself, and had worked on albums like Billy Joel’s The Piano Man. Most listeners would likely describe your band as abrasive or experimental but I’ve always felt like there was significant pop DNA to it. Do you think that comes from your family history?

JS: My dad exposed me to superlative records at a very early age. At a time when most of my friends were listening to kind of shitty ‘80s hair metal, he was giving me Prince records and Marvin Gaye records and Talking Heads records. So I think what I got from him was a broad sense of what really, for lack of a better description, “quality” music is. Not in the sense of being trendy but as an appreciation of what has depth.

He actually really pushed me to go crazy with music. Of the two pieces of musical advice he gave me, one of them was to always take it too far. So any sort of inclination towards “classic” songwriting that Xiu Xiu might have didn’t really come from him as much as I think the crazier things we attempt to do may have come from him. Or at least trying to be unafraid of the crazier things there are to explore in music.

He told me that one of his big regrets in being involved in music was feeling like he had to make things “nice.” He wished that when he was more involved in music he had gone a little further afield.

Xiu Xiu – Fast Car (from A Promise) - YouTube
Ovrld: That’s really interesting. I think for a lot of people, that’s what they gravitate towards in your music, too, that willingness you have to “take it too far,” as your father put it, in regards to everything from the imagery to the performance to the music itself.

One of my favorite quotes about Xiu Xiu comes from Brian Howe at Pitchfork, who said that “a great Xiu Xiu song is like someone hurting himself right in front of you.” That stood out to me because there is this real raw quality to your music and a vulnerability to it. How are you able to do that in a way that still feels honest but doesn’t take too much out of you? How do you keep yourself sane, in other words?

JS: [laughs] I would never say it doesn’t take too much out of me.

Ovrld: [laughs] Fair enough.

JS: But why else do it, in anything, if you’re not going to push yourself as far as you can push yourself? That seems to be the point of existing.

Ovrld: That connects to something I wanted to ask you about critical reception to your music. I’ve noticed that a lot of…

JS: It’s a very mixed critical response [laughs]

Ovrld: Yeah, there’s no real middle ground with your music.

JS: [laughs] Yeah…

Ovrld: But one of the things that stood out to me was that critics who don’t come from a queer background tend to view your performance style as, to use terms I’ve seen regularly, “affected,” or “histrionic,” or “self-indulgent” and “pretentious.” But for people in the queer community it doesn’t seem to come across that way, it feels honest. Do you get the sense that people outside the community just don’t get what you’re doing?

JS: Maybe? I don’t disagree with you at all. I think there are aspects of it that in queer land seem very normal. And there are the prescient and obvious things we are referencing, or gestures and ways of moving, or types of singing or musical and physical juxtapositions. But, and not to be dismissive, I don’t really care [laughs].

I think the only thing I like about getting slightly older is giving less of a fuck about what any critic has to say. And because of that, I think it doesn’t really matter. I hope very much that the people this music is made for get something from it and people who aren’t made for it can listen to whatever the fuck they feel like listening to.

Xiu Xiu – I Luv the Valley OH! (from Fabulous Muscles) - YouTube
Ovrld: [laughs] That’s a great way of putting it. To change things up a bit, on the new album, not that anyone would ever accuse you of not being confrontational, you seem especially politically confrontational. I’m specifically thinking of your portrayal of the story of Mary Turner on it.

I wanted to talk to you first about how you were drawn to that incident and why you specifically wanted to tell that story on this album.

JS: I don’t have a long personal history with it, on the 100th anniversary of her and her family’s murder, I just happened to read a news story about it. I think like most people, though not all people, I was unaware of the insanity around her murder and the people who murdered her. I can’t really describe how deeply disturbed I was by it.

Basically, she was a very young woman who, after a lynch mob murdered her husband for no reason, confronted the lynch mob and they murdered her and cut out her baby from her body and stomped it to death. There were no repercussions whatsoever for the mob. There are photos of the people standing around smiling. It seemed like something that could happen today. It didn’t seem that far away in history even though it happened a hundred years ago.

The initial incident was obviously extraordinarily disturbing, but that it didn’t seem particularly removed or far away at all made it impossible not to think about it in a deeper way. Or in a longer term way through the creation of that song.

Ovrld: On the subject of imagery and meaning, in the liner notes for the album on Bandcamp, you offer up what seem to be multiple interpretations of what you mean with the title Girl with Basket of Fruit. I don’t know that I’ve seen an artist do that before, preemptively listing off some of the things one might read into the title of a work before they’re even consuming the work. You liken it to Caravaggio, and the strange fruit implications of the Mary Turner murder, and many other disparate things. Were these on your mind while you were creating the album?

JS: Oh, yeah, absolutely. It’s an attempt to notate the origins of the title and what a lot of the songs are. All of those things and others factor into the composition of the lyrics.

Ovrld: The photo in the press materials even includes a whole book shelf of further reading.

JS: [laughs] Yeah, with this album, more so than other things we’ve done, external aesthetic influences were very purposefully and pointedly borrowed from.

