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Setting up for the perfect night in or out requires three key ingredients: drinks, games and, most importantly, music. To set the mood and ensure your night goes off with a bang, you need the right tunes. Regardless of the genre you gravitate towards, a catchy hook and some inspired lyrics will always have the desired effect.

Before we dive into the best tunes to set your night off on the right note, let’s talk fundamentals. According to the Drug and Alcohol Review Journal, pre-drinking has become a popular pastime for the young. Surveying 65,126 people across 25 countries, researchers found that 85% of respondents in Ireland said they drank before a night out. With Guindex.ie showing that a pint of Guinness now costs as much as €7/£6 in some parts of Dublin, it’s hardly surprising people are enjoying a few liveners before they head into town.

It’s All a Game When You Pre-Drink Games and beer = the perfect combination.

Alongside the obligatory bottles of vodka, coke and beers, games form the second pillar of your pre-drinking fortress. Classics such as Never Have I Ever, Fuzzy Duck and Beer Pong are staple offerings during any self-respecting pre-drinks session. However, with the craze proving more popular than ever, big brands have jumped on the bandwagon. For example, Firebox sells a game known as If I Had To. Essentially a contest to see who can come up with the most outrageous scenarios, the game can plunge your night to filthy but fun new depths. For some slightly less lewd card-based action, What Do You Meme allows you to match the best comedy quips the best quote to random photos.

For an activity that flows from inside to outside, Bar Bingo takes a classic game and gives it a unique twist. As described by Wink Bingo, this game swaps traditional bingo calls for words associated with a night out. Like its selection of online bingo games, Wink advises players to divide their scorecards into 25 randomly numbered squares. From there, you need to fill them with around 15 words such as “stilettos”, “mojito” and “kebab”. Once the game starts, you need to cross off as many words as you see. To prove you’re not cheating, the rules dictate you have to take a picture of the object in question. Once someone completes a line and/or a full house, they’re declared the winner and the losers have to perform a forfeit.

The Right Stream Makes the Drink Flow

After you’ve loaded up on drinks and chosen some games, the final piece of the puzzle is the music. This is, perhaps, the trickiest part of any pre-drinks party. Because everyone has different tastes, picking tunes that everyone appreciates takes some serious thought. As a standard, Spotify will be your go-to resources.

If you’re a fan of underground beats, London-based streaming service Boiler Room is perfect. Essentially recreating the underground club scene through a combination of virtual reality and streaming, this platform is a great way to hear and support independent artists. Again, however, you need to know your audience. In practice, the best strategy is to stream a combination of commercial tracks via Spotify and mix in some indie tunes via Boiler Room.

Our Top Three Pre-Drinks Playlist Picks

To complete your pre-drinks preparation, the only thing left to do is compile a playlist. Although your tastes may differ from ours, the following tracks should provide an ideal starting point for a night to remember:

Casavettes: I’m not here, I’m Somewhere Else

Casavettes - I'm Not Here, I'm Somewhere Else - YouTube

With 85% of Irish drinkers kicking their night off at home, it would be remiss of us not to put Ireland’s Casavettes in our playlist. Releasing their debut album in February 2019, this Limerick-based band are a great blend of math and emo. I’m not here, I’m Somewhere Else is one of their title tracks and has a haunting, melancholic vibe that’s perfect for the start of the night. Offering just enough energy to get the juices flowing but not so much that you peak too early, this is a great tune to get things underway.

My Dog Ate Chad: Nintendo Flavored

Nintendo Flavored - YouTube

As the night starts to build up some steam, My Dog Ate Chad will get everyone’s feet tapping. Ben Folds-esque, Nintendo Flavored has a catchy drum/piano combo that’s perfect for keeping the energy levels high. What’s more, its playful tone will lead you perfectly into the drinking games. Lifting everyone’s spirits, this ditty should get everyone in the mood for beer pong, bar bingo or whatever activities you’ve got planned.

Beastie Boys: Brass Monkey

Brass Monkey - YouTube

What’s a drinking playlist without a song about drinking? According to media outlet Timeout.com, Beastie Boys Brass Monkey tops the list of drink-inspired drinking songs. The name of a low rent mimosa (orange juice mixed with malt whiskey), a Brass Monkey has the same kick as this Beastie Boys track. Essentially a proverbial slap in the face, Brass Monkey is decidedly urban with a touch of humour. For us, that’s the perfect combination to help you shake off the effects of too much alcohol and get you ready for a night out.

As we’ve said, the perfect pre-drinks playlist probably doesn’t exist. Because musical tastes will vary depending on who you invite and what the vibe is, you can never create a definitive list. However, the three tunes we’ve listed above are certainly capable of setting the right tone and should guide you through the various stages of a session. Indeed, if you can use these in conjunction with your own picks, a few decent games and the right selection of drinks, you’ll be well on your way to the perfect night in.

The post Perfect Pre-Drinks Preparation: How to Choose the Right Music and More for a Night In appeared first on Overblown.

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Rock and roll has always appealed rebels, risk-takers, and gamblers, and while it may no longer be the driving force in popular music that it once was, it doesn’t mean that people are ignoring the classics that have come before. Whether you’re a card shark yourself, or simply enjoy hearing songs about casinos and smoke-filled rooms, here are five songs to put on your next Texas Hold’em playlist.

On the Nickel – Tom Waits

Tom Waits: On the Nickel - YouTube

Old-school Tom Waits writes the kind of gin-soaked bawdry balladry that evokes charismatic gamblers, reckless passion, and dreadful hangovers. “On the Nickel” refers to 5th Street in LA, as it would have appeared between the 1950s and 1970s (the latter period, when Mr Waits himself was haunting it). In this setting, “a royal flush can never beat a pair”, presumably because the guy with the bad hand is a violent cheat. Sentimental and sloppy, play this one near the end of the night.

Ace of Spades – Motorhead

We’ll admit, it’s a cliché to put Motorhead, especially this Motorhead song, on a list like this, but that’s only because it so masterfully captures the spirit, risk and lucky windfall that gambling and rock and roll are all about. “Ace of Spades” also draws on ample imagery from blackjack terminology and lore, which are certainly not lost on modern audiences. With blackjack available at online casino Magical Vegas online, the reach of blackjack far exceeds the limits of Las Vegas, with modern players finding more and more to love in Motorhead’s big hit. RIP Lemmy Kilmister.

Leonard Cohen – The Stranger Song

Leonard Cohen The Stranger Song - YouTube

Lines like “like any dealer he was watching for the card that is so high and wild, he’ll never need to deal another” don’t make a lot of sense when applied to a conventional game of poker, but they do sound pretty badass anyway. No one’s quite sure whether Cohen was writing about gambling or something more vaguely cosmic and sinister here, but it’s awesome whatever the case.

The Card Cheat – The Clash

The Clash - The Card Cheat - YouTube

On a record packed with classics, The Card Cheat is relegated to London Calling’s third side. A tale of a cheat at poker who meets an unlucky end, this song is nonetheless vibrant, uplifting and a great energizer for the mid-game.

Pokerface – Ghostface Killah

Gamblers are storytellers (some would say liars), and Ghostface is one of the finest in the business. Pokerface isn’t so much a story as a trip through a carnival ride of intimidating and grandiose gambling lore. Did Ghost live these lines? Does it matter? Whatever the case, this song definitely deserves a place on this list.

The list of rock and roll gambling standards could go on and on. Add these to your next playlist, and we hope the spirit of these jams will help you out when you’re feeling lucky!

The post Top 5 Songs For When You’re Feeling Lucky appeared first on Overblown.

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Overblown by Martin Wilson - 1w ago

It’s almost two years to the day since we featured Crake as our New Band of the Day. We’ve featured each of their releases since then so it was quite the thrill to see them announced as the support act for the imminent Big Thief tour. Ahead of that tour the band are sharing ‘Glycerin’ from their forthcoming Dear Natalie EP which will be released on 14th June.

‘Glycerin’ has a beautifully melancholic grace dominated by it’s slow pace and lethargic guitar chords. Its soft vocals and delicate melody feel like they’re attempting to float away but are anchored firmly in place by the occasional squalor of the lead guitar. The song has a sleepy quality but is never stagnant. Those lucky enough to be catching the Big Thief shows will lap this up.

Rather delightfully, the Dear Natalie EP will be released as a series of Tarot cards each designed by vocalist Rowan Sandle. We’ll not pretend to know much about Tarot but if you want to find your higher self you’ll do a lot worse than adding a bit of Crake to your life.

Glycerin is out on 10th May 2019 and will be followed by the Dear Natalie EP on 14th June. Keep an eye on the Crake bandcamp page here

Crake then hit the road with Big Thief. Catch them at the following shows:
18th May Brudenell Social Club, LEEDS
19th May SWG3, GLASGOW
21st May Vicar Street, DUBLIN
22nd May O2 Ritz Manchester, MANCHESTER
23rd May Roundhouse ,LONDON
24th May SWX Bristol, BRISTOL
26th May Cambridge Junction, CAMBRIDGE
27th May Trabendo, PARIS
28th May Botanique, BRUSSELS
3rd June Lido, BERLIN
4th June Bogen F, ZURICH

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The post New Music: Crake – Glycerin appeared first on Overblown.

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Japan’s shoegaze scene has been an immutable truth for more than two decades. A wellspring of fresh innovation, consistency, and beauty juxtaposed with noise. This year in particular has seen the wide gamut of shoegaze explored on all sides. Though it has been relatively short on full length shoegaze projects or EPs, it has also seen the release of some of the years absolute best albums of any genre or country of origin. Without further ado here are our 5 best Japanese shoegaze albums of the year so far.

Spool – Spool (Shoegaze, Indie Rock – February 13th)

SPOOL - Be My Valentine (Music Video) - YouTube

As the Japanese shoegaze awakening has continued towards the end of its second decade, I’ve found myself lining up artists to their nebulous western equivalents. So and so is kind of like the My Bloody Valentine of Japan, and so and so is like the Ride, etc. The one notable absence that didn’t really strike me until just a day or two ago, after finally getting to listen to Spool’s S/T debut album, was Verve. The band who perfected that combination of britpop and shoegaze which redirected their underground leaning into mass pop hysteria. Something alternative and legit but also playable at a social gathering without offending your nan.

Spool are still a bit more A Storm in Heaven than Urban Hymns, but the strong pop (especially britpop and indie pop) influences are still strong. With the early gothic undertones of “Be My Valentine”, the jangley irony-pop of “Shotgun”, or the dreamy indie balladry of “Sway, Fadeaway (Angel Version)” it’s easy to see a lane for a band like this to be playing on KEXP in a few years. There’s a genuine sonic effort to not just doll out heavy MBV worship and insular focus, while also not succumbing to the pure pop aspirations of bands like Kinoko Teikoku.

The Novembers – Angels (Art Rock, Post-Punk, Shoegaze – March 6th)

▲THE NOVEMBERS「DOWN TO HEAVEN」(OFFICIAL AUDIO) ▲ - YouTube

Angels is the most substantial album to come out of Japan in 2019. This is not an achievement accomplished by razor-thin margins or wavering indifference, it’s a proclamation screeched into a tin can coming from the back of your conference room. Arresting, startling, and a completely unforeseen revelation about the anarchist spirit of your co-workers. Sure I know of The Novembers, they’ve been some of the most stalwart contributors to Japan’s new shoegaze revolution, releasing a string of highly functional and pleasant shoegaze albums since 2008. Sure I know of them, but I have never particularly cared much about them. They existed in a space, in a box, between the lines.

The perfect description of The November’s new sound, or lack thereof, is their cover of “Ghost Rider”, kicking off the final third of the album, which sounds like the original song spit out into the moshpit of a Daughters’ show. Overlapping industrial and grind sensibilities played over noisy beds of synthetic textures and anarchic yelps. It’s what I imagine Alan Vega would have dreamed of had he grow up in the early 2010s. The most incredible quality of the album though, is that what follows is not more post-punk-ey skin-shearing noise in the vein of “Ghost Rider” or fellow barn-burners “Down to Heaven” or “Bad Dream”, but instead the albums lowest sinking dream-pop ballad “Close to Me”. The Novembers’ couldn’t be any less concerned with the rigid sonic boundaries I thought they lived in.

・・・・・・・・・  – Points (Shoegaze, Dream Pop, Techno – April 4th)

・・・・・・・・・ - Points [Full Album] - YouTube

Can You Feel The Change of the Seasons?

Summer is here and the spring has left. Little trivial observations we make so routinely, like the bands we know calling it quits, and the lives we will imagine them living from here on out. A fruitless gesture we make in our minds to try and sort out these lives and the importance these silly little bands play into them, I wonder where The Dismemberment Plan are now, I hope they are doing ok. I hope Points find their new spring and their new place, because they will be dearly missed. Right as they were beginning to bloom we must bid ado.

I’m sick of growing old. I remember watching movies in my old apartment a year ago, thinking about the new relationship I was embarking on, and the life I might lead after college came to an end. I was listening to Points’ debut EP back then, wondering what it would feel like to do something new and slip out of myself after 21 years in this ceaseless forward motion towards nothing in particular. Now I march forward to nothing but the sound of my own limp shuffle. Can’t somebody just tell me where this is going, at least before I could lean into that. Points seemed so sure that being young could mean something, that we could live forever in a state of waiting and yearning. I guess the season was bound to change eventually, I’m no longer blooming. The ground is drying out under me and I’m sure this will all be for nothing. I will miss your colors and your sense that there was water deep beneath me Points.

azsakano – Romantics (Shoegaze, Dream Pop – February 1st)

夜のこども - YouTube

For those of you who like your shoegaze like you like your life, constant and consistent, there are always Japanese musicians willing to create beautiful, straight-forward, and dreamy-as-hell shoegaze just as they always have, and perhaps always will. Azsa Kano is not by any metric the first to stand where she stands, but she is most certainly a hell of a musician to hold on to that legacy. Her sounds are so rich and filled with the kind of plinky, layered guitar textures that heavily rewards repeated and attentive listens

On Romantics, her debut mini-album, following her Good-bye, Pessimism, and 暑中 EPs she feels like smoke, finally shuffling off her simple frame and achieving something tremendous.

Soft as snow and warm inside. It’s the kind of assured genre mastery that could lead to something beyond. Only time will tell.

Michinori Toyota – Psychedelic Lovely Last Night (Experimental Rock, Shoegaze, Indie Folk – January 18th)

豊田道倫 - 国道沿いの (2019年1月18日発売『サイケデリック・ラブリー・ラスト・ナイト』より) - SoundCloud
(389 secs long, 2288 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Michinori Toyota’s sprawling career is less about the merits of individual albums as it is the merits of individual songs. Across his almost 25 solo albums he has been consistently bizarre, boundary pushing, and difficult. A quality which has extended through both his songwriting and his sonic constructions. Within each album it’s always been a sort of choose-your-own-adventure as you worm your way through the experiments that exploded in his face, and the ones that paid dividends. Psychedelic Lovely Last Night is no different, though slightly easier to recommend for it’s shorter length, and higher overall batting average. Pulling away from the more atonal schizophrenia of last year’s Love, Art, And the Night of Goodbye, released under his Paradise Garage pseudonym, he delivers a brief 38 minutes through just seven tracks which are almost universally enjoyable. Between the shoegaze experiments of “Kukudo Zoi No” and “Revolution 48”, and the noise rock of “1991”, Michinori gives up some of his best folk numbers to date. Relaxed and confident in their generally simple delivery.

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The post The 5 Best Japanese Shoegaze Albums of 2019 (So Far) appeared first on Overblown.

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The November’s 7th album is called Angels

Who: Yūsuke Kobayashi (vocals, guitar), Kengo Matsumoto (guitar), Hirofumi Takamatsu (bass), Ryōsuke Yoshiki (drums)

What: Art Rock, Post Punk, Shoegaze, Dream Pop, Noise Pop

Where: Tokyo, Japan

Why: Angels is the most substantial album to come out of Japan in 2019. This is not an achievement accomplished by razor-thin margins or wavering indifference, it’s a proclamation screeched into a tin can coming from the back of your conference room. Arresting, startling, and a completely unforeseen revelation about the anarchist spirit of your co-workers. Sure I know of The Novembers, they’ve been some of the most stalwart contributors to Japan’s new shoegaze revolution, releasing a string of highly functional and pleasant shoegaze albums since 2008. Sure I know of them, but I have never particularly cared much about them. They existed in a space, in a box, between the lines.

▲THE NOVEMBERS「DOWN TO HEAVEN」(OFFICIAL AUDIO) ▲ - YouTube

Sometime around 2016 I discovered Suicide’s self titled 1977 album. Anyone familiar with it will know that it is one of the great musical masterpieces, and of the first albums to begin those punk to post-punk transitional years. They will also know it as one of the most lopsided albums ever created, playing three near perfect songs (“Ghost Rider”, “Rocket U.S.A.”, and “Cheree”) before pushing into the more experimental and difficult second half. Those first songs were the perfect marriage of synthetic tones into propulsive punk music, especially “Ghost Rider”. I remember thinking at the time that those songs were, in their own dated way, the most punk-rock songs ever made, completely unconcerned within even the burgeoning punk-scene’s rigid sonic boundaries. Completely singular and anachronistic.

The perfect description of The November’s new sound, or lack thereof, is their cover of “Ghost Rider”, kicking off the final third of the album, which sounds like the original song spit out into the moshpit of a Daughters’ show. Overlapping industrial and grind sensibilities played over noisy beds of synthetic textures and anarchic yelps. It’s what I imagine Alan Vega would have dreamed of had he grow up in the early 2010s. What follows is not more post-punk-ey skin-shearing in the vein of “Ghost Rider” or fellow barn-burners “Down to Heaven” or “Bad Dream”, but instead the albums lowest sinking dream-pop ballad “Close to Me”. The Novembers’ couldn’t be any less concerned with the rigid sonic boundaries I thought they lived in.

The Novembers are punk af.

▲THE NOVEMBERS「ANGELS」(OFFICIAL AUDIO)▲ - YouTube

This album is splitting noise pop pulled out of the dreck and mud of Los Angeles’ The Smell, sweat and spit out of The Kitchen, and transcendent shoegaze orbiting upward and outward from Tokyo’s city center. An all consuming work so far beyond the work that precede it, it necessitates questions of where The Novembers’ had been, and what had they been doing for the past ten years. Give praise to Angels when they appear, small miracles and big ones.

Follow The Novembers on Facebook and Twitter.

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The post New Band of the Day #231: The Novembers appeared first on Overblown.

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Overblown by Nathan Alexander Howard - 2M ago

In the mid to late 60s, at both the height of Psychedelic Rock (and by extension Psychedelia in general) as well as the Folk revival, it wasn’t uncommon for artists to marry the two concepts together. With artists in the United Kingdom such as The Incredible String Band, Comus, and Donovan, and in the United States with The Byrds, The Godz, and Tim Buckley. All of these artists have something in common, which is that their music was released on record labels and, generally speaking, was readily available for the public to consume.

Before Punk and Indie would later take the world by storm and popularised the Do-It-Yourself ethics that are essentially the norm for many artists now, there was a strange hotbed of music that was usually privately pressed and, more often than not, home-recorded happening back in the 60s and 70s. These strange, obscure gems would later be lumped into a vague “movement”, which in some circles is known as Loner Folk and is very much a form of outsider music because of this. Musically a lot of these artists have very little in common with one another on the surface level besides the fact that they all use acoustic guitars and vocals as their main (and sometimes only) instrumentation, but peeling away the layers does indeed show that there is an underlying theme to a lot of these works. Their melancholic lyricism frequently deals with introspective themes and emotional vulnerability, acting somewhat as a precursor to the Bedroom Pop scene of the 10s a good 40 years prior. This is a list of five of some of the best albums in the genre.

Bob Desper – New Sounds (1974)

Bob Desper is an interesting individual. Born and raised in Oregon, a childhood accident at the age of ten left Bob blind, which is believed to have had a great affect on the music Bob creates for this record, but this is mostly speculation on the part of people who have listened to the album and know the story behind the artist, as Bob himself to no one’s knowledge has confirmed this. The album itself was recorded in one day in one take, and reportedly a good chunk of the material was actually improvised on the spot, which is a testament to how talented Bob is as a musician and songwriter as there is not a single weak song here.

Musically speaking Bob’s music bears the most resemblance to the Folk movement of his day and is remarkably similar in style and tone to that of fellow cult Folk artist Jackson C Frank (who I also highly recommend checking out), but there’s hints of strangeness here and there, the phase shifted guitar of ‘Darkness Is Like A Shadow’ (the only instance such an effect is used on the record), the fact that everything is laden with reverb, and Bob’s own beautiful mastery of dynamics, going from the tiniest pin drop to the loudest strums within the space of the same song, such as on ‘It’s Too Late’ and ‘Lonely Man’. Apparently Bob crafted this album in part to help people come to terms with their inner turmoil much like he had before making this album, which is a noble and uplifting intent and translates rather well with an undercurrent of Christianity and in Bob’s own words “Togetherness” that permeates this album, such intent can be heard best on tracks like ‘Liberty’ and ‘Let It Shine For You’.

It's Too Late - YouTube

Recommended Tracks: Darkness Is Like A Shadow, It’s Too Late, To A Friend Of Mine, Liberty

John Angaiak – I’m Lost In The City (1971)

This is the least psychedelic of the records presented here, but it’s such a fantastic record and too unique to not talk about. A native of Alaska and a Yupiit, John enrolled at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks and became actively involved in the preservation of his native language as part of the establishment’s Eskimo Language Workshop. As someone who has played the guitar since an early age, he felt inspired to work on a project to preserve his language, and with the help of his friend Stephen Halbern he managed to achieve just that.

The result was an album called I’m Lost In The City, it became the first written documentation of the previously oral Yup’ik language. The album is roughly split into two halves across two languages, the first side being in Yup’ik, and the second side being in English. Unfortunately translations for the Yup’ik lyrics are, to my knowledge, impossible to find (perhaps they come as liner notes on the vinyl edition?), but the English lyrics should give one enough insight into what they most likely dealt with. The title track ‘I’m Lost In The City’ deals with the overwhelming nature of being isolated in an urban landscape, with ‘Sunday Morning’ tackling the topic of Christianity and personal faith. ‘I’m Lost In The City’ is an absolutely crucial listen, not just for Folk aficionados, but also for anyone who wants some music from outside of the Anglosphere.

Recommended Tracks: Ak’a Tamaani, Sunday Morning, I’m Lost In The City

Philip Lewin – Am I Really Here All Alone? (1975)

Not much is known about Philip other than the fact he was born in the United States and had the opportunity to move in with his friends over at Toronto, Canada after graduating from university. The recording itself is rather rudimentary, very much a home recording on a stereo reel to reel which likely has a built-in echo unit as this album is drenched in psychedelic sounding slapback delays, predominantly featuring rhythm and lead guitars, and vocals, although ’Touch’ takes a diversion from this a piano taking centre stage.

That said, in spite of the basic recording quality and stripped back instrumentation the lyricism is rather diverse, in Philip’s own words: “I was once told that one should first write about one’s own experiences, then, expand to documenting the observed experiences of those around, and, finally write about what one imagines. Am I Really Here All Alone? encompasses all of the above.” Some of the songs deal with direct experiences he’s had, whilst others are shrouded in metaphor. He’s definitely no slouch when it comes to this aspect of his music from the beautifully melancholic songs such as ‘Unusual Day’, ‘Watercolours’, and ’The Magic Within You’ to the Bluesy swagger of ‘King Of Queens’ and ’Sweet Georgia’s Got To Be Home Tonight’, and the haunting closer ‘Am I Really Here All Alone?’ he has a lot of his bases covered for a compelling record.

Recommended Tracks: Watercolours, Back Home, To You, The Magic Within You, Am I Really Here All Alone?

Simon Finn – Pass The Distance (1971)

Perhaps the most Avant-Garde album on this list, ‘Pass The Distance’ is quite an unusual one. As a native of Surrey, Simon quickly moved to London in 1967 at the age of 16, often finding himself sleeping on park benches due to being homeless. Nonetheless he managed to somehow work on music, he managed to even open for Al Stewart, a prominent figure in the British Folk revival, and in 1970 released his debut album, Pass The Distance at the age of 19. For me age is usually an irrelevant number when discussing music and is usually indicative of our obsession with youth equating to good art, but in this instance it’s impossible to not mention due to how wonderfully strange, excitingly experimental, yet amazingly cohesive this album is.

