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Our Simple Homestead by Tracy Fredrychowski - 5M ago
How to freeze a bushel of corn in 15 minutes!

Thanks to a couple new farming friends I’ll never dread freezing corn again!

This past weekend I had the pleasure of spending time with my friend’s family, who happens to do a lot of vegetable farming. I spent all my time asking questions and taking in as much as I could from their 30 years of experience in growing vegetables, especially corn.  I love learning new things and this weekend I learned a new way to freeze corn.

I came home with a bushel of sweet corn and about that many tomatoes. I was a little worried about how I was going to get them put up before they all went bad.  However, with my new freezing method, I was able to get a whole bushel of corn done in 15 minutes.

This was the easiest method I’ve ever come across and they swear by it, It was really as simple as one, two, three…

1. “With a sharp knife, cut the silk end off pass the worm (if there is one).” 

2. With the husk left on, place the cob in a heavy duty freezer bag or seal-a-meal bags.

3. After the bag is filled and sealed, place the bag in the freezer

How much simpler can you get?

Straight from the freezer you can put the frozen cob it in the microwave for a few minutes, boil the cob in water or even let it thaw and cut it off the cob. For the first time, I cooked a couple ears in the microwave Sunday night for dinner and the husk steams the corn and it tasted great. You can even throw the frozen cobs; in the husk on the grill if you like that grilled corn flavor and the husk will protect the corn and steam it as it cooks.

What a great tip on how to freeze corn!

If you have not tried to freeze your corn this way take it from two very experienced southern gardeners.  Now…finding time to do up the tomatoes that are all over my porch is my next task!

Thanks for stopping by!

Tracy Lynn

 

P.S. Do you like what you are reading? Are you looking to slow down and live a simpler life?

I am so happy you’ve landed here and I can share some of the simple living principles that have made a huge difference in our lives. 

To give you a place to start I have created a 5 Steps to Simple Living Guide that I am offering to you free.  

Along with this free download, is included a complimentary subscription to our weekly Our Simple Homestead Newsletter. Each week you’ll receive simple living tips, homesteading ideas, old-fashion recipes and every once in awhile a touch of the Amish lifestyle.
 
Click here to receive your free download of 5 Steps to Simple Living today!

DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation from affiliate and sponsored posts on this blog.

Want more? Read on.

The post How to Freeze Corn appeared first on Our Simple Homestead.

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Cheap Garden Beds – Using Recycled Building Supplies 

After four years of heavy use, my raised garden beds are starting to fall apart and need replacing. Before I gave in to spending money on supplies, I wanted to make sure there wasn’t anything lying around the farm that I could use instead of buying new. Learning how to build a cheap raised garden bed, while sticking to our budget, was a fun challenge. 

The first thing I did was take a walk around the farm to see what I could find to use. I found cinder blocks, a stack of pallets, a pile of bricks, a pile of downed trees and piles and piles of trimmed branches. 

With those items on my list, I went searching online for some ideas on how to build a cheap raised garden bed. I was so excited that I found a plan for each item on my list.

Brick Raised Garden by Vegetable Gardener

 Pallet beds by Garden Reboot

 Down Trees by Small Farm


Wattle Fencing
 by Apartment Therapy

Cinder Block Garden Bed by Miscellaneous Topics and Ideas by Dee

There are so many things we can repurpose to use for a raised garden bed. Now I just have to decide which old material to use and the greatest thing is I won’t have to spend a dime.

We even took our recycling to a new level by using discarded pallets to make this beautiful garden fence. If you want to see how we built this picket fence for under $200 click here.

Thanks for stopping by!

Tracy Lynn

 

P.S. Do you like what you are reading? Are you looking to slow down and live a simpler life?

I am so happy you’ve landed here and I can share some of the simple living principles that have made a huge difference in our lives. 

To give you a place to start I have created a 5 Steps to Simple Living Guide that I am offering you free.  

Along with this free download, is included a complimentary subscription to our weekly Our Simple Homestead Newsletter. Each week you’ll receive simple living tips, homesteading ideas, old-fashion recipes and every once in awhile a touch of the Amish lifestyle.
 