Ovrld: You told PopMatters in an interview that with this album you were “trying not to force things in a direction.” Does that mean with prior releases you felt more constrained than you were with this?

JS: Yeah, but purposefully so. The point of doing it was to work with really specific constraints. Musically there were more constraints with this one but lyrically, on every other record, there have been very specific guidelines for what each song should be about. This one was all about letting the subconscious in and letting the dream genie drive it to wherever it was going to go.

Ovrld: What was that experience like in comparison to putting more constraints on yourself before?

JS: In some ways, lyrically, it was the most difficult one to write from an intellectual standpoint, because there wasn’t a familiar path to take. Not to say it was a path that was new to music, that approach has existed forever. But it was new to us.

I found it to be like a circle. In the past, because the songs were always about something specific, and very frequently quoting people, they kind of wrote themselves. It was just a matter of narrating them in a clear way. But because this one was much more about the lower brain stem and the lower depths of hell, there weren’t any guidelines for them other than to just listen to the darker impulses of the universe. That sounds extraordinarily pretentious but that’s just, y’know, who I am [laughs]

Ovrld: [laughs] I think that makes sense though. It definitely feels like it’s not necessarily a depressing album but dark and brutal.

JS: Yeah, I wouldn’t disagree with that. I don’t have any problem with being depressing, either. It’s not as much of sad sack release as I think some others in the past have been. But yeah, to me it does not shy away from brutality.

Ovrld: Are there albums in your catalog where you feel your relationship with the material has drastically changed or maybe even reversed?

JS: Oh yeah, of course. As time passes, I think everybody’s relationship with things change. I can probably be more specific about it with particular songs than entire records, but yeah, absolutely, my relationship with them changes all the time

Ovrld: I feel like your relationship to guitar has changed quite a bit, at least view from the view of a listener. It sounds more rugged, lately, if that makes sense.

JS: I’ve been practicing a lot more [laughs]. That could be it. I mean, I’m still pretty much a hack. But I’m a better hack now than I used to be.

Ovrld: You’ve been touring for a few months now, too, in support of this album, right?

JS: Yeah, we toured in Europe for about six weeks and we start our tour in the US in May.

Ovrld: What is that transition like, going from a European tour to the US? I’ve heard from a lot of touring bands that Europe tends to be more hospitable.

JS: Not necessarily, there’s plusses and minuses to both. And they’re all practical. You can’t really compare one show in the world to anywhere else, there’s just so many variables. It’s more just the practical aspects of it.

In Europe, it is traditional for the promoter to handle your hotel and lodging for you, whereas that doesn’t happen in the United States, usually. The weather tends to be nicer in Europe than it is in the United States. Regionally, the food can be better, but the food can also be worse. The roads are much better in the United States. It’s also easier to find something to eat. Stuff is open all the time here and it’s not in Europe. And like if you need to find a guitar store or just pick up some cough drops, you can do that in five seconds here whereas in Europe you might be shit out of luck.

Basically, different things are easier in different spots. But the shows are always a crapshoot. Audiences are great and audiences are shitty all over the world. You just gotta go for it every night and hope you’re lucky.

Xiu Xiu | For The Benefit of All Living Beings - YouTube
Ovrld: Historically, how has Austin been for you?

JS: You know, we haven’t played there since…2012? I think I did a solo show there with Swans. But the whole band hasn’t been there forever. Frankly, I don’t remember [laughs].

Ovrld: [laughs] Well, it couldn’t have been that bad then, right?

JS: Oh, yeah, I’m sure if it was awful I’d remember it [laughs]. No, I’m looking forward to it, I’m looking forward to starting there. Especially since it’s Thor’s home territory.

Ovrld: I figured that would probably give it a little bit of a boost.

JS: I hope so.

Xiu Xiu play Mohawk tonight, May 1st, with Thor & Friends.

Nick Hanover got his degree from Disneyland, but he’s the last of the secret agents and he’s your man. Which is to say you can find his particular style of espionage here at Ovrld as well as Loser City, where he mostly writes about comics. You can also flip through his archives at  Comics Bulletin, which he is formerly the Co-Managing Editor of, and Spectrum Culture, where he contributed literally hundreds of pieces for a few years. Or if you feel particularly adventurous, you can always witness his odd .gif battles with his friends and enemies on twitter: @Nick_Hanover

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Back in 2018, we said Dregs had perfected the art of the temper tantrum on their self-titled EP. A year later, the band are back with a full scale LP and if the new single “Year of the Dog” is anything to go off of, it seems they’re utilizing an approach that’s more brooding than snotty. “Year of the Dog” chugs along like an army on the warpath, air raid guitars and mortar blast rhythms clearing the battlefield for valkyrie howl vocals. The track hits with sternum quaking impact and has the all encompassing darkness of some secret line-up where Siouxsie Sioux replaced Ozzy Osbourne in Black Sabbath. Give it a listen for yourself, then catch Dregs live this Saturday at Beerland for the album release party with Think No Think, Vampyre, Chromagnus, Searing Arrow (HTX) and DJ Pop Zeus between sets!

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview