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Orphan Care Alliance by Jenna Lewis - 1M ago

I had the honor this past week to attend the Christian Alliance for Orphans conference located here in Louisville, KY. Throughout the sessions and workshops, a beautiful theme of adoption and redemption was evident: In Brokenness and Beauty, It is Well.

The foster care and adoption journey is intertwined with both brokenness and beauty. On one hand, there’s the deep and aching hurts of our children as they come face to face with pain of abandonment; and on the other hand the pure joy and delight as our children find their way home to a family who loves them. There are times in our journey when our children are struggling with deep pain from past abuse and heartache, but even then, we must be able to find strength from within. Trusting in our Savior and resting in His plan for our children’s lives is never easy in the midst of brokenness, but in those jagged places His strength is made perfect.

During this conference, I was encouraged in my own journey. Almost seven years ago, my husband and I adopted a little girl who had just celebrated her seventh birthday. We traveled to Asia to bring her home. At the time, we had no clue the extent of her mental disability or the pain she held deep inside. Our days, from the very first day, have been filled with much brokenness. At times, I have felt shattered and hopeless. As her mother, I want so desperately to fix and heal her pain. Here I am, so many years later and the journey has not become any easier; even so, I am able to say “It is well with my soul.” The brokenness is not mine to fix. Only in the hands of our Savior can the shattered pieces become something beautiful.

It Is Well

Entering into foster care and adoption is not about fixing a broken system or healing a broken heart; instead, it is about finding God’s beauty in the midst of the brokenness. It is about finding God’s peace and strength when you are at your weakest. God asks us to enter into darkness so His light can shine brighter. He asks us to do difficult things because He loves us so very much. Not only does He love us so much, He loves each and every child with the fiercest and deepest love. How will these children know the God who loves them if we don’t show them? All they know is brokenness-we need to show them the redemption and beauty of the only One who can bring them hope.

Where ever you find yourself on your foster or adoption journey, I pray that you will find strength in the One who called you to follow Him. If you are at the intersection of beauty and brokenness, or if you find yourself in the deepest, darkest place, I pray you will find peace within your soul knowing the One who called you will never leave you alone.

If you need a place to find community with others who understand the unique journey of foster care and adoption, we would love to have you join one of our OCA Connect groups that meet throughout Kentucky. Find one of the locations here.

The post CAFO Wrap-up appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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This week we want to help you get to know Lisa Owen, OCA’s Safe Harbor Ministry Director. Lisa has a heart for families in the community who are in crisis or who are struggling.

Q: Tell us a little bit about yourself. Where you are from, where you grew up and your background.

A: I was born in FT.Worth Texas and was raised in Texas and Oklahoma. I met my husband of nearly 40 years at Oklahoma Sate University where I graduated  with a degree in Sociology/ Psychology. I am blessed to have 7 kids who call me mom, two beautiful daughters-in- law, and 6 precious grand babies. Our oldest two children are our only biological kids. The Lord used many different avenues to bring our other children to our family along with giving us the opportunity to be foster parents to several more.


Q: How long have you been with OCA and what is your role here?

A: I originally came to OCA over 10 years ago when it was still strictly a volunteer organization. At that time I ran the OCA Teen Mom’s program for pregnant and parenting teens who were in foster care. I stepped away from OCA for several years to focus on my children and to continue foster parenting. I came back to OCA in the spring of 2017 as the director of the Safe Harbor Ministry.

Q: What’s a typical week look like for you as the director of the Safe Harbor Ministry?

A: It is my privilege to not only work with some pretty amazing staff and volunteers but some wonderful families in our communities who are trying to navigate through a very difficult season of struggle. A typical week for me at Safe Harbor involves talking with Safe Harbor area coordinators and Hub leaders and developing different volunteer recruitment opportunities, I also spend time meeting with other area ministries and agencies working on ways that we can partner together. The best part of my week is  when I have the opportunity to engage with parents in crisis who desperately love their children and want to do the hard work to bring stability back into their lives.

Q: Share a memorable way God has moved over the years at OCA.

A: God has done some pretty amazing things over the years here at OCA. One of my favorite things is being allowed to have a front row seat asI watch not only the lives of the people we serve are changed but watching as the volunteers lives are changed as well. Volunteers come into the different programs wanting to bless others, but soon discover that God is using their time with OCA to bless them as well. God puts people together, who at first glance would seemingly have very little in common, and before you know it very deep and meaningful relationships are formed. It’s fun to watch these relationships form into the most unlikeliest of friendships.


Q: What are your hobbies?

A: Working full time and with three active kids at home I find I have very little time for hobbies. Although, my 12 year old daughter and my 10 year old son and I plan to jump back into gardening again this year. We have enjoyed this in the past, but gave up on it last year after the wildlife enjoyed more of the fruits of our labor than we did!

Q: What is your favorite book/resource/speaker on adoption /foster care?

I would have to say that Kristin Berry, Confessions of an Adoptive Parent is one of my favorite speakers and authors on fostering and adoption. She keeps it real!

Q: Why are you so passionate about foster care and adoption?

A: Even as a young girl, I always thought I wanted to adopt a child one day. I’m not really sure why the Lord laid that on my heart at such a young age, but I always knew it was something I would do. However, fostering was a different story.  I really did not know much about foster care growing up and I never knew anyone who was a foster parent. It wasn’t until I was in my 40’s that I became aware of the needs of so many hurting children in our community and I knew my family had to do something to help. I wasn’t really sure what that would look like at the time, but God knew! I always say we just kind of”fell” into foster parenting, but really God had a plan all along. Once we made ourselves available to God to step into help hurting children it seemed like God brought opportunity after opportunity for us to minister to hurting single moms and hurting children. It wasn’t long before God chose to use one special little boy to bring us officially into the world of foster care. We took this little guy in when he was a newborn and became his official foster parents when he was about 6 months old. Since that time we have cared for over 13 children in our home, some from state Foster Care and others through different care arrangements. I have seen the impact that providing a safe place for traumatized children to land when their whole world is crashing down around them can bring. We hear so many horror stories about foster care and unfortunately many are true. That’s all the more reason why we as Christians should become involved in helping these children in some capacity. Foster parenting is hard and it’s messy. It’s certainly not for everyone and that’s okay! There are so many other ways to help these children and their families. Bottom line, these children are important to God, so as believers they should be important to us too!

Q: What is your favorite Bible verse?

A: Lamentations 3:22-23 Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail. They are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.

If you want to find out more about OCA’s Safe Harbor Ministry and how you can be involved, contact Lisa at lisa.owen@orphancarealliance.org.

The post Lisa Owen: Safe Harbor Director appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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What is Gateway?

Gateway is an online system where social workers and school resource centers can enter needs of foster families or families in difficult situations. Once the needs are entered into the system, volunteers who have signed up to be a part of Gateway will receive an e-mail notifying them of the needs. If a volunteer is able to meet the need, they click on the button to meet it and they are put in contact with the worker who entered it.

What kind of needs are entered into Gateway?

Social workers who are involved in various situations often see needs that can keep a family together if they have someone who can help. The needs can be as simple as a mom without a crib for a new baby or a family who needs multiple sizes of school uniforms for their kids. Sometimes, a young mom has no money for the deposit on an apartment, so a social worker will ask for a specific amount of money. Since the requests are entered by a social worker or resource center, we know the needs are legitimate. The needs are physical, tangible needs that, if met, will make a huge difference in keeping families together.

How can I meet the need?

We are looking for volunteers across the state willing to sign up to meet these needs. As OCA is growing, so is our Gateway ministry. We have social workers in Kentucky and southern Indiana signing up to enter requests, but we need more volunteers willing to receive the emails. It is simple to become a volunteer! Sign up here and you will receive an e-mail when a need in your area is entered into the system. If you see a request you can fulfill, simply click the link to meet the need.

Gateway is a wonderful way to show you care. Providing physical needs can make a huge difference in a family who is struggling. Many of our requests for help are for single mothers, young adults aging out of foster care, or families in desperate situations. This is a beautiful way to give hope to families in your community who simply need someone to care.

If you have further questions about our Gateway ministry, please contact our Family Support Director, Stacia Washausen at stacia.washausen@orphancarealliance.org.

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The post Gateway-An Easy Way to Show you Care! appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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There are so many great people who want to help foster and adoptive families, but they don’t know the best way to offer support. Here are a few common phrases I hear often, but are not very helpful because they require action from the foster/adoptive family. If the family has to reach out for the help, they won’t do it—especially if they are in the midst of a crisis.

“Let me know if you need a meal!”
“Let me know how I can help.”
“I am happy to help however I can.”

I have even used these phrases myself, but I am striving to become more intentional in how I offer help to my fellow adoptive families.

Here are ten great questions to ask to genuinely show love and support to a foster or adoptive family.

1. How can I pray for you this week?
2. What day would work best for me to bring you dinner this week?
3. I’m going to the store today. Send me a list of what you need and I will drop it off.
4. My husband can mow your grass this weekend. Would Saturday or Sunday be better for you?
5. Which day could I help with carpool this week?
6. Do you have any appointments coming up that I can help with?
7. Pick a Saturday in the next few weeks for {foster child} to come have a special day out with us!
8. I have some free time {these days} this week. I’d be happy to come…
…stay with the kids if you’d like to get out
…take {certain kid/kids} to the park so you can have one on one time with {other kid/kids}
…keep the kids so you can have a date night.
9. When is your next court date? I’d love to go with you.
10. What’s your favorite drink from Starbucks or ice cream? I want to bring you a special treat just for you.

Let’s be intentional in the way we show we care for foster and adoptive families! Let’s ask meaningful questions and follow through with actions. If you want more ideas and ways you can make a difference in foster and adoptive families, contact Beth Pace at beth.pace@orphancarealliance.org.

The post 10 Questions to Ask -Supporting Foster and Adoptive Families appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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Over the next few months, we would like for you to get to know our dedicated team at OCA. We have an amazing staff who are passionate about foster care and adoption.

Today we are featuring our President and Executive Director, Darren Washausen.

Q: Tell us a little bit about yourself: Where you are from, where you grew up and your background.

A: I grew up in the small town of Waterloo, Illinois in the 60’s and 70’s (I guess that makes me old!). Waterloo is now considered the best small town in Illinois. I also met my wonderful wife when I was 6 years old! She lived across the lane from my grandma. I played Happy Birthday for her on my guitar!

Q: How long have you been with OCA and how did you get started with OCA?

A: In 2008, Stacia and I were introduced to OCA (was called Louisville Orphan Care Initiative back then). We were asked lead a part of the ministry regarding local needs. However, that only lasted two months when I was asked to lead the ministry. It was a small grass roots ministry operating with all volunteers.

Q: How has OCA grown over the years?

A: As we learned more about the local needs of foster and adoptive children and families, new ministries were created for volunteers to connect with, all while working with churches to advocate and educate about the needs.  In the beginning, we focused on the various ways to adopt which included foster to adopt.  We held seminars with various community resources and then connected those called to the appropriate resource. From here, we added Life Coaching, Safe Harbor, and additional Family Support services. As OCA has built some history, it is rewarding to learn of some of the outcomes of adopted children who are entering their young adult years.

Q: What’s your favorite book on adoption/foster care and what is your favorite book in general?

A: Wow, I really don’t read much with balancing two jobs until recently. My favorite book overall is the Bible. It is the one book I read. I do hope to achieve a better balance to do more reading. Do audio books count as reading? I have debated on going down that path recently.

Q: What are your hobbies?

A: Similar to reading, most of my hobbies have gone away. I enjoy RC Aircraft and have two planes, I also play guitar, and like to bowl. I am pretty ok on a waterski too, but haven’t done that for several years.

Q: Why are you so passionate about foster care and adoption?

A: I am passionate about foster care for several reasons. In the beginning it was about helping one child as we became adoptive parents. As our journey progressed, we learned about the uncertainty and lack of hope in the lives of the kids in foster care. In recent years, we have learned about the impacts of trauma on the development of children. While trauma can be devastating, there is also hope for healing when people step into the lives children. It is this hope that drives me in calling for others to step into the lives of children. We can break the cycle now or statistically we will see more homelessness, more crime, and more incarceration in our own backyards.

Q: What is your favorite Bible verse?

A: Galatians 5:22-23 – I try to keep the fruits of the spirit in my heart as we serve all those we meet through the ministry of OCA.

The post Get to Know OCA’s Executive Director Darren Washausen appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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There is often so much excitement and support surrounding a brand new foster or adoptive family! The family is showered with gifts and diapers and loaded up with things they need. However, many times after a child is home for weeks or months or even years, the support is no longer in place when it is the most crucial. Support for foster and adoptive families is needed much past the initial placement. Parenting a child from a background of trauma many times gets more difficult over the weeks and months instead of easier.

Here are a few specific ways you can provide on-going support for any foster or adoptive family.

1. Offer to be a designated “go to” person

Ask a foster or adoptive family if you can be their “go to” person. Let them know you are willing to say yes, no matter what time of day or night they call. You will say yes, no matter how crazy the request might be. If each foster or adoptive family has a go to person, it is much easier to ask for help. It is a weight off their shoulders to know they can ask that one person for help at any time for anything and the answer will be yes.

Here’s some examples of requests they might ask for:

-Meals for a particularly busy week of therapy sessions
-A fun night out for their kids because their foster or adopted child is dealing with some major trauma behaviors
-Help with lawn maintenance while a spouse is out of town
-Help with overwhelming laundry or house cleaning during times of transition

As the go to person, you don’t have to accomplish every task yourself. Instead, you are the point person to organize others who can help. This alleviates the pressure for the family to organize getting the help they need. If they have to organize it themselves, they will never ask.

2. Set a reminder on your phone to pray for a specific foster or adoptive family daily—and let them know you are genuinely praying for them.

Foster care is a spiritual battle. Adoption is a spiritual battle. It is a battle the family cannot survive alone and they must have others who are praying with them daily. Consistent and fervent prayer is the best gift anyone can provide for a foster or adoptive family. Let them know you are praying for them and ask them how you can pray specifically for the needs of their family.

3. Set a reminder on your phone to call or text a specific foster or adoptive family weekly.

One of the most common struggles of foster and adoptive families is the feeling of isolation. A weekly text or phone message is a reminder that they are not alone. This is also a good way to let them know you are praying for them and get to know their specific prayer needs. Send an encouraging Scripture, a funny meme, or even a Starbucks gift card via text. What a blessing of encouragement this is to foster and adoptive families to know you are walking with them on this journey!

Not everyone can be a foster family or adopt a child, but everyone can do something! Find a family today and offer to provide meaningful on-going support. If you would like to talk to someone about more ways you can be a support to foster families, please contact Beth Pace at beth.pace@orphancarealliance.org.

The post 3 Easy Ways to Provide On-going Support for Foster & Adoptive Families appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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If you’re a foster parent, you may be eligible for financial resources to help pay for your growing family’s needs. The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers monthly benefits for people with disabilities, as well as family members of people on disability or Social Security retirement benefits.

If you have a foster child with a disability, or if you’re receiving Social Security yourself, you may be eligible for assistance.

Foster Children With Disabilities

Many foster children have special needs, such as those with autism or children born with Down syndrome. If you’re fostering a child with special needs, he or she may be eligible for disability benefits from the SSA.

Children will be eligible for Supplemental Security Income, or SSI benefits. These are only awarded to families with a severe financial need, so if you or your spouse is earning a decent wage, your foster child will not be eligible for benefits.

Your specific household income limit will vary depending on whether you’re married, and if you have other children. For example, if you’re a single parent you won’t be able to earn more than $38,000 before taxes and still have a child qualify for SSI benefits.

If you’re a two-parent family of five, you can instead earn more than $55,000 and still have a foster child qualify for SSI benefits. The SSA has a chart on its website that you can use to determine if your family is eligible.

Auxiliary Benefits Under Your Account

If you’re receiving Social Security retirement or disability benefits yourself, you’re likely already aware that dependents are eligible for additional benefits on top of what you already earn (usually 50% of your monthly payments). It’s possible for foster children to receive these benefits, but the rules can be challenging to meet.

First off, you must have been taking care of your foster child for at least one year, and your foster child needs to be under age 18, or under age 19 and still in high school.

On top of this, one of the following criteria must be met:

  • The child’s parents are both deceased
  • The child’s parents are both disabled (usually need to be receiving Social Security benefits themselves)
  • You legally adopt your foster child

This unfortunately means that if your foster child’s parents are still in the picture, it can be hard to add a foster child to your account. Nonetheless, it’s a great option for eligible families who need to supplement their current Social Security income.

Starting Your Foster Child’s Application

If you’re either applying for SSI on behalf of a foster child with a disability, or if you’re simply adding a foster child to your own disability or retirement account, you’ll need to do so in person at your closest Social Security office.

There are more than 1,300 offices across the country. To make an appointment to complete the paperwork in person, call the SSA toll free at 1-800-772-1213

Blog guest writer: Lauren DiCenso

The post How Foster Children can Qualify for Disability Benefits appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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With the horrors of what is happening around our country and our government passing bills to allow late-term abortion, it is important we stand up for every life. The life of every baby matters to our Heavenly Father. The life of every mom matters to the One who created her.

We often hear people say, “I wish they would just give those babies to me. I would take them all.” Or we see pictures of those holding up signs outside the abortion clinics saying, “Don’t abort your baby. We will adopt him!” However, the biggest need is not for more families willing to adopt babies. Many people do not realize there are between 1 and 2 million families wanting to adopt newborns here in the US. Moms wanting to give up their baby for adoption have the choice of many loving, waiting families.

Pro-life or Pro-birth?

The problem is, so many Christians are not really pro-life, they are pro-birth. While they are busy telling mommas to save their babies, there is a real orphan care crisis in our own backyard. In the US today there are over 420,000 kids in foster care. Over 100,000 kids are currently available for adoption. Studies show that one-third of families in the US have considered adoption, but only 2% have actually done it. When asked why they won’t adopt, most people state it is financially unfeasible. Others don’t want to deal with the trauma an older child has been through.

If Christians truly believe that EVERY LIFE matters to God, the orphan care crisis in the US would cease to exist. We would open our arms to adopt kids when they are 5, 10 or even 15. We would be willing to care for kids with special needs or who have a past of neglect and abuse. Kids are not meant to grow up without a loving family, no matter what has happened in their past or what the extent of their needs. 1 John 3:18 says “Dear children, we must show love through actions that are sincere, not through empty words.” Adopting a child puts action to our words. It speaks volumes showing the world that EVERY. SINGLE. LIFE. HAS. VALUE.

Fact or Fiction?

It is a myth that adoption through the foster system is expensive. Financially, to adopt through the US foster care system it costs very little, if anything. In many states, a stipend from the state is provided even after the adoption of your child is finalized. There are resources for children adopted through foster care in most states, including health care benefits and college scholarships.

Trauma is a real issue, but it should not be a reason to let these kids grow up without a family. The Church needs to wrap around those who adopt to be the support families need while parenting kids who have been crushed by the weight of abuse and neglect. It is not easy, but it is what we are called to do. There are resources available to families and churches to help them understand the effects of trauma and how to parent kids from hard places. Research also shows healing from trauma can happen through the loving, consistent relationships.

What Can You Do?

There are over 400,000 local churches in the US. It only takes ¼ of the churches with one family willing to adopt one of the 100,000 waiting children for every child to have a family. Let’s stand for life. Every life, born and unborn. Let’s show this world we care, not only for the baby in the womb, but for the kids living without a family to call their own.

In Kentucky alone there are 9,700 kids in foster care and 2,500 children waiting for their forever family. Pray about it and see if God is asking you to open your heart to a child to show him or her that their life matters! OCA is offering Foster Care Information meetings and training sessions to become Kentucky state foster or adoptive parents. Check our calendar here to find out when the next dates are available in your area!

The post Pro-Life: Every Life Matters appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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Whether you are a brand new foster or adoptive family or have been on this journey for years, the one thing you need above all else is a community of support. I remember the swirling fear and anxiety when we brought our daughter home for the very first time. She was a scared, angry little girl who spent the first seven years of her life in an orphanage. We brought her across the ocean where she knew no one, did not understand the language and was terrified of our little dog. Our family, jet-lagged and exhausted, was overwhelmed by behaviors we had never before experienced. I remember lying on my bed sobbing and feeling so alone.

In the depths of my struggles, I had friends who understood what I was going through and reached out to me. They supported our family with meals, taking our older kids out for a fun night, and encouraging us along the way. Through the months and years, we have experienced difficulties and heartache on this adoptive parenting journey and we continue to need the wrap-around strength of our friends. I am so thankful for the community of support we have through our church and through the ministry of OCA.

Find your Tribe

It is important to find people who truly understand how trauma affects a child and can affect your entire household. One way we found on-going support is through our monthly OCA Connect group. OCA Connect groups are a great way for you to find a like-minded understanding community of people who will encourage you along the way.  Each Connect group is facilitated by a family who is on the same journey and a professional who has experience in social work or counseling adoptive families. OCA currently hosts groups in Louisville, southern Indiana and Lexington. We are expecting to expand into Radcliff and Bowling Green this year.

I am blessed to have a community of emotional support within my church family. There are several families who have adopted both internationally and through foster care. We get together monthly at our OCA Connect Group, but we also find time outside of this group. We spend time praying together, encouraging each other and building friendships. I cannot parent my adopted children without my tribe of friends!

Seek Counseling or Therapy—for yourself, not just your child

When your child is in foster care or adopted through the foster system, therapy and counseling are frequently recommended for your child and covered by your insurance. However, counseling is most often not covered for you as a parent and it can be expensive. Many parents suffer secondary trauma as they care for kids from hard places. There is no shame or guilt in admitting you need someone to help you.

At OCA we receive calls weekly of families struggling and needing someone to help them. Because of the great need for family counseling, OCA recently added this service for a small fee. Jonathan Butler is on our staff and is a licensed Family and Marriage Therapist who is also a TBRI Practitioner.

If you find yourself needing support of a group who understands, find our monthly Connect Groups here.

If you need family counseling, contact Jonathan Butler at jonathan.butler@orphancarealliance.org.

OCA is here to serve your family and help you find the support you need!

The post Foster Care & Adoption: You Weren’t Meant to Do this Alone appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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The desire of OCA’s ministry is to mobilize the Church to lead the way in caring for the fatherless. We want to serve the local church as they integrate orphan care into ministry they are already doing. Over the past twelve months we saw churches begin caring for the vulnerable and walking alongside each other as they navigated the challenges of creating new families through fostering, adopting, or preserving current families.

Here are five ways OCA can partner with churches to integrate orphan care into your existing ministry.

1. Create an Adoption Fund For Your Church

In 2018, one church started an adoption fund from a surplus of giving and gave away $25,000 in 2018, which was all they had for the year. The money was distributed to 5 different families. This fund is now a regular part of their church and has been replenished.

2. Emphasize Orphan Care Month In Your Church

Another church made November their month to focus on orphan care. This is orphan care month anyway, so they knew it would fit in perfectly. They gave their congregation opportunities to engage in various ways throughout the month. They provided training for people of their congregation to become life coaches through OCA. Ten people signed up for the training and four people are now building relationships with young adults who are aging out of foster care. Four others are already trained and ready as soon as someone asks for a life coach.

3. Provide Trauma Training For Your Leaders

Still another church asked for OCA to come in to help train their children’s volunteers in trauma. This church has  six families who are currently engaged in foster care and they want their leaders to be ready when they have kids with a trauma background come into their children’s ministry.

4.  Meet Tangible Needs Through OCA Gateway

Multiple churches provided opportunities for their folks to sign up to help keep families together by meeting tangible and physical needs. Through OCA Gateway, these churches helped 28 families navigate challenging situations in 2018.

5. Host Foster Care Training In Your Church

Two churches opened their doors for people to explore foster care through the church. One church hosted OCA’s  foster care training for the state of Kentucky over two weekends and the other hosted a foster care informational meeting for families interested in beginning the process of fostering.

These are only a few examples of what you can do to play your part in mobilizing your community. The churches mentioned above didn’t create a new ministry, rather they took their existing ministry and integrated orphan care into the DNA of their congregation. You may not host a training or create an adoption fund, but there is a part for every local church to engage in orphan care ministry.

What would it look like if orphan care could be integrated into your current ministry? How can OCA’s ministries help mobilize your congregation to care for the fatherless?  We would love to serve you and provide resources to help you find your place.

Contact jonathan.butler@orphancarealliance.org or fill out the church ministry form here to schedule a meeting on how you can integrate orphan care into your current ministry.

What if…the Church led the way?

OCA - What If? - Vimeo

OCA – What If? from OCAKids on Vimeo.

The post 5 Ways OCA Can Help Your Church Care for Orphans appeared first on Orphan Care Alliance.

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