Click here to receive your free download of 5 Steps to Simple Living today!

DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation from affiliate and sponsored posts on this blog.

Want more? Read on.

The post How to Build a Cheap Raised Garden Bed appeared first on Our Simple Homestead.

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Old Fashion by Nature – Simplistic by Choice

What it doesn’t mean is depriving yourself of the good things in life. What it means is to slow down life and enjoy life.

I was born in a small rural town in Pennsylvania where waking up to chickens crowing and gardens needing to be tended to was nothing but normal.  I guess you could say my old fashion simple lifestyle was born right into me.  I knew I was drawn to a way of life that the world around me was fighting hard to escape.  Fast cars, fancy appliances, and fast food were creepy in fast and I either jumped on or off the bandwagon.  I choose to jump off fast and I’ve never looked back.  Many of my friends told me I had an old fashion spirit and I loved because that is how I’ve always felt. 

I still remember 30 years ago being that girl who always hung her clothes out, used cloth diapers, made baby food and cooked everything from scratch.  While all the new mothers around me were trying to balance working full-time and starting a family, I was fighting to keep true to what I held dear …my old fashion spirit.  Really I think I was born a century too late:)

Like never before the simple living movement is taking the world by storm. The desire to be self-sufficient is all about learning to consume less and live more mindfully in the 21st century.

So you might be asking, how do you live a simple life? 

You can start by adopting some of these basic elements to simple living:

  1. Frugal Living  – The true sense of frugal living means aiming to live within your means.  It means finding every way possible to repay your debt and not incur more. It’s more than just saving money, it’s reducing your consumption and learning how to be more sustainable. It can also cross over into decluttering and choosing a minimalistic lifestyle. It’s the ability to learn how to live on less and be happy living on a lower income. 
  2. Homesteading – The term homesteading has changed its meaning over the last few decades. Now urban homesteading and backyard homesteading have taken on a whole new look.  No matter if you live in the city or in the country anyone can adopt a homesteading lifestyle.  That lifestyle can include growing your own food, raising backyard chickens, raising bees, choosing a community-based life instead of technology and so much more.
  3. Green Living – Sustainable living goes hand-in-hand with homesteading.  Concentrating on reducing your carbon footprint and living a healthy lifestyle is at its core.  Buying locally organic food to generating your own power are just a few ways you can “go green.” The motto for sustainable living is “reduce, reuse, repair and recycle’.
  4. Simple Living – Living a simpler life is all about restoring a healthy balance to your life. It’s filling your calendar with more “no’s then “yes’s and it’s moving away from all of those things that are dissatisfying. It’s reducing the activities your kids participate in and replacing them with more family time. And lastly its all about reducing the things in your life that cause you stress.  

Living simply can mean different things to different people, myself included.

Here are just a few ways I surround myself with the simpler side of things:
  • Letting the bright sunshine dry my clothes while enjoying the sounds of nature around me. Choosing not to give the power company any more of our paycheck is just a bonus.
  • Listening to our wind-up antique clock, washing dishes by hand, and burning firewood to heat the house in the winter.
  • Watching bread rise on the counter while smelling dinner cooking in the oven.  There is very little if almost nothing in our house that is pre-packaged or processed. Our meals are homemade from scratch and I know exactly what is in every meal.
  • Opening my pantry to see a years’ worth of food we have canned, dried, and preserved. What we don’t grow and butcher ourselves we buy organic.
  • Seeing that my sewing machine gets a workout.  Everything is mended until it can’t be mended any longer and then it’s put to other uses. 
  • Enjoying a sunset evening or a storm rolling in with my hubby on our porch rather than an expensive dinner out or a trip to the mall.
  • Feeling dirt between my fingers, the smell of roses or the taste of a sunshine warmed tomato fresh from the garden.
  • Finding a good deal at the second-hand store while knowing the same item would have cost triple at the big box store.
  • Walking by the TV and knowing it has not been on in days and no one is missing it.

To me living a simple life means shunning the things in my life that add no value.  Living this lifestyle does come with a price tag and it usually requires a little old-fashion labor, but in the end, it forces me to slow down and gives me the peace I look for every day.

What does living a simple life mean to you?

Thanks for stopping by!

Tracy Lynn

Here is one of the most popular products in our Shop Our Simple Homestead Store:

 

P.S. Do you like what you are reading? Are you looking to slow down and live a simpler life?

I am so happy you’ve landed here and I can share some of the simple living principles that have made a huge difference in our lives. 

To give you a place to start I have created a 5 Steps to Simple Living Guide that I am offering to you free.  

Along with this free download, is included a complimentary subscription to our weekly Our Simple Homestead Newsletter. Each week you’ll receive simple living tips, homesteading ideas, old-fashion recipes and every once in awhile a touch of the Amish lifestyle.
 
Click here to receive your free download of 5 Steps to Simple Living today!

DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation from affiliate and sponsored posts on this blog.

Want more? Read on.

The post What does it mean to live a simple life? appeared first on Our Simple Homestead.

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Goodbye to things, hello to simple living and living with less!

Living a simple, minimalistic lifestyle is all about reducing the number of possessions you own to only those things that add value to your life.

In our home, we live by the unspoken rule that if it’s not used in six months, it serves no purpose in our life.

Paring down the extra “things” in our life has not only been fundamental to our lifestyle it’s given us a chance to think about what really makes us happy and what we really need to survive.

We were just like every other typical American out there.  We thought in order to be happy we needed to buy and collect as much as we could afford. Unfortanley that also meant we needed more money to buy the things we thought we needed which ended up in massive credit card debt and an unsatisfying lifestyle. It was a vicious circle that we were all but happy to jump off of.

Seven years ago we started to purge and reduce the number of things that kept us tied to that crazy cycle we were on.  We now feel more content living with less, and it was liberating when we didn’t have so many things tying us down to a materialistic lifestyle.

When we started on this journey, we asked ourselves these questions everytime we agonized over getting rid of something.

  • Does this mane me happy?
  • Have I used it in the last six months?
  • Does it hold any sentimental value to me?
  • Am I saving thinking “I might” use it someday?
  • Does it add any value to my life?

If you answer “NO” to at least three of those questions, its time to let it go.

Here are 6 of the principles we use to live a simpler minimalist lifestyle while living with less:
  1. Don’t go into a store unless you need something and go in and out buying only that.
  2. Look to family and friends to borrow those items you may only need to use once or twice a year. Or choose to go in together and buy those more expensive items that are only required occasionally.
  3. Always look for used before buying new.
  4. If you do buy new, choose high-quality that will last longer than the cheaper version.
  5. Second-hand clothing is always an excellent option for growing children and always donate any items that have not been worn in six months. You should aim to minimize your clothes to 20 to 30 items.
  6. Only keep multipurpose items. If an object does not serve multiple purposes, ditch it to make room for something that does.
We’ve found life is more peaceful living with less stuff.

The world around you will consistently be showing you more and more ads for stuff they think you need to be happy. Instead of focusing on “stuff to make you happy,” focus on freeing up your time and money for things that really matter. Start focusing on the important stuff like relationships and experiences and stop focusing on just the physical stuff.

Here is an excellent way I’ve found to keep control of the clutter in our home.

We live by the 3 Month 3 Step Program.
  • Step #1  Set a box in the middle of the room that is beginning overrun with clutter. Put anything in the box that has not used in three months.
  • Step #2 – Tape the box shut and store it in another room, out of sight out of mind.
  • Step #3 – Mark on my calendar 3 months from the day you filled the box. If after 3 months you’ve not opened the box, donate it.
  • This 3 Month – 3 Step Program works great for weeding out toys from a kids room, kitchen clutter, closets (excluding seasonal clothing), garages and knickknacks.

There is something about organizing your life and getting rid of the extra things that surround you that is liberating! Try it, and you’ll be amazed that after trying the 3 Month 3 Step Program you’re well on your way to living on less and a simple, minimalistic lifestyle without even trying too hard.

Here is one of my favorite organization products for the Shop Our Simple Homestead Store.

 

Thanks for stopping by!

Tracy Lynn

P.S. Do you like what you are reading? Are you looking to slow down and live a simpler life?

I am so happy you’ve landed here and I can share some of the simple living principles that have made a huge difference in our lives. 

To give you a place to start I have created a 5 Steps to Simple Living Guide that I am offering to you free.  

Along with this free download, is included a complimentary subscription to our weekly Our Simple Homestead Newsletter. Each week you’ll receive simple living tips, homesteading ideas, old-fashion recipes and every once in awhile a touch of the Amish lifestyle.
 
Click here to receive your free download of 5 Steps to Simple Living today!

DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation from affiliate and sponsored posts on this blog.

Want more? Read on.

The post Living with Less is Liberating – Living Simple appeared first on Our Simple Homestead.

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Jump Rope Songs and Rhymes

One of my first memories of singing jump rope songs were in elementary school jumping rope to “Down in the valley where the green grass grows there sat Tracy sweet as a rose…” 

What I also remember is my white knee high socks falling down and being so mad at them I took them off and jumped rope in my bare feet.  When recess was over, I got in trouble for taking my shoes off and got a note sent home to my mother. Oh…the simple days of jumping rope and recess!

This past weekend I had my granddaughters, and I was trying to teach them to play jump-rope.  I was also teaching them some of those old-time favorite jumping songs.  I had to look a few of them up, but they came right back to me, and it took me back to 1970. 

I sure hope the young girls of today find as much joy in a simple game of jump rope as I did was when I was a child.  If you have little ones in your life, please take a moment to teach them some of these old fashion jump rope songs, you will be making wonderful memories for them!

Johnny gave me apples,
Johnny gave me pears.
Johnny gave me fifty cents
To kiss him on the stairs.
I gave him back his apples,
I gave him back his pears.
I gave him back his fifty cents
And kicked him down the stairs.

Laura and David
Sitting in a tree,
K-I-S-S-I-N-G
First comes love,
Then comes marriage
Then comes Laura
With a baby carriage.

Down in the valley
Where the green grass grows,
There sat Tracy Sweet as a rose.
She sang, she sang,
She sang so sweet.
Along came Craig
And kissed her cheek.
How many kisses did he give her?
One, two, three, tour, five…

I went upstairs to make my bed.
I made a mistake and bumped my head.
I went downstairs to milk my cow.
I made a mistake and milked a sow.
I went in the kitchen to bake a pie.
I made a mistake and baked a fly.

I love coffee.
I love tea.
I love boys.
And the boys love me.

Cinderella dressed in yellow
Went downstairs to kiss her fellow.
How many kisses did she give?
One, two, three, four, five…

Do you have a favorite that you remember?  Please share it with us, and maybe we can pass on this old time favorite game to some young children of today!

Thanks for stopping by!

Tracy Lynn

P.S. Do you like what you are reading? Are you looking to slow down and live a simpler life?

I am so happy you’ve landed here and I can share some of the simple living principles that have made a huge difference in our lives. 

To give you a place to start I have created a 5 Steps to Simple Living Guide that I am offering to you free.  

Along with this free download, is included a complimentary subscription to our weekly Our Simple Homestead Newsletter. Each week you’ll receive simple living tips, homesteading ideas, old-fashion recipes and every once in awhile a touch of the Amish lifestyle.
 
Click here to receive your free download of 5 Steps to Simple Living today!

DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation from affiliate and sponsored posts on this blog.

Here is a list of some of our favorite 70’s toys:
(Contains Affiliate Links)

Connect Four Wiffle Ball & Bat Jumbo Jacks
Slinky Green Army Men Giant Pick Up Sticks
Operation Game Lincoln Logs Tiddly Winks
Jacob’s Ladder Pot Holder Loom Etch A Sketch
Barrel of Monkey’s Chinese Checkers Checkers
Tea Set Cabbage Patch Doll Radio Flyer Red Wagon
Pedal Fire Engine Pink Pedal Car Banana Seat Bike
Want more? Read on.
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Our Simple Homestead by Tracy Fredrychowski - 7M ago
When life makes a complete circle here on the farm …it’s time to make beef bone broth.

Our freezer is once again full of grass-fed beef and with it always comes plenty of beef bones for beef broth.  It’s one of the many staples I always like to have on hand. It’s easy to make I don’t mind at all spending a few hours preparing it for a great tasting homemade beef bone broth.

Simple step-by-step instructions for making bone broth:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Lightly coat a baking sheet with olive oil.
In a single layer place soup bones on a baking sheet.
Lightly sprinkle soup bones with salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
Bake for 1 hour.

After removing bones from baking sheet, deglaze the pan with hot water, scraping the bottom of the pan for browned particles. Add deglazed particles to large stock pot.
In the same large stock pot add; bones, onion, carrots, celery, garlic, bay leaves, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, garlic powder.
Cover with water.
Bring to a boil and then simmer for 2 hours.

Strain vegetables from broth and let cool to room temperature and freeze in quart jars. (See instructions below)

How to freeze beef bone broth:

I always store my homemade broths in the freezer.  It saves me time from having to dig out the pressure canner every time I need to make a batch of bone broth. It’s quick and easy to pull a jar out in the morning to thaw when I need broth for a supper meal.

  1. Cool beef broth to room temperature.
  2. Leave a small layer of fat in broth to create a seal between lid and broth.
  3. Using clean quart size canning jars fill jars 3/4 full. Leave more than enough room for the broth to expand when it freezes.
  4. Once all of the jars are filled, wipe jars down with a clean cloth, paying particular attention to threads around the jar.
  5. Dry threads completely before placing lids on jars. Use solid tops and not two-piece banded lids.  Hidden moisture here can cause breakage later on when the liquid freezes and expands.
  6. Place the jars in the freezer, with ample space between each jar so that there is no chance of condensation forming between jars that could potentially freeze the jar to the surface.

Beef Bone Broth
Simple rich beef broth recipe.
Print
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
3 hr
Total Time
3 hr 15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
3 hr
Total Time
3 hr 15 min
Ingredients
  1. Approximately 5 pounds beef bone with meat
  2. 1 1/2 whole onions, skins left on
  3. 2 cups chopped carrots
  4. 2 cups chopped celery
  5. 2 teaspoons chopped garlic
  6. 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  7. 2 teaspoons pepper
  8. 1 teaspoon salt
  9. 3 bay leaves
  10. Water to cover all ingredients.
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Lightly coat a baking sheet with olive oil.
  3. In a single layer place soup bones on a baking sheet.
  4. Lightly sprinkle soup bones with salt & pepper.
  5. Bake for 1 hour.
  6. After removing bones from baking sheet, deglaze the pan with hot water, scraping the bottom of the pan for browned particles. Add deglazed particles to large stock pot.
  7. In same large stock pot add; bones, onion, carrots, celery, garlic, bay leaves, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper.
  8. Cover with water.
  9. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 2 hours.
  10. Strain vegetables from broth and let cool to room temperature and freeze in quart jars.
How to freeze beef bone broth
  1. temperature.
  2. 2. Leave a small layer of fat in broth to create a seal between lid and broth.
  3. 3. Using clean quart size canning jars fill jars 3/4 full with broth. Leave more than enough room for the broth to expand when it freezes.
  4. 4. Once all of the jars are filled, wipe jars down with a clean cloth, paying particular attention to threads around the jar. Dry threads completely before placing lids on jars. Use solid tops and not two-piece banded lids. Hidden moisture here can cause breakage later on when the liquid freezes and expands.
  5. 5. Place the jars in the freezer, with ample space between each jar so that there is no chance of condensation forming between jars that could potentially freeze the jar to the surface.
Our Simple Homestead https://oursimplehomestead.com/
 
Thanks for stopping by!

Tracy Lynn

Are you looking to slow down and live a simpler life?

I am so happy you’ve landed here and I can share some of the simple living principles that have made a huge difference in our lives. 

To give you a place to start I have created a 5 Steps to Simple Living Guide that I am offering to you free.  

Along with this free download, is included a complimentary subscription to our weekly Our Simple Homestead Newsletter. Each week you’ll receive simple living tips, homesteading ideas, old-fashion recipes and every once in awhile a touch of the Amish lifestyle.
 