It’s no coincidence that he eventually had a brief stint in the seminal Neofolk band Current 93 as listening to the two artists side by side showcases a lot of similarities, a lot of which appear in the crown jewel of this album ‘Jerusalem’. The highly repetitive song structures, willingness to experiment with Avant-Garde ideas, the sometimes frantic vocal delivery that is unhinged in it’s passion, and mystical lyricism are all things they share in common with one another. One often wonders if David Tibet just listened to this album on repeat for the basis of transforming C93 from an early Industrial project to a more Folk orientated one? Who knows, but it’s a compelling theory.

Recommended Tracks: Very Close Friend, Jerusalem, Patrice, Big White Car

Honourary Mention: Mike Craig – Stuck in Phoenix (1972)

This record is too good to not get at least a honourable mention. Unfortunately there’s no information on Mike Craig anywhere to my knowledge, although presuming this album is biographical then he comes from San Francisco. Stuck In Phoenix can arguably be seen as a loose concept album that is quite literally about a man in Phoenix, Arizona. A lot of the songs on this album are typical of the American Folk Revival, but then there are moments where Mike indulges in some Bluesy and Psychedelic tendencies, which results in stuff like ‘San Francisco Sunshine Mary’, a song that sounds remarkably similar to Donovan’s ‘Season Of The Witch’. One could only speculate that Mike was a big fan of the Scottish musician. That’s not to dismiss Mike here as his easily songs stand on their own, the haunting Doo Wop vibes of ‘Dancing Lady’, the aforementioned Psych Folk of ‘San Francisco Sunshine Mary’, there’s a lot on offer here, definitely one to check out for yourself.

Mike Craig [USA] - b_1. Dancing Lady. - YouTube
Dave Bixby – Ode To Quetzalcoatl (1969)

This is without a shadow of a doubt probably the most essential album when it comes to this “movement”. As a teenager in the mid 60s Michigander Dave Bixby was intimately involved in the Rock scene of his day, which unfortunately meant he came into contact with the drugs culture of his day. He eventually became obsessed with LSD and burned out on it in a similar fashion to Syd Barrett, before quitting drugs entirely and then joining a cult lead by a man called Don DeGraff. Having been playing these songs at their meetings in the basement of a church for quite some time, Dave was encouraged by members of the cult to record an album, and with funding from DeGraff himself they recorded it in DeGraff’s living room on a stereo reel to reel with a built in echo unit.

Whilst this album was made partially with the intent of spreading the word of this cult and growing their membership in mind, and on the surface level comes across as just an ex-hippie ranting about how great Jesus is (in fact some detractors of the album are put off by it for this very reason), it does not take away from the fact that it is a deeply emotional account of one man’s discovery of faith after being left hopeless and isolated for many years, with ‘Drug Song’ directly dealing with the fact that LSD has had a negative impact on his life, to ‘Free Indeed’ being his discovery of faith, and ‘Mother’ being an attempt for him to reconcile with his mother after his estrangement from her, and ‘Waiting For The Rains’ being a metaphor for wiping the slate clean and starting over anew. There is a fantastic documentary about the man on YouTube, which for anyone who is further curious about Dave and his story should definitely check out.

Recommended Tracks: Drug Song, Free Indeed, Mother, Morning Sun

FAR OFF SOUNDS - Dave Bixby, God's Singing Man - YouTube

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The post An Ode To Loner Folk appeared first on Overblown.

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Overblown by Jamie Coughlan - 2M ago

Casavettes debut album Senselessness is out today!

Who: Guitar, Vocals – Diarmuid O’Shea, Bass – Michael Hennessy, and Drums – Stephen Ryan.

What: Math/emo.

Where: Limerick, Ireland.

Why: Hailing from Ireland’s third city Limerick, Casavettes are a trio that craft raw and emotional math tinged emo that also touches on aspects of post-hardcore. Think American Football, if someone had stolen all the jam from American Football’s collection of vintage doughnuts. You can expect periods of melancholia interspersed with fuzzy guitars and the occasional shout wrought with emotion.