Click here to receive your free download of 5 Steps to Simple Living today!

DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation from affiliate and sponsored posts on this blog.

Want more? Read on.

The post How to Make Beef Bone Broth appeared first on Our Simple Homestead.

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It’s Vegetable Garden Planting Time

There is something magical that happens in the spring, things that I can count on every year. The birds sing louder, the sky seems bluer, the grass is greener and I love planting a garden.

I have an old book that I devour every year, and I especially pull it out for vegetable gardening tips. My favorite part of the book is reading about old-time planting lore. 

How many of these vegetable gardening tips and old-time planting lore have you heard of?
  1. Plant corn when the oak leaves are the size of a squirrel’s ear.
  2. Sprinkle plants with wood ashes to keep the bugs off.
  3. Bury a piece of rhubarb in the row when planting cabbage to protect it from club root.
  4. To keep cabbage heads from splitting, give each young plant a half-twist in the ground.
  5. When planting corn, be generous. “One for the woodchuck, one for the crow, one for the slug, and one for me.”
  6. Plant beans when the elms leaves are as big as a penny.
  7. When you see growth on green ash, grapes, and oaks, it is safe to plant tender vines, annuals, and perennials.
  8. Wrap tape around your hands’ sticky side out to remove aphids from your plants.
  9. Make measurement marks on the wooden handle of a rake. Use it as a measuring tool in the garden.
  10. Use sandpaper to scratch off old plastic gardening labels in order to use them repeatedly.
  11. Make your own garden labels using painted rocks or roof tiles.
  12. Cover plants with an old plant pot at night to shield them from frost.
  13. Use a spray bottle to keep your plants hydrated.
  14. Drill a few holes in the cap of a water bottle and cut the bottom out. Turn it upside down and use it as a plant waterer.
  15. Keep all your extra water from cooking and use it to water your plants.
  16. For seeds with tough outside covers like peas, soak them in warm water the night before planting.
  17. Use flat rocks around peppers as mulch. Rocks heat up during the day and will keep plants toasty at night.
  18. Go around to your local coffee shops and ask if they would save their old coffee grounds and filters. It makes excellent compost.
  19. Plant your potatoes under only half an inch or so of dirt, then cover them with a few inches of straw or grass clippings. When it comes time for harvest, you only need to rake back the straw and brush the dirt off your potatoes. 
  20. Learn your weeds – many of the most common are edible (usually extremely nutritious) and/or medicinal.
  21. Before you plant anything, watch the sunlight in your garden. Depending on what is around your gardens like trees or your house etc, you can have a garden space that is fairly open, yet receives either too much or too little sunlight throughout the day. 
  22. Composting is totally worth the time and effort — your kitchen scraps are gardening gold.
  23. Learning crop rotation and cover cropping is a high investment in time learning and implementing, but it keeps the soil healthy and also helps keep bad insects out and good insects in.
  24. Be prepared to water. A lot. Every other day in the summer. 
  25. Soil ph level is very important and worth testing.
  26. Bonus: For those really tiny seeds use a tiny seed dispenser like this one. It pays for itself by saving you seed and time.

These are a few of my favorites and what is so special about them is I remember my dad telling me some of these as I was growing up and learning how to garden.

Do you plant your vegetable gardening tips you use that you can share?  I’d love to hear them!

Thanks for stopping by!

Tracy Lynn

P.S. Do you like what you are reading?

Are you looking to slow down and live a simpler life?

I am so happy you’ve landed here and I can share some of the simple living principles that have made a huge difference in our lives. 

To give you a place to start I have created a 5 Steps to Simple Living Guide that I am offering to you free.  

Along with this free download, is included a complimentary subscription to our weekly Our Simple Homestead Newsletter. Each week you’ll receive simple living tips, homesteading ideas, old-fashion recipes and every once in awhile a touch of the Amish lifestyle.
 
Click here to receive your free download of 5 Steps to Simple Living today!

DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation from affiliate and sponsored posts on this blog.

Want more? Read on.

The post How to Make Beef Bone Broth appeared first on Our Simple Homestead.

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