The outfit has just released their debut album Senselessness and it is quite the charmer. A raw and fervent affair, it displays a band who has confidence in their abilities and sound. A beautifully intense experience.

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The post New Band of the Day #230: Casavettes appeared first on Overblown.

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Sorry, Marshal’s debut EP, titled ep 1, is out now.

Lo-fi shoegaze outfit Sorry, Marshal has shared a new and wonderfully charming track titled ‘Neenah’. One part shoegaze, one part dream pop, and one part indie rock, the song is an endearing jaunt through lo-fi fuzzy ass guitars. The group, which was founded by Greg Pamer, reminds us that sometimes all one needs is a guitar, a fuzz box and a melody. Palmer had been on hiatus from music for the last ten years. He’d obviously been storing up his creatives juices for the big reveal.

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Neenah - YouTube

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The post Shoegaze/dream pop: Sorry, Marshal share charming track ‘Neenah’ appeared first on Overblown.

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BRUTUS’ new album Nest is coming out on Sargent House on March 29th.

Post-hardcore power trio Brutus continues to impress with the release of their latest single ‘Cemetery’. The track sees them continue to expand on the promise of their debut album Burst. Using that album as a starting point, on ‘Cemetery’ the band continue to lump pretty much any metal genre they can find into a pot and mix it all together. Ostensibly a post-hardcore track the song also displays a touch of black metal, alternative rock, and a big old dollop of sludge.

We’re enamoured. Where does Sargent House find these bands?

Brutus "Cemetery" (Official Video) - YouTube

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The post Post-hardcore: Brutus share soaring new track ‘Cemetery’ appeared first on Overblown.

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Deafheaven’s most recent album, Ordinary Corrupt Human Love, is out now via ANTI-.

Post black metal outfit Deafheaven have shared a brand new track titled ‘Black Brick’. Taken a bit of a turn from the experimental and genre defying recent album Ordinary Corrupt Human Love, ‘Black Brick’ sees the outfit bound and bluster through over seven minutes of pretty straight up black metal. It is ferocious. Listen below.

Deafheaven - "Black Brick" - YouTube

They also heading out on tour with Zeal & Ardor and Baroness. Mighty.

Tour Dates:

3/08 – Houston, TX @ White Oak Music Hall *
3/09 – Austin, TX @ Emo’s *
3/10 – Dallas, TX @ Canton Hall *
3/12 – Phoenix, AZ @ Van Buren *
3/13 – Los Angeles, CA @ The Wiltern *
3/14 – Anaheim, CA @ The House of Blues *
3/16 – Berkeley, CA @ UC Theatre *
3/18 – Portland, OR @ Roseland *
3/19 – Seattle, WA @ The Showbox *
3/20 – Vancouver, BC @ The Vogue Theatre *
3/22 – Edmonton, CA @ Union Hall *
3/23 – Calgary, AB @ The Palace Theatre *
3/24 – Spokane, WA @ The Knitting Factory *
3/26 – Salt Lake City, UT @ The Complex *
3/27 – Denver, CO @ The Ogden Theater *
3/29 – Minneapolis, MN @ Skyway Theatre *
3/30 – Madison, WI @ The Sylvee *
3/31 – Chicago, IL @ Riviera Theater *
4/02 – Toronto, ON @ The Danforth Music Hall *
4/03 – Montreal, QC @ The Corona Theater *
4/05 – Sayreville, NJ @ Starland Ballroom *
4/06 – Worcester, MA @ The Palladium *
4/07 – Albany, NY @ Upstate Concert Hall *
4/09 – Cleveland, OH @ Agora Theatre *
4/10 – Silver Spring, MD @ The Fillmore *
4/12 – New York, NY @ Terminal 5 *
4/14 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Fillmore / Decibel Metal & Beer Fest *
6/11 – Raleigh, NC @ The Ritz ^
6/12 – Charlotte, NC @ The Fillmore ^
6/13 – Asheville, NC @ The Orange Peel ^
6/14 – Manchester, TN @ Bonnaroo
8/16-18 – Las Vegas @ Psycho Las Vegas

* with Baroness, Zeal & Ardor
^ with Gojira

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The post Post black metal: Deafheaven share b-side titled ‘Black Brick’ appeared first on Overblown.

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